MMD462 Media Mining Digest: 1918 Pandemic, Americans with Disabilities, Army Crime Lab, Blind Chemist, Broadband in Africa, Cancer Treatment, Cattle Domestication, Computers and Mobile Phones, Corona Virus Family, Corona Virus Medicine, Coroners vs Medical Examiners, Covid and African Americans, Covid Clinical Trials, Covid in Iceland, Covid Religion and Travel, Covid Research, Covid Symptoms, Covid Tests, Covid Vaccine, Covid-19 Background, Covid19 Special Topics, Disability History, Weed Research, Emerging Technologies, Futurists, Golden State Killer, Grafting Plants, Improvised Explosive Devices, Innovation Execution, Murdered American Indians, National Digital Inclusion Alliance, Plant Based Oils, Science Costs, Stalking Protection, STEM Cells TED Talk, Telehealth, Universal Influenza Vaccine, W.H.O. Response to Covid-19, Weed Research, Wrongful Convictions

Exercise your ears: the 50 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 772 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,950 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

1918 Pandemic 13 mins – “Mütter Museum historical curator Jane E. Boyd discusses the parallels between the 1918–1919 flu pandemic and the coronavirus. In the fall of 1918 the (misnomered) Spanish flu ravaged much of the world. Philadelphia was hit especially hard: it had the highest death rate of any major American city. Over the course of six weeks 12,000 people in the city died. Hospitals were overcrowded and bodies piled up. When the Mütter Museum embarked on the multiyear exhibition and public art project Spit Spreads Death, the curators and researchers behind it had no idea how relevant it would become—or how quickly.” At the sound bar left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Americans with Disabilities Act 30 mins – “Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division Eric Dreiband speaks with Robbie Kirkendall, Special Legal Counsel in the division’s Disability Rights Section, about the division’s efforts to enforce the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the 30th anniversary of the ADA, and the important role it has played in our society.” At the link right-click “Download audio file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Army Crime Lab 16 mins – “In episode seven of the DNA season, Just Science interviews Molly Hall, an examiner for the United States Army Criminal Investigation Laboratory, about their transition to a Direct-to-DNA approach to processing sexual assault kits. The United States Army Criminal Investigation Laboratory acts as the true crime lab for the entire Department of Defense and serves all branches of the military. With roughly 2,000 sexual assault kits being submitted per year, they needed to find a way to efficiently process these kits without being bogged down by screening or an influx in submissions. Listen along as Molly Hall discusses Sexual Assault Kit processing and why their lab made the switch to a Direct-to-DNA approach in this episode of Just Science.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Biotech Seeds in Africa 25 mins – “Western Africa holds many nations of substantial population and an emerging economies. The nation has recently approved the use of the Bt cowpea to farm without applied insecticide, and with the new technology comes the need to ensure that it is used correctly. Today’s podcast features Francis Onyekachi, Program Officer, West African Agricultural Technology Foundation (AATF). AATF helps with training farmers around the proper stewardship practices and connecting them with national extension experts. He describes the infrastructure that came with deregulation of the cowpea, and describes how the country’s regulators and oversight agencies will work with them to ensure successful application.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Chemist 27 mins – “Everyone knows that observation is a key part of the scientific method, but what does that mean for scientists who can’t see? Judith Summers-Gates is a successful, visually impaired chemist who uses a telescope to read street signs. If the thought of a blind scientist gives you pause, you’re not alone. But stop and ask yourself why. What assumptions do we make about how knowledge is produced? And who gets to produce it? And who gets to participate in science? In this episode we go deep into the history of how vision came to dominate scientific observation and how blind scientists challenge our assumptions. This is the first of two episodes about science and disability and was produced in collaboration with the Science and Disability oral history project at the Science History Institute.” At the sound bar left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Africa 19 mins – “This week on the Community Broadband Bits podcast, Christopher speaks with Steve Song, a fellow at Mozilla who works to connect unserved communities across the globe. Steve shares his background starting out at a nonprofit Internet service provider in 1990s South Africa, and they discuss the negative but mostly positive effects of widespread Internet access. While acknowledging the limitations of mobile connectivity, Steve describes the essential role wireless technologies have played in connecting people worldwide. To get everyone online, Steve argues that we need a mixture of models, including wireless providers. Christopher and Steve also talk about how the potential impact of 5G is being diluted by focusing on high speeds instead of affordable, rural Internet access. At the same time, Steve explains that the U.S. has been a global leader in terms of opening up wireless spectrum for many uses. For better rural connectivity, Steve points to cooperatives as an exemplary model to follow, and he speaks to the need to treat spectrum differently in rural areas.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Massachusettes 18 mins – “When Paul Revere rode through Concord, Massachusetts, to warn the Colonists about the Red Coats, horseback was the fastest way to move information. More than 240 years later, the community that was so instrumental to founding of the United States as we know it now sends information via their own fast, affordable, reliable Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) municipal network. This week, Concord’s former CIO Mark Howell joins Christopher to talk about the community and their investment. Mark discusses the community’s history and the story of the network, which includes their reasons for investing in the infrastructure. He talks about the local citizens’ enthusiasm for the project and what it was like to go from operating an electric utility to adding Internet access for the public. Mark also discusses the funding mechanism that Concord used to pay for the project and shares a few of the many benefits that the network has brought to Concord and its people. Christopher and Mark review the reasoning behind the different service offerings available to subscribers and the rationale behind choosing these tiers. They also talk about some of the challenges Concord has faced and Mark gets into the possibilities of regional efforts in order to maximize the possibility of reaching more households.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 25 mins – “Early last month, before the spread of the novel coronavirus turned staying home from a quiet night in into a moral imperative, Christopher traveled to North Carolina to attend the Institute for Emerging Issues Forum at North Carolina State University. While there, he interviewed Leslie Boney, Director of the Institute for Emerging Issues. He also spoke with Darren Smith from Wilson’s Gig East Exchange and Ron Townley from the Upper Coastal Plain Council of Governments. We wanted to share their conversation as a special episode of the “Why NC Broadband Matters” podcast series we’ve been working on with NC Broadband Matters. The nonprofit organization works to connect communities across North Carolina, bringing high-quality broadband access to residents and businesses.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Broadband in Oklahoma 28 mins – “Norman, Oklahoma, is known for the University of Oklahoma and, with 30,000 students enrolled, one expects Internet access to be vibrant and readily available throughout the area. It hasn’t always been that way, but thanks to Oklahoma Electric Cooperative and their OEC Fiber, those who live and work in the areas around the fringes of the University and the city now have access to fast, affordable, reliable connectivity. CEO of the co-op Patrick Grace and President of OEC Fiber David Goodspeed visit with Christopher during this week’s episode. They talk about how the electric cooperative got into offering fiber to folks in their region and how they’ve financed the deployment. Patrick and David describe how local competition has influenced their project and how they knew they needed to pursue the prospect of offering Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) service. They talk about their rapid expansion and share information on the popularity of their gig service. They also describe the reactions from subscribers who once had to rely on satellite or mobile hotspots as they’ve transitioned to at-home gigabit connectivity. Enthusiasm for OEC Fiber has been high, partly due to the services they offer, but also because the community and employees of the cooperative have a deep sense of pride in the contribution their project is making to the region.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Treatment 39 mins – “Understanding duplication in certain genes may be the key to creating personalized cancer care for patients with triple-negative breast cancer, scientists from The Jackson Laboratory (JAX) shared during a JAXtaposition virtual event.“It really depends on the type of treatment, but the whole research field is trying to move away from chemotherapy and towards more specific approaches that would be much more effective specifically on cancer cells and have fewer side effects for the normal cells,” said Francesca Menghi, Ph.D., associate research scientist in the Liu lab. Menghi studies critical genomic changes implicated in ovarian and breast cancers, with the goal of a better understanding of the individuality of cancer genomes and the development of novel approaches toward the personalized management of cancer patients. “Precision comes from understanding how to take a surgical strike against the signaling pathway or the growth-promoting feature of the cancer cells, specifically, without targeting everything else that’s present in all the other cells in the body,” added Professor Mark Adams, Ph.D., deputy director of The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, who moderated the discussion. Adams also serves as director of clinical diagnostic research at the Laboratory. “That’s really where the promise is, is understanding that basic science that leads to how is it that the cancer cell stays alive and progresses, and being able to target that correctly,” he said.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cattle Domestication 21 mins – “Cattle are currently used for meat, milk, hide products and as work animals. Where did they come from? Who are the wild relatives? Dr. Hans Lenstra from the Utrecht University describes the domestication of cattle, their radiation throughout the world, and the traits that humans have selected. We discuss the current state of genomics as well as how genomic selection, artificial insemination and gene editing might influence the future of cattle production.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Computers and Mobile Phones 17 mins – “In episode six, Just Science interviews Barbara Guttman from the National Institute of Standards and Technology about the first large-scale black box study to test the accuracy of computer and mobile phone forensics.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Corona Virus and Broadband in Minnesota 23 mins – “Not even a pandemic can stop this week’s guest, US Internet CEO Travis Carter, from finding ways to bring better connectivity to his company’s subscribers and the community. For the 400th episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast, Christopher interviewed Travis (from six feet away) at the US Internet office outside Minneapolis, Minnesota. The pair discuss how the ISP is responding to the crisis, including by limiting home installs and opening up access to its public Wi-Fi network. As people transition to remote work, online education, and digital entertainment, Travis explains how the network is experiencing increased interest from new customers and greater demand from current subscribers. Christopher and Travis also talk about US Internet’s pilot project in low-income housing and how the ISP is trying to determine what barriers prevent households from signing up for the service. Travis describes some of the funding challenges he faces as he expands the network throughout the city and how US Internet differentiates itself in terms of reliability. Before closing the interview, he shares his disappointing experience with mobile connectivity during a big roadtrip he took last summer, arguing that wireless networks can never replace fiber. Travis was previously a guest on Community Broadband Bits episdoes 359 – An Insider’s Perspective on Urban Fiber Deployment, 301 – Wireless and Wired; US Internet Knows Both, and 194 – ISP US Internet Gets More Respect Than Rodney Dangerfield.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Corona Virus Family 50 mins – “Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode we speak with Susan Weiss, a microbiology professor at the University of Pennsylvania and the director for the Penn Center for Research on Coronavirus and Emerging Pathogens. She’ll talk about her 40 years of experience researching coronaviruses, how her field reacted to the 2002 SARS and 2012 MERS outbreaks, and the importance of studying diseases that transfer from animals to humans.” At the sound bar left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus Medicine 16 mins – “When you’ve got a public health crisis like this, you’ve got no choice but to deploy all of your resources toward finding a solution,” says the Alnylam Pharmaceuticals CEO. Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode our senior producer, Mariel Carr, talks with John Maraganore, the CEO of Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, a company developing an antiviral medication for COVID-19. When news broke in January about the new coronavirus, John Maraganore made the decision to pause other drugs in development and pivot to working on an antiviral medication for this new and alarmingly infectious virus. He says it was a difficult decision, but this virus had all the ingredients to become a pandemic. “And when you have a public health crisis like this, that’s what you do.” At the sound bar left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Coroners vs Medical Examiners 25 mins – “This second episode of the medicolegal death investigation special release season of the National Institute of Justice’s (NIJ’s) Just Science podcasts is an interview with John Fudenberg, the Coroner of Clark County (Nevada), regarding differences between coroner and medical-examiner systems.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid and African Americans 49 mins – “Early data from the U.S. shows a higher death rate for African Americans from COVID-19. We discuss what Canada can do to better protect people of colour from inequalities in health care. Then, author and podcast host Brené Brown talks to Matt Galloway about how being vulnerable can help us give us the strength to face the COVID-19 pandemic. Plus, Nova Scotia woman Crystal Blair tells us she’s kept her truckstop restaurant open during the pandemic, so she can serve up free meals to the truck drivers with few options. And as COVID19 cases climb in New York, doctors face tough choices over who gets access to limited resources. Now guidelines have been published in Canada, in case our doctors have to make those same life-or-death decisions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Covid Clinical Trials 19 mins – “Is your local lawmaker flush with pharma cash? How does racism in medicine loom over Covid-19 studies? And who decides when a clinical trial goes on pause? We discuss all that and more this week on “The Readout LOUD,” STAT’s biotech podcast. First, we discuss two high-profile pauses to Covid-19 clinical trials from Eli Lilly and Johnson & Johnson and explain why experts say they offer more good news than bad. Then, STAT Washington correspondent Lev Facher calls in to talk about his first-of-its-kind analysis of the drug industry’s spending to influence policy at the state level. Finally, our STAT colleague Nicholas St. Fleur joins us to tell the story of two Black university leaders who urged their campuses to join a Covid-19 vaccine trial — and the backlash that ensued.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Covid in Iceland 19 mins – “Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, Iceland had become the worst-hit country in Scandinavia. But it reversed its fate, without a full lockdown. And to date, Iceland has seen very few deaths. How? Largely because of the harmonious collaboration of “The Trinity” – Iceland’s chief epidemiologist, Director of Health, and superintendent of police – who implemented the “pandemic plan” – a framework for working together, and saving lives. In episode two of Teamistry’s second season, host Gabriela Cowperthwaite brings us a story of optimism to cut through the gloom. We hear directly from The Trinity: Alma Moller, Iceland’s Director of Health, Þórólfur Guðnason, its Chief Epidemiologist, and Víðir Reynisson, Chief Superintendent of the Office of the National Commissioner of the Police. We also learn how Kári Stefánsson, the CEO of deCODE genetics, and his team of scientists assisted government health officials by examining the virus and increasing Iceland’s testing capacity. And Alexander Elliott, an Icelandic journalist, describes how the country’s pandemic fight unfolded and how its teamwork saved lives. Teamistry is an original podcast from Atlassian.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download MP3” to get the podcast.

Covid Religion and Travel 50 mins – “We’re talking to faith leaders about how they tend to their communities during the pandemic, and why empty houses of worship this weekend don’t mean we can’t come together. Then, we hear from Canadians who were stranded abroad because of COVID-19, but have made it home against all the odds. Also, in these uncertain times, we talk to seniors who have experienced similar challenges in the past, including one 107-year-old Nova Scotian who remembers the 1918 Spanish Influenza pandemic. What can we learn from their experiences? And as some Canadians forgo meat this Good Friday, we’ll check in with a St. John’s fish and chip shop that has been serving the city for almost 70 years.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Covid Research 16 mins – “Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode our producer Rigberto Hernandez talks with Katrine Bosley, who has worked in the biotech industry for more than 30 years. Until recently she was the CEO of Editas Medicine, a company that focuses on a gene-editing technology known as CRISPR. She’s now on the board of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Hospital and is advising the facility on its quest to create a COVID-19 vaccine. She tells us how CRISPR can be used to make faster diagnostic tests and how the hospital in Boston is creating a vaccine using a gene therapy method. “One of the things that’s important for all of us competing against this virus is to have a lot of technologically different strategies to try to make a vaccine.” At the sound bar left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Symptoms 19 mins – “What you need to know – Management of covid-19 after the first three weeks is currently based on limited evidence; Approximately 10% of people experience prolonged illness after covid-19; Many such patients recover spontaneously (if slowly) with holistic support, rest, symptomatic treatment, and gradual increase in activity; Home pulse oximetry can be helpful in monitoring breathlessness; Indications for specialist assessment include clinical concern along with respiratory, cardiac, or neurological symptoms that are new, persistent, or progressive Post-acute covid-19 (“long covid”) seems to be a multisystem disease, sometimes occurring after a relatively mild acute illness.1 Clinical management requires a whole-patient perspective.2 This article, intended for primary care clinicians, relates to the patient who has a delayed recovery from an episode of covid-19 that was managed in the community or in a standard hospital ward. Broadly, such patients can be divided into those who may have serious sequelae (such as thromboembolic complications) and those with a non-specific clinical picture, often dominated by fatigue and breathlessness. The specialist rehabilitation needs of a third group, covid-19 patients whose acute illness required intensive care, have been covered elsewhere.3” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Covid Tests 24 mins – “Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode we talk to Mark Stevenson, the chief operating officer of Thermo Fisher Scientific, an instrumentation company that has designed a diagnostic test for the novel coronavirus. The company is also working on a serology test, which will determine who has already had the virus. He tells us how the company developed those tests and the role they play in managing this pandemic. The Thermo Fisher Scientific executive tells us what it took for his instrumentation company to design a diagnostic test for the novel coronavirus. Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode we talk to Mark Stevenson, the chief operating officer of Thermo Fisher Scientific, an instrumentation company that has designed a diagnostic test for the novel coronavirus. The company is also working on a serology test, which will determine who has already had the virus. He tells us how the company developed those tests and the role they play in managing this pandemic.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Vaccine 24 mins – “Over the past few weeks Distillations has been talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode we talk with Magda Marquet, a biochemical engineer and an entrepreneur. Marquet has spent decades working on DNA vaccines, one of the many techniques being used to create a vaccine for COVID-19. She also sits on the board of Arcturus Therapeutics, which is developing a vaccine for the disease. She tells us about how a company she cofounded, AltheaDx, is taking on the mental health crisis, which has been exacerbated by the pandemic. And she discusses her hopes that the lessons learned during the pandemic might change society for the better.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.  

Covid Vaccine Development 24 mins – “Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode we talk with Robert Langer, a chemical engineer and an entrepreneur, who runs the largest biomedical engineering research laboratory in the world at MIT. He has also started numerous biotech companies, including Moderna Therapeutics, a company that’s been making headlines for the COVID-19 vaccine they’re developing. Langer told us about his work with the Gates Foundation to develop a way for vaccines to self-boost in the body, his work with the sneaker company New Balance to create masks, and his thoughts about how diagnostic testing could be better.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Covid-19 Background 31 mins – “As of 3/11/2020 COVID-19 is emerging as a significant health threat worldwide.  This pandemic is on the rise, and public health suffers from politicized spin, misinformation, and a lack of good information.  This episode is targeted to the Talking Biotech listener that can connect with family and friends, sharing the facts of this outbreak.   Today’s guest is Dr. ChubbyEmu, the YouTube physician that has been at ground zero in discussing the coronavirus outbreak.  We dig a layer deeper into the disease, its physical manifestations, and the current state of the disease as it spreads into the USA.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Covid19 Special Topics 22 mins – “In this special edition of the Talking Bitotech Podcast Dr. Kevin Folta covers recent topics in COVID19.  These topics are pulled from the headlines and distilled to that you can better communicate the current state of this health crisis.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Disability History 41 mins – “There’s a common assumption that to be a scientist you must also be a genius, someone who excelled at school, and learns easily and quickly. But are these really the qualities necessary to produce new scientific knowledge? Collin Diedrich is a research scientist with a doctorate in molecular virology and microbiology. On paper he might seem to be the archetypal smart scientist, but the reality is more complicated. Collin has multiple learning disabilities, and he has struggled to overcome the stigma that comes with them for his entire life. In this episode we explore how our narrow definition of intelligence not only holds back people such as Collin, but also prevents the creation of new scientific knowledge that benefits us all. This is the second of two episodes about science and disability and was produced in collaboration with the Science and Disability oral history project at the Science History Institute.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

EmergingTechnologies 21 mins – “I mentioned last week that I would spend time on education and our critical need to rethink it. To start that journey, fellow Futurist Alexandra Whittington joins our future of business show with host Kevin Benedict. Listen in to their wide ranging conversation about futurism and the rethinking of higher education.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Futurists 37 mins – “Futurists are people who attempt to predict the future – authors, consultants, thinkers, organizational leaders and others who engage in interdisciplinary and systems thinking to advise private and public organizations on diverse global trends, possible scenarios, emerging market opportunities and risk management. Futurists are motivated by change. Not content merely to describe or forecast, they desire an active role in world transformation. Futurology is concerned with ‘three P’s and a W’, i.e., ‘possible, probable, and preferable’ futures, plus ‘wildcards’, which are low-probability, high-impact events. In The Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula K. Le Guin distinguished futurology – the business of prophets, clairvoyants, and futurists – from novelists, whose ‘business is lying.’” en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Futurist We’ll ask futurists Mike Bechtel, Frank Diana, Tom Raftery, and Alexandra Whittington for their take on The Future of Futurists, Futurology and Crystal Ball Tech.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Golden State Killer 18 mins – “In the last episode of Just Science, Dr. Barbara Rae-Venter shared her techniques for creating family trees and discussed the resolution of her first cold case. In episode five of the DNA season, we continue that conversation. In February 2017, Forensic Magazine published an article detailing the Bear Brook Murders, an abandoned girl, and Rae-Venter’s involvement in the resolution of a cold case that tied them all together. One month later, she was contacted by investigator Paul Holes and was on the hunt yet again. Listen along as she discusses building a profile and explains how she used investigative genetic genealogy to identify the Golden State Killer. This season is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Grafting Plants 28 mins – “Grafting is an age-old practice of connecting a set of roots to an aerial portion of a separate plant.  Together they typically exhibit enhanced productivity, disease resistance, or other trait that makes grafting a useful practice.  But why does it work? How does it work? What happens at the cells in the junction where different plants collide?  Dr. Charles Melnyk from the Swedish Agricultural University sheds light on this mysterious process.  We cover the history, applications, and what’s happening at the interface of two very different biologies uniting as one.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Improvised Explosives 20 mins – “In episode six of the Identification season, Just Science interviews Hillary Daluz, an instructor for Tritech Forensics and author on latent print analysis. From soda cans and cigarette packs to animal carcasses and pressure cookers, an improvised explosive device is just that: improvised. One of the most difficult parts of I.E.D. identification after the explosion is figuring out what was part of the bomb itself. Hillary Daluz spent 14 months in Iraq as a latent print examiner working on the remains of improvised explosive devices. Listen along as she discusses contextual bias, the difficulty of identifying finger prints on improvised explosives, and the importance of partnering with other disciplines in this episode of Just Science.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Innovation Execution 25 mins – “I have used the FIRE (Focus, Ideation, Ranking, Execution) framework for more than 20 years, and thousands of organizations use it. Focus is defining where your problem area is. Ideation is the process of creating ideas to address your problem areas. The process consists of individual and team ideation, which, when combined, generates 30% more ideas than when done individually. Ranking is where you prioritize your ideas. This process is through dot/wow voting and criteria ranking. Execution, the last element of the FIRE framework,  is how one turns ideas into innovation. Done through two phases; it involves testing and validation and launching the MVP (Minimum viable product). Execution is not easy. 92% of CEOs say innovation is critical to their organization, but only 35% of them have confidence in executing these ideas.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Innovation Execution 25 mins – “On this week’s show, we will wrap up the series of shows on the innovation framework known as FIRE. We will discuss the part of the innovation framework known as execution. Execution is composed of making your best ideas into something real.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” to get the podcast.

Innovation Lean Canvas 25 mins – “The lean canvas replaces a typically created business plan. We print this out on a huge poster-sized paper and tack it to the wall in our workshops. It allows you to look at your best idea and the critical areas around it, all in one glance. Updated as you acquire more learnings, you’ll be able to see these ideas and critical areas on the paper. I would encourage you to customize your lean canvas to your own organization’s needs. Don’t be afraid to try something different that fits you. Let’s walk through my lean canvas so we can get a feel for it. Starting, we talk about the problem statement, and what makes this idea different. We discuss who the customers are and what the key metrics are. The steps and activities that are needed, as well as the resources needed, are discussed. With this framework, you get a perfect snapshot view of the problem, the solution, and how it all works. It helps you pinpoint areas that need work.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Innovation Ranking 25 mins – “Innovation is about challenging an industry’s assumptions, questioning what we think we know about our customers, and being open to new ideas. When it comes to the framework, it is not the process. Instead, it defines the elements that you need to structure your process around. We use the FIRE framework. The focus area has to be defined or come up with ideas that aren’t impactful. Next is ideation, which is generating ideas. Ideation establishes the framework, and you can use whatever process you want to generate those ideas. The use of ranking is for identifying the best ideas out of the group. Ideas without execution are a hobby, and we are not in the hobby business….So why is ranking so important? Let’s say management asks your team to come up with some new ideas. You write some things down on a flip chart, and someone types them up and emails them out. Typically, this method results in nothing, as there are too many broad ideas. Ranking helps you find the best ideas and zeroes you in on them.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Management System 26 mins – “This week, we will continue the discussion on the FIRE framework and expound upon it. We will discuss a technology that will enable your FIRE framework, known as an Idea Management System (IMS). The Idea Management System supports everything from the focus, ideation, and ranking, to managing your funnel for the execution phase. I deployed my first IMS in 2008 while I was CTO at HP. Not known as IMS yet, we chose a particular platform back then. Every IMS system has its built-in assumptions as part of its basic platform. They have to work on enhancing their platforms due to competition continuously. If you have procured an IMS, are building one, or are integrating one with other systems, there are seven must-have features you need. The first feature is known as the ease of idea capture. This consists of getting all of your ideas captured and putting them into your IMS. The key here is to get every idea you have into this system. It is also important to track who came up with each idea for legal reasons.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Murdered American Indians 25 mins – “Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Justice Programs Katie Sullivan speaks with Wyn Hornbuckle, Deputy Director of the Office of Public Affairs, about Operation Lady Justice, the Presidential Task Force on Missing and Murdered American Indians and Alaska Natives.” At the link right-click “Download audio file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Digital Inclusion Alliance 21 mins – “Our lives have mostly moved online as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, but the millions of Americans who don’t have access to home broadband have been left behind. Whether it’s unavailable or just unaffordable, these families must risk their health to access essential services, like healthcare and education. This week for the Community Broadband Bits podcast, Christopher talks with Angela Siefer, Executive Director of the National Digital Inclusion Alliance (NDIA), about the many ways that the pandemic has highlighted digital divides in our country. Angela shares how NDIA is helping address urgent connectivity needs by supporting digital inclusion practitioners on the ground and by raising public awareness during the crisis. One of NDIA’s efforts is their list of Free and Low-Cost Internet Plans from national broadband providers. Christopher and Angela review some of the providers’ offers and discuss the problems that NDIA has found with the plans. (Spoiler: Comcast is doing, well, pretty good actually. Charter Spectrum on the other hand . . . ) Angela explains why it’s important that these plans serve more than just students if we want to keep people safe at home. The pair also talk about creative efforts to temporarily deploy public Wi-Fi hotspots as well as longer term plans to improve broadband access and availability. However, Angela reminds us that removing the cost barrier is still the quickest way to get people connected today.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plant Based Oils 31 mins – “Plants produce a variety of oils, many that are critical to the human diet. The precise chemical qualities of plant oils dictate its stability, use, nutrient quality, or even its use as fuel. Dr. Surinder Singh is an expert in plant oils at CSIRO, the Australian National Research Laboratory. His laboratory has been working on projects in a variety of crops to improve the oil quality for human nutrition, but also as a potential fuel. Such efforts provide a renewable and more sustainable source of valuable oils, taking pressure off of fisheries and carbon-intensive practices.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Science Costs 33 mins – “In science, we tend to focus on the destination, not the journey. But for every big breakthrough, every historic discovery, there are countless contributions that no one notices: the forgotten grunt workers, research that came to nothing, even lives lost in the pursuit of progress. Today’s episode is about the hidden cost of science — the price of doing business that we rarely think about. We hear stories about the mental health toll of graduate school, the literal cost of research, and the environmental impact of scientific progress.” At the link left-click “Listen” and select “MP3” to download the podcast.

Stalking Protection 17 mins – “Acting Director for the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) Laura Rogers speaks with Bob Davis, the Communications Officer at OVW, about stalking and how the office works to educate and provide resources to prevent it and support victims.” At the link right-click “Download audio file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

STEM Cells TED Talk 10 mins – “Bernie was a courtroom attorney, and a cancer and Hurricane Andrew survivor. For fun, he owned a minor league basketball team and became commissioner of a pro-wrestling federation. A decade ago, he ignited a media firestorm when seeking a guardian for the alleged clone, “Baby Eve.” 18 months later, he found himself at the United Nations addressing the promise of stem cell research as a global leader of the advocacy community.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Telehealth 19 mins – “In February, Christopher was in North Carolina at the Institute for Emerging Issues Forum at North Carolina State University. While he was there, he had the opportunity to conduct several interviews with people engaged in research, working with boots on the ground to expand broadband, or advocating for better policy so more people have access to high-quality Internet access. One of the people he spoke with was Danika Tynes, Ph.D., a Senior Research Associate from the Georgia Tech Research Institute. One of Danika’s areas of expertise is telehealth, which continues to expand in relevance and application with new innovations and the expansion of broadband access. During the conversation, Danika discusses some of the results of her research, including the elements that help telehealth efforts succeed. She also discusses how telehealth applies in different environments and how data can be used to improve its applications for patients and healthcare professionals. Danika also shares a personal experience that illustrates how telehealth is actually more ingrained in our daily lives than we realize.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thai Cave Rescue 24 mins – “In the summer of 2018, twelve Thai teenagers from a soccer team and their 25-year-old coach got stuck deep inside the labyrinthine – and flooding – Tham Luang caves of Thailand’s Chiang Rai province. Missing for over a week, the team was feared dead until they were found by a British cave diver, one of few experts in the world. Weary but alive, the boys’ calm demeanor gave people hope but their discovery also signaled the beginning of a frenzied, complicated, and nearly impossible rescue mission. In this episode of Teamistry, host Gabriela Cowperthwaite takes us inside the caves and alongside the people assembled from across Thailand and the world to work together on this dire operation. This included Thai Navy Seals, British cave divers, members of the U.S. Air Force, doctors, engineers, and countless volunteers, all who worked against the clock to retrieve each individual safely. Hour after hour, as the caves continued to flood and oxygen tanks ran low, we learn about the leadership and teamwork that enabled these disparate groups to remain synchronized, overcome cultural barriers, and make difficult, life-or-death decisions. We hear from Narongsak Osottanakorn, the former Governor of Chiang Rai province, who marshaled the various teams and became a national hero. Lt. Col. Charles Hodges of the U.S. Air Force talks about his role in getting teams to communicate effectively, and Dr. Richard Harris, an anesthesiologist from Australia, describes his climactic moments while inside the caves with the boys. We also hear from Wharton Professor Michael Useem, who offers insight into the leadership techniques that propelled the successful mission. And Richard Lloyd Parry, Asia Editor of The Times of London, revisits his daily on-the-ground reporting to tell us how the rescue unfolded.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download MP3” to get the podcast.

Universal Influenza Vaccine 40 mins – “Seasonal influenza causes thousands of deaths annually. Part of the problem is that the vaccine must be administered annually because the virus presents different immunological faces to avoid detection. Dr. Peter Palese is a pioneer in studying the molecular biology of the influenza viruses Today he and colleagues are on a quest to identify a universal flu vaccine that would provide one-time durable immunity. We discuss the strategies and progress toward this public health milestone.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

W.H.O. Response to Covid 25 mins – “We knew a pandemic was coming at some point – it’s kind of why we have the WHO. We have had various smaller scale tests of the international response to an infectious disease outbreak – Ebola in west africa being the most recent. After that, reports criticised the WHO’s response – citing problems around the swiftness of their action, the lack of coordination between countries, and the platforms for knowledge sharing. Is the agency doing any better in Covid-19? Suerie Moon is co-director of the Global Health Centre at the Graduate Institute of International and Development studies in Geneva, and author of one of those critical reports which was published in The BMJ. She joins us to assess how the WHO is responding.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Weed Research 23 mins – “Weeds are a tremendous problem in agriculture, costing farmers billions a year in crop loss and the cost of control. In Europe one of the critical weeds is black grass, which causes great losses in wheat and other grass crops. However, little is known about this weed, especially the molecular basis of herbicide resistance. Dr. Dana MacGregor came to the daunting task of attacking the molecular biology of a non-model organism. She has applied an ambitious toolbox from basic science to an aggressive agricultural pest You can genuinely sense her passions in how to solve problems that matter using the tools of basic biology.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Wrongful Convictions 5 mins – “This transcript and audio of one segment from the Beat podcast series examines victim issues in cases of wrongful convictions. In this podcast, Jennifer Thompson, the crime victim from the Ronald Cotton case in North Carolina, who misidentified the perpetrator of her rape; and Meg Morrow, former OVC attorney advisor, discuss the impacts of wrongful convictions on survivors, victims of crime, and law enforcement.” At the link right-click “mp3 Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

 

 

 

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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