MMD457 Media Mining Digest: Achoque Preservation, AI and Human Input, Black Lives Matter, Boarder Wall Effectiveness, Capitalism, Child Sex Trafficking, Childhood Trauma, Climate Activist, Climate Countdown, Corona Virus and Bill Gates, Corona Virus Creation, Corruption Reduction, Covid Economic Impact, Covid Vaccine Development, Coworker.Com, Cryptography, Disinformation Online, Elephant Advocate, Farmers Markets, Fire Drill Fridays, Food Waste, Freedom and Democracy, Fungal Mycorrhiza, Global Economics, Hungry Farmers, Immigrant Attorney, Investigative Journalist, Ivermectrin Treatment, Jo Rogan Debate, Kenya Forest Preservation, Kinder Politics, LGBTQ TV Series, Microbe Impact on Health, North Korean Life, Novelty, Nuclear Weapons, Ocean Overfishing, Origins of Life, Plastic Garbage, Pregnancy Deaths, Private Data Ownership, Programming Biology, Rabies Prevention, Ruth Bade Ginsburg, Seaweed Farms, Sex Hormones, Sex Trafficking Bust, Six Hour Workday, Smartphone Chemistry, Soil Scientist, Stockton Mayor, Structure and Order, Student Trauma, Teaching Trends, Technology Trends, The N Word, Tobacco Deaths, Water Quality, Whale Preservation, Zoom Call Fatigue

Exercise your ears: the 74 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 666 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,650 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Achoque Preservation 9 mins – “To save the achoque — an exotic (and adorable) salamander found in a lake in northern Mexico — scientists teamed up with an unexpected research partner: a group of nuns called the Sisters of the Immaculate Health. In this delightful talk, science journalist Victoria Gill shares the story of how this unusual collaboration saved the achoque from extinction — and demonstrates how local and indigenous people could hold the secret to saving our planet’s weird, wonderful and most threatened species.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Video” [only video is available] and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI and Human Input 10 mins -.“Here’s a paradox: as companies try to streamline their businesses by using artificial intelligence to make critical decisions, they may inadvertently make themselves less efficient. Business technologist Sylvain Duranton advocates for a “Human plus AI” approach — using AI systems alongside humans, not instead of them — and shares the specific formula companies can adopt to successfully employ AI while keeping humans in the loop.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Lives Matter 7 mins – “In this lively talk and performance, artist and TED Fellow Amma Y. Ghartey-Tagoe Kootin offers a sneak peek of her forthcoming musical “At Buffalo.” Drawing on archival material from the 1901 Pan-American Exhibition, a world’s fair held in Buffalo, New York, the show examines conflicting representations of black identity exhibited at the fair — highlighting unsettlingly familiar parallels between American society at the turn of the century and today, and asking: Are we all still part of the show?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boarder Crossings..7 mins.-.“In this powerful, personal talk, author and academic Juan Enriquez shares stories from inside the immigration crisis at the US-Mexico border, bringing this often-abstract debate back down to earth — and showing what you can do every day to create a sense of belonging for immigrants. “This isn’t about kids and borders,” he says. “It’s about us. This is about who we are, who we the people are, as a nation and as individuals.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boarder Wall Effectiveness 12 mins – “”Building a 30-foot-high concrete structure from sea to shining sea is the most expensive and least effective way to do border security,” says Congressman Will Hurd, a Republican from Texas whose district encompasses two times zones and shares an 820-mile border with Mexico. Speaking from Washington, DC in a video interview with former state attorney general Anne Milgram, Hurd discusses the US government’s border policy and its controversial detention and child separation practices — and lays out steps toward a better future at the border.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Business Rules 4 mins – “There are three billion working people on this planet, and only 40 percent of them report being happy at work. Michael C. Bush shares his insights into what makes workers unhappy — and how companies can benefit their bottom lines by fostering satisfaction.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Capitalism 12 mins – “Rising inequality and growing political instability are the direct result of decades of bad economic theory, says entrepreneur Nick Hanauer. In a visionary talk, he dismantles the mantra that “greed is good” — an idea he describes as not only morally corrosive, but also scientifically wrong — and lays out a new theory of economics powered by reciprocity and cooperation.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Pornography 9 mins – “Social entrepreneur Julie Cordua works on a problem that isn’t easy to talk about: the sexual abuse of children in images and videos on the internet. At Thorn, she’s building technology to connect the dots between the tech industry, law enforcement and government — so we can swiftly end the viral distribution of abuse material and rescue children faster. Learn more about how this scalable solution could help dismantle the communities normalizing child sexual abuse around the world today. (This ambitious plan is part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childhood Trauma 10 mins – “”To make a difference in the life of a child … I made the commitment to tell my personal story,” says educator Lisa Godwin. In this moving talk, she shares her experience of overcoming childhood trauma with the quiet, unwavering support of a teacher and school counselor — and shows how educators can help students and families navigate hardships by sharing their own stories.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Activist 12 mins – “”I dream of a world where geography classes teach about the climate crisis as this one great challenge that was won by people like you and me,” says climate activist Luisa Neubauer. With Greta Thunberg, Neubauer helped initiate “Fridays For Future,” the momentous international school strike movement that protests the lack of action on the climate crisis. She shares four first steps that anyone, regardless of age, can take to become a climate activist. “This is not a job for a single generation. This is a job for humanity,” she says.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Causes 6 mins – “Journalistic ethics have long tabooed rushing to judgement about the cause of this tornado or that flash flood. But now, with mathematical rigor and clarity, scientists in the field of “extreme weather attribution” can make such connections in some cases. Heidi Cullen, chief scientist at Climate Central, believes the media are failing to contextualize current weather coverage — similar to misleading reporting leading up to the financial crisis. She speaks with Bob about how journalists can embrace this form of science and more precise language to better explain global warming’s role in extreme weather events.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Countdown 42 mins – “Content will focus on five big questions: POWER: How rapidly can we move to 100% clean energy? The plunging cost of renewables is a thrilling game-changer. BUILT ENVIRONMENT: How can we re-engineer the stuff that surrounds us? We need regenerative economics and a materials revolution. TRANSPORT: How do we transform the ways we move? It’s time to rethink our cars, trucks, ships and planes for the 21st century. FOOD: How can we spark a worldwide shift to healthier food systems? A delicious, nutritious future can be good for farmers — and the planet. NATURE: How extensively can we re-green the earth? Our forests, soil and oceans can return us to a stable carbon cycle — and save countless other species.” At the link you cannot download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Corona Virus and Bill Gates 35 mins – “Philanthropist and Microsoft cofounder Bill Gates offers insights into the COVID-19 pandemic, discussing why testing and self-isolation are essential, which medical advancements show promise and what it will take for the world to endure this crisis. (This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. Recorded March 24, 2020)” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus Creation 42 mins – “When will the coronavirus vaccine be ready? Epidemiologist Seth Berkley (head of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance) takes us inside the effort to create a vaccine for COVID-19. With clarity and urgency, he explains what makes it so challenging to develop, when we can expect it to be rolled out at scale and why we’ll need global collaboration to get it done. (This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. Recorded March 26, 2020)” At the link left-click “Share” then select “Download video” (no audio option) to get the podcast.

Corruption Reduction 8 mins – “Traditional thinking on corruption goes like this: if you put good laws in place and enforce them well, then economic development increases and corruption falls. In reality, we have the equation backwards, says innovation researcher Efosa Ojomo. In this compelling talk, he offers new thinking on how we could potentially eliminate corruption worldwide by focusing on one thing: scarcity. “Societies don’t develop because they’ve reduced corruption,” he says. “They’re able to reduce corruption because they’ve developed.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Economic Impact 28 mins – “In episode 1 of World vs Virus podcast, economist Nouriel Roubini explains why the economic impact of the COVID-19 coronavirus will be different than anything we have seen before, and a mental health expert gives tips on staying sane. World vs Virus is a weekly podcast breaking down the latest news, research, and analysis of the COVID-19 coronavirus, from the World Economic Forum. Hear the latest episodes as they become available each Thursday: On Spotify ► https://spoti.fi/2Xk5xGR …More information on World Economic Forum’s website ► https://bit.ly/2yLuJfp Episode published 20/03/20 The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Vaccine Development 31 mins – “Antibodies, convalescent plasma, gene-based vaccines — you may have heard these terms on the evening news, but what do they mean? How might they help in the battle against Covid-19? As the race to develop a vaccine continues, questions remain about effectiveness, testing, and whether people will actually get the vaccine once it’s on the market. Two medical experts involved in the fight explain the science behind developing effective protection.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Coworker.org 5 mins – “Got an idea to make your workplace better? Labor organizer and TED Fellow Jess Kutch can show you how to put it into action. In this quick talk, she explains how “productive conflict” — when people organize to challenge and change their work lives for the better — can be beneficial for employees and employers alike.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cryptography 11 mins – “In the war for information, will quantum computers defeat cryptographers?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disinformation Online..36 mins.-.“Disinformation online is on the minds of voters, candidates, government officials, and technology platforms as the US election gets closer. Already experts have seen disinformation campaigns around the Covid-19 pandemic, which could spell trouble in November, says Laura Rosenberger, director of the Alliance for Securing Democracy. “When you’re sowing doubt about the information the government is providing about the pandemic, you’re sowing doubt in citizens’ faith in their democratic institutions. That primes us to have less faith in the integrity of the election.” She speaks with Renée DiResta, technical research manager at Stanford Internet Observatory, and Cecilia Kang, technology reporter for The New York Times, about how this perfect storm of disinformation is being tackled.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Elephant Advocate 9 mins – “Imagine waking in the middle of the night to an elephant ripping the roof from your house in search of food. This is a reality in some communities in Africa where, as wild spaces shrink, people and elephants are competing for space and resources like never before. In this engaging talk, zoologist Lucy King shares her solution to the rising conflict: fences made from beehives that keep elephants at bay while also helping farmers establish new livelihoods.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farmers Markets 4 mins – “The average farmer in America makes less than 15 cents of every dollar on a product that you purchase at a store. They feed our communities, but farmers often cannot afford the very foods they grow. In this actionable talk, social entrepreneur Mohammad Modarres shows how to put your purchasing power into action to save local agriculture from collapse and transform the food industry from the bottom up.

Fire Drill Fridays 10 mins – “At age 81, actor and activist Jane Fonda is putting herself on the line for the planet — literally. In a video interview with TEDWomen curator Pat Mitchell, Fonda speaks about getting arrested multiple times during Fire Drill Fridays, the weekly climate demonstrations she leads in Washington, DC — and discusses why civil disobedience is becoming a new normal in the age of climate change.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Food Waste 8 mins – “In a world that’s wasting more food than ever before, why do one in nine people still go to bed hungry each night? Social entrepreneur Jasmine Crowe calls for a radical transformation to our fight to end global hunger — challenging us to rethink our routine approaches to addressing food insecurity and sharing how we can use technology to gather unused food and deliver it directly to people in need.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Freedom and Democracy 9 mins – “Millions of images and videos are uploaded to the internet each day, yet we rarely see shocking and disturbing content in our social media feeds. Who’s keeping the internet “clean” for us? In this eye-opening talk, documentarians Hans Block and Moritz Riesewieck take us inside the shadowy world of online content moderators — the people contracted by major platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Google to rid the internet of toxic material. Learn more about the psychological impact of this kind of work — and how “digital cleaning” influences what all of us see and think.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fungal Mycorrhiza..11 mins.- “Resource inequality is one of our greatest challenges, but it’s not unique to humans. Like us, mycorrhizal fungi that live in plant and tree roots strategically trade, steal and withhold resources, displaying remarkable parallels to humans in their capacity to be opportunistic (and sometimes ruthless) — all in the absence of cognition. In a mind-blowing talk, evolutionary biologist Toby Kiers shares what fungi networks and relationships reveal about human economies, and what they can tell us about inequality.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Economics 13 mins – “Where does wealth come from, who creates it and what destroys it? In this deep dive into global economics, Mariana Mazzucato explains how we lost sight of what value means and why we need to rethink our current financial systems — so capitalism can be steered toward a bold, innovative and sustainable future that works for all of us.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Government Bureaucracy 4 mins -. “What if the government ran more like Silicon Valley? Engineer Matt Cutts shares why he decided to leave Google (where he worked for nearly 17 years) for a career in the US government — and makes the case that if you really want to make an impact, go where your help is needed most.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Video” [only video is available] and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Hungry Farmers 8 mins – “Nearly 800 million people worldwide depend on cassava for survival — but this critical food source is under attack by entirely preventable viruses, says computational biologist and TED Senior Fellow Laura Boykin. She takes us to the farms in East Africa where she’s working with a diverse team of scientists to help farmers keep their crops healthy using a portable DNA lab and mini supercomputer that can identify viruses in hours, instead of months.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Attorney 14 mins – “At the US-Mexico border, policies of prolonged detention and family separation have made seeking asylum in the United States difficult and dangerous. In this raw and heartfelt talk, immigration attorney Erika Pinheiro offers a glimpse into her daily work on both sides of the border and shares some of the stories behind the statistics — including her own story of being detained and separated from her son. It’s a clear-eyed call to remember the humanity that’s impacted by policy — and a warning: “History shows us that the first population to be vilified and stripped of their rights is rarely the last,” she says.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Immigrant Questions 12 mins – “How did the US immigration debate get to be so divisive? In this informative talk, historian and writer Paul A. Kramer shows how an “insider vs. outsider” framing has come to dominate the way people in the US talk about immigration — and suggests a set of new questions that could reshape the conversation around whose life, rights and thriving matters.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigenous Elements 9 mins – “Indigenous languages across North America are under threat of extinction due to the colonial legacy of cultural erasure, says linguist Lindsay Morcom. Highlighting grassroots strategies developed by the Anishinaabe people of Canada to revive their language and community, Morcom makes a passionate case for enacting policies that could protect Indigenous heritage for generations to come.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investigative Journalist 8 mins – “Film has the power to change the way we think about ourselves and our culture. Documentarian and TED Fellow Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy uses it to fight violence against women, turning her camera on the tradition of honor killings in Pakistan. In a stirring talk, she shares how she took her Oscar-winning film on the road in a mobile cinema, visiting small towns and villages across Pakistan — and shifting the dynamics between women, men and society, one screening at a time.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ivermectin for Covid 10 mins – “For three nights in April, Heather Coutts listened through the door as her husband lay awake in bed, gasping for air. He told her later he’d strained to remember the details of his life insurance policy —  had he signed all the documents? — in case he didn’t make it. Coutts cared for him from a distance, while minding their 11-year-old and 1-year-old. After two weeks of belabored breathing, extreme fatigue and a trip to the emergency room, her husband started to feel better. But Coutts felt like she’d been hit by a truck. She had a sore throat and a fever. Hoping to avoid the hell her husband had just endured, Coutts called her close friend Alexis Lieberman, a Philadelphia pediatrician, to ask if there was anything else she should be doing. Lieberman and Coutts are like family — they met years ago volunteering at a camp for kids with queer parents and have stayed friends ever since. So when Lieberman suggested that Coutts try ivermectin, a cheap, safe drug designed to treat parasites that had almost no known side effects, Coutts trusted her. “We kind of thought, well, there’s no negatives to taking this,” said Coutts. “It’s not going to have any really bad side effects. If it could help, why not?” Within 24 hours, her fever was gone. After two days, Coutts felt completely herself again.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Joe Rogan Debate 12 mins – “Earlier this year we aired a profile of Joe Rogan. The unbelievably popular podcast host was in the headlines because then-presidential candidate Bernie Sanders had gone on his show — resulting in a kerfuffle in the progressive camp, because of Rogans misogyny and racism. He’s back in the headlines again this week after Trump tweeted that he would gladly participate in a debate hosted by Rogan. The fact that Joe Rogan wields so much influence is itself a kind of a head-scratcher for many coastal media observers. “Why Is Joe Rogan So Popular?” is the title of a profile in The Atlantic by Devin Gordon, a writer who immersed himself in Joe Rogan’s podcast and lifestyle to understand his enormous popularity. In this segment, first aired in January, he and Brooke discuss Rogan’s complicated appeal.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Select Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Kinder Politics 9 mins – “In spring 2019, more than 17,000 Europeans from 33 countries signed up to have a political argument with a complete stranger. They were part of “Europe Talks,” a project that organizes one-on-one conversations between people who disagree — sort of like a Tinder for politics. Editor Jochen Wegner shares the unexpected things that happened when people met up to talk — and shows how face-to-face discussions could get a divided world to rethink itself.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language Disappearance 4 mins – “As many as 3,000 languages could disappear within the next 80 years, all but silencing entire cultures. In this quick talk, language activist Daniel Bögre Udell shows how people around the world are finding new ways to revive ancestral languages and rebuild their traditions — and encourages us all to investigate the tongues of our ancestors. “Reclaiming your language and embracing your culture is a powerful way to be yourself,” he says.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

LGBTQ TV Series 5 mins – “Lindsay Amer is the creator of “Queer Kid Stuff,” an educational video series that breaks down complex ideas around gender and sexuality through songs and metaphors. By giving kids and their families a vocabulary to express themselves, Amer is helping to create more empathetic adults — and spreading a message of radical acceptance in a world where it’s sometimes dangerous to just be yourself. “I want kids to grow up and into themselves with pride for who they are and who they can be,” Amer says.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbe Impact on Health 7 mins – “Your lifelong health may have been decided the day you were born, says microbiome researcher Henna-Maria Uusitupa. In this fascinating talk, she shows how the gut microbes you acquire during birth and as an infant impact your health into adulthood — and discusses new microbiome research that could help tackle problems like obesity and diabetes.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

North Korean Life 8 mins -””North Korea is unimaginable,” says human rights activist Yeonmi Park, who escaped the country at the age of 13. Sharing the harrowing story of her childhood, she reflects on the fragility of freedom — and shows how change can be achieved even in the world’s darkest places.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Novelty 10 mins – “Theoretical physicist David Deutsch delivers a mind-bending meditation on the “great monotony” — the idea that nothing novel has appeared in the universe for billions of years — and shows how humanity’s capacity to create explanatory knowledge could be the thing that bucks this trend. “Humans are not playthings of cosmic forces,” he says. “We are users of cosmic forces.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Weapons 9 mins – “There are more than 10,000 nuclear weapons in existence today, each one capable of causing immense destruction. Why don’t we talk about this threat as much as some other major issues? In this practical talk, nuclear security expert Emma Belcher shares three questions you can ask your elected officials to gain a better understanding of nuclear weapons and the measures we need to stay safe.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Ocean Overfishing 9 mins – “We need a radically new approach to ocean conservation, says marine biologist and TED Fellow Alasdair Harris. In a visionary talk, he lays out a surprising solution to the problem of overfishing that could both revive marine life and rebuild local fisheries — all by taking less from the ocean. “When we design it right, marine conservation reaps dividends that go far beyond protecting nature,” he says.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Origins of Life 6 mins – “Exactly when and where did life on Earth begin? Scientists have long thought that it emerged three billion years ago in the ocean — until astrobiologist Tara Djokic and her team made an unexpected discovery in the western Australian desert. Learn how an ancient rock found near a hot volcanic pool is shifting our understanding of the origin-of-life puzzle.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plastic Garbage 10 mins – “Plastic is an incredible substance for the economy — and the worst substance possible for the environment, says entrepreneur Andrew Forrest. In a conversation meant to spark debate, Forrest and head of TED Chris Anderson discuss an ambitious plan to get the world’s biggest companies to fund an environmental revolution — and transition industry towards getting all of its plastic from recycled materials, not from fossil fuels.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pregnancy Deaths 11 mins – “Shocking, but true: the United States has the highest rate of deaths for new mothers of any developed country — and 60 percent of them are preventable. With clarity and urgency, physician Elizabeth Howell explains the causes of maternal mortality and shares ways for hospitals and doctors to make pregnancy safer for women before, during and after childbirth.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Private Data Ownership 10 mins – “The world’s most valuable tech companies profit from the personal data you generate. So why aren’t you getting paid for it? In this eye-opening talk, entrepreneur and technologist Jennifer Zhu Scott makes the case for private data ownership — which would empower you to donate, destroy or sell your data as you see fit — and shows how this growing movement could put power (and cash) back into the hands of people.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Programming Biology 10 mins – “The cells in your body are like computer software: they’re “programmed” to carry out specific functions at specific times. If we can better understand this process, we could unlock the ability to reprogram cells ourselves, says computational biologist Sara-Jane Dunn. In a talk from the cutting-edge of science, she explains how her team is studying embryonic stem cells to gain a new understanding of the biological programs that power life — and develop “living software” that could transform medicine, agriculture and energy.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rabies Prevention 11 mins – “Could we anticipate the next big disease outbreak, stopping a virus like Ebola before it ever strikes? In this talk about frontline scientific research, ecologist Daniel Streicker takes us to the Amazon rainforest in Peru where he tracks the movement of vampire bats in order to forecast and prevent rabies outbreaks. By studying these disease patterns, Streicker shows how we could learn to cut off the next pandemic at its source.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rumination Control 9 mins – “Feeling burned out? You may be spending too much time ruminating about your job, says psychologist Guy Winch. Learn how to stop worrying about tomorrow’s tasks or stewing over office tensions with three simple techniques aimed at helping you truly relax and recharge after work.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg 40 mins – “The late Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second female justice confirmed to the US Supreme Court, told an Aspen Institute crowd in 2017 that her experiences as a woman gave her a unique perspective on the Court. She talked about her relationships with Justices Sandra Day O’Connor and the late Antonin Scalia. She also explained what it was like to work with newly-elected Justice Neil Gorsuch. Her discussion with Elliot Gerson, an executive vice president at the Aspen Institute, also touched on her book My Own Words. This podcast originally dropped in June of 2017.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Seaweed Farms 9 mins – “It’s time for planetary-scale interventions to combat climate change — and environmentalist Tim Flannery thinks seaweed can help. In a bold talk, he shares the epic carbon-capturing potential of seaweed, explaining how oceangoing seaweed farms created on a massive scale could trap all the carbon we emit into the atmosphere. Learn more about this potentially planet-saving solution — and the work that’s still needed to get there.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Hormones 10 mins – “The common thinking on biological sex goes like this: females have two X chromosomes in their cells, while males have one X and one Y. In this myth-busting talk, science writer and podcaster Molly Webster shows why the so-called “sex chromosomes” are more complicated than this simple definition — and reveals why we should think about them differently.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Video” [no audio available] and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Trafficking Bust 10 mins – “Last month, Huffington Post Senior Enterprise Reporter Michael Hobbes noticed a shocking story from Georgia emerge. It traveled from local news outlets, to the Associated Press, to The New York Times and cable news. According the headlines, 39 children had been rescued in a child sex trafficking bust. Except, that wasn’t quite true. Missing children had been located — but almost all of them were found separately in a two-week operation that crossed state lines. In fact, the U.S. Marshals Service that found them doesn’t even investigate child sex trafficking cases. So why the headline? According to Hobbes, it’s a PR strategy used by law enforcement that plays well with the press. But it’s not harmless. The misleading idea that child sex trafficking is rampant stokes fear in the public, lends credibility to conspiracy theories, and can lead to negligence of more widespread and pressing child safety issues.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Relations 7 mins – “As a sex educator, Emily Nagoski is often asked: How do couples sustain a strong sexual connection over the long term? In this funny, insightful talk, she shares her answer — drawing on (somewhat surprising) research to reveal why some couples stop having sex while others keep up a connection for a lifetime.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Victim 10 mins – “’To make a difference in the life of a child … I made the commitment to tell my personal story,’ says educator Lisa Godwin. In this moving talk, she shares her experience of overcoming childhood trauma with the quiet, unwavering support of a teacher and school counselor — and shows how educators can help students and families navigate hardships by sharing their own stories.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Six Hour Workday 26 mins – “This week’s guest offers some excellent knowledge about productivity and having your priorities in place. Steve Glaveski, CEO and Co-Founder of Collective Campus, joins us to discuss prioritizing high-value work. We talk about his view of the 6-hour workday, and how it helps to better innovation. Steve went through the motions of getting his degree and climbing the corporate ladder, chasing what society associates with success. He worked for companies such as KPMG and Ernst and Young and found himself miserably comfortable while in his late twenties. Despite reaching these levels of success, but Steve felt it wasn’t doing what he was called to do. He decided to give it all away and pursue entrepreneurship, which led him to co-found Collective Campus, launch other ventures, and write multiple books. The inspiration behind the work he does is helping organizations and people unlock their potential to create an impact in the world and lead more fulfilling lives. One of his ventures is a company called Lemonade Stand that donates a license to children from socioeconomically disadvantaged areas for every license they sell to the developed world. It works as a software service platform that walks kids aged 10-15 through the entrepreneurial life cycle. When it comes to licenses, they work with schools, governments, and individuals. Steve has a lot on his plate with all the ventures he runs. People often say you can’t do more than one thing if you want to do it well. According to Steve, it is based on how you go about doing things. If you are intentional about getting rid of unnecessary tasks and focus on the high-value work, you will get a lot done and innovate better. Steve reflects monthly and quarterly on how he spends his time, whether it’s his daily tasks or when he’s working on products. A couple of years ago, Steve and his team ran a 6-hour workday experiment to get more done in less time. The shorter timeframe forced them to do away with meetings/outsource and focus on the high-value work. After the experiment, they discovered that productivity was the same if not higher. People had more time to do things outside of the office.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Smartphone Chemistry 10 mins – “Ever wondered how your smartphone works? Take a journey down to the atomic level with scientist Cathy Mulzer, who reveals how almost every component of our high-powered devices exists thanks to chemists — and not the Silicon Valley entrepreneurs that come to most people’s minds. As she puts it: “Chemistry is the hero of electronic communications.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soil Scientist 10 mins – “There’s two times more carbon in the earth’s soil than in all of its vegetation and the atmosphere — combined. Biogeochemist Asmeret Asefaw Berhe dives into the science of soil and shares how we could use its awesome carbon-trapping power to offset climate change. “[Soil] represents the difference between life and lifelessness in the earth system, and it can also help us combat climate change — if we can only stop treating it like dirt,” she says.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stockton Mayor 12 mins – “Michael Tubbs is the youngest mayor in American history to represent a city with more than 100,000 people — and his policies are sparking national conversations. In this rousing talk, he shares how growing up amid poverty and violence in Stockton, California shaped his bold vision for change and his commitment to govern as a neighbor, not a politician. “When we see someone different from us, they should not reflect our fears, our anxieties, our insecurities,” he says. “We should see our common humanity.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Structure and Order 11 mins – “Social media has become our new home. Can we build it better? Taking design cues from urban planners and social scientists, technologist Eli Pariser shows how the problems we’re encountering on digital platforms aren’t all that new — and shares how, by following the model of thriving towns and cities, we can create trustworthy online communities.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Video” [no audio available] and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Trauma 7 mins – “Teachers emotionally support our kids — but who’s supporting our teachers? In this eye-opening talk, educator Sydney Jensen explores how teachers are at risk of “secondary trauma” — the idea that they absorb the emotional weight of their students’ experiences — and shows how schools can get creative in supporting everyone’s mental health and wellness.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Teaching Excellence 7 mins – “Teachers emotionally support our kids — but who’s supporting our teachers? In this eye-opening talk, educator Sydney Jensen explores how teachers are at risk of “secondary trauma” — the idea that they absorb the emotional weight of their students’ experiences — and shows how schools can get creative in supporting everyone’s mental health and wellness.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teaching Trends 15 mins – “Lauren Herckis, an anthropologist at Carnegie Mellon University who has studied the culture of ancient Mayan cities, is turning her focus closer to home these days—exploring why professors try new teaching approaches, or decide not to. She found many professors are reluctant to move away from the way they’ve traditionally taught, even when presented with evidence new approaches might work better. But that isn’t because the professors don’t care about teaching. In some cases the issue involves broader philosophical differences among faculty members over what it means to teach. “I found that every single professor who I spoke to really valued teaching,” she said. “To all of them, teaching was central to their avocation—and their identity.” EdSurge sat down with Herckis to talk about her research and what it might mean for others leading teaching-innovation projects on campuses. The conversation has been edited and condensed for clarity.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Technology Trends 8 mins – “’You don’t predict the future — you imagine the future,’ says sci-fi writer Charlie Jane Anders. In a talk that’s part dream, part research-based extrapolation, she takes us on a wild, speculative tour of the delights and challenges the future may hold — and shows how dreaming up weird, futuristic possibilities empowers us to construct a better tomorrow.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

The N Word 13 mins – “Historian Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor leads a thoughtful and history-backed examination of one of the most divisive words in the English language: the N-word. Drawing from personal experience, she explains how reflecting on our points of encounter with the word can help promote productive discussions and, ultimately, create a framework that reshapes education around the complicated history of racism in the US.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tobacco Deaths 10 mins – “Tobacco causes more than seven million deaths every year — and many of us are far more complicit in the problem than we realize. In a bold talk, oncologist Dr. Bronwyn King tells the story of how she uncovered the deep ties between the tobacco industry and the entire global finance sector, which invests our money in cigarette companies through big banks, insurers and pension funds. Learn how Dr. King has ignited a worldwide movement to create tobacco-free investments and how each of us can play a role in ending this epidemic.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water 9 mins – “We need a global weather service for water, says entrepreneur and TED Fellow Sonaar Luthra. In a talk about environmental accountability, Luthra shows how we could forecast water shortages and risks with a global data collection effort — just like we monitor the movement of storms — and better listen to what the earth is telling us.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water in Flint 8 mins – “Artist LaToya Ruby Frazier spent five months living in Flint, Michigan, documenting the lives of those affected by the city’s water crisis for her photo essay “Flint is Family.” As the crisis dragged on, she realized it was going to take more than a series of photos to bring relief. In this inspiring, surprising talk, she shares the creative lengths she went to in order to bring free, clean water to the people of Flint.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Water Quality 9 mins – “Water is essential to life. Yet in the eyes of the law, it remains largely unprotected — leaving many communities without access to safe drinking water, says legal scholar Kelsey Leonard. In this powerful talk, she shows why granting lakes and rivers legal “personhood” — giving them the same legal rights as humans — is the first step to protecting our bodies of water and fundamentally transforming how we value this vital resource.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Whale Preservation 9 mins – “The ocean is a naturally noisy place full of singing whales, grunting fish, snapping shrimp, cracking ice, wind and rain. But human-made sounds — from ship engines to oil drilling — have become an acute threat to marine life, says science journalist Nicola Jones. Watch (and listen) as she discusses the strange things that happen to underwater creatures in the face of ocean noise pollution — and shares straightforward ways we can dial down the sound to see almost immediate impacts.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Video” [no audio available] and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zoom Call Fatique 15 mins – “At this point the Zoom call has almost come to define learning and working in the age of COVID-19. But a few months ago, people began realizing that all these video calls were making them tired—exhausted even—more so than a day of in-person class or all-day meetings. The phenomena even has a name: Zoom fatigue. And it’s backed by some pretty interesting brain science. According to scientists, the cause of Zoom fatigue “is that technology can disrupt our normal intricate human communication methods that have been finely tuned over centuries to help humans survive,” writes Brenda Wiederhold in a thought-provoking editorial in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking. As it turns out, live Zoom calls aren’t as live as we think they are. Wiederhold is a licensed clinical psychologist who uses advanced technology, such as virtual reality, to treat patients who experience trauma or stress and also runs the nonprofit Interactive Media Institute. She joins us on the EdSurge podcast this week to discuss how we can combat Zoom fatigue, and she offers a glimpse into her work in virtual reality, weighing in on whether it may one day replace communication as we know it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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