MMD453 Media Mining Digest: AI Impact, Black Hair and Swimming, Brain Functions, Brazil Museum Burns, Chile’s First Female President, Chile’s Stolen Babies, Climate Doomsday, Cloud Importance, Cognitive Seduction, Covid Contact Tracing, Cuba’s Digital Revolution, Elephants in India, Fake News, Finances Small Cap Futures, Gravity Bikes in Columbia, Hazelnut Harvest, Health Disparities, Hearing Loss, Heart Disease, Investing Allocations, Investing DIY, Investing Long Term, Investing-Past-Present-Future, Investing Small-Cap Value, Ireland in 1969, Leprosy, Machine Bias Concerns, Marawi Lost City, Medical Costs, Mosambu Bridge Collapse, MRL Mouse, Negotiating, Neural Networks, Nobel Prizes, Ocean Health, Passport Business, Politicians Mangle Science, Press Releases, Rainbow Railroad, Robert Mugabe, Scaramucci Interview, Smartphone Access, Southern Tales, Stearman Aircraft, Theranos, Time Cells, Undocumented Immigrant, Warp Speed, Warts, WWII Economics

Exercise your ears: the 54 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 682 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,300 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

AI Impact 22 mins – “No human, or team of humans, could possibly keep up with the avalanche of information produced by many of today’s physics and astronomy experiments. Some of them record terabytes of data every day — and the torrent is only increasing. The Square Kilometer Array, a radio telescope slated to switch on in the mid-2020s, will generate about as much data traffic each year as the entire internet. The deluge has many scientists turning to artificial intelligence for help. With minimal human input, AI systems such as artificial neural networks — computer-simulated networks of neurons that mimic the function of brains — can plow through mountains of data, highlighting anomalies and detecting patterns that humans could never have spotted….“It’s basically a third approach, between observation and simulation,” says Kevin Schawinski, an astrophysicist and one of generative modeling’s most enthusiastic proponents, who worked until recently at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH Zurich). “It’s a different way to attack a problem.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Functions 26 mins – “Emerging evidence suggests that the brain encodes abstract knowledge in the same way that it represents positions in space, which hints at a more universal theory of cognition.We humans have always experienced an odd — and oddly deep — connection between the mental worlds and physical worlds we inhabit, especially when it comes to memory. We’re good at remembering landmarks and settings, and if we give our memories a location for context, hanging on to them becomes easier. To remember long speeches, ancient Greek and Roman orators imagined wandering through “memory palaces” full of reminders. Modern memory contest champions still use that technique to “place” long lists of numbers, names and other pieces of information. As the philosopher Immanuel Kant put it, the concept of space serves as the organizing principle by which we perceive and interpret the world, even in abstract ways. “Our language is riddled with spatial metaphors for reasoning, and for memory in general,” said Kim Stachenfeld, a neuroscientist at the British artificial intelligence company DeepMind.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chiles Stolen Babies – “A Chilean man – adopted at birth and sent overseas – searches for the mother forced to give him up. He is among thousands now finding out the truth about their past. Many mothers were pressurised into giving up their children during General Pinochet’s military dictatorship in the 1970s and 80s. A government investigation is gathering evidence from judges, socials workers, medical staff and nuns who are all thought to be involved. Families are meeting after decades. And mothers are being reunited with children they were told were dead.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Doomsday – “Have you heard? Climate change. We did it. And it’s bad. It’s going to be worse. We are already suffering the effects of it in many ways. How should we TALK about the dangers we are facing, though? Should we get people good and scared? Or give them hope? Or both? Host Bethany Brookshire talks with David Wallace-Wells and Sheril Kirschenbaum to find out. This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cloud Importance – “On a 1987 voyage to the Antarctic, the paleoceanographer James Kennett and his crew dropped anchor in the Weddell Sea, drilled into the seabed, and extracted a vertical cylinder of sediment. In an inch-thick layer of plankton fossils and other detritus buried more than 500 feet deep, they found a disturbing clue about the planet’s past that could spell disaster for the future. Lower in the sediment core, fossils abounded from 60 plankton species. But in that thin cross-section from about 56 million years ago, the number of species dropped to 17. And the planktons’ oxygen and carbon isotope compositions had dramatically changed. Kennett and his student Lowell Stott deduced from the anomalous isotopes that carbon dioxide had flooded the air, causing the ocean to rapidly acidify and heat up, in a process similar to what we are seeing today.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Contact Tracing – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on August 19, 2020, the editors discuss the use of contact tracing to limit the spread of SARS-CoV-2 and the challenges posed by certain characteristics of the virus.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cubas Digital Revolution – A revolution is underway in Cuba. The country’s communist leaders, who normally retain tight control of the media, have encouraged Cubans to become more connected online. Internet access used to be the preserve of a privileged (and relatively rich) few. But prices have come down, public wifi spots are popular, and less than a year ago 3G data access became available on Cuban phones. Along with a huge uptake in the internet has come a flood of Cubans signing up to social media accounts. Even President Miguel Diaz-Canel is on Twitter. And unlike staid and traditional state-run media, Cuban social media is relatively open, freewheeling, full of jokes, criticism of the government and, of course, memes. Prices are still high and the government keeps a close eye on dissidents or “counter-revolutionaries”. But online, Cubans are exploring new ways to communicate that would have been unheard of just a few years ago. The BBC’s Cuba correspondent Will Grant and BBC Trending reporter Reha Kansara have been meeting the Cubans at the forefront of their country’s digital revolution. They meet political podcasters, a lesbian activist, a pro-government blogger, a gamer-turned-protester, a dissident journalist and one of Cuba’s biggest YouTube stars. How are Cubans making their voices heard in a way they never have before – and how might social media transform the country?” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Geysers – “Geothermal energy brings steam created with the heat of magma deep in the earth to generate electric power. California is endowed with numerous sites where magma is close enough to the surface to make geothermal energy practical. The Geysers, a geothermal field in northern California, is the world’s largest source of geothermal electric energy, where six different companies use steam from 350 wells to provide enough electric power to support nearly half-a-million homes. To learn more about the Geysers, and to explore the functionality and sustainability of geothermal power, we talk with California Energy Commissioner Karen Douglas, an attorney and one of five members of the commission.” At the link find the title, “The Geysers Geothermal Field in California – the World’s Largest Geothermal Energy Producer,” right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gravity Bikes in Colomia – “Precipitous mountain roads, specially-modified bikes, and deadly consequences. Simon Maybin spends time with the young men who race down the steep roads of Colombia’s second city Medellin. Marlon is 16 and he’s a gravitoso – a gravity biker. He hooks onto the back of lorries or buses climbing the precipitous roads to reach high points around the city. Then, he lets gravity do its thing and – without any safety gear – hurtles back down the roads, trying to dodge the traffic. This year, two of his friends have died gravity biking and Marlon has had a near-fatal accident. But he’s not quitting. So what drives young men like him to take their lives into their own hands? And what’s being done to stop more deaths?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Hazelnut Harvest – “Every August tens of thousands of Kurdish migrant workers, including children, toil long hours for a pittance in the mountains of northern Turkey picking hazelnuts for the spreads and chocolate bars the world adores. Turkey provides 70% of all hazelnut supplies – and the biggest buyer is Ferrero, maker of Nutella and Kinder Bueno. The confectionery giant says it’s committed to ethical sourcing, and aiming for its hazelnuts to be 100% traceable next year. But how is that possible in Turkey, with its half a million tiny family orchards, where child labour is rife? Tim Whewell investigates Ferrero’s complex supply chain and finds that while hazelnuts are celebrated in Turkish culture and song, it’s a sector where workers and farmers feel increasingly unhappy and reform is very hard to achieve.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Health Disparities – “In this Hippo Education bonus conversation, Drs. Jay-Sheree Allen and Neda Frayha sit down with noted health disparities researcher Dr. Utibe Essien, an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Core Investigator for the Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion at the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System. They explore reasons for disparities in the health care outcomes of our patients, disparities in the diversity of our medical profession, and the crucial bridge that connects these two. They close with three concrete steps we all can take to improve our clinical practice and reduce health disparities in our patient communities.” At the link you can listen, but must subscribe to download the podcast; however, it is included in this audio archive.

Hearing Losses – “(This programme contains audio effects that may cause discomfort to people living with hearing conditions. There is a modified version of this programme, with quieter effects, on this page https://bbc.in/2TrInga) What does life sound like for someone whose hearing has suddenly changed? Carly Sygrove is a British teacher living in Madrid. She was sitting in her school’s auditorium when suddenly her head was filled with a loud screeching sound. Diagnosed as sudden sensorineural hearing loss, Carly no longer has any functional hearing in her left ear, and battles with the whoops, squeals and ringing that comes from having tinnitus. This dramatically changed her work and personal life, as well as her ability to communicate in a country thousands of kilometres from where she was born. It made Carly realise how fragile our bodies are – and how wonderful sounds can be. In this intimate programme for the BBC World Service, Carly shares her personal story and speaks honestly about how life with hearing in only one ear is far from quiet.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Investing Allocations – “Do you want to have a better idea of the range — or returns and risks of loss — that different equity asset classes have generated over a long period of time?  In this podcast, Paul discusses 5 tables covering the S&P 500, Worldwide Equity (50% U.S./50% International), Worldwide Equity (70% U.S./30% International), All Value (50% U.S./50% International)  All Value (70% U.S./30% International).  In each case the table will show 50 years of annual returns of the equity portfolio, as well as returns with 9 different combinations of fixed income and equity. It will be helpful to listen to Paul’s podcast on the Ultimate Buy and Hold Strategy 2020 Update before listening to this podcast. Our enormous thanks to Daryl Bahls for building the tables for this podcast and the balance of the more than 60 tables we will cover in the next 2 months. Links to Tables: S&P 500 Worldwide Equity (50% U.S./50% International) Worldwide Equity (70% U.S./30% International) All Value (50% U.S./50% International) All Value (70% U.S./30% International)” At the link select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Investing DIY – “On February 22, before the recent bear market and during the very early days of the Coronavirus, I was scheduled to speak at Vestory’s Annual Retiremeet.  I went a day early so I could interview two very good friends I’d worked with for more than 10 years, Tom Cock and Don MacDonald. The three of us used to do a weekly radio show together.  It was always fun and we had great guests like John Bogle, Knight Kiplinger, Larry Swedroe, Scott Burns, Robert Kiyosaki and Joe Granville, to name a few. In 2009 Tom and Don left the Merriman firm to found Vestory  a registered investment advisory firm. In this podcast we discuss the challenges of helping the do-it-yourself investor.  While Don mentions the importance of staying in front of the investors on a regular basis, they felt one of the most difficult decisions for DIY investors is determining their risk tolerance. They offer an interesting risk tolerance test that I took. It has some very good questions. I suggest you give it a try as it is more specific than most.” At the link select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Investing in Small Cap Funds – “Some controversy and concern seems to have risen about small-cap-value returns. While on vacation in Europe recently, I used the early morning hours to complete a study examining the history of returns for many of the popular asset classes: S&P 500, Total Market Index, Large Cap Value, Small Cap Blend, Small Cap Value, U.S. Long Term Bonds, U.S. Treasury Bills and Inflation. My goal was to see what we might learn from the past performance of these asset classes.  What can we learn from history about predicting future returns? Should we expect the Total Market Index to give us access to the premium returns of small-cap and value?  Should we expect bonds to give an excess return over taxes and inflation? In this podcast, I am happy to share what I learned and deduced.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Investing Long Term – “What’s the toughest challenge for many investors? Staying the course for the long term. In this podcast, Paul discusses what he considers “the most useful information for investors.” While adding new insights to his Ultimate Buy and Hold StrategyFine Tuning Your Asset Allocation and Distributions in Retirement articles and podcasts, Paul explores nine decades of returns for six asset classes that academics have studied for over 50 years. It turns out that the end result of the returns has been exactly what the academics predicted, but the trip was not an easy one for investors. See and download the Tables referenced here. Paul hopes that in understanding this, all investors  — especially young investors — will see that the strategy with the most predictable returns is also the one with the best predictable returns, and maintain the focus and confidence to make it through the normal ups and downs of the market without giving up.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing Past, Present and Future – “In this special presentation to the Bainbridge Community Foundation, June 2020, Paul provides insights into the past, present and future of investing. What are the most important lessons learned about investing in the last 50 years? How can we use them to make more money for our retirement? What 3 myths cost investors up to half their retirement savings? What three people changed investing forever? And much more. If you enjoy this podcast, please share.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing Small Cap Questions – “Some controversy and concern seems to have risen about small-cap-value returns. While on vacation in Europe recently, I used the early morning hours to complete a study examining the history of returns for many of the popular asset classes: S&P 500, Total Market Index, Large Cap Value, Small Cap Blend, Small Cap Value, U.S. Long Term Bonds, U.S. Treasury Bills and Inflation. My goal was to see what we might learn from the past performance of these asset classes.  What can we learn from history about predicting future returns? Should we expect the Total Market Index to give us access to the premium returns of small-cap and value?  Should we expect bonds to give an excess return over taxes and inflation? In this podcast, I am happy to share what I learned and deduced.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Investing Small-Cap Value – “Focusing on small-cap value from every angle Paul knows, this podcast compares Price-to-Earnings ratios, Price-to-Book ratios, average size company and one-year and 40-year period returns.  Paul shares the latest academic research on small-cap value, comparison of risk and return for S&P vs. small-cap value asset classes, and the likely long-term impact of adding even a little small-cap value to a portfolio. He also discusses the Fine Tuning Your Asset Allocation table for small-cap value, and Tables 1 and 3 from “90 Years of Evidence Shows Investor Patience Leads to Better Returns“.” At the link select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Ireland in 1969 – “Ruth Sanderson grew up in Northern Ireland yet never really understood how the Troubles started. Although the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement effectively brought peace in 1998, Ruth believes the fallout from the violence continues to cast a long shadow over a society which is still divided. Now Ruth returns to the same courtroom in Belfast where the Scarman Tribunal sat and begins to piece together the events of August 1969 when Northern Ireland spiralled out of control. The Northern Irish Troubles began when civil disturbances tipped into widespread violence across a single week in August 1969. The bitter conflict between those who wanted Northern Ireland to remain part of the United Kingdom and those who wanted a united Ireland would go on for more than three decades and claim thousands of lives. While there is no definitive way of knowing exactly what happened during the week when violence erupted, the Scarman Tribunal sat soon after and compelled witnesses from all sides to give their account of the events which led to the breakdown of law and order and the British Army being deployed.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Leprosy – “When Aleks Krotoski was six years old she lived in a world surrounded by people with leprosy, or Hansen’s Disease as it’s officially known. Both her dad and step mum worked at the US’s last leper home, the National Hansen’s Disease Centre in Carville Louisiana, tucked away in a bend of the mighty Mississippi. Today she makes a return journey to find out if the stigma of leprosy still exists and how the disease is being treated.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Machine Bias Concerns – “Now that algorithms are everywhere, helping us to both run and make sense of the world, a strange question has emerged among artificial intelligence researchers: When is it ok to predict the future based on the past? When is it ok to be biased? “I want a machine-learning algorithm to learn what tumors looked like in the past, and I want it to become biased toward selecting those kind of tumors in the future,” explains philosopher Shannon Vallor at Santa Clara University.  “But I don’t want a machine-learning algorithm to learn what successful engineers and doctors looked like in the past and then become biased toward selecting those kinds of people when sorting and ranking resumes.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marawi Lost City – “In 2017, Marawi was besieged by Islamic State supporters. Today it is a city of ghosts.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Costs – “Entrepreneur and Anesthesiologist Keith Smith of the Surgery Center of Oklahoma talks with host Russ Roberts about what it’s like to run a surgery center that posts prices on the internet and that does not take insurance. Along the way, he discusses the distortions in the market for health care and how a real market for health care might function if government took a smaller role.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Negotiating – “In this episode, we sit down with negotiation expert Misha Glouberman who explains how to talk to people about things — that is, how to avoid the pitfalls associated with debate when two or more people attempt to come to an agreement that will be mutually beneficial. Misha Glouberman teaches negotiation, both in the classroom and within organizations, and he also works as a professional facilitator, which means he helps people design and run conferences and meetings. He also lectures, hosts Trampoline Hall (which has a podcast) — where he interviews the speakers afterfield and fields questions from the audience — and he is the co-author of the book The Chairs Are Where the People Go, a collection of his dictated musings about life recorded and edited by author Sheila Heti.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neural Networks – “When we design a skyscraper we expect it will perform to specification: that the tower will support so much weight and be able to withstand an earthquake of a certain strength. But with one of the most important technologies of the modern world, we’re effectively building blind. We play with different designs, tinker with different setups, but until we take it out for a test run, we don’t really know what it can do or where it will fail. This technology is the neural network, which underpins today’s most advanced artificial intelligence systems. Increasingly, neural networks are moving into the core areas of society: They determine what we learn of the world through our social media feeds, they help doctors diagnose illnesses, and they even influence whether a person convicted of a crime will spend time in jail. Yet “the best approximation to what we know is that we know almost nothing about how neural networks actually work and what a really insightful theory would be,” said Boris Hanin, a mathematician at Texas A&M University and a visiting scientist at Facebook AI Research who studies neural networks. He likens the situation to the development of another revolutionary technology: the steam engine. At first, steam engines weren’t good for much more than pumping water. Then they powered trains, which is maybe the level of sophistication neural networks have reached. Then scientists and mathematicians developed a theory of thermodynamics, which let them understand exactly what was going on inside engines of any kind. Eventually, that knowledge took us to the moon. “First you had great engineering, and you had some great trains, then you needed some theoretical understanding to go to rocket ships,” Hanin said. Within the sprawling community of neural network development, there is a small group of mathematically minded researchers who are trying to build a theory of neural networks — one that would explain how they work and guarantee that if you construct a neural network in a prescribed manner, it will be able to perform certain tasks. This work is still in its very early stages, but in the last year researchers have produced several papers which elaborate the relationship between form and function in neural networks. The work takes neural networks all the way down to their foundations. It shows that long before you can certify that neural networks can drive cars, you need to prove that they can multiply.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nobel Prizes – “This week we start with this year’s physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds — and sometimes thousands — of people’s hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Operation Warp Speed – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on August 26, 2020, the editors discuss the U.S. government’s rapid SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development strategy, as well as the recent FDA approval of convalescent plasma to treat Covid-19.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Passport Business – “Citizenship is changing; and half the world’s governments are making money through citizenship schemes. In Vanuatu, a tiny Pacific Island Nation, a blossoming and controversial passport scheme is in place. Vanuatu’s government says it needs the revenue to boost the weak economy, but many are asking why the money from passport sales does not seem to have trickled down, while growing Chinese influence in the region is becoming a common cause of concern.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Passport Business – “Citizenship is changing; and half the world’s governments are making money through citizenship schemes. We investigate the booming trade in passports, and in a rare interview with the boss of the world’s biggest citizenship brokerage, we hear how easy it can be to get a second – or third – passport, for the right price.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Politicians Mangle Science – “Our guest in this episode of the You Are Not So Smart Podcast is Dave Levitan, a science journalist with a new book titled: Not a Scientist: how politicians mistake, misrepresent, and utterly mangle science.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Press Releases – “Everyone’s seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you’d be right. But there’s other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We’re talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rainbow Railroad – “Jane and Patricia fled their home in the middle of the night. Days before they had narrowly escaped an arson attack. It’s illegal to be gay in Barbados. You can be sent to prison for life. Now they needed out. A few months before they had reached out to an organisation in Canada, the Rainbow Railroad which helps move gay people, persecuted for their sexuality, to safety. After the arson attack Jane and Patricia contacted them again – “Please help us now”. In Canada, the team leapt into action. In collaboration with CBC’s The Doc Project, presenter Acey Rowe picks up the story as the women pack to board a flight to an uncertain future.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Robert Mugabe – “Audrey Brown looks back at the life of the former Zimbabwean president, Robert Mugabe, who has died in Singapore aged 95.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Scaramucci Interview – “Anthony Scaramucci, the infamous 11-day communications director for President Donald Trump in 2017, talks to Virginia Heffernan about his conversion from Trumpism; his politics and his relationship to power; growing up working-class; his wife, Diedre; and the real story behind missing the birth of his son.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Smartphone Access – “Windows 7 support dies today, but 1 in 7 PCs are still running it; Cablehaunt- the remote exploit with the catchy logo that works on ALL cable modems; US government still wants backdoor access to iPhones; CheckRain iPhone jailbreak keeps getting better; How Apple scans your photos for evidence of child abuse; The sim swapping threat; Anatomy/timeline of the exploitation of an unpatched VPN bug, and speaking of patching right away… patch your Firefox browser right now!” At the link right-click “Download now,” then right-click “audio,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Southern Stories – “Episode Info – TFTS #54 Encore: Tin Roof Project with Vic Fleming, April 4th, 2016” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Theranos – “Theranos is an unbelievable tale of ambition and fame gone terribly wrong. How did the world’s youngest self-made female billionaire lose it all in the blink of an eye? How did the woman once heralded as “the next Steve Jobs” find herself facing criminal charges — to which she pleaded not guilty — and up to 20 years in jail? How did her technology, meant to revolutionize healthcare, potentially put millions of patients at risk? And how did so many smart people get it so wrong along the way? ABC News chief business, technology and economics correspondent Rebecca Jarvis, along with producers Taylor Dunn and Victoria Thompson, take listeners on a journey that includes a three-year-long investigation.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Time Cells – “Our brains have an extraordinary ability to monitor time. A driver can judge just how much time is left to run a yellow light; a dancer can keep a beat down to the millisecond. But exactly how the brain tracks time is still a mystery. Researchers have defined the brain areas involved in movement, memory, color vision and other functions, but not the ones that monitor time. Indeed, our neural timekeeper has proved so elusive that most scientists assume this mechanism is distributed throughout the brain, with different regions using different monitors to keep track of time according to their needs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Undocumented Immigrant – “Imran fled violence in Myanmar – now he is in detention on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea, with no papers and no idea what will happen to him. Hosted by Academy Award-winning documentary film-maker Asif Kapadia (Amy, Senna, Diego Maradona), this is the fourth episode in a five-part series from BBC World Service in collaboration with Robert Redford’s Sundance Institute. Detours takes us off the main roads of our lives, following people who didn’t end up where they expected.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Undocumented Immigrants in Costa Rica – “A small Costa Rican surfing city is the unexpected final home for people leaving Asia and Africa in search of a better life in the US. Hosted by Academy Award-winning documentary film-maker Asif Kapadia (Amy, Senna, Diego Maradona), this is the last episode in a five-part series from BBC World Service in collaboration with Robert Redford’s Sundance Institute. Detours takes us off the main roads of our lives, following people who didn’t end up where they expected.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Undocumented Immigrants in Costa Rica – “A small Costa Rican surfing city is the unexpected final home for people leaving Asia and Africa in search of a better life in the US. Hosted by Academy Award-winning documentary film-maker Asif Kapadia (Amy, Senna, Diego Maradona), this is the last episode in a five-part series from BBC World Service in collaboration with Robert Redford’s Sundance Institute. Detours takes us off the main roads of our lives, following people who didn’t end up where they expected.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Warts – “Warts…Not Just a Toad Problem” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

WWII Economics – “The story of World War Two is usually told in terms of heroism on the battlefield, but perhaps the most important struggle was the economic battle. Across the world countries were fighting to feed their populations, maximise production from their factories and fund their armies. To mark the 80th anniversary of the start of World War Two, economist Duncan Weldon examines how the economies of the European powers, the United Kingdom, Germany, France and the Soviet Union, set the scene for the conduct of the war in 1939 and 1940.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Black Hair and Swimming – “Seren Jones swam competitively for 13 years in the UK and in the US collegiate system. But in that time she only ever saw six other black girls in the pool. Why so few? A survey published by the University of Memphis and USA Swimming found that black respondents were significantly more concerned about getting their hair wet, and about the negative impact of chemicals on their appearances, than white respondents. Seren explores whether maintaining ‘good’ hair really is the leading factor behind why black women do not take part in competitive swimming.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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