MMD459 Media Mining Digest: Afrofuturism, Agriculture and Drone Usage, Agriculture Hacking, Agriculture in India, Agriculture Indoors, Agriculture Regeneration, Agriculture Small Robot Use, Agriculture Technology, AI and Security, Audio and Video Forensics, Black in Russia, CO2 in Concrete, Computer Penetration Tests, Coronovirus Tech Handbook Online, Covid-19 Stories, Diversity Visa Lottery, Economic Future, Emergency Care Systems, Ethiopia Internet Censorship, Fake News, Food Security, Grief, Hong Kong Life, Identity Theft Resources for Lawyer, Kidney Transplants, Liver Cancer, Muscular Dystrophy Story, Nano Engineering, Nigerian Internet, Pancreas vs Islet Transplantation, Power from Waste Water, Ranching Startups, Troll Tracking, Turkey Lifestyle, Ultrasound in Low Resource Settings, US President Covid-19, Uyghur Story, Vietnam Intelligence Agent, Water Scarcity, Windows Encryption, Working Remotely for Lawyers, Uyghur Story

Exercise your ears: the 52 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 666 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,800 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Agriculture and Drone Usage 29 mins – “We made it to episode 200! Drones have become a sort of symbol for modern ag technology whether over-hyped or legitimate. Michael Ott, CEO of Rantizo, proves that there is little room to be a drone skeptic anymore. Rantizo uses drones with a ten foot boom sprayer to spray, seed and sometimes even pollinate crops. Their main customers are retailers interested in expanding their territory by virtue of ease of application and mobility of equipment. We can get into fields where nobody else can….We’re doing a demo tomorrow, it’s going to be super sloppy and muddy. That’s totally fine. We can get out and apply in those situations.” – Michael Ott The inputs carried by the drone are tailored to keep its weight below 55 pounds. At this weight, Michael says he “can train pretty much anyone to be an operator” through a 2-3 day course. The drone flies itself requiring the operator to only hold the controller rather than actively maneuver the drone. The light weight does result in multiple trips to refill tanks to be able to cover a field. But in this instance that doesn’t serve as a disadvantage. Using this technology enables the farmer to precisely deliver the inputs to specific areas in the field that require them.” At the link right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Food Companies 21 mins – “Michael Bosworth is the President & CEO of Next Generation Foods, a food business that markets and distributes locally produced foods in the Northern California area. Brent Lafollette, Martin Miller, and Robert James Woodry are 5th generation farmers and the founders of Premium Growers, a company that produces and sells a variety of flavored, premium roasted Oregon Hazelnuts. They are some of the many farmers who transitioned from being producers to direct-to-consumer retailers. Michael joins me today to share his company’s humble beginnings. He explains how he puts a price tag on his products and how much of his farm is dedicated to retail. He also describes the benefits of going to food shows. Brent, Martin, and Robert discuss why they decided to start a hazelnut company. They share the effort it took to get their company up and running. They also describe the marketing process involved with their hazelnuts.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Hacking 26 mins – “Michael Stenta is the software developer and owner of farmOS, a web-based app used for planning, record keeping, and general farm management. What sets farmOS apart from other apps is its open-source nature. This means the app can be tweaked or fixed by virtually any contributor. To take advantage of its open-source nature, Michael also created Farmier, a platform that makes it easy for farmers to update or host their farmOS systems. Michael joins me today to discuss what farmOS is, its purpose, and why he decided to develop it. He shares where his passion for programming came from and what inspired him to apply his skills to the ag industry. He explains the unique aspects of creating an app that is open-source by nature and some of the benefits and risks involved with open-source platforms. Michael also describes what the farmOS community is like and the onboarding process involved with using the app.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture in India 26 mins – “Mark Kahn is the Managing Partner of Omnivore, an India-based venture capital firm specifically focusing on funding entrepreneurs who are working to advance agriculture and food systems. Before this role, Mark served as the Executive Vice President of Strategy and Business Development at Godrej Agrovet and Strategy Manager of Syngenta. Mark earned his MBA from Harvard Business School and has extensive experience in rural marketing, corporate strategy, product development, research and development, mergers and acquisitions, and new business incubation. Mark joins me today to discuss his business, Omnivore, and share his insights on the agritech landscape in India. He shares differences between the makeup of the agricultural sectors in India versus the United States, including how the family dynamic plays a role in certain Indian aspects of agriculture such as dairy farming. Mark also explains impact investing, and what Omnivore looks for when it comes to choosing which start-ups to invest in.” At the link right-click “FOA 197: Agritech in India Apr 22, 2020” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Indoors 25 mins – “Jim Pantaleo is a renowned expert and consultant for Indoor Vertical Farming and offers ag companies sound and technical advice on best practices. Some of his services include performing market research and business development work. Other than companies, Jim also works with different universities such as the University of Arizona, UC Davis, and the University of Santa Barbara. He also enjoys writing about indoor vertical farming and regularly speaks at ag-related conventions. Jim joins me today to describe how indoor vertical farming will change the way we look at sustainable food sources. He shares the current technology available for indoor vertical farming and what we can expect in the next few years. He discusses the myths about soil nutrition and crops regarding indoor environments. Jim also explains why the ag industry is experiencing its own version of the Dot Com era.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Agriculture Regeneration 24 mins – “Today’s episode is the deepest dive I’ve done to date into the world of regenerative agriculture. You’ll probably be able to hear it in my voice in the interview, but this one had me on the edge of my seat the entire time. In fact I think the conversation just gets more and more interesting the deeper we get into it.  If you’re new to the concept of regenerative agriculture, some previous episodes in which we discuss the concepts are episodes 44, 64, 109, 135, 182, and 199. My viewpoint on regenerative agriculture since I first was introduced to the concept a few years ago is somewhere in between “cautious optimism” and maybe skepticism. I’m certainly not skeptical about the importance of soil health. I think you’ve heard that from me a lot on this show, and certainly you have if you listen to Soil Sense, one of the other podcasts that I host. But some of the – what I’ll call hype associated with regenerative ag have left me asking a lot of questions. …I couldn’t be more impressed with our guest we have on the show today to talk about these issues. Paige Stanley is a finishing PhD candidate at UC Berkeley, who works at the intersection of rangeland ecology and soil science. ….This master’s program furthered her interest in soil carbon sequestration in grazing lands; how it might reduce greenhouse gas emissions, provide ecosystem services, improving animal welfare, and improving rural livelihoods. That led her to her work today at UC Berkeley. I’m going to let her describe it to you, but first a quick definition: you’ll hear regenerative grazing called AMP grazing in this episode. That stands for adaptive multi-paddock grazing, you may have heard of it as mob grazing. Essentially this is controlled and intensive grazing that is rotated across sections or paddocks of a field. For more on that  go way back to episodes 44 or 64.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Agriculture Small Robot Use 36 mins – “Sam Watson Jones is a fourth-generation farmer and the co-founder of Small Robot Company, an agri-tech startup firm that specializes in advancing agriculture through artificial intelligence and robotics. Specifically, Small Robot Company uses precision agriculture to promote efficiency over speed. Sam is also a director of his family’s farming, house building, and manufacturing business, Howle Manor Group. Sam joins me today to discuss a different way of looking at precision agriculture and how his brand, Small Robot Company, is making waves in the agricultural industry. He shares some insights on agricultural technology entrepreneurship as well as current trends in agriculture. Sam also highlights how his brand’s technology enables per plant precision agriculture as well as his vision for the future of farming.” At the link right-click “FOA 196: Changing Agriculture with Small Robots, Mar 11, 2020,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Startup Strategy 24 mins – “Matthew Pryor joins us today as not only a partner in AgThentic, an Australian based food, and ag sustainability and innovation consulting firm, but also as a co-founder of Tenacious Ventures, a food and ag venture capital firm that just closed their first fund of nearly $30 million. As though that wasn’t enough, Matthew has already successfully exited two different startups. To say he has his finger on the pulse of ag innovation, sustainability and company start-ups is putting it mildly.  In this episode, we discuss Matthew’s rise to success from an entrepreneurial point of view beginning with his first company, Observant. Observant is a company that was born from an issue of water management for cattle in remote areas of Australia. Matthew was solving this water management problem with “bespoke micro-electronics” that they were building themselves.” At the link right-click “FOA 201: AgTech Startup Strategy with Matthew Pryor Apr 15, 2020,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Tech Startups 21 mins – “Micki Seibel is an investor, advisor, and tech builder who was part of the team behind internet products such as Netscape and eBay. She is currently an Operating Partner for Radicle Growth, an acceleration fund that partners with entrepreneurs who have ideas that can innovate the future of food. She has over 20 years of experience in building companies and has made much of it at Silicon Valley. Micki also serves on the advisory board of multiple food system startup companies such as Swarm Technologies. Micki joins me today to share how Radicle Growth is helping startups in the AgTech industry. She discusses the goals of Radicle Growth, their criteria when selecting companies to fund, and the ideas that they want to promote. She describes her career in Silicon Valley and how it led her to be part of the food industry. Micki also explains the effects of climate change on the ag economy and ag innovations.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Technology 21 mins – “CEO Randy Barker joins me to share some high-level thoughts on customer adoption. He told me it all starts with the farmer, and the recognition that all farmers are different…Collaborator Chad Rubbelke is a farmer in Central North Dakota who is a great example of someone who is the right type of collaborative, intelligent, and curious farmer collaborator any company would want to work with. Along with Chad, we talk with John Grandin, who is the National Agronomy Coordinator for Compass Minerals, which is an industry-leading plant nutrient company.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

AI and Security 22 mins – “From manufacturing to healthcare, and from criminal justice to national security, artificial intelligence is changing nearly every sector of the global economy and many aspects of our public and private lives. And as artificial intelligence technology races ahead, its political, legal, and ethical considerations cannot be left undiscussed. Last Tuesday, as part of the A. Alfred Taubman Forum on Public Policy, James Baker, Susan Hennessey, and Scott Tousley joined John Allen at the Brookings Institution to discuss the opportunities AI offers and the challenges it presents to security.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Audio and Video Forensics 35 mins – “This week on Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Hany Farid, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, whose work focuses on analyzing and identifying altered photo and video—what’s known as digital image forensics. Recently, he has done work on deep fakes—realistic synthetic media in which a person’s likeness is altered to show them doing or saying something they never did or said. He’s also helped develop technology used by platforms to identify and remove material related to child sexual abuse. They talked about how dangerous deep fakes really are, how much of that danger is the technology itself and how much of it has to do with how big platforms amplify incendiary content, and whether platforms should moderate disinformation and misinformation in the same aggressive way they take down sexually abusive material.” At the link right-click “Hany Farid on Deep Fakes, Doctored Photos and Disinformation,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black in Russia 43 mins – “People looking everywhere to find a place—any place—where, for once, they don’t have to be the odd man out. Emanuele Berry and Ira Glass watch a Soviet film from 1936. A bizarre cameo of an African American baby in an all-white crowd makes Emanuele wonder about what it’s like to be black in a country with so few black people. (7 minutes) Yelena Khanga grew up in Russia knowing almost no other black people. Emanuele Berry asks Yelena what that was like. As Emanuele learns about it, she realizes something about being black in America, too. (22 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CO2 in Concrete 19 mins – “Concrete is the most used man-made product in the world but it comes with a heavy environmental price. Between 5% and 7% of the world’s annual carbon emissions come from producing the cement that glues concrete together. Most of these climate-changing gases are released when a vital ingredient, limestone, is melted down in the manufacturing process. But one company has devised a new type of cement that only solidifies when you pump carbon dioxide into it. The gas becomes locked in as it turns to concrete. This is similar to the way carbon dioxide has been stored in rocks by nature over millions of years. As Nick Holland reports, it’s one of the solutions the industry could use to mitigate its impact on the environment.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Computer Penetration Tests 16 mins – “The upheaval caused by Covid-19 could very well have put your firm at risk for a data breach. Lawyers can’t simply hope they won’t become a target for hackers. Taking steps to maintain your security is your ethical obligation and vital to your clients’ security. John Simek and Sharon Nelson talk with Mike Maschke about how to assess your cybersecurity and the role of penetration tests in discovering weaknesses in your systems.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Coronovirus Tech Handbook Online 25 mins – “In these unprecedented times of a global pandemic many people are working or studying from home, doctors are facing new challenges, so medical equipment is in short supply – how do deal with this? Perhaps check the coronavirus tech as a shared open source online document where anyone can post their experiences or advice. Open source tech for COVID-1- A 3d printed ventilator that could be used for COVID-19 patients could be ready by the end of the week. An open source project has led to a collaboration of IT professionals and engineers to work on the project. Developing responsible AI – Cultural anthropologist Genevieve Bell joins us on the programme to talk about developing AI safely and responsibly. She’s cofounded an innovation institute – the 3Ai Institute at the Australian National University and is looking for new students from around the world to apply.” At the link left-click “Lesser Quality,” then right-click “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Covid 19 Stories 52 mins – “Michigan has passed its Covid-19 peak, and the state has started opening up. But it’s still been intensely difficult for the staff in the ICU at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. We’ve embedded with them over the past few months, and tracked how this pandemic has changed them and their city. We meet the doctors. Rana Awdish spends hours of each day walking the floors of the ICU checking in on her co-workers, which means that maybe more than any single person in the hospital she knows best what the staff has been going through at each stage of this pandemic. One doctor that has deep ties to Detroit is Geneva Tatem. She’s one of the few Black doctors in the ICU and has a deep awareness of what Covid-19 has done to families in the city. (13 minutes) When it comes to caring for Covid-19 patients, it’s the nurses who are carrying the heaviest burden. Ben Calhoun spent weeks talking to the nurses in the first Covid-19 unit to open in the ICU – Pod 4. (17 minutes) We found out about a patient from a recording made by young doctor named Stan Linder. Producer Emanuele Berry put this together. It begins with a voice memo Stan recorded for us on his phone. (10 minutes) Robert Granger was a patient in Pod 4 for several weeks. During that time, his daughter learns something about him she’d never realized before. (12 minutes) Some of the first Covid-19 patients to arrive at Henry Ford Hospital were police and others who’d attended a community breakfast in early March called Police and Pancakes. Aaron K. Foley has this story of this breakfast and of one man — Marlowe Stoudamire — who ended up at Henry Ford. (20 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Diversity Visa Lottery – “We return to our story about Abdi Nor from 2015, with some big news about his life today. When we first broadcast the story, Abdi was a Somali refugee living in Kenya desperately trying – against long odds – to get to the United States. Then he got the luckiest break of his life: he won a lottery that puts him on a short list for a U.S. visa. But before he could cash in his golden ticket, the police started raiding his neighborhood, targeting refugees. We return to our story about Abdi Nor from 2015, with some big news about his life today. When we first broadcast the story, Abdi was a Somali refugee living in Kenya desperately trying – against long odds – to get to the United States. Then he got the luckiest break of his life: he won a lottery that puts him on a short list for a U.S. visa. But before he could cash in his golden ticket, the police started raiding his neighborhood, targeting refugees. Three weeks ago, Abdi Nor became a U.S. citizen, in a ceremony in Maine. We go to the ceremony, and then head back in time to 2013, when he won a visa under the Diversity Visa Lottery. It turns out winning the lottery is only the first step in trying to come to America. More than half of the people who win each year never make it. Abdi is living in Nairobi, Kenya, when he wins, and as he’s trying to prepare for his interview at the U.S. Embassy, Kenyan police start relentlessly raiding his neighborhood, rounding up Somalis and taking them away. So Abdi goes into hiding in his apartment. Leo Hornak spoke to Abdi almost every night while this was happening, to find out if Abdi would evade the police and make it to America. (17 minutes) Abdi has a memoir called “Call Me American.”  Leo Hornak’s story about Abdi continues. Abdi encounters one obstacle after another on the streets of Nairobi. And finally, the moment of truth comes: his embassy interview. (31 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diversity Visa Lottery 43 mins – “We return to our story about Abdi Nor from 2015, with some big news about his life today. When we first broadcast the story, Abdi was a Somali refugee living in Kenya desperately trying – against long odds – to get to the United States. Then he got the luckiest break of his life: he won a lottery that puts him on a short list for a U.S. visa. But before he could cash in his golden ticket, the police started raiding his neighborhood, targeting refugees. Three weeks ago, Abdi Nor became a U.S. citizen, in a ceremony in Maine. We go to the ceremony, and then head back in time to 2013, when he won a visa under the Diversity Visa Lottery. It turns out winning the lottery is only the first step in trying to come to America. More than half of the people who win each year never make it. Abdi is living in Nairobi, Kenya, when he wins, and as he’s trying to prepare for his interview at the U.S. Embassy, Kenyan police start relentlessly raiding his neighborhood, rounding up Somalis and taking them away. So Abdi goes into hiding in his apartment. Leo Hornak spoke to Abdi almost every night while this was happening, to find out if Abdi would evade the police and make it to America. (17 minutes) Leo Hornak’s story about Abdi continues. Abdi encounters one obstacle after another on the streets of Nairobi. And finally, the moment of truth comes: his embassy interview. (31 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Future 55 mins – “Where does wealth come from, who creates it and what destroys it? In this deep dive into global economics, Mariana Mazzucato explains how we lost sight of what value means and why we need to rethink our current financial systems — so capitalism can be steered toward a bold, innovative and sustainable future that works for all of us.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Emergency Care Systems 36 mins – “Dr. Andi Tenner, Co-Director, UCSF WHO Collaborating Centre for Emergency and Trauma Care, looks at emergency care systems needed to ensure care for the acutely ill and injured. Recorded on 03/30/2020. (#35576)” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ethiopian Internet Censorship 32 mins – “The internet shutdown in Ethiopia has been in place for 2 weeks now. – The Ethiopian Government cut internet connectivity following protests over the killing of singer and activist Hachalu Hundessa. The civil society group NetBlocks monitors connectivity around the world. Their Executive Director Alp Toker explains how by controlling mobile telecoms Ethiopian authorities are able to keep a tight grip on internet access. Researchers at Queen Mary University looked at the network traffic data generated by internet-connected home security cameras. Their work flagged up that hackers can get information about your daily routine without looking at any video content from the cameras. Dr Gareth Tyson, lead author of the study, explains how the rate at which cameras upload internet data can predict whether a house is occupied or not. BBC series Springwatch has been using automated wildlife cameras to record animals in areas of interest, such as Woodpecker nests across the UK. They have been training machine learning systems to only recognise when an activity is happening with a particular animal. Gareth speaks to senior BBC Research engineer, Robert Dawes to find out more.” At the link left-click “Lower quality” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 11 mins – “Fake news does not only disrupt society but also economy and the deep roots of democracy. Sometimes, their impact can even be measured in terms of people killed by the misinformation that it’s spread around. Sinan Aral, a scientist, entrepreneur and investor with a PhD in IT economics, applied econometrics and statistics, has run some of the largest randomised experiments in digital social networks like Facebook and Twitter to measure the impact of persuasive messages and peer influence on our economy, our society and our public health. Having conducted the most extensive longitudinal study of false news spread on Twitter, which was published on the cover of Science this March, Aral has proven that false news diffuses farther, faster, deeper, and more broadly than the truth online. But why? The answer will leave you astonished as the main cause for such an effective spread of false news is not bots, it’s…us. So, how can we be sure that something is real?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Food Security 25 mins – “What does food security mean? We hear about it frequently but this complex category involves much more than just assessing our agricultural capabilities. The main pillars of food security involve food affordability, food availability, food quality, food safety, and natural resource and resilience. One tool for evaluating where companies and governments land is provided in the Food Security Index Report performed by the Economist Intelligence Unit and sponsored by Corteva. Dana Bolden joins us today from Corteva where he acts as the Global Corporate Communications Leader. He shares the motivation behind creating the Food Security Index Report and the impact it could have.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, right-click “Save A” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Grief 10 mins – “In a talk that’s by turns heartbreaking and hilarious, writer and podcaster Nora McInerny shares her hard-earned wisdom about life and death. Her candid approach to something that will, let’s face it, affect us all, is as liberating as it is gut-wrenching. Most powerfully, she encourages us to shift how we approach grief. “A grieving person is going to laugh again and smile again,” she says. “They’re going to move forward. But that doesn’t mean that they’ve moved on.” At the link left-click “Share,” then left-click “Download audio,” then left-click “Save file” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Hong Kong Life 49 mins – “As China’s new national security law tightens its control over Hong Kong, we return to our episode about last fall’s anti-government protests and check in to see how people are responding. Host Ira Glass explains how things have changed in Hong Kong this month, and wonders how things are going for a protester we’re calling Jennifer, who he went to protests with back in the fall. We start with what her life was like in September. (9 minutes) A bunch of 22-year-olds from Hong Kong explain why they are cursed and what that means for their and Hong Kong’s future. (17 minutes) Jennifer, Ira, and producer Emanuele Berry go to a protest and get tear gassed in front of a Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse. (6 minutes) A protestor who thinks the Hong Kong police are terrible has a chat with his dad — a police officer. Alan Yu reports. (12 minutes) Producer Diane Wu goes to a party. A Chinese flag party. (7 minutes) Host Ira Glass calls Jennifer to talk about the new security law. (12 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Humanitarian Community 36 mins – “Dr. Kayla Enriquez explores regions of the world suffering from humanitarian crises. She looks at the history of humanitarian aid and next steps for the humanitarian community, Recorded on 02/25/2020. (#35575)” At the link you can listen, but not record; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Identity Theft Resources for Lawyers 19 mins – “Identity theft doesn’t just apply to stolen credit cards or social security numbers. For attorneys, scammers can steal names and even bar numbers in order to trick consumers. In this episode of The Florida Bar Podcast, hosts Christine Bilbrey and Karla Eckardt talk to Shanell Schuyler about attorney identity theft scams, what they look like, and what both lawyers and clients can do to prevent them. For victims of identity theft, they also share resources within and outside of the Florida Bar that can help attorneys recover from and report identity theft.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Kashmir Internet Shutdown 31 mins – “On August 5, the Indian government announced that it was revoking “special status” for the states of Jammu and Kashmir, enshrined in Article 370 of its constitution. Since then, the government has instituted a lockdown in the Kashmir valley, hundreds of people have been detained, there have been mass protests, and tens of thousands of Indian troops have been deployed to the region. Professor Christine Fair of Georgetown University’s Security Studies Program sat down with Benjamin Wittes to discuss Article 370, its history, and the current state-of-play in the region.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_447.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kidney Transplants 37 mins – “The wait time for a kidney transplant from a deceased donor is many years. Dr. Brian Lee, Medical Director of the Living Kidney Donor Program at UCSF, discusses the risks and benefits of live donor kidney transplant, both for the donor and the recipient. He also talks about the importance of a crossmatch test and the National Kidney Registry and the Advanced Donor Program. Recorded on 10/23/2019. (#35232)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liver Cancer 39 mins – “Liver cancer is the 5th most common cancer worldwide, and the 3rd leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of primary liver cancer. Dr. Neil Mehta explores the risk factors, diagnosis and staging, and treatment decisions including surgery. Recorded on 11/13/2019. (#35235)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liver Transplants 39 mins – “Nationally, there are approximately 18,000 patients on the liver transplant list. Annually, about 6,000 patients receive a liver transplant. Because of the organ shortage, many patients waiting for liver transplants die on the list or become too sick to undergo transplant. Dr. John Roberts offers these solutions: expanded criteria donors, split livers and living donors. Recorded on 10/30/2019. (#35233)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muscular Dystrophy Story 61 mins – “When you’re the only one who can see something, sometimes it feels like you’re in on a special secret. The hard part is getting anyone to believe your secret is real. This week, people trying to show others what they see—including a woman with muscular dystrophy who believes she has the same condition as an Olympic athlete. Journalist David Epstein tells the story of Jill Viles, who has muscular dystrophy and can’t walk. But she believes that she somehow has same condition as one of the best hurdlers in the world, Priscilla Lopes-Schliep. (36 minutes) David Epstein is the author of The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance. Read more from David about Jill and Priscilla and see photos at ProPublica.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Nano Engineering 19 mins – “Cyber attack on Australia, Weird technology from the US Navy, by Ian Woolf, Nano-engineering molecular motors by Dr Shelley Wickham, Sound and facts checked by Charles Willock, Hosted and produced by Ian Woolf” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nigerian Internet 34 mins – “A major problem in laying internet cables in Nigeria is the phenomenal cost of right of way charges – these are local state imposed fees to broadband providers. Ekiti, one of Nigeria’s smallest states, has cut its right of way charges by 96%. It will now cost $374 to lay a kilometre of broadband cable down from $11,600. Tech reporter Yomi Kazeem joins us from Lagos and explains that Ekiti aims to have full broadband access by 2021. Superethics instead of superintelligence – Artificial intelligence research is striving towards creating machines that could surpass the human mind, but shouldn’t we focus on technologies that make us wiser instead of smarter? This is the central question in philosopher Pim Haselager’s most recent paper. He explains how we might use technology as moral crutches for ethical behaviour. Solar Batteries storage – Renewable technology accounted for a quarter of energy production globally in 2018. It’s expected to rise to 45% by 2040. At the end of last year, the Pavagada solar park, in Karnataka, India, became fully operational. Spanning 53 square kilometres, and with a capacity of over 2000 megawatts, this is the largest solar farm in the world. But basic limitations still exist – what can be done to supply electricity when there isn’t sufficient sunlight? Our reporter, Jason Hosken, has been finding out about some energy storage solutions.” At the link left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Pancreas vs Islet Transplantation 52 mins – “Dr. Peter Stock is Professor of Surgery at UCSF and heads up the solid organ pancreas transplant program as well as pancreatic islet cell program. He explores the pros and cons of pancreas transplant and discusses transplant islets, an alternative to whole organ transplants. Recorded on 11/20/2019. (#35236)” At the link left-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Power from Waste Water 19 mins – “Stories copy brain states by Ian Woolf, Qilin Wang generates power from waste water, Lachlan Whatmore tells the tale of Louis Pasteur, “A Little Bit” by MJ Hibbert and the Validators. Produced and hosted by Ian Woolf “ At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ranching Startups 27 mins – “Is it possible to become a rancher when you aren’t born into a land inheritance? Aimee Danch and Jeremiah Stent from Square Mile Ranch join us today to talk about their recent purchase of a 370-acre ranch in Wallowa, Oregon. Like people buy a fixer-upper home for their first one. We’re buying a fixer-upper ranch for our first one and we feel really excited about (it). -Jeremiah Stent  Both Jeremiah and Aimee have experience managing ranches across and even outside the country. Originally their goal was to manage livestock and land rather than own their own. They planned on being able to “sell semi truckloads of finished animals and get a paycheck.” But the allure of ownership, autonomy, personally contributing to a local community and being able to manage at their own discretion led them to start looking at land for sale. By pursuing services from the Farm Service Agency Joint Financing Program they were able to gain access to operating loans. Pairing that with an individual investor allowed them to take their first steps into ranch ownership. That’s what people think about farmers and ranchers buying land. They (think) they probably pay for it with what they’re going to grow there. But that’s not very common anymore” – Aimee Danch Despite working very long hours and needing to find supplemental income off the farm Aimee explains that their “quality of life is so high.” They enjoy the food they produce, the “amazing relations” with their neighbors, the “hands-on time with their daughter” and the control over their own schedule.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.  

Segregation in Schools 43 mins – “Years ago, producer Chana Joffe-Walt started reporting on one school in New York. She thought the story was about segregation and inequality in public schools. But the more she looked into it, the more she realized she was witnessing something else. She was seeing the inordinate power of white parents at this school. This is the first episode of Chana’s new mini-series: Nice White Parents.  When the trailer was released for Chana Joffe-Walt’s new show, it prompted a kind of online war. Within a week, people left thousands of ratings and comments: some saying it was divisive and racist; others saying the opposite. But nobody had even heard the show yet. Ira Glass talks about what the discussion illuminates about the show and about this moment. (2 minutes) In just one year, everything in one ordinary public middle school changed. It went from an incoming class of thirty sixth graders—most of them Black, Latino, and Middle Eastern—to a class of 103 sixth graders. The influx was driven by wealthy white students. Producer Chana Joffe-Walt follows how that works out. (29 minutes) As the school year moved forward, the fundraising committee planned a gala at the French Embassy. And the PTA planned a separate, Spring Carnival. Chana explains what happens as quiet resentments lock in place between the two groups of parents. (25 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Troll Tracking 28 mins – “How can we distinguish the online posts written by real people from those coming out of professional bot-farms intent on influencing elections? New research from Princeton University in America uses machine learning to identify malicious online trolls, even before they’ve sent a single tweet. Lead author Meysam Alizadeh explains the power of this work to protect voters in future elections. Gesture-controlled robots – Robots can now be controlled by a simple wave of your arm. Professor Daniela Rus from MIT explains how new research has simplified robot controls by using human movement rather than complicated systems of buttons and gear-sticks. The aim is to allow anyone to pilot a robot without requiring any training. Augmented surgery – Digital Planet’s Florian Bohr reports from Augmented World Expo USA to discover how the new field of spatial computing can be used in medicine. From doctors with x-ray spectacles to virtual reality surgery training, new visual technologies are promising a big impact on healthcare.” At the link left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Uber Strike in Kenya 40 mins – “Benjamen Walker of the podcast Theory of Everything tells guest host Sean Cole about an Uber drivers strike he came across in Kenya. The guys who didn’t join the strike and kept driving for Uber made extra money since there were fewer cars on the road. The strikers felt like it was impossible to beat Uber. But some of them knew a way. (10 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ultrasound in Low Resource Settings 38 mins – “Find out about the history and use of point-of-care ultrasound and how they are used in tropical/low resource environments with Dr. Sally Graglia. Recorded on 02/18/2020. (#35574)” At the link left-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Presidential COVID-19 23 mins – “Daniel Griffin discusses President Trump’s case of COVID-19, including the clinical course, the medications he received and why, and expectations for the next few weeks.”. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog.

Uyghur Story 42 mins – “Desperate to know what happened to his family, a man obsessively decodes the only information about them he can get. That, and other stories of people looking into the void for answers. A Phone Flickers in the Dark Abdurahman Tohti left his home country, China, behind 7 years ago to move to Turkey, safe from the Chinese regime that discriminates and arbitrarily detains Uyghurs, specifically, which Abdurahman is. Reporter Durrie Bouscaren talks to him about what happened to his wife and children and extended family in China, and the endless challenges he faces trying to be sure they are safe. (34 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Vietnam Intelligence Agent 56 mins – “In this DHP episode, CJ is joined by John Murphy and Michael Reiter, who are, respectively, the star and director of the extremely interesting documentary film Agents Unknown: A Vietnam War Intelligence Officer’s Story, which tells the story of John’s experience as a military intelligence officer in the Vietnam War. Join CJ, John, & Mike as they discuss John’s experiences in Vietnam and reflections on them, as well as the making of the film and the takeaways to be gleaned from it.” At the link left-click “Share,” then left-click the down-pointing arrow and select

Water Management 13 mins – “Matthew Pryor joins us today as not only a partner in AgThentic, an Australian based food, and ag sustainability and innovation consulting firm, but also as a co-founder of Tenacious Ventures, a food and ag venture capital firm that just closed their first fund of nearly $30 million. As though that wasn’t enough, Matthew has already successfully exited two different startups. To say he has his finger on the pulse of ag innovation, sustainability and company start-ups is putting it mildly.  In this episode, we discuss Matthew’s rise to success from an entrepreneurial point of view beginning with his first company, Observant. Observant is a company that was born from an issue of water management for cattle in remote areas of Australia. Matthew was solving his water management problem with “bespoke micro-electronics” that they were building themselves.” At the left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Water Scarcity 22 mins – “Chris Peacock is the CEO and Founder of AQUAOSO, a company that aims to build a water-resilient future through software and technologies that identify, analyze, and monitor water risk in the economy. Chris is a three-time water tech entrepreneur with over 20 years of experience in the water industry. He works with agricultural lenders and helps reduce their financial risk by providing analytics and insights on water risk management. Chris joins me today to share AQUAOSO’s main goal and how it can help interpret water data that can benefit both banks and farmers. He discusses the importance of knowing where farm water is sourced and how much water they use. He explains why there is an imperative need to address water needs from both an economic and humanitarian perspective. Chris also describes what happens if AQUAOSO becomes a successful company in the future.” At the link right-click “FOA 198: Data Solutions for Water Scarcity Mar 25, 2020,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Windows Cryptographic Encryption 21 mins – “If you’ve lost the Germans on privacy, you’ve lost Europe, and maybe the world. That’s the lesson that emerges from my conversation with David Kris and Paul Rosenzweig about the latest declaration that the German interior minister wants to force messaging apps to decrypt chats. This comes at the same time that industry and civil society groups are claiming that GCHQ’s “ghost proposal” for breaking end-to-end encryption should be rejected. The paper, signed by all the social media giants, says that GCHQ’s proposal will erode the trust that users place in Silicon Valley. I argue that that argument is well past its sell-by date. Speaking of trust, Paul outlines the latest tit-for-tat in the growing Silicon Curtain between the US and China, as that country announces plans to publish an “unreliable entities” list. I note that the same spirit seems to be animating the announcement that China and Russia are transitioning their militaries from Microsoft Windows to other operating systems. Talk about a bonanza for the NSA: Just the coding errors will sustain its hackers for a generation – even in the unlikely event that the Chinese and Russians resist the temptation to seed the system with backdoors aimed at their erstwhile coding partners.” At the link right-click “Download the 266th Episode (mp3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Windows Encryption 16 mins – “If you’ve lost the Germans on privacy, you’ve lost Europe, and maybe the world. That’s the lesson that emerges from my conversation with David Kris and Paul Rosenzweig about the latest declaration that the German interior minister wants to force messaging apps to decrypt chats. This comes at the same time that industry and civil society groups are claiming that GCHQ’s “ghost proposal” for breaking end-to-end encryption should be rejected. The paper, signed by all the social media giants, says that GCHQ’s proposal will erode the trust that users place in Silicon Valley. I argue that that argument is well past its sell-by date.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Working Remotely for Lawyers 19 mims – “With the coronavirus outbreak driving people to work remotely, John and Sharon have been inundated with questions from lawyers and law firms on how to work from home securely. This edition of Digital Detectives is dedicated to answering the most common questions they’ve received and helping listeners continue to serve their clients in these uncertain times. They discuss methods lawyers should be employing during this crisis and offer recommendations for remote work tools and services.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Wuhan Story 41 mins – “What happens when a Chinese man—just a guy, not a journalist or dissident—decides to go to Wuhan and investigate the country’s response to coronavirus? Reporter Jiayang Fan brings us the story of Chen Qiushi. (23 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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