MMD460 Media Mining Digest: Antivaxxers vs Vaccines, Cancer Survivorship, Climate Deadline, Corona Virus in Wuhan, Corona Virus Questions, Coronavirus Fight, Coronavirus Questions, Covid Alert, Covid and Climate Treatment, Covid and Public Health, Covid Background, Covid in Santa Clara County, Covid Information Sources, Covid Misinformation, Covid Publishing Data Sources, Covid Publishing Links, Covid Symptoms, Covid Tests-Vaccines-Cures, Covid HIV-Aids and Ebola, CRISPR Research Tools, Digital Textbooks, Disinformation, Fauchi Interview, Flying War Stories, Genome Editing, George Marshall’s Biography, In The Dark S1, Janet Napolitano, Mayors Run the World, Nuclear Power Future, Pandemic Campus, Publishing Pirating, Reports from the Field, Super Spreader, Trump Election Health Policy, US President and Covid, Women’s Role in the Workplace, Work Life Redesign, Young Voters

Exercise your ears: the 53 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 514 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,850 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Anti-Asian Violence 39 mins – “As Americans have grappled with coming to terms with the pandemic and its many effects on their lives—working from home, loss of income or job, homeschooling their children, worries about their own or their loved ones’ health—some of them also have to worry about being attacked because of their race. Join us for a timely discussion of the discrimination, verbal abuse and even physical attacks directed at Asian-Americans as the COVID-19 pandemic has spread across the country.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Antivaxxers vs Vaccines 31 mins – “False rumours and conspiracy theories pose a real threat to the rollout of a COVID-19 vaccine. Professors Paul Offit and Heidi Larson tell us how we can fight back.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Cancer Surviorship 12 mins – “With the number of cancer survivors growing and the longer lasting effects of newer treatments, how well equipped are primary care clinicians to care for cancer survivors over the long haul? Dr. Cathy Handy Marshall, an oncologist at Johns Hopkins, joins Neda for a conversation about cancer survivorship in primary care.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Climate Deadline 35 mins – “SPEAKERS Chris Field Faculty Director, Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University Renee Lertzman Climate Engagement Strategist, Author David Fenton Founder, Fenton Communications Greg Dalton Founder and Host, Climate One This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco on February 24th, 2020.” At the link find the title, “What the 2030 Climate Deadline Really Means” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Corona Virus in Wuhan 12 mins – “In a very special ad hoc episode, we have the personal experience from the inside of the coronavirus outbreak. From mainland China in Wuhan City, fellow postdocs Elihu Araday and Rute Pinto talked with Siyuan Hu, a PhD student in the Profesor Margaret Hosie’s group, who is currently in Wuhan and living this outbreak from a different perspective.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Corona Virus Questions 14 mins – “In the COVID19 era, data scientists have the expertise and a professional obligation to play vital roles, says Harvard statistics Professor Xiao-Li Meng. The coronavirus pandemic, he says, presents them with opportunities to explore important social and scientific questions. The founding editor-in-chief of the Harvard Data Science Review, Prof. Meng asserts that research based on data sets can yield important insights – from the efficacy of virtual learning and the impact of declining air pollution to best practices for vaccine development. HDSR recently published an online special issue, “COVID-19: Unprecedented Challenges and Chances.” The coronavirus crisis, according to Prof. Meng, amounts to a massive stress test for data science at a critical time in the field’s development. “There’s a lack of global protocol for data collection or even understanding of the differences. Yet you have seen comparisons of countries or systems all the time,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “But the issue here is that different countries and different systems have different definitions, different ways of collecting data. So we’re not even talking about comparing apples and oranges – at least, they are round fruits. We are talking about comparing apples with bananas or maybe even oranges with footballs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus Fight 43 mins – “Combatting the coronavirus pandemic has quickly become a global health priority. Communities across the United States, including here in the Bay Area, are using a range of strategies to mitigate the spread of coronavirus. In its first program on the coronavirus crisis, The Commonwealth Club will feature two experts who will discuss why significant community interventions are so important and what must be done now. The program will feature the lead author of the well-publicized Journal of the American Medical Association article on how Taiwan has been so effective at reducing the spread of the coronavirus, and what communities in the United States can learn from this experience.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Alert 22 mins – “We knew a pandemic was coming at some point – it’s kind of why we have the WHO. We have had various smaller scale tests of the international response to an infectious disease outbreak – Ebola in west africa being the most recent. After that, reports criticised the WHO’s response – citing problems around the swiftness of their action, the lack of coordination between countries, and the platforms for knowledge sharing. Is the agency doing any better in Covid-19?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid and Climate Treatment 35 mins – “Estimates vary, but somewhere from a fifth to half of the world’s population are confined today to their homes in a global effort to control the spread of the novel coronavirus. Two and a half million people worldwide have already been infected and more than 166,000 have died. In this special report for Copyright Clearance Center’s podcast series, Chris Kenneally travels virtually to India and China to learn how publishers and researchers in the most populous countries on earth are managing. From Delhi, Vikas Gupta, managing director of Wiley India, describes the 2020 pandemic as the latest and most serious challenge to his industry, one which Indians have met with resolve. “One thing about Indians is that they really work well when it comes to adversity, and that has been the case even across the country when it comes to the crisis, and the way the crisis has been managed by the government,” Gupta says. “Publishing as an industry is under threat globally. We know that. It’s not about Wiley, but across the publishing industry we are fighting multiple battles for the last few years, battles around free content, battles around copyrights, battles around re-exports. There are multiple battles they are fighting. So there is a resolve in the people who are in publishing. They work in publishing because that’s their passion. That’s what they want to do.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid and Public Health 35 mins – “What can the spread of the coronavirus teach us about the spread of climate change? Both crises have global reach, invisible perpetrators, and require aggressive, early action for containment. But while an infectious disease is acute and deeply personal, the impacts of a changing climate are systemic and vague. Scientists point out that the coronavirus family—which includes COVID-19 and SARS—originated as an animal disease that can be passed along to humans. With increased human development encroaching into wildlife areas, should communities be preparing for more pandemics? A conversation on climate factors shaping human health with Brian Allan, associate professor of entomology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Aaron Bernstein, interim director of the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at the Harvard School of Public Health, and Barbara Gottlieb, director of environment and health at Physicians for Social Responsibility.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Background 31 mins – “As of 3/11/2020 COVID-19 is emerging as a significant health threat worldwide.  This pandemic is on the rise, and public health suffers from politicized spin, misinformation, and a lack of good information.  This episode is targeted to the Talking Biotech listener that can connect with family and friends, sharing the facts of this outbreak.   Today’s guest is Dr. ChubbyEmu, the YouTube physician that has been at ground zero in discussing the coronavirus outbreak.  We dig a layer deeper into the disease, its physical manifestations, and the current state of the disease as it spreads into the USA.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid in Santa Clara County 42 mins – “As California nears 25,000 cases of COVID-19, there have now been more than 1,800 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Santa Clara County, with a death toll of over 60. With a population of nearly 2 million, the number of COVID-19-related deaths per 100,000 residents is the highest rate of any of the Bay Area’s five most populous counties. How are Santa Clara’s leaders handling this crisis and what steps will they take to handle pandemics in the future? Hear more from Santa Clara County officials.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Information Sources 19 mins – “When reporters cite numbers related to the coronavirus pandemic, they usually are an accounting of grim milestones – so many new cases in one state or another country, so many more deaths within a hot zone of illness. Yet not all numbers on COVID-19 are quite so bleak. The global scientific and medical community have dramatically stepped up the pace of research about COVID-19. According to the research data platform Dimensions, which includes preprints and datasets alongside more traditional research outputs such as journal articles, nearly 15,000 journal publications have appeared related to the pandemic in just the few short months since the disease emerged. “This is a unique moment in scientific research communication history,” says Mike Taylor, Head of Metrics Development for Digital Science, whose portfolio of companies includes Altmetric as well as Dimensions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Misinformation 9 mins – “The spread of the coronavirus across the world is viral, in the common, medical sense of the term. A parallel pandemic has simultaneously erupted, too: A virtual, viral infodemic of misinformation. Anita Makri writes from London on science and global development, and has covered previous health emergencies, including the 2014 Ebola epidemic in west Africa. Lessons learned then can help to dispel rumors and myths about COVID-19, Makri asserts. To battle misinformation successfully, she says, we must try to understand it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Publishing Data Sources 13 mins – “As the American economy shrinks under lockdown limitations imposed to halt the coronavirus pandemic, ongoing enterprises are reduced to a handful – grocery markets, pharmacies, home supplies, and hardware stores. These businesses serve our basic needs of shelter and sustenance. What of those that feed our appetite for information? Are they not essential, too? Factual local reporting is, indeed, “essential” in an age of fear and misinformation, asserts Ken Doctor, a leading news industry analyst and political columnist whose Newsonomics blog appears regularly for NeimanLab. Yet the COVID-19 crisis that is driving readers and listeners and viewers back to substantive news sources, especially local news sources, could also be the proximate cause of death for much of the same industry, Doctor fears. While subscriptions and eyeballs may have soared to new levels, the prognosis for advertising is more frightful than ever.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Publishing Links 14 mins – “In this time of global pandemic, once ordinary medical resources have taken on greater importance – from simple thermometers to sophisticated ventilators. Most highly prized of all may be peer-reviewed research and carefully-curated information. Indeed, immediate access to research findings and reliable news sources can make a critical difference for individuals and entire nations. In an effort to contribute to the common good, leading scientific, news, trade, education and business publishers are offering “open to read” access to a deep pool of content on topics related to the novel coronavirus and the COVID-19 disease pandemic it is creating. Effective immediately, Copyright Clearance Center will regularly update an alphabetical list of links to this important content. CCC will support this roll call of responsible publishing through our own social media channels to give it the greatest possible reach for individuals, academic researchers, commercial scientists and students. Earlier this week, Publishing Perspectives editor-in-chief Porter Anderson reported on how leading publishers across the scholarly publishing ecosystem have enlisted in this volunteer army of knowledge sharing.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Symptoms 27 mins – “There are have been local lockdowns in the UK, in places such as Oldham, Birmingham, Manchester – but what is the criteria for making that decision? In the non-Covid world: does honey alleviate symptoms in upper-respiratory tract infections? When does unexpected weight-loss warrant further investigation for cancer in primary care? Plus, in the light of findings from the Cumberlege review of safety in medical devices, the team discuss the issue of doctors’ declaration of interests. There are have been local lockdowns in the UK, in places such as Oldham, Birmingham, Manchester – but what is the criteria for making that decision? In the non-Covid world: does honey alleviate symptoms in upper-respiratory tract infections? When does unexpected weight-loss warrant further investigation for cancer in primary care? Plus, in the light of findings from the Cumberlege review of safety in medical devices, the team discuss the issue of doctors’ declaration of interests.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Tests, Vaccines, Cures 43 mins – “As the coronavirus spreads rapidly through the population, the United States is racing to provide test kits, develop a vaccine and find treatments. Meanwhile, we’re running dangerously low on supplies, ranging from ventilators and test reagents to gowns and N95 masks. When will we have the test kits we need? Can we develop a vaccine and identify treatments in time to contain the pandemic? Will we have enough ventilators to save patients and sufficient equipment to protect our providers? Three leading experts will share where we are today, where we are headed, and what it will take to get us there.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid19, HIV-AIDS and Ebola 19 mins – “As researchers who have long experience with HIV/AIDS prevention, vaccines, and therapies, some of whom also have experience with Ebola, we believe it is critical to build the response to the Covid-19 pandemic on lessons from the HIV pandemic and recent Ebola outbreaks. First and foremost, those epidemics have taught us that interventions must be based on sound science. As in the early days of AIDS, we face many uncertainties about the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and natural history of a new virus. SARS-CoV-2 science is therefore evolving quickly, which adds to the complexity of decision making, communication, and development and sustainability of public trust. Yet Covid-19 presents an important opportunity for smart deployment of our hard-won knowledge.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CRISPR Research Tools 41 mins – “Dr. Ilaria Capua is an internationally recognized virologist, and a world expert in avian influenza and other animal viruses.  Following her effort to make genetic information about viruses more accessible in the interest of finding faster cures, she was unknowingly put under investigation, as she was central in moving viral information and samples to colleagues worldwide.  Wire taps and clandestine evidence gathering filled a file, that eventually would be discovered, leaked and maliciously reinterpreted, alleging that Dr. Capua was the mastermind of an international virus trafficking ring. She was accused in the media, without evidence, of providing viruses for others to spread so that she could profit from vaccines produced. These false allegations left her facing life in prison. Years later the charges were completely dismissed as manufactured claims by the media. However, the events were life changing. Today Dr. Capua has channeled her energies into broadening science education, and continuing her outstanding work as a virologist. In the second half of the podcast she provides her expert interpretation of the 2019 nCov Coronavirus outbreak, its origin, risks and concerns.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Textbooks 28 mins – “As print textbooks eventually do give way to courseware, industry analyst Michael Cairns says, college professors, administrators and students will appreciate an education delivered in 21st century models. While it has long been foretold that the print textbook would disappear, the revolution has actually taken quite a bit longer than people anticipated.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disinformation 37 mins – “Disinformation online is on the minds of voters, candidates, government officials, technology platorms as the US election gets closer. Already experts have seen disinformationc ampaigns around the Covid-19 pandemic, which chould spell trouble in November says Laura Rosenberger, director of the Alliance for Securing Democraty. “When you’re sowing doubt about the information the government is providing about the pandemic, you’re sowing doubt about in citizens’ faith in their democratic institutions. That primes us to have less faith in the integrity of the election.” She speaks with Renee DiResta, technical research manager at the Stanford Internet Observatory, and Celia Kang, technology reporter for the New York Times, about how this perfect storm of disinformation is being tackled.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Fauchi Interview 21 mins – “International experts Helen Clark and Dr Anthony Fauci bring us their global perspective on the challenge and management of Covid 19. Linda Clark asks the questions in this in-depth conversation brought to you by the Aspen Institute New Zealand and the Aspen Institute’s Health, Medicine and Society Program.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Flying and Corona Virus 13 mins – “Wings Over PittsburghFuming passenger delayed by stricken flight gives finger to hero pilots after emergency landingBoeing company uses A321 in website promoNew FAA Ruling Allows For Visibility Commercial Landings…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Flying Scope Clauses 21 mins – “APG/Flying and Life Fly-Ins…APG Home AirportsEclipse 2017 MapUnited ‘clarifies’ that Flight 3411 was not overbookedPentagon awards contract to United Airlines to forcibly remove Assad….Harrison Ford won’t face any penalties over runway incidentRussia Requests…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Flying War Stories 130 mins – “…Crash: Conviasa AT42 near Puerto Ordaz on Sep 13th 2010Crash: Santa Barbara ATR42 near Merida on Feb 21st 2008Accident: Shanghai B738 at Shanghai on Jan 3rd 2020, Tail Strike on Landing, Captain and First Officer Swapped Seats in FlightCorona Virus Disease 19 (COVID-19) Related…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Genome Editing 14 mins – “Over the past 15 years we have made huge advances in our ability to engineer the genome, meaning that we now have the ability to edit DNA in a programmable and precise manner. In the lab, these editing tools allow us to create models of disease and to investigate how changes in the genome lead to changes in cell and organismal biology. And excitingly, these genome editing technologies are now entering clinical trials to treat, and possibly cure, diseases like sickle cell anemia. But there is a component of the human genome which even the much lauded and powerful CRISPR system has not been able to touch: the mitochondrial DNA. The mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell and contain their own, much smaller, genomes which encode several essential proteins and RNAs. Mutations in the mitochondrial genome are the cause of over 150 diseases, but to date, fixing these mutations with gene editing and gene therapy has been off the table due to the inaccessibility of this genome.In this episode of Journal Club, a16z general partner Jorge Conde and bio deal team partner, Andy Tran – experts in genomics and genome engineering – join Lauren Richardson to discuss groundbreaking research creating the first genome editor able to target the mitochondrial DNA: “A bacterial cytidine deaminase toxin enables CRISPR-free mitochondrial base editing” by Beverly Y. Mok Marcos H. de Moraes, Jun Zeng, Dustin E. Bosch, Anna V. Kotrys, Aditya Raguram, FoSheng Hsu, Matthew C. Radey, S. Brook Peterson, Vamsi K. Mootha, Joseph D. Mougous & David R. Liu, published in Nature.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.  

George Marshall’s Biography 45 mns – “As a young officer in World War I, George Marshall’s sterling reputation started forming when he planned and executed a nighttime movement of more than a half million troops from one battlefield to another, leading to the armistice. Between the world wars, he helped modernize combat training, restaffed the U.S. Army’s officer corps with future leaders such as Dwight Eisenhower, Omar Bradley and George Patton, and served as army chief of staff in the run up to Work War II, when his commitment to duty came face-to-face with the realities of Washington politics.  Roll sets his biography of Marshall against the backdrop of five major conflicts—the two world wars, Palestine, Korea and the Cold War—and focuses on the nuances and ambiguities of Marshall’s education in the use of military, diplomatic and political power while watching America emerge as a global superpower. Roll’s conclusion could hardly be clearer: Principled leadership matters.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Harvard University Opening 17 mins – “The Harvard Data Science Review’s Editor-in-Chief, Xiao-Li Meng, and Media Feature Editor, Liberty Vittert, sat down with Lawrence Bacow, the 29th President of Harvard University. Following President Bacow’s COVID-19 recovery, he joined the editors to discuss the data used behind both the decisions to close and to open the university in stages, how economists contemplate the concept of risk and the value of life, and the impact of COVID-19 on higher education and society in general. This interview was conducted online on May 11, 2020.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Humanitarian Action 49 mins – “The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) presents a discussion on the most pressing challenges to humanitarian assistance in the 21st century. Globally, 70.8 million people are considered forcibly displaced by armed conflict, and over 160 million people need emergency humanitarian assistance. Conflict has replaced natural disasters as the driver of humanitarian need—aid organizations are faced with navigating complicated security and political environments while meeting growing demand on the ground. In addition, new actors and increasingly urbanized conflict have strained the global acceptance and adherence to international humanitarian law and the Geneva Conventions. The Humanitarian Agenda is an initiative that leverages the expertise of CSIS programs to explore complex humanitarian challenges. Jacob Kurtzer’s primary focus is the Task Force on Humanitarian Access, which will look at challenges in access to aid in complex man-made emergencies. Prior to joining CSIS, Kurtzer spent seven years with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), most recently as head of communications for the ICRC Delegation in Israel and the occupied territories. Previously, he served as head of public and congressional affairs for the Washington delegation of the ICRC, representing the ICRC to a broad spectrum of audiences in the United States and Canada. In addition, he has conducted field missions in South Sudan and Rakhine State, Myanmar and spent nearly three years as a consultant with the ICRC delegation in Pretoria, South Africa. From 2007–2009, he served as the congressional advocate at Refugees International (RI), a humanitarian advocacy organization based in Washington D.C. Kurtzer began his career as a legislative assistant to Representative Robert Wexler (D–FL), covering domestic and foreign policy issues, including managing the Congressional Indonesia Caucus. Kurtzer earned a master’s in peace and conflict studies from the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, where he studied as a Rotary Foundation World Peace Fellow. He also holds a bachelor’s in philosophy from the University of Maryland, College Park, with a citation in religious studies, and is an alumnus of the College Park Scholars Public Leadership program.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

In the Dark E20 42 mins – “During three years investigating the Curtis Flowers case, we’d talked to nearly everyone involved: lawyers, witnesses, jurors, family members, investigators, politicians, and many, many people around town. But there was one person we hadn’t yet interviewed — Curtis Flowers. That is, until one day in early October, a few weeks after he’d been cleared of all charges. For the final episode of Season 2, we at long last talk to the man at the center of it all.” At the link you can listen, but download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

In The Dark Ep 1 28 mins – “On the morning of July 16, 1996, someone walked into a furniture store in downtown Winona, Mississippi, and murdered four employees. Each was shot in the head. It was perhaps the most shocking crime the small town had ever seen. Investigators charged a man named Curtis Flowers with the murders. What followed was a two-decade legal odyssey in which Flowers was tried six times for the same crime. He remains on death row, though some people believe he’s innocent. For the second season of In the Dark, we spent a year digging into the Flowers case. We found a town divided by race and a murder conviction supported by questionable evidence. And it all began that summer morning in 1996 with a horrifying crime scene that left investigators puzzled.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Janet Napolitano 35 mins – “Join us for a rare conversation with Janet Napolitano about the societal impact of COVID-19 on universities and the U.C. system in particular, as well as the implications for national security now and in the aftermath of the COVID crisis. Napolitano is the 20th president of the University of California and the first woman to serve in this role. She leads a university system of 10 campuses, five medical centers, three affiliated national laboratories, and a statewide agriculture and natural resources program. She also served as the U.S. secretary of homeland security from 2009 to 2013, as governor of Arizona from 2003 to 2009, as attorney general of Arizona from 1998 to 2003, and as U.S. attorney for the district of Arizona from 1993 to 1997. Napolitano earned a B.S. degree (summa cum laude in political science) from Santa Clara University, where she was the university’s first female valedictorian. She received her law degree from the University of Virginia School of Law.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Kaiser Family Foundation 43 mins – “American health care has seen dramatic changes over the past decade. Obamacare reduced the number of uninsured citizens, but rising prices and deductibles have made care unaffordable for many. Medicaid has become the nation’s largest payer and now pays for half of all long-term care. Now the coronavirus pandemic is challenging the health care system in unprecedented ways. All this is happening within the context of a presidential election within a highly polarized country. How will the health care system—and American voters—respond? Kaiser Family Foundation Senior Vice President Dr. Jennifer Kates will be joined by Dr. Josh Michaud, KFF’s associate director of global health policy. A former infectious disease epidemiologist with both the U.S. Department of Defense and the Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Michaud is an expert on the types of models being used to forecast the arc of COVID-19 cases.They will discuss the current and probable future states of the pandemic and the responses by the government, health-care system and public.

Kindness and Mental Health 40 mins – “The Commonwealth Club and Born This Way Foundation Invite you to a conversation focused on the intersection of kindness and mental health during these unprecedented times. In this conversation, moderated by Maya Smith, you’ll hear from mental health experts, advocates and young people on the many ways the COVID-19 pandemic has uprooted our normality, how we can find ways to spread kindness while also focusing on our mental health.

Mayors Run the World 47 mins – “At a time of anxiety about the effectiveness of our national government, Rahm Emanuel believes local government offers a clear vision, for both progressives and centrists, of how to get things done in America today. In his new book, The Nation City, Emanuel, the former two-term mayor of Chicago and President Obama’s first White House chief of staff, offers a firsthand account of how cities, rather than the federal government, stand at the center of innovation and effective governance. Drawing on his own experiences in Chicago, and on his relationships with other mayors around America, Emanuel shows how cities are improving education, infrastructure, job conditions and environmental policy at a local level. Emanuel argues that cities are the most ancient political institutions, dating back thousands of years, and have reemerged as the nation-states of our time. Emanuel argues that mayors are accountable to their voters to a greater degree than any other elected officials and that progressives and centrists alike can best accomplish their goals by focusing their energies on local politics. Join us as Rahm Emanuel maps out a new, energizing and hopeful way forward.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Nuclear Power Future 35 mins – “Nuclear power – revive it or allow a slow death? In middle of the last century, nuclear power promised an exciting new world of efficient and eternal energy. But after a series of major accidents – most notably those at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima — public opposition grew into a vigorous “no nukes” movement. Ken Farabaugh worked as a nuclear engineer at a number of plants. During the the eighties, he was working at the Shoreham plant in Long Island – the hotbed of the anti-nuclear movement. “It just became so emotional that rational thought went out the door,” Farabaugh remembers. “There were protest picket lines and what have you. There were people that worked at the plant that had their houses set on fire.” A handful of the plants that once dotted the landscape have been shuttered because they can’t compete with cheaper sources of power.  By the end of the century, the industry was languishing. But the urgency of climate change causes some to advocate giving nuclear a new lease on life. And a number of companies, such as Oklo and Nuscale power, are coming up with technical innovations, such as smaller, scalable designs and non-water-cooled reactors, that could offer nuclear a new path forward. Per Petersen, professor of nuclear engineering at UC Berkeley, believes that the advantages of using nuclear power instead of burning fossil fuels outweigh the perceived dangers. “Fixing the problem of nuclear waste is something that future generations can grapple with, and it’s technically feasible for them,” Petersen asserts. “The billions and billions of tons of carbon that we’re releasing into the atmosphere now, there’s no practical way for future generations to ever rectify that problem.  And I think that shutting down nuclear plants instead of coal plants is just morally indefensible, when you look at what the consequences are and how hard it’s going to be in the future to deal with what it is that we’re doing today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Pandemic Campus 29 mins – “Fall 2020 will bring the first full college term of the COVID-19 pandemic, and no one knows quite what to expect. Plexiglass has been installed in classrooms. Professors have brushed up on their online teaching skills. New social distancing rules have been issued for students—and already broken. How will it all work out? We’ve enlisted professors and students at six colleges, and we’ve asked them to share audio diaries of college life in this unprecedented time. Follow their stories here.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Publishing and Corona Virus 25 mins – “COVID-19 has given rise to a new, terrifying vocabulary from epidemiology and health: Social distancing. Flattening the curve. Super-spreader. We have become suddenly well acquainted with medical equipment: ventilators; PPEs; N-95 respirators. We are learning quite a lot these days about subjects few but the professionals ever gave much thought. For those under quarantine, many with children out of school, the Internet is a lifeline, providing information, instruction and welcome distraction. We are recognizing, in new ways, how much of daily life that authors and publishers make possible and how much they make life under lockdown bearable. In this special report for Beyond the Book, CCC’s Chris Kenneally visits virtually with journalists, publishers and industry analysts in France, Italy, Spain and Mexico. To date, Italy is the European country hit hardest by COVID-19, with the deaths recently climbing over 10,000. Piero Attanasio of the Italian Publishers Association describes an industry in severe contraction with impact across the supply chain.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Publishing and Corona Virus 29 mins – “In nature, the coronavirus is smaller than a dust particle but its effect on both individual health and society at large is massive. The abrupt halt to all but essential businesses that has shuttered bookstores and libraries is leading to catastrophe for authors and others creators in book publishing. Around the world, the coronavirus pandemic has marked half the planet’s population for confinement in an effort to block spread of the disease. In this special report for CCC’s Beyond the Book, a trio of trade association leaders share with CCC’s Chris Kenneally how writers, researchers and their publishing partners are coping with the unprecedented public health and economic crisis. From London, bestselling children’s book author Tony Bradman, who serves as chair of the Authors’ Licensing and Collecting Society, tells me that quarantine not only cuts off writers from their audiences but also from a living. “In Britain, a lot of writers make a living from other things – activities around writing, such as school visits, festivals, events.  Poets do readings.  And a lot of that has been cancelled, clearly, because of the lockdown.  I knew a lot of writers who were really struggling almost immediately,” he says. In the United States, Authors Guild executive director Mary Rasenberger has directed her organization to be an online lifeline as a clearinghouse of essential information. “We’re organizing that information and providing a one-stop place where authors can find information related to the crisis that is crucial to them.  We have information about how to obtain relief from the federal assistance programs,” she says/ “We also have information about the various funds that are providing relief for writers right now – additional emergency relief.  We also are offering a number of webinars and how-to videos to help authors market their books.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Publishing and Corona Virus 25 mins – “A panel of scholarly publishing executives discussed TechTrends 2024, STM’s annual forecast of technology trends impacting scholarly communications, for the recent STM annual US conference. In 2020, at least as the STM Future Lab Group sees the scholarly publishing universe, the individual user stands at the center of a cloud of media and data. Yet in an age troubled by fake news and fake science, and especially as the world battles the coronavirus crisis, information consumers must take great care lest they become lost in that cloud, says Heather Ruland Staines of the Knowledge Futures Group. “There’s such a higher bar that researchers need to meet in order to ensure reproducibility, replicability, and trust,” she says. “It’s going to be the connection of different researchers together, different lab environments, perhaps workflow tools like their electronic lab notebook and maybe even their AI assistant. “So when all of this comes together and we want to look under the hood, again, we want those trusted partners. We want to be able to see that a publisher asserted that this data is connected to this article and a researcher asserted this lab is responsible for this data. That trust is really the underpinning upon which we’re all trying to move forward now.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Publishing Data Sources 19 mins – “As the American economy shrinks under lockdown limitations imposed to halt the coronavirus pandemic, ongoing enterprises are reduced to a handful – grocery markets, pharmacies, home supplies, and hardware stores. These businesses serve our basic needs of shelter and sustenance. What of those that feed our appetite for information? Are they not essential, too? Factual local reporting is, indeed, “essential” in an age of fear and misinformation, asserts Ken Doctor, a leading news industry analyst and political columnist whose Newsonomics blog appears regularly for NeimanLab. Yet the COVID-19 crisis that is driving readers and listeners and viewers back to substantive news sources, especially local news sources, could also be the proximate cause of death for much of the same industry, Doctor fears. While subscriptions and eyeballs may have soared to new levels, the prognosis for advertising is more frightful than ever.

Publishing Pirating P1 48 mins – “Over recent years, publishers have expanded and evolved strategies for combating content piracy in response to increasingly sophisticated counterfeiting techniques. The most promising ways forward involve collaboration across businesses, industries, and continents, pulling together the expertise of legal, content, production, sales and marketing teams globally. For this first of two programs called, The Never-ending Story of Pirates: Global Strategies to Combat Counterfeiting, special content from Copyright Clearance Center examines a variety of international perspectives across different industries. A follow-up program will explore in-depth specific publisher experiences, illuminating how their organizations are responding to the ongoing challenge of piracy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Publishing Pirating P2 29 mins – “In this second half of The Never-ending Story of Pirates: Global Strategies to Combat Counterfeiting, special content from Copyright Clearance Center explores in-depth, specific publisher experiences, illuminating how these organizations are responding to the ongoing challenge of piracy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reports from the Field 44 mins – “COVID-19 is challenging the U.S. health-care system in unprecedented ways. Hospitals are staggering under the burden of treating infected patients, doctors struggle to protect themselves while working overtime, and insurers weigh eliminating co-pays for testing and treatment as their expenses skyrocket. Hear top executives from among the country’s largest hospital systems, physician groups and health insurers describe the situations they’re facing and how they’re coping with our nation’s worst pandemic.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Super-Spreader 33 mins – “With President Donald Trump as contagion in chief and the election right around the corner, co-hosts Joe Hagan and Emily Jane Fox break down the administration’s trust deficit, the debate over the next presidential debate, and the personal bellwethers they’ve seen over the last few weeks.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Trump Election Health Policy 12 mins – “The chances of a Republican presidential victory in the November election are unclear, but future changes in U.S. health policy depend even more on another unpredictable event: the U.S. Supreme Court decision on a constitutional challenge to the Affordable Care Act (ACA). If the ACA remains in effect, any changes in a second Trump administration are likely to be modest and to represent a continuation of efforts begun during President Donald Trump’s first term. If the ACA is ruled unconstitutional, then regardless of who wins the election, far-reaching legislative changes will be required, possibly in a divided-government setting. Nevertheless, assuming that no Covid-related twist keeps the health care system from returning to its prepandemic status, the current administration’s policy efforts provide a guide to what might happen after the Court rules — especially given that the Republican National Committee has not written a new platform.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

US President and Covid 25 mins – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on October 7, 2020, the editors discuss treatments the President has reportedly received for Covid-19, the rationale for them, and what is known about risks and benefits.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Vaccinology and Covid-19 22 mins – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on October 14, 2020, the editors discuss the fundamental concepts behind candidate vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 and the status of ongoing clinical trial.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Voter Motivation 41 mins – “As the presidential election approaches, voters are considering factors unique to 2020. While divides on a number of fronts and growing distrust in government may motivate some voters, there’s also deepening concern about America’s response to the Covid-19 crisis and the resulting recession. How will such a chaotic environment continue to shape the public’s interests and discourse, and how much will swing voters matter? Rachel Bitecofer, senior fellow of elections at the Niskanen Center, says turning out new voters is more important than capturing swing votes. She speaks with Tamara Keith, White House correspondent for NPR, and Dan Glickman, executive director of the Aspen Institute’s Congressional program.” At the link right-click the “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women’s Role in the Workplace 42 mins – “Recent feminist movements such as #MeToo and #TimesUp have called out sexism. They have empowered women to become more aware and also raise more questions: How do we find common ground in the new world we are building? How do we keep the momentum going with individual power, structural power and the power of movements? How do we handle a real situation at work, which could affect our livelihoods? Join psychotherapist and professor Joanne Bagshaw, author of The Feminist Handbook, and Professor Kellie McElhaney, founder and executive director of the Center for Equity, Gender and Leadership, in a lively, engaging dialogue meant to educate, prompt inner reflection and inspire. Walk away with a plan to help change society for yourself, your community and future generations.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Work Life Redesign 41 mins – “We spend one third of our lives at work, whether it’s at a job we love or one we can’t wait to leave. As the job market shifts with the increase of automation and artificial intelligence, a flexible mindset is more important than ever. Stanford professor Bill Burnett (co-author of the No. 1 New York Times best seller Designing Your Life) believes we can transform our work experience by building and utilizing a designer mindset. He argues that much of our unhappiness and difficulty is caused by “dysfunctional beliefs” that limit our potential.  In the forthcoming Designing Your Work Life, Burnett offer strategies on everything work related—from how to quit to how to get the job we want—and everything in between. Join INFORUM as Bill Burnett teaches us how design thinking can transform our experience of work and our outlook on life, without necessarily changing the job we have.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Young Voters 23 mins – “It’s election season in the U.S., and get-out-the-vote efforts are in full swing. And one question being asked by pundits and politicos is, how can we motivate young voters to show up at the polls? After all, in the most recent presidential election, less than half of citizens ages 18 to 29 participated, compared to 71 percent of those 65 and older and 67 percent of eligible voters ages 45 to 64. But a book published earlier this year by two political scientists tweaks that question. Young people are already plenty motivated to vote, the authors say, but they don’t always follow through to cast ballots. So this book asks, what is it that prevents young people from actually voting?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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