MMD468 Media Mining Digest: Amgen Tea Brazil, Anthropology and Finances, Bed Bugs, Cement Innovation, Change Disruptive, Cognitive Dissonance, Corporate Insurgent, Disrupt Yourself, Diversity Bonus, Fearless Organization, Innovation, Investment Concepts, Medical Care Access, Medici Effect, Mobile Phone Skype, Nuclear Submarine Commander, Parasitism by Worms, Parasitism in Uganda, Phase Transitions, Proactive Obsolescence, Rotifier Infestation, Sanitizing Hygiene, Smart Companies, Startup History, Team Leadership, Unconscious Bias

Exercise your ears: the 29 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 512 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Aging Mentor, Young Turk 28 mins – “I find stories of leaders who have successfully reinvented themselves mid-career both compelling and informative. This is mainly because I have been on this journey for the past 4 years and am always on the look out for guides. Chip Conley has successfully made this transition, and is now helping many others take the same journey. Rather than being a “sage from the stage”, Chip describes himself as a “guide from the side”. His story of going from founder and CEO of the leading chain of boutique hotels in the US, Joie de Vivre, to being essentially an intern at Airbnb and mentor to founder Brian Chesky, will be of interest to anyone feeling overwhelmed by changes in their industry, or worried about becoming irrelevant in the workplace as a result of technology or other disruptive forces shaping our world of work. As a result of his experiences at Airbnb, and the success of his latest book “Wisdom at Work: The Making of a Modern Elder,” Chip has recently launched The Modern Elder Academy, with the tag line: Where midlife mastery is the launchpad to growing whole, not old. In our conversation he tells his story.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

AI Impact 24 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by digital and marketing entrepreneur, John Straw, who describes himself as a “technonomist” – someone exploring the cutting edge of technology and looking to understand where it fits from both an economic and commercial perspective. John is a Senior Advisor at McKinsey, as well as an author, speaker and investor with over 30 years of experience in IT and digital transformation. What Was Covered: The journey John sees towards “programmatic enterprises” in which the availability of data and artificial intelligence allow for organizational control on a totally different level than possible today; How this journey takes us from decision making via experience and intuition to experience augmented by data to data augmented by experience to simply by data. And how, as per previous major shifts (think of the introduction of the PC) this happens not as a “big bang” but as a more gradual or “stealthy” process; The advice that John uses when personally investing in new technology businesses and his two-part rule which he advises business leaders to use in renovation and innovation implementation Key Takeaways and Learnings: How companies are using “layered” data to improve their renovation and innovation activities; How new technologies, and the pace of their development, provide opportunities for scale for all companies’ renovation processes; Why transformational innovation activities (“breaking” the existing business) need to go “in the garage”, away from the innovation “killers” of process and politics” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Amgen Tea Brazil 25 mins – “In this episode we’re joined by Tyler Gage, co-founder of the organic tea company Runa, and author of the book, Fully Alive: Using the Lessons of the Amazon to Live Your Mission in Business and Life. Tyler shares how his immersion into life in the Amazon guided him in building a socially responsible business able to thrive in the hyper-competitive soft drinks segment. What Was Covered: How Tyler’s interest in peak performance led him to indigenous elders in the Amazon and how life there inspired him to build a business; The parallels to be found from the Amazonian concept of wisdom and modern business and entrepreneurship; Discovering strength in vulnerability and how admitting what we don’t know creates an environment to learn from others Key Takeaways and Learnings: How the sophisticated listening and landscape awareness skills that are required to provide food in the Amazon can deliver success for an executive or entrepreneur; Seeing obstacles as teachers, and how this tribal practice of the South American rainforests is a winning strategy for business problem solving; How businesses can use their “taproot”, their reason for existence, to create cultures that inspire employees” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Anthropology and Finances 29 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by author and journalist, Gillian Tett, to discuss the role anthropology plays in today’s business world. Gillian is the author of the award-winning book, Fool’s Gold, which analyses the origin of the 2008 financial crisis, and more recently, The Silo Effect, and is currently a columnist and US Managing Editor of The Financial Times. What Was Covered: Why more and more companies today are turning to anthropologists for insight into employee and consumer culture. What executives can do to prevent silos from developing within their organizations. How anthropology and cultural awareness can help us to understand and predict the future of the digital and technology economy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Bed Bugs 50 mins – “Dickson, Daniel and Vincent solve the case of the Ugandan Volunteer With Morning Bites and discuss integration of HIV-1 into the Schistosome genome, with a sprinkling of COVID-19 throughout. Case Study for TWiP 18260 yo female comes in with husband, grew up in Lima Peru. Having issue had when child, would get itchiness around anus, mother would have her eat pumpkin seeds. Every 2-3 weeks wakes up with severe itching. Put in q-tip and extracted something, has video of it. ONP stool cultures negative. Referred to Daniel. Negative medical history, no allergies, no surgeries, no medications. Does travel, mainly to Uganda. HIV negative, no toxic habits. Husband reports no symptoms. Has children/grandchildren.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cement Innovation 30 mins – “In this episode we are joined by Annalisa Gigante, former Head of Innovation and R&D at LafargeHolcim. With over 25 years of experience her expertise includes management, HR, strategy, marketing and innovation. She is currently a Board member of ZIS. What was covered: How Annalisa’s experience in different industries throughout her career has given her the opportunity to see parallels in business innovation; Annalisa’s unique approach on handling project failures and how to regain momentum as an individual and as a team; Annalisa’s view that innovation is present in all areas of business and not limited to within innovation teams, and how this multi-disciplinary approach ultimately helps creative growth” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Change Disruption 26 mins – “In this episode, Scott D Anthony, writer, speaker and Senior Partner at consulting firm Innosight, joins us to discuss his book, Dual Transformation – How to Reposition Today’s Business While Creating the Future. Scott is a globally renowned specialist in innovation, publishing several books on the domain as well as being a regular contributor to the Harvard Business Review.What Was Covered: Scott’s concept of ‘dual transformation’ and his assertion today’s every changing global marketplace companies need to reinventing their business of today to make it ‘better, faster, cheaper’ (Transformation A) at the same time as creating their business of tomorrow (Transformation B); Why the most successful leaders in innovation are ‘living at the periphery’ and not at the core of their industry; Why Scott believes that combining the best elements of startups and large companies is a good path to solve today’s biggest global challenges; How Scott’s experience of living in Asia has evolved his thinking on how best to organize markets, and the role that family owned businesses, private companies and government linked enterprises can play” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cognitive Dissonance 18 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by David Novak, former CEO and Founder of Yum! Brands which includes Pizza Hut, Taco Bell, and KFC. David is the author of several books including Taking People With You and his biography The Education of An Accidental CEO. David has co-founded oGoLead, a digital leadership training platform that aims to change the world by building better leaders. What Was Covered: Why David believes there is a toxic leadership problem in today’s business world and the role leadership training has to play in solving this problem; The recognition methods and processes that are central to David’s leadership philosophy; How David uses his experience as a marketer to get inside the minds of the people he leads to learn perceptions, habits, and beliefs and so better understand where to focus efforts to achieve change” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Corporate Insurgent 25 mins – “In this episode, writer, speaker, and intrapreneur, Gib Bulloch, joins us to discuss his book ‘The Intrapreneur: Confessions of a Corporate Insurgent.’ He spent 20 years at Accenture where he started Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), a businsess unit set up to leverage that business’s expertise and experience in service of global development organizations.Gib now works as a consultant specializing in intrapreneurship, social enterprise, and cross-sectoral partnerships. He is also a noted public speaker and has contributed to The Huffington Post, Businessweek, and The Stanford Social Innovation Review.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Disrupt Yourself 28 mins – “Whitney Johnson is the author of Disrupt Yourself and a contributor to the Harvard Business Review. Whitney is best known for her work on driving corporate innovation through personal disruption. She discusses the four things that help you know whether you’re on the right or wrong S curve and shares examples of how to disrupt a constraint in a company environment. Tune in for more insightful advice from Whitney!” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Diversity Bonus 34 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by Scott E. Page, a Professor of Complex Systems, Politcal Sciences, and Economics at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Scott is an external faculty member at the Santa Fe Institute and is an author and speaker who has worked with Google, Bloomberg, Blackrock and NASA. Today, he discusses his book, The Diversity Bonus. What was covered: Why diversity within teams must be based on cognitive differences and not solely differences in identity; How the best problem-solvers and forecasters use several models and equations to assess the best strategy for solving complex economic issues; Why cognitive diversity is a strategic asset given its impact on high-value problem solving, predictions and strategic planning” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Fearless Organization 35 mins – “When Google embarked on an extensive study to understand what makes for a high-performing team, it was Amy Edmondson’s research on “psychological safety” that became the foundation of the company’s findings. Edmondson, a Harvard Business School professor and organizational behavior expert, joins the podcast to talk about her latest book, The Fearless Organization. She says that “psychological safety describes a climate at work where one believes that you can freely speak up with any idea, concern, question, even mistakes.” It’s “a sense of permission for candor.” She explains the benefits of creating psychological safety in the workplace and why it’s essential for learning, innovation, and growth in the knowledge economy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Fearless Organization 31 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by Hal Gregersen, author of The Innovator’s DNA, to discuss his latest book, Questions are the Answer. Hal is a Senior Lecturer in Leadership and Innovation and the Executive Director of the Leadership Center at MIT, and has previously taught at Dartmouth College, The World Economic Forum, and the London Business School. What Was Covered: Why Hal believes most CEOs have trouble asking questions and how to pivot from answer-centric to question-led leadership. How to be a better leader by asking the ‘different, better question’ and using the ‘power of the pause’. How Hal’s question-first process of re-framing of challenges can help us discover the winning solution.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Innovating 27 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by Luis Perez-Breva, a lecturer and research scientist at MIT’s School of Engineering and the Director of MIT’s Innovation Teams Program. Luis has extensive experience in both innovation practice – via his involvement in multiple startups – and innovation research – through his academic work.   We are talking about his first book, Innovating: A Doer’s Manifesto for Starting from a Hunch, Prototyping Problems, Scaling Up, and Learning to Be Productively Wrong. What Was Covered: Why Luis sees following “innovation recipes” is inherently wasteful and essentially high stakes gambling; How the best innovators both prepare for scale at each stage and excel at applying their “parts” to identified problems; How a corporation’s existing products and services give it an innovation advantage over startups Key Takeaways and Learnings: Luis’s tried and tested method, anticipating failure at each ‘scale’, which can help innovators to prepare and solve as many foreseeable faults as possible – what he calls being “productively wrong” as a way to avoid “failing predictably”; How to use linear processes to improve the non-linear process of building innovation; Innovating the skillset; how companies learn and re-purpose what they do today to provide entirely different products in the future” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Investment Concepts 25 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by Robert Hagstrom, who is an author, investment strategist, and portfolio manager. His books include The New York Times bestselling The Warren Buffett Way and The NASCAR Way: The Business That Drives the Sport and Investing: The Last Liberal Art, in which he investigates investment concepts that lie out with traditional economics.” What Was Covered: Robert’s commitment to the “latticework” theory of investing, which is based on building connections between different mental models and disciplines; The reasons that Robert views biology as the better discipline to think about markets rather than the physics based approach most commonly used in modern portfolio theory; The risks of comparative analysis for decision making given our tendency to look for what is similar more than what is different Key Takeaways and Learnings: Steps to being a better investor by using multiple models of comparison and analysis and observing multiple perspectives; Robert’s advice on the questions to ask yourself before investing in companies, and how he personally looks for growth in potential new investments; How to think outside of traditional economic theory and use concepts from biology, philosophy, and psychology to make better business decisions” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Medical Care Access 15 mins – “Sahar Hashemi OBE is best known as the founder of Coffee Republic, as well as a confectionery brand Skinny Candy. She is active in the world of entrepreneurialism and charity, and is an accomplished author, having written “Anyone can do it” about her journey from corporate lawyer to founding a successful chain of coffee shops, and a more recent book titled “Start Up Forever” helping large companies innovate. In this conversation, we cover all topics related to being an entrepreneur, building a business, and what it means from a personal development point of view. We discuss some of the skills and mindsets that one needs, as well as how this impacts people in larger process-driven organizations looking to foster a more entrepreneurial mindset. What Is Covered:  How entrepreneurialism drives resourcefulness and self-discovery; Why people confuse entrepreneurs with inventors and what the difference is; The ‘startup forever’ habits that can help large companies adopt an entrepreneurial mindset Key Learnings and Takeaways: The only way to give momentum to an entrepreneurial idea is to take it out of one’s head, make that first phone call, get a sample of it, try to price it and make the idea tangible in the physical world. Five habits to foster entrepreneurial mindset: get rid of bureaucracy and processes; get out of the office; be clueless, curious, have an open mind; bootstrap and try your idea out on a small scale, and expect people to say no to your idea. The only way to see how a company performs is to maintain the balance between the status quo and having certain systems and processes in place, but also giving people the freedom to break that status quo.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Medici Effect 31 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by author, speaker, and entrepreneur, Frans Johansson. Frans is the author of the bestselling book, The Medici Effect, from which the now popular term was coined, and more recently, The Click Moment. Frans is the Founder and CEO of The Medici Group, a consultancy firm which promotes innovation through diversity. What Was Covered: The Medici Effect, the name given to what happened in a period in Florence history where creative individuals from myriad disciplines, sculptors, architects, painters, philosophers, etc., were able to break down the boundaries between the different disciplines and cultures and ignite what became one of the most creative eras in Europe’s history and the lessons it has for today’s world of business; How the instinct to surround yourself with people like yourself creates barriers to innovation; How organizations typically do not properly capitalize on the valuable resource that new hires bring – a critical period where new concepts and ideas can be introduced; How to introduce diversity at executive level by overcoming the fear of the unpredictability of innovation” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Mobile Phone Skype 25 mins – “Combining Startup and Corporate with Jenny Fielding of Techstars In this episode we are joined by Jenny Fielding Managing Director at Techstars, a global venture capital fund for innovative tech startups. Jenny has extensive experience in both the startup and corporate worlds and a strong passion for “marrying startups with corporates” to create innovation and cultural shifts.  In this episode we cover: Jenny’s extraordinary success scaling and exiting her first startup Switch-Mobile in three years; How she moved a legacy organisation like BBC into the new digital era and founded BBC Labs, the UK’s first corporate incubator. Why infusing corporate and startup culture is so powerful and how she continues to do it at Techstars with the likes of GE, Bosch, Verizon, SAP and PWC. What we learned: Why listening to those from all levels of the organisation is so important in effectively innovating.The virtue of listening is also explored by Robert Cialdini and Kevin Kelly. How potent and powerful the idea of bringing people together from different worlds can be and how it can be done effectively. How the startup scene has been hugely idealised and why it’s important to talk openly about the struggles founders face and how it differs from the corporate world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Nuclear Submarine Commander 26 mins – “Captain David Marquet was supposed to command another submarine but was vectored to the USS Santa Fe at the last minute. The Santa Fe was in the hurt locker: morale was low, performance was low, retention was at the bottom of the fleet. The subsequent journey caused him to rethink everything about leadership he’d been taught. …We cover his book, Turn The Ship Around! A True Story of Building Leaders by Breaking Rules, which has been recently re-released with a new companion workbook. Why it is essential to have a longer-term perspective in your people development processes. Because while achievement scorecard runs while you’re at an organization, your leadership scorecard starts counting the day you leave; Why leadership should be centered on ‘leaning back’ and inviting your team to ‘lean forward’; Why David believes it is important to alternate between two sets of behaviors, languages, and mindsets to optimize between production and decision-making scenarios Key Takeaways and Learnings; How pausing – and fighting the urge to take immediate action – is essential to developing the ‘leadership muscle’ of a team…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Parasitism by Worms 69 mins – “The TWiP DVD solve the case of the Child Who Passed Worms, and discuss a non-human primate model for severe malarial anemia.” At the link right-click “Download TWiP #179” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parasitism in Uganda 74 mins – “Eastern border of Uganda with Kenya, in mountains. Drinking water from nearby stream. Two young boys come to clinic, without parents. Sent in by grandmother because 1 yo brother has been passing worms. Long, white, flat. Shown photos in PD7, pinkish worm, 8 inches long, round. He points to those, what he has been seeing in brother’s stool. 1 year old seems small, protuberant abdomen; brother small for stated age, bit of protuberant belly. Diet: high carbohydrate, flour deep fried; yams; cabbage; some rice; soybeans; pumpkin; bananas.” At the link right-click “Download TWiP #178 ” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phase Transitions 40 mins – “Safi Bahcall is a second-generation physicist and entrepreneur, whose first book, Loonshots, has been described as a cross between Freakonomics and the da Vinci Code. At the heart of the book is a philosophy which is foundational for everything we do at OutsideLens: that you can learn a great deal by applying the tools and techniques from one world, in this case the world of physics and to a lesser extent psychology, to the world of innovation in business. What Was Covered: How the structure of a company, rather than its culture, enables or disables innovation; The two basic phases in any organisation – who are “artists” and “soldiers” and how to achieve an equilibrium between them; The three key elements to build a sustainable innovation system – the metaphor of the ice cube, the garden hoe and the heart” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Proactive Obsolescence 24 mins – “Lisa Bodell is a globally recognized innovation leader and futurist. She founded futurethink in 2003 and is the author of the book, Kill the Company. Lisa sits down with Mark to discuss how leaders can become more efficient in the work place and how they can properly simplify the work process for everyone in the company.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Rotifer Infestation 60 mins – “The TWiPsters solve the case of the Rashy Schoolteacher, and reveal a drug from rotifers that live on the snail intermediate host which paralyzes schistosome cercariae and prevents infection of mice. 49 yo man sent to Daniel for ID consultation. Reports in August visited Hawaii with family, then flies to CA. Family event there. Take him to Pakistani restaurant. One day later has gastrointestinal issues, nausea, diarrhea. Goes to urgent care, send stool for O&P. Look at stool, shows chilomastix mesnili. No medicines, will be ok. Over this period of 1 week he loses 15 pounds. Gains 5 back. End of October feels fine, no bloating or diarrhea. No symptoms but goes to gastroenterologist. Stool test returns with D. fragilis; and chilomastix mesnili. Now sees Daniel. Not on any meds. No allergies, no toxic habits, athletic. No illness in family. Normal exam. He ate salads in Hawaii.” At the link right-click “Download TWiP #177” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sanitizing Hygiene 69 mins – “The TWiP DVD solve the case of the Child Who Passed Worms, and discuss a non-human primate model for severe malarial anemia. From Uganda, eastern up in mountains, rainy season. 6 yo girl brought in by mother on Monday, reporting several days of feeling poorly, headache, fever, muscle aches. Negative malaria smear on Monday. Wednesday returns, feeling worse, fever higher, headache worse. Lungs clear, belly (pain on left side) has large spleen. Living in good conditions, well dressed, dirt floor house, concrete walls. Toilet is hole in back. Same dietary habits, high in carbs. No mosquito netting. Water from stream. No siblings. HIV negative.” At the link right-click “Download TWiP #179” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smart Companies 35 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by author and professor, Ed Hess. He has published several notable books on learning and innovation including Learn or Die and his most recent work, Humility is the New Smart: Rethinking Human Excellence in the Smart Machine Age. Ed Hess is currently a professor, Batten Executive-in-Residence and Batten Faculty Fellow at the Darden Graduate Business School at the University of Virginia” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Startup History 35 mins – “This week we are joined by entrepreneur, author and venture capitalist, Brad Feld. Brad is a co-founder of Techstars, a platform for startups to access funding and entrepreneurial networking, and is also the co-founder of venture capital firm, Foundry Group. Brad is the author of several books on startups as well as an entrepreneurial advice blog. He sits on the board of several technology startups and was an early investor in Fitbit, Zynga, and Harmonix. What Was Covered: How startup ecosystems have changed – and become more democratized – in the 30 years in which Brad has been active within them; How digitization of production, distribution, customer relationships, etc., is making strategic “moats” much more penetrable than they were before; How diversity of an ecosystem builds resilience but how our biases (both conscious and unconscious) make this difficult for us” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Team Leadership 26 mins – “I sat down with Dave Kesby, organizational coach and author, to talk about his book, “Extra-Dependent Teams: Realising the Power of Similarity”, where he challenges the conventional wisdom of teams. As he writes in his introduction, “through the lens of convention a lot of the features of Extra-Dependent Teams are misdiagnosed as faults: working apart is seen as working in silos, lack of interdependency is seen as uncollaborative, and working only towards their individual goal is seen as not being a team player.” Dave served in The British Army for seven years before turning to a career in  organizational and leadership development. He combines military, academic, corporate and volunteering experiences to provide a fresh and challenging perspective on what it means to lead, as well as be part of a team.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Unconscious Bias 26 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by author and social scientist, Dolly Chugh, to discuss her book, The Person You Mean to Be: How Good People Fight Bias, which studies how implicit bias and unintentional ethical behavior affects our everyday decision making. Dolly is a Professor of Management and Organizations at New York University, has won several awards for excellence in teaching and ethics, and is a monthly columnist for Forbes.com. What We Covered: Why our brains are biased, and the ways in which we can begin to recognize our own conscious and unconscious biases; Why confirmation bias can hinder the success of a recruiting the best potential talent in the workplace; How we can learn to recognize and use our own privileges to challenge and help change other people’s biases” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.