MMD463 Media Mining Digest: Addiction During a Pandemic, Apartheid Justification, Black America Speaks, Bread Research Project, Butchers Talk Shop, Chilean Educational Issues, China and the Virus, Corona History, Coronavirus and Africa, Coronavirus and Europe, Coronavirus and Food, Coronavirus and Latin America, Coronavirus Frontline Special, Coronavirus Medic Deaths, Coronavirus Stories, Covid Vaccine Availability, Criminal Justice Reform, Deaf, Disabled Covid Issues, Disabled Stories, Elder Care, Farmer Production, Femicide in Serbia, Fertilizer that Blew Up Beirut, Food Stockpiles, Fried Chicken, Ireland Housing Costs, Jurgen Klopp, Karachi Ambulance Driver, Lebanese Contaminated Fuel, Mafia in Naples, Maggot Masters, Pandemic and Finances, Pot Washers, Race in America, Recycled Orchestra, Recycling Chile and Spain, Robot Fruit Pickers, Swine Fever, Wuhan, Zimbabwe Mental Health Control

Exercise your ears: the 63 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 972 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Addiction During a Pandemic 17 mins – “Nuala McGovern considers alcohol and drug addiction relapse during the pandemic. We hear from two men, in Kenya and the United States, about how they have fought their addictions while under lockdown. Nuala also talks about the importance of family in these times and hears how one man travelled more than 2,000 km across the US to play his trombone for his brother, who was recovering in a rehab centre after a fall. She also talks about how hobbies are helping us and joins a wrestler, a dancer and a musician in conversation about social distancing.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apartheid Justification 18 mins – “As a child of Soweto, apartheid South Africa’s most notorious black township, Milton Nkosi could easily have become an embittered adult; in June 1976 he witnessed the Soweto uprising in which white police brutally suppressed protests by black schoolchildren, leading to many deaths. Yet, as apartheid began to collapse in the early 1990s, Milton found himself drawn into TV journalism; enabling him to question his former tormentors and helping viewers around the world to see the moral case for change. So began a career that took him from translator and fixer to producer and eventually, the head of bureau for the BBC’s news operation in South Africa, where he then sought to diversify coverage of a fast-changing continent. As Milton explains in this conversation with Owen Bennett-Jones, his humble beginnings turned out to be an asset: Among his childhood neighbours in Soweto were anti-apartheid activists including Nelson Mandela’s wife and children, many of whom would become valuable contacts. However, after the transition to democracy in 1994, Milton also had to ask uncomfortable questions of some of them, as claims of corruption emerged within the ANC government. Moral dilemmas such as this defined his working life: Is it even possible to be an impartial reporter when your subject might be a close associate? For Milton, the issues need to be seen in context. As he points out: “Nobody can ever justify apartheid based on the mistakes of the post-apartheid leaders.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black America Speaks 34 mins – “We listen in to four black-owned radio stations in the United States to find out how they are covering the killing of George Floyd and the waves of protest since. From Philadelphia, Houston, Los Angeles and Chicago, we hear discussions on preparing young people for encounters with police, on access to finance and housing and on black identity and activism. We also bring the hosts together, in conversation with Chloe Tilley, to find out what it means to be behind the mic on a black-owned station. How is it different to working elsewhere in the US media?” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bread Research Program 19 mins – “Dan Saladino meets the mastermind behind one of biggest bread research projects ever undertaken. Nathan Myhrvold spent four years researching, baking and collaborating with leading industry professionals to write Modernist Bread – a five-volume, global exploration of this great staple. It follows another hugely ambitious food project -Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking – from 2011. Perhaps it is no surprise then that Nathan Myhrvold has spent his life trying to understand how things work, he researched quantum theory with the late Stephen Hawking and went on to work directly with Bill Gates at Microsoft. So what pearls of wisdom can the man who baked 36,000 loaves share? This is a rebroadcast of an episode of the Food Programme that first aired on BBC Radio 4 in March 2018.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Butchers Talk Shop 19 mins – “Carving up carcasses and slicing up flesh. Day in, day out. Doling out blood for pet leeches, and helpings of animals brains. What drives people to do it? And why do they see themselves as animal lovers, and therapists? Emily Thomas meets three butchers from Limerick, Lagos and Brooklyn to find out what it’s really like to be a butcher. Why is the trade disparaged in some parts of the world? And why in others has it become ‘trendy’ to leave an office job to join the trade? We hear how business might be affected by changing patterns of meat consumption, the popularity of veganism and the dominance of the supermarkets. And are they worried that robots might take their jobs?” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chilean Educational Issues 18 mins – “A much anticipated referendum in Chile on a new constitution has been postponed till the autumn amid safety concerns over the spread of the coronavirus. President Sebastian Piñera had agreed to the vote and a range of reforms following months of civil unrest. Since last autumn, the country has been experiencing a wave of protests with people on the streets angry at the level of inequality in the country. Amongst them thousands of university students, teachers and school children – who have been prepared to face tear gas, water cannon and rubber bullets – in a bid to change the education system in Chile. They say a privileged few have access to all the best jobs and the rest are given a substandard schooling with leaky roofs in winter, boiling hot classrooms in summer and inadequate teaching. For Assignment, Jane Chambers spent time with the protestors calling for a fairer education for all.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

China and the Virus 19 mins – “Has the coronavirus epidemic weakened or strengthened the grip of China’s Communist Party? In the early stages of the outbreak in the city of Wuhan, authorities there downplayed its significance. A doctor who sounded the alarm was forced to contradict himself. He later contracted Covid-19 and died from it. Medical facilities were initially unprepared. This and other similar stories led to an explosion of critical comment on Chinese social media, with deep distrust emerging of the official explanations. President Xi Jinping initially avoided becoming publicly involved in the response to the epidemic, perhaps to avoid a political taint.The government then began do change tack, instituting wide-ranging and it seems effective restrictions, which have slowed the growth of the epidemic. The central government blamed any problems on failings by local authorities. Many Chinese citizens are now taking pride in their country’s response, even arguing that it is an example to the world, despite the continuing economic slowdown. In this documentary, Mark Mardell assesses how President Xi and his government will emerge from the crisis.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Corona History 25 mins – “Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode we speak with Susan Weiss, a microbiology professor at the University of Pennsylvania and the director for the Penn Center for Research on Coronavirus and Emerging Pathogens. She’ll talk about her 40 years of experience researching coronaviruses, how her field reacted to the 2002 SARS and 2012 MERS outbreaks, and the importance of studying diseases that transfer from animals to humans.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Coronavirus and Africa 34 mins – “The terrible choice between hunger and infection, police imposing lockdowns with brutality and the unexpected positives to come out of the pandemic in Africa. Presenter Toyosi Ogunseye in Lagos examines these issues with panellists Dr Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa; Bright Simons, social entrepreneur based in Congo and president of mPedigree, Ghana; Sabina Chege MP, Health Select Committee Chair, Kenya; Ralph Mathekga, political analyst and writer, South Africa.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus and Europe 34 mins – “Experts discuss the challenges posed by and the consequences of the outbreak of Covid-19 in Europe. BBC correspondent Jonny Dymond is joined by a panel of experts from across the continent who answer questions from the public. The panel: Dunja Mijatovic: Commissioner for Human Rights at the Council of Europe; Margaret Harris: World Health Organisation; Richard Horton: Editor in Chief of The Lancet; Nathalie Tocci: Political analyst and Director of the Institute of International Affairs; Danae Kyriakopoulou: Economist from OMFIF, the Official Monetary and Financial Institutions Forum, an independent financial think tank.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Coronavirus and Food 21 mins – “As coronavirus tightens its grip on the world, many of us are facing life in lockdown and are worried about food. Graihagh Jackson takes a journey along the global food supply chain – via her grandparents – to see how it is holding up so far through the crisis. We hear how supermarkets are responding to the strain of widespread stockpiling and panic buying and what implications this could have on the future of food shopping. Food giant Unilever reveals how they are weathering transport bottlenecks and are adapting production to cater to the ‘post-virus’ food penchants of different nations. As global lockdowns affect the flow of local and migrant labour forces we speak to one of Europe’s largest fresh food producers about how they will manage this season’s fruit and vegetable harvests; and the United Nations warns that cooperation by consumers and between countries is key, if we are to avert a global food crisis.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus and Latin American 34 mins – “How has Latin America dealt with the pandemic? The lockdown, the needs of the economy, cash pay-outs to the poor, culture, tradition and safety in a time of crisis are all discussed with an expert panel and questions from the public across the region. Presenter Jonny Dymond is joined by Dr Denise Dresser – political scientist, Mexico. Luiz Philippe de Orleans e Braganca – Chamber of Representatives, Social Liberal Party, Brazil, Laura Alonso – former head of Argentina’s Anti-Corruption office. Margarita Lopez Maya – Venezuelan historian and Dr Marcus Espinal – Pan American Health Organisation.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up me2 – “In March, Aafiyah was told the garment factory where she worked would be closing. And like many other garment workers, she was left destitute in the slums of Dhaka. Bangladesh’s garment industry employs millions of workers, mainly women, who make clothes for high street brands in Europe and the US. Western retailers, who have seen sales plummet due to the pandemic, have cancelled or suspended more than 3 billion dollars’ worth of orders from Bangladeshi garment factories. Over a million jobs in the sector could now be at risk. For Assignment, Caroline Bayley and Morshed Ali Khan hear Aafiyah’s story, and talk to factory owners and the British Retail Consortium about the huge challenges facing Bangladesh’s main export industry.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus Bangladesh Garment Workers 19 mins – “In March, Aafiyah was told the garment factory where she worked would be closing. And like many other garment workers, she was left destitute in the slums of Dhaka. Bangladesh’s garment industry employs millions of workers, mainly women, who make clothes for high street brands in Europe and the US. Western retailers, who have seen sales plummet due to the pandemic, have cancelled or suspended more than 3 billion dollars’ worth of orders from Bangladeshi garment factories. Over a million jobs in the sector could now be at risk. For Assignment, Caroline Bayley and Morshed Ali Khan hear Aafiyah’s story, and talk to factory owners and the British Retail Consortium about the huge challenges facing Bangladesh’s main export industry.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus Frontline Special 34 mins – “This series comes from the Bradford Royal Infirmary, in the North of England, with recordings made by Dr John Wright, who works there. He is an epidemiologist and as he helps the hospital prepare and cope with a huge influx of patients, he’s also searching for answers about Covid-19.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus in Algeria 18 mins – “A mysterious illness appears out of nowhere. The number of cases rises exponentially, as the authorities attempt to downplay the severity of the disease. There is a shortage of medical staff, equipment and arguments about whether people should wear masks. People are forbidden to leave their homes and many are left stranded in unfamiliar places, separated from loved ones. Albert Camus’ novel The Plague set in the Algerian city of Oran under French colonial rule was published more than 70 years ago. But today it almost reads like a current news bulletin and seems more relevant than ever. This edition of Assignment revisits Oran in the age of the coronavirus and investigates the parallels between now and then. For the time being, it seems the pandemic has achieved something the authorities have tried but failed to do for the past year – clear the streets of protesters. Lucy Ash investigates Algeria’s plague of authoritarianism and finds that the government has been using Covid-19 as an excuse to crack down harder on dissent.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus in South America 19 mins – “We speak to people in China’s capital, Beijing, where a fresh spike of Covid-19 cases has been detected. Fan Fan and Richard tell us what it feels like to go through lockdown all over again. Meanwhile, the most intense outbreaks are now in Latin America. We hear accounts of how communities in countries including Peru and Colombia are dealing with the disease. As restrictions ease elsewhere, businesses are preparing to open again in a very different world. We bring together business owners in Botswana, Turkey and the United States to talk about the challenges they face and their hopes for the future.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus Medic Deaths 19 mins – “As medical staff – often originating from economically developing countries – struggle to save the life of patients during the coronavirus epidemic in developed countries, Zeinab Badawi asks if their work amounts to exploitation of poorer nations. More than 17,000 people have died in the UK after testing positive for coronavirus. Among them are frontline medical staff. Dr Adil El Tayar – a British-Sudanese doctor – became the first working medic to die of coronavirus in the UK. His story is illustrative of the many international medics who even now are battling Covid-19. Born in Sudan, he graduated from the University of Khartoum in 1982 and moved to the UK in 1996, where he then studied at university, before becoming a hospital consultant at St. George’s Hospital. He was a cousin of BBC journalist Zeinab Badawi, who paid tribute to him in an impassioned dispatch for From Our Own Correspondent where she wrote. “Adel was a stoic and an optimist and was never one to imagine the worst. So he thought he would soon recover. But then he took a turn for the worse and became breathless. He knew what that meant. His children insisted he go to hospital. He did. He was admitted and put on a ventilator. A few days later his daughter told me his medical team informed the family that his lungs had come under attack from coronavirus and that he could not breathe unaided. Soon after the ventilator was switched off. It had taken just twelve days for Adel to go from being a fit and capable doctor working in a busy hospital to himself lying in a hospital morgue.” For Zeinab, the story – alongside the deaths of other NHS staff – raises wider questions. A vast number of doctors, nurses and others have come to Britain and other Western counties after training in the developing world. Naturally, they want to improve their standards of living and work in more sophisticated medical systems. But is it fair for the rich world to benefit by effectively cherry-picking the brightest and best from poorer countries? Or can the expertise of those medical staff who migrate to wealthier countries benefit their home nations? Some argue that this brain cycle – rather than a brain drain – along with remittances, is actually of benefit to the developing world. Through the stories of individuals, combined with expert analysis, Zeinab unpicks this tricky and intensely personal conundrum.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Coronavirus Medic Deaths 19 mins – “We hear about Sophie Fagan, a nurse in London for over 50 years; Dr. J Ronald Verrier, a critical care surgeon in New York; and Vicenzo Leone, a beloved GP in Northern Italy. Their relatives talk about their enduring pride, but also the shock of losing them to Covid-19. And hospital chaplains talk to us about the religious, spiritual and emotional support they are providing for patients and their loved ones. Also, mothers in Spain tell us how the 40-day lockdown is emotionally impacting their children.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus Missing Bodies in Ecuador 19 mins – “In March and April, Guayaquil in Ecuador was the epicentre of the Covid pandemic in Latin America. The city’s health services began to collapse fast – hospitals, cemeteries and morgues were overwhelmed. As the bodies of the dead were not collected, hundreds of desperate families kept the remains of their loved ones at home, or deposited them on the streets. Eventually they were picked up. But in the chaos, some corpses went missing. For Assignment, Mike Lanchin teams up with Guayaquil journalist Blanca Moncada, to follow the story of one woman in her dramatic search for the body of her late husband.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus Stories 19 mins – “Listeners from Brazil, Germany, Rwanda, Australia and Norway report on their experiences of lockdown, from reaction to Jair Bolsanaro’s coronavirus policies to the partial easing of lockdown in Germany, to racial abuse experienced by Chinese residents in Australia. By emailing a voice memo recorded on their smartphones listeners from different countries offer their unique perspectives on a global crisis.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus Vaccine Development P1 18 mins – “Nearly every person on the planet is vulnerable to the new coronavirus, SarsCoV2. That’s why there are more than 100 projects around the world racing towards the goal of creating a safe and effective vaccine for the disease it causes, Covid19, in the next 12 to 18 months. But this is just the first part of a long and complex process, working at a pace and scale never attempted before. In Vaccines, Money and Politics, Sandra Kanthal looks at the vast ecosystem needed to deliver a vaccination programme to the world in record time. This will require billions of dollars, and likely more than one successful candidate to meet the global demand. The world will need to secure supply chains in order to avoid shortages of vital supplies like medical glass. Companies will have to manufacture the most promising candidates even before they know if the vaccines will work, otherwise the process will be further delayed. Authorities across the world will have to work together to overcome the temptation for countries to keep the vaccines for themselves and allocate a fair global distribution, and then decide which sectors of the population get them first. And they’ll need a communication strategy to convince the public the vaccines are safe and effective – and to combat the antivaxx messages already gaining traction on social media. What plans are in place to make this all happen – and will they work?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Coronavirus Vaccine Development P2 18 mins – “Scientists around the world are working at pandemic speed to discover a safe and effective vaccine against the virus SarsCoV2, and the disease it causes Covid 19. But while all this research is taking place, a host of other critical elements need to be organised if we are to have any chance of successfully building an immunisation programme to reach more than seven billion people with a vaccine that will, at least initially, be in limited supply. In part two of Vaccines, Money and Politics, Sandra Kanthal looks at what strategies are being put in place to transport a vaccine to countries around the world, who will be the first in those countries to get the vaccine, and, once it is available, how to convince people to take it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Covid Vaccine Availability 19 mins – “Scientists around the world are working at pandemic speed to discover a safe and effective vaccine against the virus SarsCoV2, and the disease it causes Covid 19. But while all this research is taking place, a host of other critical elements need to be organised if we are to have any chance of successfully building an immunisation programme to reach more than seven billion people with a vaccine that will, at least initially, be in limited supply. In part two of Vaccines, Money and Politics, Sandra Kanthal looks at what strategies are being put in place to transport a vaccine to countries around the world, who will be the first in those countries to get the vaccine, and, once it is available, how to convince people to take it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Criminal Justice Reform 18 mins – “One year ago, voters in Houston, Texas, elected a slate of liberal Democrats to their local courthouse. These new judges promised to remake justice in America’s fourth-largest city, together with the liberal District Attorney, herself elected just two years earlier. Marshall Project criminal justice reporter Keri Blakinger, who lives and works in Houston, asks how far they have been able to make good on their promises of reform, and whether that has been a good thing. Criminal justice reform has been a rare point of bipartisan agreement across the United States, but away from the cameras how do tricky questions play out in practice? Whether it’s bail reform, defence for suspects with no money to pay for a lawyer, or whether to prosecute low-level drug crime – can reforms stick, and who do they help? Keri has been covering these stories for several years and takes us inside the Harris County courtrooms, where we meet some of the new judges; to the DA’s office; the headquarters of the local police union; and the public defenders’ chambers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Deaf 37 mins – “Joyce welcomes Danielle Filip, vice president of operations, at Sign Language Interpreting Professionals (SLIP) to the show. Founded in 2003, SLIP provides reliable, consistent and professional communication and consultation services thereby connecting the deaf and hearing communities of Pittsburgh. During the show, Danielle will discuss the services provided by SLIP and ways that businesses and hospitals can assure members of the deaf community that clear communication is provided for them during the COVID-19 pandemic.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” to get the podcast.

Disability Education and Health 32 mins – “Joyce welcomes back to the show, Peri Jude Radecic, CEO of Disability Rights Pennsylvania. Disability Rights Pennsylvania is an independent, nonprofit corporation authorized by the U.S. Congress and designated by the Governor of Pennsylvania’s as the Protection and Advocacy System in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Their mission is to advance, protect, and advocate for the human, civil, and legal rights of Pennsylvanians with disabilities. She will discuss issues affecting Pennsylvanians with disabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic.” At the link left-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Covid Issues 35 mins – “Joyce welcomes Maria Town, the president and CEO of the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) and Kelly Buckland, executive director of the National Council of Independent Living (NCIL) to the show. Her guests will discuss the issues facing people with disabilities now amid the current outbreak of COVID-19 and will answer questions from callers. The AAPD promotes equal opportunity, economic power, independent living, and political participation for people with disabilities, while NCIL is the longest-running national cross-disability, grassroots organization run by and for people with disabilities. NCIL represents thousands of organizations and individuals including: individuals with disabilities, Centers for Independent Living (CILs), Statewide Independent Living Councils (SILCs), and other organizations that advocate for the human and civil rights of people with disabilities throughout the United States.” At the link left-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Locations 34 mins – ”Joyce welcomes Nedra Dickson, international/national business leader and disability advocate to the show. Ms. Dickson is managing director, Global Supplier Inclusion and Sustainability Programs across 18 countries at Accenture. Accenture is a leading global professional services company, providing a broad range of services in strategy and consulting, interactive, technology and operations, with digital capabilities across all of these services. They combine unmatched experience and specialized capabilities across more than 40 industries – powered by the world’s largest network of Advanced Technology and Intelligent Operations centers. With 509,000 people serving clients in more than 120 countries. Ms. Dickson will offer advice on what businesses can do to prepare for and survive the COVID-19 pandemic.” At the link left-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Stories 37 mins – Joyce welcomes Gerald Homme, recruitment specialist for Bender Consulting Services, Inc. to the show. Gerald will discuss the various talent program recruiting services offered through Bender Consulting and how to apply for a job through the company. He will explain what differentiates Bender from an employment agency. Among other topics discussed, Gerald will share tips to prepare for interviews, what he looks for in a candidate, and the importance of providing references to us and getting references to respond quickly to outreach. mins Gerald will share why it is important for candidates to indicate outside career efforts they are pursuing. This includes sharing about other interviews they have had or are planning, additional job offers, planned vacations, or changes in career desires.” At the link left-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. –

Elder Care 15 mins – “For most of us, people over the age of 65 make up a huge portion of the patients we see and the energy we pour into clinical care. And yet most of us receive woefully inadequate training to provide the best care for these patients and to overcome structural, systemic biases against the elderly. In this special conversation, Neda sits down with Dr. Louise Aronson, geriatrician and Professor of Medicine at UCSF and author of the fantastic book Elderhood to learn more about how we can take better care of our over-65 patients. Pearls: When working with elders, consider the following strategies: start by understanding goals, assess functional status, avoid over controlling chronic illnesses like diabetes and hypertension, keep Beers criteria on your radar, and consider age with tools like ePrognosis when considering “routine” screenings.” At the link you can listen, but not download;however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Farmer Creations 19 mins – “Fancy a career change? If you’re not doing it already, what would it take to make you a farmer? Would smart technology, matchmaking websites or reality TV do it? In our second episode to explore the problem of the world’s ageing agricultural workers Emily Thomas hears about some innovative and surprising attempts to re-brand farming. Is education or technology the answer, does farming need a re-brand, OR is it just too hard for most farmers to make a living – and does the global food system itself need to change? It matters – if the farmers die out, where will you get your food in the future?” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farmer Production 20 mins – “The average age of farmers globally is thought to be around 60, and rising. So where have all the young farmers gone and who is going to farm our food in the future? It’s an issue that could affect every single one us and the food we eat. Emily Thomas meets families in Kenya, the UK and the Netherlands to find out how farmer’s sons and daughters really feel about taking over the family business. How much of a role do economics, regulations, lifestyle and public perceptions play in driving them from agriculture? This is the first of two episodes to explore why so many young people across the globe are turning away from farming, and what can be done to tempt them back.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Femicide in Serbia 18 mins – “Violence against women is a persistent problem in Serbia. The numbers aren’t clear, but in the last decade more than 330 women have been murdered by men, mostly partners or close family members. Already this year, more than twenty women have been murdered and countless others abused. According to some studies, 1 in 3 women has experienced physical violence, and almost half of all women have endured psychological violence. In November 2016 the Serbian Parliament adopted a new law on the Prevention Of Domestic Violence, introducing a series of legal and protection measures. The legal aspects were aimed at meeting the standards set by the Council Of Europe Convention On Domestic Violence, ratified by Serbia in 2013. Despite the new law coming into force in June 2017, reported gender-based violence is on the rise. As Serbia continues its negotiations to join the European Union, Nicola Kelly reports from Belgrade on the progress to address violence against women. She speaks to victims of abuse and relatives of those killed and asks what more can be done to address what critics say are systemic institutional failings.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.”

Fermentation Art 19 mins – “For 20 years Sandor Katz has been fascinated by fermentation – the breaking down of food and drink by microbes. Through his books and workshops he has helped thousands of people begin to experiment with flavours, fruits, vegetables, spices… and microorganisms. Dan Saladino travels to Sandor’s forest home in rural Tennessee to meet Sandor, hear his story, and discover for himself the transformative potential of this culinary process.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fertilizer that Blew Up Beirut 21 mins – “Following the Beirut explosion, we’re exploring the chemical that caused the blast – ammonium nitrate. It’s something many of us will have come across before, it’s in some of our antibiotics and used to feed yeast but it’s most commonly sold as a fertiliser. Graihagh Jackson examines how this substance has changed the world – feeding millions on the one hand, and fuelling warfare, pollution and biodiversity loss on the other.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Stockpiles 20 mins – “We’re on the hunt for the world’s biggest stashes of food. Can the food system handle a big shock, or is it time to stock up on your supplies? In last week’s episode we met people doing just that – stockpiling food in anticipation of anything from a major natural disaster, to the apocalypse. They had little faith that their governments would be able to keep the food supply under control in extreme circumstances. This week we set out to test their assumptions. From forgotten World War Two food sheds to Switzerland’s stockpiling sirens, which companies and governments are storing food in bulk? Where are they keeping it? Who can access it? And, if disaster strikes, will any get to you?” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fried Chicken 19 mins – “Fried chicken is loved the world over – it’s the most popular dish in global fast food, according to industry analysts, eclipsing even the burger. From Senegal to Singapore many countries have their own native twist on it, whether it’s covered in sesame seeds, battered in tempura or finished with a dunk in aioli. But what is it that makes fried chicken so appealing to so many different cultures? Graihagh Jackson speaks to three fried chicken shop owners from South Korea, the UK and South Africa to find out how battered poultry has come to achieve such global dominance. They explain how different cultures like their birds fried, how competitive the industry can be, and go deep into the science behind the perfect bite. We also learn how hard it can be to convince customers that fried chicken should be viewed as a gourmet meal, and priced accordingly, rather than a cheap, unhealthy snack. And how important is it to source the best possible meat, without going bust? Plus, is the smell of a deep fat fryer any good for your love life?” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Georgia Mental Health Program 37 mins – “Joyce welcomes Eric Jacobson, executive director Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities and Marlyn Tillman, co-founder and executive director, Gwinnett Parent Coalition to Dismantle the School-to-Prison Pipeline (Gwinnett SToPP) to the show. In keeping with our commitment to cover how the COVID-19 pandemic is being addressed for those with developmental disabilities, Mr. Jacobson will discuss how this population is being assisted during this critical time. While Ms. Tillman will discuss Gwinnett STOPP and why it is a critical need during this pandemic.” At the link left-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless in Silicon Valley 18 mins – “‘Motel 22’ is an unusual shelter for California’s homeless people. The state is one of the wealthiest in America yet it has the largest population of homeless people – more than 151,000 – in the US. In the Silicon Valley the bus route 22 runs an endless loop from Palo Alto to the Valley’s biggest city, San Jose. Along the way it passes some of the world’s biggest tech giants: Google, Apple, Hewlett-Packard and Facebook. It is the Valley’s only all night bus and many of its night-time passengers ride to keep warm and sleep. For Assignment, Sarah Svoboda takes a ride on the bus, known to many as ‘Motel 22’, to hear the stories of its travelers.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ireland Housing Costs 18 mins – “Ireland has booming investment and lots of new jobs. But Chris Bowlby discovers how a huge housing crisis is haunting the country’s young people in particular. Anger about poor housing, and fear of mass emigration by the young are issues with deep roots in Irish memory. And the housing crisis was a crucial factor in the recent Irish election which shocked the main parties and saw big gains for the nationalists of Sinn Fein . Chris travels to the city of Cork in the southwest of the country. He traces the roots of the crisis in a crazy house buying boom a few years ago. And he hears how a lack of good, affordable housing is affecting everyone from students to young families to Ireland’s many younger migrants who hope to stay in Ireland, but have nowhere to call home.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Jurgen Klopp 19 mins – “The manager of Liverpool Football Club, who lead them to victory in the Champions League. But Jurgen Klopp has not always been this successful. When he was a young footballer at Mainz 05 in Germany, his former team mate Guido Shafer says he ‘had no talent’. So what can we learn from his childhood in Germany’s Black Forest? How did he become the manager he is today?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Karachi Ambulance Driver P1 19 mins – “In Karachi, with a population of around 20 million people, ambulance drivers are on the front lines of this megacity’s shifting conflicts. Samira Shackle joins one of these drivers, Muhammad Safdar, on his relentless round of call-outs. As a first-responder for more than fifteen years, Safdar has witnessed Karachi wracked by gang wars, political violence and terrorism. At the height of the unrest, the number of fatalities was often overwhelming. Then a harsh crackdown by the army and the police, beginning in 2014, brought the conflict under control. Following this, Safdar and others like him have seen drastic changes in the nature of their work. Samira joins Safdar as he takes a young man home from hospital after undergoing a leg amputation. They head towards Lyari, on the outskirts of Karachi, which at several points in recent decades has essentially been run by gangsters. Safdar has vivid memories of gang war and street violence, in stark contrast to the situation today. With no state ambulance service in Pakistan, the Edhi Foundation, set up by the late Abdul Sattar Edhi in 1954, stepped in to offer services to the poor. Safdar drives one of its fleet of four hundred ambulances: rudimentary converted vans with basic emergency provision. His missions bring him to many of Karachi’s most deprived and troubled areas, revealing the complex social and economic problems at the heart of the country. As Samira and Safdar traverse this enormous city, their experiences reveal a remarkable story of life and death in contemporary Pakistan.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Karachi Ambulance Driver P2 19 mins – “…Safdar gets an emergency call out: a six-storey building has collapsed in Gollimore. There are many injured. Arriving at the scene, full of noise and chaos, Samira is witness to the scale of the problems Karachi is yet to overcome. As a first-responder for more than fifteen years, Safdar has witnessed Karachi wracked by gang wars, political violence and terrorism. At the height of the unrest, the number of fatalities was often overwhelming. Then a harsh crackdown by the army and the police, beginning in 2014, brought the conflict under control. Following this, Safdar and others like him have seen drastic changes in the nature of their work….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Lebanese Contaminated Fuel 27 mins – “The discovery of a mysterious delivery of defective, sediment-heavy fuel intended to generate electricity in Lebanon has sparked a huge scandal in the country. More than two dozen people, including senior officials, have been charged with various alleged crimes including bribery, fraud, money-laundering and forging documents. Lebanon has already been in uproar since last autumn, with hundreds of thousands of people involved in street protests demanding the overthrow of the entire political elite – and now the country’s suffering its worst economic crisis in decades. The national currency has collapsed and more than a third of the workforce is unemployed. Electricity shortages – long a problem in Lebanon – have become still more acute, with whole towns plunged into darkness for long periods – and the row over the suspect oil delivery has exacerbated the problem. Now the investigation into the tainted fuel has raised questions about the original deal to import heavy fuel oil – and Lebanese hope it will eventually help explain why they’ve suffered black-outs for so long. Did officials try to cover up the presence of sediment in the shipment? How did the original much-criticised 2005 fuel contract come about? And what do the revelations tell us about the shadowy world of oil trading that the world relies on? Reporters Tim Whewell and Mohamad Chreyteh investigate.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mafia in Naples 18 mins – “Across Italy hundreds of mafia leaders, hitmen and drug-traffickers are being jailed thanks to the most powerful weapon now in the hands of Italy’s anti-mafia investigators: the words of one clan against another. Italy’s state collaborator scheme has seen mafia chiefs breaking the code of silence – in return for a lifetime in witness protection, rather than a life behind bars. For Assignment, Dominic Casciani gets exclusive access to an anti-mafia prison to meet one of Naples’ most important “Penitents” – a boss and killer whose evidence has jailed his associates. In the city itself, he witnesses, alongside hardened investigators, the ongoing nightly battle against the Camorra – and also hears voices of hope across the city that the tide has finally turned.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Maggot Masters 19 mins – “This week we’re in South Africa, picking up great big squirming handfuls of maggots. Could these unpalatable little creatures hold the answer to some big questions – what to do about the huge amount of waste going into landfill, and how to meet the world’s growing demand for a sustainable supply of farmed fish, pigs and poultry? A company called Agriprotein thinks its fly farm is the solution. They’ve just won The Food Chain’s first Global Champion Award – which recognises innovative ideas that could have a longstanding impact on the way we produce or consume food. The Food Chain’s Emily Thomas gets up close to their armada of over 9 billion flies in the first of two episodes to explore the potential of using insects as a protein source for animal and fish feed.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marrow Registry 14 mins – “RMF’s Bernie Siegel welcomes Jay Feinberg, founder and CEO of the Gift of Life Marrow Registry, to share his inspiring story, which began in 1991 as a bone marrow transplant recipient. Jay’s experience in finding a match ultimately led to his mission to expand the registry to include all under-represented groups, so that every patient has an equal opportunity and the chance for a cure.” At th link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Mental Health Issues 38 mins – “Joyce welcomes Jennifer Mathis, deputy legal director and director of Policy and Legal Advocacy for the Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law to the show. Ms. Mathis will share advice and suggestions for those dealing with mental health issues, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and employers dealing with increased anxiety due to isolation working from home.” At the link left-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pandemic and Finances 33 mins – “As coronavirus spreads people are worrying about their money as well as their health. What can you do to protect your finances and what are governments doing to help? You’ve been sharing your stories and advice with Manuela Saragosa and Paul Lewis who are joined by: Professor Ricardo Reis, from the London School of Economics Professor Ila Patnaik, a former economic advisor to the Indian government Oluwatosin Olaseinde, founder of Money Africa in Nigeria Bola Sokunbi, the founder of Clever Girl finance in the US Jürgen Stock, the Secretary General of Interpol.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pot Washers 19 mins – “Do you know who’s washing your dishes? Emily Thomas talks to pot washers from around the world, about what they love and loathe about life at the sink. A kitchen can’t survive without the pot washer, yet we rarely give them a second thought, lavishing all our attention instead on the chefs. But maybe we should. Being a pot washer, dishwasher or kitchen porter as it’s variably known, can be the first rung on the restaurant ladder, and many a great chef started out with a scourer in hand. But the job also attracts those who have very limited opportunities in life, and this means they may be more vulnerable to exploitation and abuse.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race and Change 16 mins – “In the days since the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis on 25 May, we have witnessed many things from police officers marching alongside protesters; to the political debate about US police reform; to the toppling of statues that symbolise the history of slavery and racism. Nuala McGovern takes you through conversations with some of the people involved in the global discussion that is taking place.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race in America 16 mins – “As Americans call for change following the killing of George Floyd, three women share the history of slavery in their families and discuss its impact on society today. Sharon Leslie Morgan in Mississippi is the founder of Our Black Ancestry Foundation, which provides resources for African American genealogical research. She’s also co-written a book on the subject called Gather at the Table. Bernice Alexander Bennett is a blogger and radio host in Silverspring, Maryland. Shonda Brooks is a therapist in New Jersey. They’ve been reflecting with Nuala McGovern on what they uncovered when they researched their own family trees.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race in America 16 mins – “The death of George Floyd has provoked a global response and galvanised opinion. We bring together African Americans to discuss race and share experiences of racism in the US. We hear from people who have sought justice from police aggression, from those attempting reconciliation and from police officers themselves. What changes do they want to see to move America in the right direction?” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recycled Orchestra 34 mins – “Every year we produce over 2 billion tonnes of solid waste worldwide. Most of it ends up in dumps or landfills, or is thrown into the oceans, or is burned. Only a small fraction is ever recycled. But are there other, more creative uses for all that rubbish? To try and find some answers, BBC Mundo reporter Lucia Blasco visits Paraguay to meet the inspiring young musicians of the Recycled Orchestra of Cateura, whose instruments are made out of rubbish from the city’s main landfill; and she travels to the city of Linköping in southern Sweden, where almost all the houses are heated by energy produced by incinerating waste.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Recycling Chile and Spain 34 mins – “Leena Vuotovesi, the leader of environmental work in Europe’s greenest town, Ii in Finland, travels to Chile and Spain to compare recycling practices. First she visits La Pintana – Chile’s unlikely climate champion: an impoverished neighbourhood plagued by crime and violence that recycles more than any other town in Chile. Leena then goes to a pristine part of southern Spain – a country where municipal recycling rates lag way behind EU targets. She speaks to children, teachers and waste management experts to find out why Spanish people don’t appear to care about recycling and to see what could be done to reduce environmental and economic damage.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Fruit Pickers 19 mins – “Across the world, as fruits ripen, teams of pickers set out across the fields. Without them, produce would be left to rot and farms profits would plummet. But in many countries, population shifts and changes to immigration laws have left farmers struggling to find enough people to do the work. The effect has been particularly pronounced in the US where President Trump has cracked down on immigration, and the UK with its plans to leave the EU. Enter the robots. Over the past few years, interest and investment in machines that can pick fruit and vegetables that are usually harvested by humans, have been ramping up. Emily Thomas asks whether we should welcome these new developments. Picking fruit is low paid, low-skilled and physically demanding work, and exploitation in the industry is well-documented. But it’s also a source of income that many depend on, and the main source of employment in some parts of the world. Plus, if we do let machines do the job, what are the implications for the environment, and how our food looks and tastes?” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Romanian Revolution 18 mins – “Thirty years after Dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife Elena were executed on Christmas day, Tessa Dunlop looks back at the violent birth of post-Communist Romania and asks if it has shaken off the legacy of decades of ruthless totalitarianism. The violence of the Romanian Revolution marked its difference from the other former Eastern European communist states which were swept away by largely peaceful pro-democracy movements born after the fall of the Berlin wall. In Romania, hundreds died in bloody protests as the regime’s grisly endgame was played out across the world’s media. Now, 30 years later, we revisit the hope and trauma behind the December revolution. What has changed, and how well has Romania come to terms with its past?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Swine Fever 19 mins – “A deadly and highly contagious disease is spreading across Europe’s pig farms. African Swine Fever Virus doesn’t harm humans, but once it infects domestic and wild pigs almost all of them die through internal bleeding within days. More than a million pigs are thought to have died as a result of the latest outbreak, devastating hundreds of farms and damaging exports. It’s the first time the virus has ever hit Europe’s pig farming heartland. With a vaccine still years off, and amid fears the disease could reach as far as China, we ask if the virus can be stopped, and how. Emily Thomas meets people who think the answer lies in building fences between countries, genetically engineering pigs, and even calling in the army to hunt down disease-spreading wild boar.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Teacher in Germany 34 mins – “Five years on from the refugee crisis of 2015, Germany is now home to over a million refugees. In Germany’s Refugee Teachers, Naomi Scherbel-Ball explores a classroom experiment with a difference, a scheme to retrain refugee teachers and place them in German schools to help the country with a shortage of 40,000 teachers. Naomi visits a school in Mönchengladbach in Western Germany, where Mustafa Hammal teaches English. Mustafa, an English teacher with eight years of experience, fled the civil war in Syria with his family in 2015. Arriving in Germany, he discovered a teacher retraining programme designed to harness the skills that refugee teachers bring with them. Miriam Vock, an educational psychologist at Potsdam University transports us back to the summer of 2015. Amidst the chaos of the refugee crisis, she wondered if there might be some teachers amongst the refugees arriving in Germany. A year later the first refugee teacher retraining course was launched, an idea that inspired a number of other pilot courses across Germany. Retraining as a teacher in a system with rigid set qualifications, is particularly challenging however and graduates are finding it difficult to find work. The success of the far-right Alternative for Germany, now the country’s main opposition party, has raised the stakes for refugees trying to integrate. As Germany struggles with an ageing population and a severe labour shortage, Naomi asks if refugees can fill the gap?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Tunes from Trash 34 mins – “Just outside the Paraguayan capital city of Asuncion lies the town of Cateura. It’s an impoverished settlement ranged along the banks of a stinking, polluted river, in the shadow of a giant landfill site. Many of its inhabitants scratch a living by reclaiming objects from the endless ocean of garbage to sell. Recycling of a kind. But for the last ten years the residents of Cateura have been part of a recycling project of a much sweeter sort. La Orquesta de Instrumentos Reciclados de Cateura — the Recycled Orchestra of Cateura — use materials from the landfill site to create musical instruments. An oil drum for a cello, a pipe for a flute, a tin can for a guitar. They’ve toured the world and recorded with the likes of Metallica. As the Orchestra leader Favio Chávez says, “The world sends us garbage. We send back music.” The BBC’s South America Correspondent Wyre Davies visits Cateura, meets Favio Chávez and other members of the Recycled Orchestra and learns how trash, and lives, are being transformed by music.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Wine with Less Alcohol 19 mins – “Wine has been getting more and more alcoholic in recent decades, driven by consumer tastes and climate change. This has big implications not only for public health, but also the quality of the bottle. But making a lower alcohol wine that is still full of flavour is extremely complicated, especially when growing grapes in rising temperatures – some have called it the profession’s Holy Grail. Emily Thomas meets those trying to solve the puzzle: a Chilean vineyard owner; a climate change and grape variety academic; and an Australian scientist whose raspberry-flavoured Chardonnay could hold the key.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wuhan 18 mins – “The BBC’s China correspondent, John Sudworth, travels to Wuhan – the city on the banks of the Yangtze river where Covid-19 first emerged. As the city returns to life, he examines one of the biggest questions on everyone’s mind: did the virus emerge naturally or could it have been leaked, as the US alleges, from a Wuhan lab, where work was being carried out to research bat viruses? As John and his team discover, asking questions and getting answers in Wuhan is no easy task.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zimbabwe Mental Health Control 18 mins – “Zimbabwe has over 14 million people but fewer than 20 psychiatrists. After years of economic turmoil, unemployment and HIV, mental health is a huge challenge and doctors estimate one in four Zimbabweans battles with depression or anxiety. Lucia is one of the 700 grandmothers in the country turning the nation around. She sits on a wooden bench using a gentle form of cognitive behavioural or talking therapy with her community. This is one of 250 Friendship Benches set up by Zimbabwean psychiatrist Dr Dixon Chibanda, who believed that after a few weeks of simple training, grandmothers could become lay health workers for their communities. Lucia has the time, wisdom and respect to help the people who come to her. She understands them and has direct experience of their problems. Presenter Kim Chakanetsa hears the grandmothers are having astounding results. They have helped over 50,000 people and are breaking down the stigma around mental health. Recent clinical trials found they are more effective than conventional medical treatments. As a result, Dixon Chibanda gets enquiries from around the world for the Friendship Bench and he’s setting them up in Malawi, Zanzibar, Kenya, Tanzania and now New York. The World Health Organisation said more than 264 million people were suffering from depression. That was before Covid-19 brought new challenges. As people are more isolated and anxious, Dixon Chibanda explains how he is facing up to the pandemic, moving his idea online and giving the world access to a virtual Friendship Bench.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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