MMD458 Media Mining Digest: Animal Emotions, Antimicrobial Resistance, Autism, Biofabrication, Branding Daily, Chinese Management, Climate Change Solution in Chad, Climate Migration, Cochlear Implants, Code for Venezuela, Corona Virus Chinese Response, Corona Virus Cure, Corona Virus Knowledge, Covid History, Covid Tracking with Cellphones, Covid19 and Supercomputers, Crisis Text Line, Deep Fakes, Digital Death, Disabled Person, Disinformation, Dismantle Biases, Dr Fauci Interview, Drug Patent Problem, Economic Future, Evolutionary Medicine, Facial Recognition Software, Fake News, GDP Failings, Guest Worker, Hate Panel Discussion, Internet Scammers, Internet Trolls, Just Legal System, Kenya Corruption, Menstruation, Monica Lewinsky, Monkeynomics, Psychedelic-assisted Psychotherapy, QAnon Explained, Racism, Remote Working, Safety-Respect-Truth, Salman Khan, Sleep Value, Teacher Quality, Testing Ed Tech, Tobacco Use, Turning Schools Around, Violence, Womens Rights Activist, Worlds Best Teachers

Exercise your ears: the 68 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 791 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,750 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Animal Emotions 10 mins – “From mourning orcas to distressed elephants, biological anthropologist Barbara J. King has witnessed grief and love across the animal kingdom. In this eye-opening talk, she explains the evidence behind her belief that many animals experience complex emotions, and suggests ways all of us can treat them more ethically — including every time we eat. “Animals don’t grieve exactly like we do, but this doesn’t mean that their grief isn’t real,” she says. “It is real, and it’s searing, and we can see it if we choose.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Antimicrobial Resistance 7 mins – “The UN predicts that antimicrobial resistance will be our biggest killer by 2050. “That should really scare the hell out of all of us,” says bioprocess engineer Leon Marchal. He’s working on an urgently needed solution: transforming the massive, global animal feed industry. Learn why the overuse of antibiotics in animal products, from livestock feed to everyday pet treats, has skyrocketed worldwide — and how we can take common-sense measures to stave off a potential epidemic.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Autism 11 mins – “”Autism is not a disease; it’s just another way of thinking,” says Ethan Lisi. Offering a glimpse into the way he experiences the world, Lisi breaks down misleading stereotypes about autism, shares insights into common behaviors like stimming and masking and promotes a more inclusive understanding of the spectrum.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Download Video” [no audio is available] to get the podcast.

Biofabrication 8 mins – “What if we could “grow” clothes from microbes, furniture from living organisms and buildings with exteriors like tree bark? TED Fellow Suzanne Lee shares exciting developments from the field of biofabrication and shows how it could help us replace major sources of waste, like plastic and cement, with sustainable and eco-friendly alternatives.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Branding Daily 14 mins – “”Branding is the profound manifestation of the human spirit,” says designer and podcaster Debbie Millman. In a historical odyssey that she illustrated herself, Millman traces the evolution of branding, from cave paintings to flags to beer labels and beyond. She explores the power of symbols to unite people, beginning with prehistoric communities who used them to represent beliefs and identify affiliations to modern companies that adopt logos and trademarks to market their products — and explains how branding reflects the state of humanity.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Download Video” [no audio is available] to get the podcast.

Brazil Digital Exclusion 31 mins – “The number of COVID-19 cases continues to increase in Brazil, but access to digital services is getting harder for many of the country’s poorest residents. Emergency aid and state health advice about the virus are only available online, leaving those without internet access with no help at all. Digital Planet’s Angelica Mari explains the situation in Brazil’s favelas and talks about a number of community projects trying to bridge the technology gap. Mixed reality in Covid-19 wards -Over recent months, some hospitals in London have radically reduced the amount of healthcare workers coming into contact with Covid-19. Thanks to mixed reality headsets, only one doctor needs to be at the patient’s bedside while the rest of the medical team sees the same field of view from a different location. Gareth speaks to Dr. James Kinross and Dr. Guy Martin from Imperial College London about how this tech has helped improve working conditions. 3D printing face masks – Shortages of face masks are a common issue around the globe. Could 3D printing be the solution? A firm in Chile has developed an open source design using the natural antimicrobial properties of copper. Meanwhile, a shoe factory in the United States has switched to printing masks for healthcare workers.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Chinese Management 7 mins- “Business management in China is changing, says consultant Fang Ruan. Learn how Chinese entrepreneurs — long guided by Confucianism’s emphasis on authority and regulation — are now looking to Taoist philosophy for a new, dynamic leadership style that believes things spontaneously transform and naturally achieve perfection when they’re supported, not controlled.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Download audio” and then “Save File” to get the podcast.

Climate Change Solution in Chad 9 mins – “To tackle a problem as large as climate change, we need both science and Indigenous wisdom, says environmental activist Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim. In this engaging talk, she shares how her nomadic community in Chad is working closely with scientists to restore endangered ecosystems — and offers lessons on how to create more resilient communities.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download video” [no audio available] and select “Save File” to download the podcast.

Climate Migration 9 mins – “Scientists predict climate change will displace more than 180 million people by 2100 — a crisis of “climate migration” the world isn’t ready for, says disaster recovery lawyer and Louisiana native Colette Pichon Battle. In this passionate, lyrical talk, she urges us to radically restructure the economic and social systems that are driving climate migration — and caused it in the first place — and shares how we can cultivate collective resilience, better prepare before disaster strikes and advance human rights for all.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Download audio” and then “Save File” to get the podcast.

Co-conspirators 8 mins – “In a complex and changing world, how can we make sure unconventional people and their ideas thrive? Business executive Ipsita Dasgupta introduces the concept of “co-conspirators” — people willing to bend or break the rules to challenge the status quo — and shows how they can help create new ways of thinking, acting and being.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download video” [no audio available] and select “Save File” to download the podcast.

Cochlear Implants 9 mins – “”Complete silence is very addictive,” says Rebecca Knill, a writer who has cochlear implants that enable her to hear. In this funny, insightful talk, she explores the evolution of assistive listening technology, the outdated way people still respond to deafness and how we can shift our cultural understanding of ability to build a more inclusive world. “Technology has come so far,” Knill says. “Our mindset just needs to catch up.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Download audio” and then “Save File” to get the podcast.

Code for Venezuela 7 mins – “The world is more connected than ever, but some communities are still cut off from vital resources like electricity and health care. In this solution-oriented talk, activist Johanna Figueira discusses her work with Code for Venezuela — a platform that gathers technologists to address Venezuela’s needs for information and medical supplies — and shares ideas for how it could be used as a model to help other communities in need.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Download audio” and then “Save File” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus Chinese Response 40 mins – “From Hong Kong, South China Morning Post CEO Gary Liu tracks China’s response to the coronavirus pandemic — from the initial outbreak in Wuhan to the shutdown of Hubei province and the containment measures taken across its major cities. Sharing insights into how the culture in places like Hong Kong and South Korea contributed to fast action against the virus, Liu identifies lessons people across the world can use to stop its spread. (This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. Recorded March 25, 2020)” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Download audio” and then “Save File” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus Cure 11 mins – “Examining the facts and figures of the coronavirus outbreak, epidemiologist Larry Brilliant evaluates the global response in a candid interview with head of TED Chris Anderson. Brilliant lays out a clear plan to end the pandemic — and shows why, to achieve it, we’ll have to work together across political and geographical divides. “This is not the zombie apocalypse; this is not a mass extinction event,” he says. “We need to be the best version of ourselves.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Download audio” and then “Save File” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus Knowledge 7 mins – “What happens if you get infected with the coronavirus? Who’s most at risk? How can you protect yourself? Public health expert David Heymann, who led the global response to the SARS outbreak in 2003, shares the latest findings about COVID-19 and what the future may hold. (Recorded February 27, 2020)” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download video” [no audio available] and select “Save File” to download the podcast.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Download audio” and then “Save File” to get the podcast.

Covid History 11 mins – “(Update: the CDC and international science community urge everyone to wear face coverings in public.) Where did the new coronavirus originate, how did it spread so fast — and what’s next? Sharing insights from the outbreak, global health expert and TED Fellow Alanna Shaikh traces the spread of COVID-19, discusses why travel restrictions aren’t effective and highlights the medical changes needed worldwide to prepare for the next pandemic. “We need to make sure that every country in the world has the capacity to identify new diseases and treat them,” she says. Recorded March 5, 2020” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download video” [no audio available] and select “Save File” to download the podcast.

Covid Tracking with Cellphones 17 mins – “As COVID-19 continues to spread, the world is facing two existential threats at once: a public health emergency and an economic crisis. Political theorist Danielle Allen describes how we can ethically and democratically address both problems by scaling up “smart testing,” which would track positive cases with peer-to-peer software on people’s cell phones — so we can end the pandemic and get back to work. (This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and business curator Corey Hajim. Recorded April 6, 2020)

Covid19 and Supercomputers 29 mins – “Supercomputing power for Covid-19 solutions – The world’s most powerful supercomputers are being used for urgent investigations into the Sars-Cov-2 virus. Professor Peter Coveney from the UCL Centre for Computational Science is part of this consortium of hundreds of scientists across the globe, and tells Gareth how this phenomenal amount of computer power is already trying to identify potential treatments and vaccine candidates for Covid-19. Hot and Cold Cognition -Gareth and Bill meet Professor Barbara Sahakian at Cambridge University to discuss her work on hot and cold cognition. Cold cognition is the mechanics of AI. Hot cognition is what humans do so well – being able to empathise. So if we are to take AI to the next stage eg. interactive care robots, it is the hot cognition that needs to be developed – the social and emotional side of AI. Digital Radio Mondiale -DRM is the sister standard to DAB. DAB has taken off in the UK and other developed countries, but it is DRM that is becoming more popular in the developing world – India, Pakistan, China are all using it. Recently Brazil added their support for DRM. The key with DRM is that it digitises everything so we don’t need a new infrastructure for it and it can even act as a backup in disasters when other forms of communication fail.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Crisis Text Line 8 mins – “What if we could help people in crisis anytime, anywhere with a simple text message? That’s the idea behind Crisis Text Line, a free 24-hour service that connects people in need with trained, volunteer crisis counselors — “strangers helping strangers around the world, like a giant global love machine,” as cofounder and former CEO Nancy Lublin puts it. Learn more about their big plans to expand to four new languages, providing a third of the globe with crucial, life-saving support. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Deep Fakes 35 mins – “This week on Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Hany Farid, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, whose work focuses on analyzing and identifying altered photo and video—what’s known as digital image forensics. Recently, he has done work on deep fakes—realistic synthetic media in which a person’s likeness is altered to show them doing or saying something they never did or said. He’s also helped develop technology used by platforms to identify and remove material related to child sexual abuse. They talked about how dangerous deep fakes really are, how much of that danger is the technology itself and how much of it has to do with how big platforms amplify incendiary content, and whether platforms should moderate disinformation and misinformation in the same aggressive way they take down sexually abusive material.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Hany_Farid_on_Deep_Fakes.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deep Fakes 36 mins “Jack Goldsmith spoke with Harold Holzer, director of the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College, about his new book, “The Presidents vs. the Press: The Endless Battle Between the White House and the Media from the Founding Fathers to Fake News.” They discussed the long and interesting history of the contentious relationship between presidents and the press, and how President Trump’s relationship with journalists has many precedents and is not the low point in president-press relations. They also discussed the likely arc of the battle between the White House and the media after Trump leaves office.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Harold_Holzer_on_The_Presidents_vs_the_Press.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Death 32 mins – “This week Digital Planet explores digital death and how the COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to update our death rituals and move most of our grieving online. We hear from a listener whose mother passed away with her children by her side via Facetime and how they then moved their traditional American-Irish funeral practices online. In India people of all religions are facing huge disruptions to their traditional burials and are taking tech into their own hands to share their experiences. In some developed countries funeral businesses are using cutting edge tech including sophisticated recording set ups in places of worship to bring together mourners from across the world. People are moving more and more online not only with virtual memorials, RFID tags on gravestones and also ceremonies in gaming environments including Animal Crossing. And we find out more about the Reimagine Festival that’s about to start. The now virtual event explores death during COVID-19 and we see how people are determining their digital legacies after they die.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Digital Government 9 mins – ”What if you never had to fill out paperwork again? In Estonia, this is a reality: citizens conduct nearly all public services online, from starting a business to voting from their laptops, thanks to the nation’s ambitious post-Soviet digital transformation known as “e-Estonia.” One of the program’s experts, Anna Piperal, explains the key design principles that power the country’s “e-government” — and shows why the rest of the world should follow suit to eradicate outdated bureaucracy and regain citizens’ trust.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Disabled Person 6 mins – “In this deeply charming and humorous talk, DJ and self-professed pirate Tom Nash meditates on how facing adversity due to disability invited patience, ambition and pragmatism into his life in enlightening, unexpected ways. “We all have unique weaknesses,” he says. “If we’re honest about what they are, we can learn how to best take advantage of them.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Disinformation 31 mins – “This week on Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth miniseries on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke to Nina Jankowicz, a disinformation fellow at the Wilson Center, about her new book: “How to Lose the Information War: Russia, Fake News, and the Future of Conflict.” The book chronicles Nina’s journey around Europe, tracing down how information operations spearheaded by Russia have played out in countries in the former Soviet bloc, from Georgia to the Czech Republic. What do these case studies reveal about disinformation and how best to counter it—and how many of these lessons can be extrapolated to the United States? How should we understand the role of locals who get swept up in information operations, like the Americans who attended rallies in 2016 that were organized by a Russian troll farm? And what is an information war, anyway?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Dismantle Biases 8 mins – “More barriers exist now than at the end of World War II, says designer Alexandra Auer. And when you erect one wall, you unwittingly create a second — an “us” versus “them” partition in the mind that compromises our collective safety. With intriguing results from her social design project focused on two elementary schools separated by a fence, Auer encourages us to dismantle our biases and regain perspective on all the things we have in common.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio,” then “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Dr Fauci Interview 15 mins – “Beyond the near complete failure of U.S. federal leadership in combating the pandemic, one significant problem, according to Harvard epidemiologist Marc Lipsitch, has been the absence of consistent communication from nonpartisan experts. During the 2009 H1N1 influenza epidemic, he recalled, scientists and public health officials communicated daily with the public, offering nonpartisan advice. “The sidelining of all nonpartisan technical experts…has made it very hard for anyone to know what they should do,” Lipsitch said. That the administration has not just marginalized experts but has actively attempted to undermine their credibility has sown further confusion and distrust, a problem magnified by the many uncertainties surrounding SARS-CoV-2. But though President Donald Trump weaponizes scientific uncertainty and dismisses evidence of the virus’s widespread destruction, he is also exploiting a distrust in scientists that long predated his presidency….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Patent Problem 9 mins – “Between 2006 and 2016, the number of drug patents granted in the United States doubled — but not because there was an explosion in invention or innovation. Drug companies have learned how to game the system, accumulating patents not for new medicines but for small changes to existing ones, which allows them to build monopolies, block competition and drive prices up. Health justice lawyer Priti Krishtel sheds light on how we’ve lost sight of the patent system’s original intent — and offers five reforms for a redesign that would serve the public and save lives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Economic Future 55 mins – “Is the future of our economy scary? Exciting? MIT research scientist Andrew McAfee argues that it’s both. (Audio only)” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evolutionary Medicine 11 mins – “How does your genetic inheritance, culture and history influence your health? Biological anthropologist Lara Durgavich discusses the field of evolutionary medicine as a gateway to understanding the quirks of human biology — including why a genetic mutation can sometimes have beneficial effects — and emphasizes how unraveling your own evolutionary past could glean insights into your current and future health.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Facial Recognition 32 mins – “…what’s the future for the tech with the big names pulling out? Most of the big tech companies have now declared they will not sell facial recognition tech to police, but will this mean that police forces will stop using this tech? There are many smaller companies that have so far not declared their intentions and others are clearly breaking the few regulations in place by using people’s images without consent. It’s widely known that facial recognition technology is racially and sexually biased, and there is little, if any, evidence that this tech does help to reduce crime levels. Dr.Stephanie Hare discusses what might now happen with this tech. Online gambling surge during COVID-19 – Lockdowns are making many players and gamblers move to online gambling platforms, the big issue here is that they do not come under strict regulations like their real world counterparts. Silvia Lazzaris and Katie Kropshofer report on this growing problem. Can you protect a rising number of online gamblers, many of whom suffer from addiction and are bunkered in their homes, from targeted advertising and fraud? And how can regulation catch up with this sudden shift to the online world? Will gaze tech replace touch tech in times of the pandemic? – As computer processing speeds continue to increase, so does the versatility and accuracy of gaze tech – using your eyes instead of a computer mouse or touchpad. Dr. David Souto, from the University of Leicester, explains that as our eye muscles do not tire this technology has untapped benefits. His work is part of the British Academy Virtual Summer Showcase which goes live online this week.” At the link left-click “Lower quality,” then right-click “Save File” to get the podcast.

Facial Recognition Software 32 mins – “Facial recognition – what’s the future for the tech with the big names pulling out? Most of the big tech companies have now declared they will not sell facial recognition tech to police, but will this mean that police forces will stop using this tech? There are many smaller companies that have so far not declared their intentions and others are clearly breaking the few regulations in place by using people’s images without consent. It’s widely known that facial recognition technology is racially and sexually biased, and there is little, if any, evidence that this tech does help to reduce crime levels. Dr.Stephanie Hare discusses what might now happen with this tech.

Fake News 31 mins – “This week on Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth miniseries on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke to Nina Jankowicz, a disinformation fellow at the Wilson Center, about her new book: “How to Lose the Information War: Russia, Fake News, and the Future of Conflict.” The book chronicles Nina’s journey around Europe, tracing down how information operations spearheaded by Russia have played out in countries in the former Soviet bloc, from Georgia to the Czech Republic. What do these case studies reveal about disinformation and how best to counter it—and how many of these lessons can be extrapolated to the United States? How should we understand the role of locals who get swept up in information operations, like the Americans who attended rallies in 2016 that were organized by a Russian troll farm? And what is an information war, anyway?” At the link right-click “Thu, 24 September 2020, Nina Jankowicz on ‘How to Lose the Information War’” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 32 mins – “On this week’s episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek spoke with Craig Silverman, the media editor for Buzzfeed News and one of the leading journalists covering the disinformation beat. Craig is credited with coining the phrase “Fake News.” Evelyn spoke with him about how he feels about that, especially now that the phrase has taken on a life of its own. They also talked about a book Craig edited, the second edition of the “Verification Handbook,” available online now, that equips journalists with the tools they need to verify the things they see online. Journalism and reporting on disinformation has never been so important—but the internet has never been so chaotic and journalists are not only observers of disinformation, but also targets of it.” At the link right-click “Thu, 14 May 2020 Craig Silverman on Real Reporting on Fake News” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 36 mins – “Jack Goldsmith spoke with Harold Holzer, director of the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College, about his new book, “The Presidents vs. the Press: The Endless Battle Between the White House and the Media from the Founding Fathers to Fake News.” They discussed the long and interesting history of the contentious relationship between presidents and the press, and how President Trump’s relationship with journalists has many precedents and is not the low point in president-press relations. They also discussed the likely arc of the battle between the White House and the media after Trump leaves office.” At the link right-click “25 August 2020, Harold Holzer on ‘The Presidents vs. the Press’” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GDP Failings 12 mins – “If you: do laundry, are (or have been) pregnant, tidy up, shop for your household or do similar labor, then by GDP standards, you’re unproductive. In this visionary talk, economist Marilyn Waring seeks to correct the failures of this narrow-minded system, detailing why we deserve a better way to measure growth that values not just our own livelihood but the planet’s as well.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” then “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Guest Worker 7 mins – “The United States can create a more humane immigration system; in fact, it’s been done before, says policy analyst David J. Bier. Pointing to the historical success of the US guest worker program, which allows foreign workers to legally enter and work in the country, Bier shows why expanding the program to Central Americans could alleviate the border crisis and provide new opportunities for immigrants.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” then “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Hate Panel Discussion 40 mins – “Sounds Like Hate is a new podcast from the Southern Poverty Law Center that focuses on the stories of people and communities grappling with hate and searching for solutions. Each two-part chapter, divided into 40-minute parts, takes a deep dive into the realities of hate in modern America: how it functions, how it spreads, who is affected and what people are doing about it. These are human stories. You will meet people who have been personally touched by hate, hear their voices and be immersed in the sounds of their world. You will learn about the power of people to change – or to succumb to their worst instincts. And you will hear about ways that people across the country are becoming change agents in their own communities.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Health Coaches 5 mins – “There’s no shortage of resources to help people change their health behaviors — but far too often, these resources aren’t accessible in underserved communities, says physician Priscilla Pemu. Enter “culturally congruent coaching,” a program Pemu and her team developed to help patients with chronic diseases monitor their health with the assistance of a coach from their community. Learn more about how this approach transcends language and cultural barriers — and could potentially transform health care in America.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” then “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Internet Scammers 26 mins – “Cyber criminals use online forums to sell stolen identity information and other illicit goods. Alex Kigerl, a criminologist at Washington State University explains how a recent leak from two such forums allowed him to identify different types of criminals, with implications for online policing. Migrant money – The pandemic has made it harder for migrants to send money home, forcing some to use criminal networks to avoid expensive bank fees. But new digital platforms are creating safer and cheaper options – as Digital Planet reporters Benjamin Breitegger and Katharina Kropshofer find out. Frictech – Imagine being able to pay with nothing more than a smile – frictionless technology (frictech) aims to make financial transactions as smooth and easy as that. Anders Hartington from Sao Paulo based firm Unike Technologies gives listeners a vision of the future from this fast developing technology.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Internet Structure Safety 34 mins – “The Internet Society has created a way of checking how new regulations could harm the structure of the internet. As the internet doesn’t respect borders, what happens in one country can impact the internet in another. The internet can sustain one or two attacks but many at the same time could even bring it down. Until now there has been no way of predicting how such changes could affect the internet’s architecture. The new toolkit also identifies the critical properties that must be protected to enable the Internet to reach its full potential. EEG that works with Black African American hair – Measuring brain activity can be done using Electroencephalograms, or EEGs. These rely on a number of electrodes being attached to the scalp and the tests are used to diagnose diseases like epilepsy. However if the electrodes are not attached to the scalp properly then getting accurate readings is very hard. This is a problem for people with thick and very curly hair – with some patients having to shave their hair for the test. Now Arnelle Etienne, a student at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, has designed electrodes that suit her hair type – she is African American and hopes her design will significantly improve test results for patients like her. Buddy PKGE – tech to monitor animal vital signs -Harrison Lewis reports on a device capable of measuring animal vital signs that is being adapted to save human lives. The non-invasive tech could help sniffer dogs find people following natural disasters, alerting the handler as soon as dog detects a human heartbeat.” At the link left-click “Lower quality,” then right-click “Save File” to get the podcast.

Internet Trolls 10 mins – “Journalist Andrew Marantz spent three years embedded in the world of internet trolls and social media propagandists, seeking out the people who are propelling fringe talking points into the heart of conversation online and trying to understand how they’re making their ideas spread. Go down the rabbit hole of online propaganda and misinformation — and learn we can start to make the internet less toxic.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Just Legal System 10 mins – “Pardons, commutations and bankruptcy laws are all tools of forgiveness within the US legal system. Are we using them frequently enough, and with fairness? Law professor Martha Minow outlines how these merciful measures can reinforce racial and economic inequality — and makes the case for creating a system of restorative justice that focuses on accountability and reconciliation rather than punishment.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Kenya Corruption 8 mins – “Corruption is a constant threat in Kenya, says social entrepreneur Wanjira Mathai — and to stop it there (or anywhere else), we need to intervene early. Following the legacy of her mother, political activist and Nobel Prize recipient Wangari Maathai, Mathai shares three strategies to uproot a culture of corruption by teaching children and young people about leadership, purpose and integrity.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Legal Identity 6 mins – “More than a billion people worldwide, mostly children, do not have a legal identity. In many countries, this means they can’t get access to vital services like health care and education, says legal identity expert Kristen Wenz. She discusses why this problem is one of the greatest human rights violations of our time — and shares five strategies to ensure everyone can get registered and protected.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Menstruation 12 mins – “’It shouldn’t be an act of feminism to know how your body works,’ says gynecologist and author Jen Gunter. In this revelatory talk, she explains how menstrual shame silences and represses — and leads to the spread of harmful misinformation and the mismanagement of pain. Declaring the era of the menstrual taboos over, she delivers a clear, much-needed lesson on the once-mysterious mechanics of the uterus.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Monarch Butterfly Preservation 8 mins – “Monarch butterflies are dying at an alarming rate around the world — a looming extinction that could also put human life at risk. But we have just the thing to help save these insects, says author Mary Ellen Hannibal: citizen scientists. Learn how these grassroots volunteers are playing a crucial role in measuring and rescuing the monarch’s dwindling population — and how you could join their ranks to help protect nature. (You’ll be in good company: Charles Darwin was a citizen scientist!)” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Download Video” [no audio is available] to get the podcast.

Monica Lewinsky 15 mins – “Monica Lewinsky reveals the very personal price to public humiliation and explores how we can all do better. (Audio only)” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Monkeyomics 14 mins – “Laurie Santos looks for the roots of human irrationality by watching the way our primate relatives make decisions. A clever series of experiments in “monkeynomics” shows that some of the silly choices we make, monkeys make too.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Productivity 11 mins – “The more we rely on technology to make us efficient, the fewer skills we have to confront the unexpected, says writer and entrepreneur Margaret Heffernan. She shares why we need less tech and more messy human skills — imagination, humility, bravery — to solve problems in business, government and life in an unpredictable age. “We are brave enough to invent things we’ve never seen before,” she says. ‘We can make any future we choose.’” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Psychedelic-assisted Psychotherapy 11 mins – “Could psychedelics help us heal from trauma and mental illnesses? Researcher Rick Doblin has spent the past three decades investigating this question, and the results are promising. In this fascinating dive into the science of psychedelics, he explains how drugs like LSD, psilocybin and MDMA affect your brain — and shows how, when paired with psychotherapy, they could change the way we treat PTSD, depression, substance abuse and more.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

QAnon Explained 35 mins – “This week on Lawfare’s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Ben Collins and Brandy Zadrozny, reporters at NBC News. Writing at NBCNews.com, they report on disinformation and misinformation in health and politics. Their work covers a lot of ground, but for this episode, they discussed one increasingly prominent issue on that beat: QAnon, a conspiracy theory built around anonymous posts on an internet forum claiming that Donald Trump is waging war against a deep state and a vast network of child sex traffickers. The conspiracy theory has inspired acts of violence and is becoming increasingly mainstream, with several candidates for U.S. Congress being QAnon believers. They talked about how QAnon started, why we need to take it seriously and how the internet—and big technology platforms—have allowed the theory to spread.” At the link right-click “Thu, 6 August 2020, Ben Collins and Brandy Zadrozny Explain Qanon” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism 10 mins – “Racism makes our economy worse — and not just in ways that harm people of color, says public policy expert Heather C. McGhee. From her research and travels across the US, McGhee shares startling insights into how racism fuels bad policymaking and drains our economic potential — and offers a crucial rethink on what we can do to create a more prosperous nation for all. ‘Our fates are linked,” she says. “It costs us so much to remain divided.’” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Remote Working 4 mins – “As the popularity of remote working continues to spread, workers today can collaborate across cities, countries and even multiple time zones. How does this change office dynamics? And how can we make sure that all employees, both at headquarters and at home, feel connected? Matt Mullenweg, cofounder of WordPress and CEO of Automattic (which has a 100 percent distributed workforce), shares his secrets.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Rwanda Women 8 mins – “In 1996, Agnes Binagwaho returned home to Rwanda in the aftermath of its genocide. She considered leaving amid the overwhelming devastation, but women in her community motivated her to stay and help rebuild — and she’s glad she did. In an inspiring talk, Binagwaho reflects on her work as Rwanda’s former Minister of Health and discusses her new women’s education initiative for the country, which strives to create one of the greatest levels of gender equality worldwide.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Download Video” [no audio is available] to get the podcast.

Safety, Respect, Truth 12 mins – “Pat Mitchell has nothing left to prove and much less to lose — she’s become a “dangerous woman.” Not dangerous as in feared, she says, but fearless: a force to be reckoned with. In this powerful call to action, Mitchell invites all women, men and allies to join her in embracing the risks necessary to create a world where safety, respect and truth burn brighter than the darkness of our current times.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Salman Kahn 19 mins – “Sal Khan worked as a hedge-fund analyst before he set up the Khan Academy, almost by accident, when his cousin in another city needed help with her maths homework. Since then, his online video lessons have been watched half a billion times, and he’s been described by Bill Gates as ‘the world’s favourite teacher’. In this programme, Sal Khan talks about how and why he set up the not-for-profit organisation. He tells Sarah Montague why he believes lesson time in school could be spent more effectively if the explanation of new ideas is done at home, with students watching video lectures, in a process known as ‘flipped learning’. He argues that pupils should have the freedom to move at their own pace, only moving on when they have mastered a concept. He says this type of learning would be done best in larger classes made up of students from mixed age groups and abilities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Scammers Scamming 26 mins – “(Dis)honour amongst thieves – Cyber criminals use online forums to sell stolen identity information and other illicit goods. Alex Kigerl, a criminologist at Washington State University explains how a recent leak from two such forums allowed him to identify different types of criminals, with implications for online policing. Migrant money – The pandemic has made it harder for migrants to send money home, forcing some to use criminal networks to avoid expensive bank fees. But new digital platforms are creating safer and cheaper options – as Digital Planet reporters Benjamin Breitegger and Katharina Kropshofer find out. Frictech – Imagine being able to pay with nothing more than a smile – frictionless technology (frictech) aims to make financial transactions as smooth and easy as that. Anders Hartington from Sao Paulo based firm Unike Technologies gives listeners a vision of the future from this fast developing technology.” At the link left-click “Lower quality,” then right-click “Save File” to get the podcast.

Sleep Value 13 mins – “A good night’s sleep has perhaps never been more important. Sharing wisdom and debunking myths, sleep scientist Matt Walker discusses the impact of sleep on mind and body — from unleashing your creative powers to boosting your memory and immune health — and details practices you can start (and stop) doing tonight to get some rest. (This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. Recorded April 1, 2020)” At the link left-click “Download,” select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Social Interest in Africa 8 mins – “What if you could repay loans through volunteering and mentorship instead of money? Activist Angie Murimirwa shares how a game-changing economic tool known as “social interest” is reinvigorating sub-Saharan communities once trapped in cycles of poverty. Join her as she explains how this approach to lending is creating opportunities for thousands of African women and girls — and shows why this model can be replicated anywhere with lasting effects.” At the link left-click “Download,” select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Stubborn Optimism 12 mins – “When it comes to big life problems, we often stand at a crossroads: either believe we’re powerless against great change, or we rise to meet the challenge. In an urgent call to action, political strategist Tom Rivett-Carnac makes the case for adopting a mindset of “stubborn optimism” to confront climate change — or whatever crisis may come our way — and sustain the action needed to build a regenerative future. As he puts it: “Stubborn optimism can fill our lives with meaning and purpose.” At the link left-click “Download,” select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Teacher Quality 18 mins – “Studies have shown that the most important thing in a child’s education is the quality of their teacher. A child at a bad school with a good teacher can learn more than someone at a good school getting bad tuition. Doug Lemov has trained thousands of teachers in the UK in how to use their classroom time effectively – keeping children focused with the most subtle of techniques and gestures. His work is based on identifying the most successful teachers in the world, filming them, and studying their methods. He believes that weak teachers can be turned into strong performers, and that the children who benefit most a well-run classroom are those from the most disadvantaged families.” At the link left-click “Download,” select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Testing Education Technology 29 mins – “Across the globe, learning has been transformed over the last few months, often with the help of specialised tech. More and more educational technology, or EdTech for short, is entering the market. But how do governments, schools, and teachers know which tools and platforms to use? And how do countries with limited resources choose the best tech for their needs? Gareth is joined by Joysy John from NESTA and Susan Nicolai, from the Edtech Hub, to find out. Bot or not? – With so many of us socialising and working online it becomes more important than ever to know whether we are talking to a real person or a computer-generated bot. A study from Carnegie Mellon University showed that 45.5% of users tweeting about coronavirus have bot characteristics. A new Mozilla-funded project called “Bot or Not” invites visitors to take part in a modern-day Turing test. One of the creators, Agnes Cameron, tells us about the project, bots online, and how to spot them. Lockdown views – As many people are forced to stay at home we look at how some are using tech to keep looking out on the world. Many are flocking to online webcams to observe serene nature scenes or unusually empty streets in the tourist hot spots of the world. Jacqui Kenny has long used Google Street View to visit foreign places due to her fear of open spaces. She talks about her new photobook and how machine learning may help her find new images to capture.” At the link left-click “Lower quality,” then right-click “Save File” to get the podcast.

Tobacco Use 12 – “The past, present and future of nicotine addiction…” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Turning Schools Around 18 mins – “Schools in England have been warned that if they coast, rather than improve, they risk being closed down. Sarah Montague meets the new head teachers of a Birmingham secondary school involved in the so-called Trojan Horse scandal. Golden Hillock School re-opened in September with new leadership, and became Ark Boulton Academy , where some of the students have seen four different head teachers in four years. Now, principals David Gould and Herminder Channa plan to take the school out of special measures and introduce higher expectations for students, staff and parents. Their promise to students is that they will learn everything they need to go on to university or a career of their choice, but it will require focus, discipline and hard work from students, staff and parents.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Uganda Businesses 7 mins – “What’s your passion? Social entrepreneur Noeline Kirabo reflects on her work helping out-of-school young people in Uganda turn their passions into profitable businesses — and shares the two questions you can ask yourself to begin doing the same.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio,” then “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Violence 16 mins – “You are more likely to die violently if you live in a middle-income democracy with high levels of inequality and political polarization than if you live in a country at war, says democracy advisor Rachel Kleinfeld. This historical shift in the nature of violence presents an opportunity for everyday voters to act as a great force for change in their unbalanced societies. In this eye-opening talk, Kleinfeld unravels the causes of violence and offers a path to security for the world’s deadliest countries.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Download Video” [no audio is available] to get the podcast.

Womens Rights Activist 8 mins – “There’s a simple and powerful way to confront the world’s most pressing crises, says women’s rights activist Yifat Susskind: think like a mother. As she puts it: “When you think like a mother, you prioritize the needs of the many, not

the whims of the few.” Follow along as she shares moving stories of people around the world who embody this mindset — and shows how it can also help you see beyond suffering and act to build a better world.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Worlds Best Teachers 19 mins – “Studies have shown that the most important thing in a child’s education is the quality of their teacher. A child at a bad school with a good teacher can learn more than someone at a good school getting bad tuition. Doug Lemov has trained thousands of teachers in the UK in how to use their classroom time effectively – keeping children focused with the most subtle of techniques and gestures. His work is based on identifying the most successful teachers in the world, filming them, and studying their methods. He believes that weak teachers can be turned into strong performers, and that the children who benefit most a well-run classroom are those from the most disadvantaged families.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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