MMD 467 Media Mining Digest: BARDA, Body Mass Index, Boy Scouts Bankruptcy, Cave Man, Chinese Espionage, Corona Virus Testing, Covid Financial Bailout, Covid Infected Doctor, Culinary Extinction, Deepwater Horizon Spill, Economic Crisis, Exercise, Feeble Mindedness Discussion, Food Production, Ginger Handbook, Gift Card Value, Gluten Removal, Hospital Bed Economics, Jane Goodall, Libyan Female Fighters, Mars Exploration, Moon Exploration, Munition Site Explosions, North Korea Arms Trafficking, Oil Price Control, Oil Prices Drop, Ostomies, Pangolins, Protective Equipment Purchase, Saving Our Planet, Scott and the South Pole, Small Business Support by Government, Telegraphy History in Australia, Temperature and Productivity, Unemployment, Ventilators, Virus Economic Response

Exercise your ears: the 37 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 665 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

BARDA 14 mins – “So as you might’ve heard, we are in the middle of a coronavirus outbreak, and this isn’t the first one. There have been three bad ones in the past 18 years. SARAH GONZALEZ, HOST: There was SARS. Remember that one? That was a coronavirus. It hit in 2003, and it probably came from bats. And then there was MERS, which started in 2012, and that came from camels. ARONCZYK: And now there is COVID-19. That’s the official name of this current coronavirus disease. And that one probably also came from bats. GONZALEZ: And once you know that these coronaviruses aren’t something that came out of nowhere, that they’ve been around for years, the obvious question is, where’s the vaccine? ARONCZYK: That would be great. A vaccine would be great right about now. GONZALEZ: I think people would buy it. ARONCZYK: Yes, we would.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Body Mass Index 12 mins – “Having a high BMI is supposed to be a call to get serious about your health by losing weight. But recent studies say BMI can be inaccurate and misleading. So should you worry if your BMI is too high? To cut through the BS about BMI, Dr. Brian Goldman sits down with Dr. Arya Sharma, a professor of medicine at the University of Alberta, who just happens to be Canada’s obesity guru.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Boy Scouts Bankruptcy 31 mins – “Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy after years of declining enrollment and mounting allegations of widespread sexual abuse. Is this the death knell for the organization?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cave Man 4 mins – “Historically, anthropologists have used brain size to infer intelligence of our ancestors. Lucy, the famous Australopithecine, lived 3.2 million years ago and based on brain size has had her intelligence placed between gorillas and modern humans . But Roger Seymour challenges that approach and says blood flow needs to be considered, as it is related to cognitive ability. By measuring the holes in the brain case through which the carotid artery passes, Roger Seymour is able to determine the rate of blood flow and suggests our ancestor Australopithecine might not have been as intelligent as once thought.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Espionage 32 mins – “Chinese espionage is a real problem for this country. But is the FBI overreacting to Chinese theft of intellectual property, and creating a new red scare?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus Test 15 mins – “The coronavirus feels like it came out of nowhere, but the rules for developing tests have been around for a century. In this episode, we take you inside the pandemic testing system to try and understand the coronavirus tests we’ve all been hearing so much about: how they work, who makes them, and why it’s all taking so long.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Financial Bailout 15 mins – “Now is not the time for finely crafted solutions. The economy is in crisis, and Congress is tackling it by doing what they do best: Spending inconceivable amounts of money. The economic rescue package coming out of the Senate will send an avalanche of cash to small businesses, large corporations, state and local governments — and, mostly importantly, regular Americans. Almost everyone will have more money in their pockets, but where exactly will that money come from? On today’s show, we go deep inside the mechanisms to come up with two trillion dollars before the economy collapses. There’s the regular way and the magical way, and this time we’ll need both. Also, we’ll ask: Can you create too much money, and what happens when you do?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Infected Doctor 18 mins – “Canadians are doing their bit to control the spread of COVID-19 through physical distancing. The idea is to stay far away from a sometimes-deadly virus to which we’re not immune. You can’t do that if you’re a frontline healthcare worker. This week, Dr. Brian Goldman speaks to fellow healthcare workers, who, like him, are dealing with COVID-19 every day, on the job. Maureen Taylor is a physician assistant working on COVID-19 ward at Toronto’s Michael Garron hospital. She shares an intimate look at what it’s like to treat COVID-19 patients, some of whom will not recover. She and Dr. Goldman share thoughts on how they remain calm in the face of the crisis, concerns about a lack of protective equipment and the heightened risk they face for getting infected. That risk became a reality for Dr. Joseph Finkler, a Vancover ER doctor who is now recovering from COVID-19. He tells Dr. Goldman what it felt like to have COVID-19 and how he feels now that he’s recovered, including the fact that he’s facing stigma from neighbours and even other healthcare workers because he tested positive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Culinary Extinction 36 mins – “It all came of a discussion between food researcher Lenore Newman and a friend. They were discussing whether species that we ate would be preserved from extinction because we’d make the effort to save them, if only to keep supplying our dinner tables. This led Newman to investigate the phenomenon of “culinary extinction” in which humans have, by hunting foods to extinction, or just changing our eating habits, allowed edible species and varieties of plant to disappear.  She explores this, and what it means for the future of food in her new book, Lost Feast – Culinary Extinction and the Future of Food. Lenore Newman is the Canada Research Chair in Food Security and Environment at the University of The Fraser Valley.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Deepwater Horizon Spill 37 mins – “On the 5th anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon disaster, Science Editor-in-Chief Marcia McNutt discusses the role of science in responding to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Also, Warren Cornwall examines the state of ecological recovery 5 years later.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Economic Crisis 10 mins – “Neel Kashkari ran the bailout of the banks and car companies in 2008. He explained to Congress why they needed to spend hundreds of billions of dollars. Now, he’s the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, and a member of the committee that sets interest rates. His advice for fighting a crisis like the one we’re facing now: Whatever you think you should do, do more. Whenever you think you should do it, do it sooner.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exercise 36 mins – “We’re constantly told of the importance of exercise…Professor John Hawley from the Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research tells us just how much we need.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feeble Mindedness Discussion 36 mins – “She has her mother’s laugh, or sense of humour, or sensibility, or even intelligence. It raises the age-old question; genetics or environment? In his book, Carl Zimmer dispels longstanding misconceptions about heredity. We are taken on a journey through time and technology, from the inbred Holy Roman Empire to the birthplace of American eugenics to the Japanese lab where scientists are reprogramming skin cells into eggs and sperm – the book covers the entire history of genetics and epigenetics. It was The Guardian’s Science Book of the Year in 2018. This discussion took place at the Adelaide Writer’s Festival.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Production 12 mins – “The empty grocery shelves are unnerving. While we’re probably not going to starve in the long run, the farm system is going to be seriously stressed. Most of our fruits and vegetables are picked by hand. 73% of farmworkers in the U.S. are foreign born; half are undocumented. What happens when those workers get sick? How do we keep the food supply chain going when borders are closed over coronavirus concerns? In this episode, to understand how the coronavirus is affecting and might affect our food, we talk to an economist, a farmer, and, of course, the people who really make farms go — the farmworkers.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Handbook 19 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on gender in small arms control, as part of the Gender Lens for Arms Control Support and Sustainability (GLASS) project, funded by the Government of Canada. The Small Arms Survey will publish a Handbook on gender and arms control later in 2019, the authors and editor of which are discussants in this episode: Vanessa Corlazzoli, independent evaluation consultant; Emile LeBrun, Small Arms Survey consultant; Henri Myrttinen, independent researcher; Allison Pytlak, disarmament programme manager, Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF)” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gift Card Value 20 mins – “Over the past couple weeks, we’ve gotten a ton of questions. Like: How can I help my local small business? Why don’t they just shut down the market? How is the government going to get a check to everybody? In this episode, we reach out to people in the know and try to answer some of the most asked, and most interesting questions. Keep them coming. Some answers: The deal with toilet paper; stock market circuit breakers; coronabucks; corporate paper & how to help. We read every one…” At the link right-click “MP3”the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gluten Removal 5 mins – “Gluten is present in the grains of plants. It is a protein and often a source of nitrogen for the germinating plant. Some plant proteins act as a defence for the plant, leaving insects with a belly ache, similar to when people with gluten intolerance eat gluten. Michelle Colgrave is working to identify gluten in plants, find its genetic source and breed plants without it. It is not an easy task. In wheat for example, there are six chromosomes all with genes coding for proteins including gluten. Her work covers a range of grains including barley and rye. Even when there is success in developing a gluten-free plant, there are additional challenges in growing the gluten-free varieties as contamination occurs easily with crop rotation in fields.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hospital Bed Economics 14 mins – “Bellevue, the oldest public hospital in the nation, has seen everything and survived everything. But even they might not have enough beds. Here’s why.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jane Goodall 36 mins – “How can Jane Goodall have hope for the future, especially for the animals she loves, when the news about extinctions is so bleak? The chimpanzees she’s studied for 60 years are in trouble and climate change bothers her deeply. But she is exuberant above all about Roots and Shoots! These are the young people across the globe who’ve supported her good work and show no signs of slackening their ultra-green efforts.  As The Hope, a 2-hour film about Jane and her life, is launched this week by National Geographic Jane joins Robyn on The Science Show to discuss the film, her work and her hope.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Libyan Female Fighters 17 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on Libyan female fighters and the role of women during the Libyan conflict and post-conflict peacebuilding, as part of the Survey’s Security Assessment in North Africa (SANA) project. The discussants are: Hasnaa El Jamali, Small Arms Survey consultant who has conducted original research with Libyan women who were active during and after the 2011 revolution; David Lochhead, Small Arms Survey consultant with wide experience on security sector reform, border security, and peacekeeping in different parts of Africa with the United Nations; and Manal Taha, Small Arms Survey consultant and northern Africa regional expert with extensive knowledge on violent extremist, stabilization, and conflict resolution.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mars Exploration 12 mins – “One hundred years ago, the first humans reached the South Pole of this planet. More than 40 years ago, man first walked on the moon. When will our species first set foot to explore the planet Mars? Kevin Fong seeks a likely launch date. He asks who will get us there and why we really need to explore the Red Planet.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Moon Exploration 12 mins – “One hundred years ago, Scott reached the South Pole. Fifty years later, the first geologist briefly walked on the moon. Kevin Fong asks if why we might want to return to the lunar surface and what will get us. He talks to that first lunar geologist of Apollo 17, Harrison Schmitt and Nasa’s Chief Administrator Charles Bolden, among others.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Munition Site Explosions 16 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on unplanned explosions at munitions sites (UEMS). Our speakers, Jovana Carapic, Remo Gassmann, and Benjamin King, discuss the problem at hand, the causes behind these explosions, as well as their consequences. The episode forms part of our Gender Lens for Arms Control Support and Sustainability (GLASS) project, funded by the Government of Canada.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Arms Trafficking 24 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on illicit arms trafficking from North Korea, including sources of arms, routes and modes of transport, concealment methods, and ways to curb such trafficking. Our discussants are Bruce Bechtol, North Korea expert as well as professor of Political Science, Angelo State University; and Matt Schroeder, senior researcher, Small Arms Survey, and co-author of the Survey’s upcoming Briefing Paper on the mechanics of North Korean arms trafficking. The episode forms part of the Small Arms Survey project Strengthening Implementation and Enforcement of the Arms Embargo on North Korea (SAENK), supported by the Kingdom of the Netherlands ” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Price Control 13 mins – “OPEC started in the 1960s when a bunch of oil-exporting countries got together and asked themselves: Why are we all competing with each other? Why don’t we just carve up the market and let the profits roll in? So they formed a cartel. And it had been working pretty well — until this weekend, when something went horribly wrong for the cartel, and the price of oil fell almost 25%. In this episode, we follow the plunge in oil prices from the viral outbreak in China, to a secret meeting in Vienna, to one guy who runs a little mom-and-pop oil business in Kansas — all to find out why this happened, and what exactly this price crash means.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Prices Drop 13 mins – “OPEC started in the 1960s when a bunch of oil-exporting countries got together and asked themselves: Why are we all competing with each other? Why don’t we just carve up the market and let the profits roll in? So they formed a cartel. And it had been working pretty well — until this weekend, when something went horribly wrong for the cartel, and the price of oil fell almost 25%. In this episode, we follow the plunge in oil prices from the viral outbreak in China, to a secret meeting in Vienna, to one guy who runs a little mom-and-pop oil business in Kansas — all to find out why this happened, and what exactly this price crash means.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ostomies 18 mins – “Dr Brian Goldman talks to Jessica Grossman, a twenty-nine year-old marketing executive with Crohn’s disease. In an effort to battle the stigma of having an ostomy, she uses social media to post photos of herself with her ostomy clearly visible. Brian also talks to Karen Bruton, a frontline nurse in Victoria BC who specializes in wound, ostomy and continence care – or NSWOC for short. In her 34-year career, Bruton has taught dozens of patients how to live with an ostomy. She says much of the stigma surrounding ostomies comes directly from health care providers themselves.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Pangolins 36 mins – “Evidence strongly points to a single jump of the SARS COV 2 virus which causes COVID-19 in a wet market in Wuhan China. And now, the pangolin is thought to be a likely transmission vector between bats and humans. Pangolins are found 48 countries across Asia and Africa. They are poached for meat and scales. This excerpt from a discussion about the illegal animal trade is from a discussion at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in February 2016.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Protective Equipment Purchase 16 mins – “The pandemic has turned the market for critical items like masks and gloves into a free-for-all. The national stockpile is pretty much depleted. The normal channels are tapped out. The Feds have opted not to manage it, leaving every state to fend for itself. Today on the show, we take you into one high pressure deal where the difference between life and death comes down to a locked room filled with computer servers, bureaucrats willing to bend the rules, and a guy… who knows a guy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saving Our Planet 14 mins – “Dr. Kathy Sullivan talks about her experiences as a space and maritime explorer and how exploration improves the science of sustainability. Hear Esri Chief Scientist Dawn Wright lead this discussion with a voyager who puts her expeditions in the context of civilization. To learn more about location intelligence and solutions for sustainability, visit www.esri.com.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scott and the South Pole 12 mins – “Kevin Fong looks beyond the failure of Robert Falcon Scott’s expedition to be the first to reach the South Pole and focuses instead on the scientific legacy of Scott’s explorations of Antarctica between 1901 and 1912. In recent years, much has been written about Scott the polar loser and bungler. But that personalised focus ignores the pioneering scientific research and discoveries. The revelations transformed Antarctica from an unknown quantity on the map into a profoundly important continent in the Earth’s past and present. Before Scott and Shackleton trekked across the vast ice sheets in the early 1900s, no-one was sure whether there was even a continent there. Some geographers had suggested Antarctica was merely a vast raft of ice anchored to a scattering of islands. The science teams on Scott’s expeditions made fundamental discoveries about Antarctic weather and began to realise the frozen continent’s fundamental role in global climate and ocean circulation. They discovered rocks and fossils which showed Antarctica was once a balmy forested place. They mapped the magnetism around the South Pole for both science and navigators. They found many new species of animals and revealed the extraordinary winter breeding habits of the penguins. The dedication to scientific discovery is most poignantly revealed by fossils that Scott’s party collected after their disappointment of being beaten by Amundsen and a few weeks before they froze to death trudging across the Ross ice shelf. They found a particular plant fossil which had been one of the Holy Grails on the early explorations of Antarctica’s interior. Its discovery proved an hypothesis raised by Darwin among others that all the southern continents were once linked together by a landmass that would lain where Antarctica is today. The fossils were also important evidence to support the new and controversial theory of Continental Drift – a theory which now underpins the entirety of modern Earth science.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Small Business Support by Government 16 mins – “Over this past week, America’s small businesses have been looking for relief and economic security. Their best bet: A brand new government program with $349 billion worth of support. The Paycheck Protection Program, or PPP, was designed for businesses that employ fewer than 500 people. Every business can ask for enough money to cover two and half months worth of payroll. The problem is that this program, meant to save the economy from collapse, is untested. It was thrown together in a week, and the launch has been a mess. The big question: Can the government come up with a system to get massive amounts of money to the right people before millions of businesses close, forever?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Telegraphy History in Australia 36 mins – “It is now thirty years since the internet began to transform the way we communicate. But the age of modern communication was born almost 150 years ago when the telegraph began to spread around the world. For Australia, so isolated by distance, this wonderful new technology had a huge impact on society, business and politics, connecting the far-flung continent with the rest of globe. Paul Davies retraces one of the great engineering achievements of the 19th century. And now, Julian Todd, great great grandson of Sir Charles Todd, who oversaw construction of the telegraph from Adelaide to Darwin is about to set out and retrace Sir Charles’ heroic journey across the continent. This program by Paul Davies and Pauline Newman was first broadcast 26th Nov 2005.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Temperature and Productivity 4 mins – “Women generally want to feel warmer. Younger people are happy in a T-shirt. How do we please everyone in a modern open-plan office? Why should people need personal radiators under their desks and heavy jackets? Tom Chang has investigated who wants what, and how office temperature effects productivity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Unemployment 16 mins – “On Thursday mornings, the Department of Labor releases its weekly unemployment claims — something that never makes the news. On average, maybe a few hundred thousand sign up. But at 8:30am, they announced the worst spike in unemployment the country has ever seen, by far — a staggering 3,283,000 new claims for unemployment. In a week. Today on the show — what it means to lose a job right now when the mandate for most of us is: Stay home. We look at an overwhelmed unemployment system – the system that exists, the one we dream of, and the one that’s being built on the fly.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ventilators 16 mins – “Today on the show: ventilators — the supply and demand problem of the COVID pandemic. The simplest way for the world to get more ventilators is for existing companies to max out production — pay overtime; hire extra workers; run the factory 24/7. They already know how to make ventilators and already have FDA approval. The problem with that strategy is that there’s a ceiling to it. Take the Seattle-area-based Ventec. They’re set up to make around 200 ventilators a month. They could maybe get that up to 1,000. But that’s not going to be nearly enough. So companies that have never made ventilator parts are racing to help. With hundreds of thousands of lives at stake, all across the world, factories are trying to turn on a dime. From the frantic emails, to the supply chain nightmares to the maxed-out assembly lines — we go inside the scramble to make more ventilators, fast.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Economic Response 14 mins – “COVID-19 isn’t the first coronavirus outbreak. It’s actually the third in the past 18 years, following SARS and MERS. And you would think that with all the drug makers in the world, at least one would have come up with a vaccine by now — because it seems like they would have a lot of customers. But the market for emergency vaccines isn’t like a regular market… it’s a lot weirder than that. In this episode, we meet the guy who’s supposed to save us all, we explore how vaccines are made and why they take so long to make, and why you can’t just walk into Walgreens and buy one. Yet.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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