MMD469 Media Mining Digest: AI Future, Antibiotic Resistance Research, Barbie Dress Designer, Biomedical Research, Convalescent Plasma, Corona Treatments, Corona Virus Affects, Corona Virus Spread, Covid Lab Special, Emerging Markets, Glial Cells, How Inventions Shaped Us, Ira Glass, Learning Process, Marine Microbes, Microbe Research, Mold Control, Neuroscience History, Numbers Instinct, Ocean Water Microbes, Plant Diseases, Prion Proteins, Prosperity Paradox, Prosthetic Vision, Pseudomonas and Candida Interaction, Rape of Chanel Miller, Robert Wong, Robin Williams, Rotavirus and Noravirus, Seaweed Farming, Spontaneous Brain, Surveillance Capitalism, Tosh Hall, Trump Administration Book, Unconscious

Exercise your ears: the 36 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 512 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

AI Future 37 mins – “This episode of Books and Ideas is an interview with Susan Schneider, author of a fascinating new book called Artificial You: AI and the Future of Your Mind. Schneider’s book goes beyond the question of whether AI might become conscious to issues that might affect us on a more personal level.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotic Resistance Researcher 44 mins – “The TWiM holobionts pay tribute to Stuart Levy, and reveal the remarkably diverse array of cyclic nucleotides synthesized by bacteria that likely mediate interactions with animal and plant hosts.” At the link right-click “TWiM#206,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Barbie Dress Designer 10 mins – “I designed surgeon Barbie Fashion Pack shortly after my biopsy, where I saw women as nurses and men as doctors or surgeons. Why shouldn’t a woman become a doctor?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biomedical Research 55 mins – “At Georgia Tech, members and trainees of the Center for Microbial Dynamics and Infection discuss the identification of pathogen essential genes during coinfections, and how coral management can improve coral defenses against pathogens.” At the link right-click “Right click to download TWiM#208” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biomedical Research 56 mins – “Mark Martin joins Vincent and Michael to present compelling papers suitable for teaching microbiology to undergraduate students.” At the link right-click “Right click to download TWiM #201” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Convalescent Plasma 24 mins – “We’re joined by Drs. Liise-Anne Pirofski of Albert Einstein College of Medicine & Shmuel Shoham of Johns Hopkins University to examine convalescent plasma and its role in the treatment of COVID-19. *This podcast episode was funded by a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (grant number 6 NU50CK000477-04-01). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is an agency within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this podcast do not necessarily represent the policy of CDC or HHS, and should not be considered an endorsement by the Federal Government.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the popup menu.

Corona Treatments 18 mins – “Could blood plasma from coronavirus survivors be an effective short-term treatment for patients?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus Affects 16 mins – “Coronavirus affects far more than just the lungs, and doctors and researchers in the midst of the pandemic are trying to catalog—and understand—the virus’ impact on our bodies. Staff Writer Meredith Wadman joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss what we know about how COVID-19 kills. See all of our News coverage of the pandemic here, and all of our Research and Editorials here. Also this week, Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with Sarah about quantum diamond microscopes. These new devices are able to detect minute traces of magnetism, giving insight into the earliest movements of Earth’s tectonic plates and even ancient paleomagnetic events in space.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus Spread 34 mins – “Over the past two months, packed cities have been repeatedly blamed for the rapid spread of coronavirus. Meanwhile, in jails and prisons, incarcerated people have been contracting the virus at alarming rates, in no small part due to their own overcrowded conditions. On this week’s On the Media, we explore what gets lost in conversations about urban density, prisons and the climate amid coronavirus. Plus, what the history of timekeeping can teach us about our current disorientation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

COVID Lab Special 14 mins – “In this Hippo Education bonus, Dr. Paul Simmons and Dr. Jay-Sheree Allen sit down to discuss what lab studies are recommended on admission of a COVID patient to the hospital, which labs are followed daily, and how they’re best used.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Emerging Markets 38 mins – “Emerging markets are challenging and hostile environments for many mature businesses. Corruption; poorly developed infrastructure; a lack of basic services. In established markets, much has been written about innovation, most notably by Clay Christensen with The Innovator’s Dilemma in 1997: this influential book constituted a roadmap used by many of the world’s most successful companies both to plan their innovation journeys and at the same time avoid being disrupted by agile new competitors. But little has been written about how innovation really works in the developing world. Recently, all this changed with the publication of Clay’s latest book, The Prosperity Paradox, co-authored by Efosa Ojomo and Karen Dillon, one of the most eagerly awaited business books of 2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Glial Cells 40 mins – “BS 169 is an exploration of glial cells with R Douglas Fields, author of The Other Brain: The Scientific and Medical Breakthroughs That Will Heal Our Brains and Revolutionize Our Health. Glial cells outnumber the neurons in our nervous system, but until the last few years they were thought to merely support cells. Dr. Fields takes us through the discovery that they have their own signaling methods and are much more important than we ever imagined. This interview first aired in 2010, but Dr. Fields reviewed the original transcript and made no significant corrections. What was once controversial is now mainstream. I recorded a new introduction and summary and I have included some more recent references below.” At the link “Right Click to download mp3” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

How Inventions Shaped Us 32 mins – “Materials scientist and science writer Ainissa Ramirez talks about her latest book The Alchemy of Us: How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another.” “Ainissa Ramirez, Ph.D., is a scientist and science communicator. A Brown and Stanford graduate, she has worked as a research scientist at Bell Labs and held academic positions at Yale University and MIT. She is the author of The Alchemy of Us (The MIT Press).” At the link find the title, “Inventing Us: How Inventions Shaped Humanity,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ira Glass 34 mins – “From creativity to creative struggles and what makes or breaks a “This American Life” story, Ira Glass reflects on his career on the airwaves.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Learning Process 44 mins – “This is an interview with Stanislas Dehaene about his new book How We Learn: Why Brains Learn Better Than Any Machine . . . for Now. According to neuroscientist Dehaene neuroscience has revealed that human babies are incredible “learning machines” whose abilities exceed those of the best current artificial intelligence. We explore why this is so and how this information could be used to help learners (and teachers) of all ages.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Marine Microbes 37 mins – “The most abundant organism on Earth lives in its seas: the marine bacterium SAR11 [carbon oxidizing bacterium]. Steve Giovannoni describes how the origins of SAR11 provided its name, and the ways that studying SAR11 have taught scientists about ocean ecology. He also discusses how the different depths of the ocean vary in their microbial compositions and what his big questions are in marine microbiology. …These primary producers fix carbon for the entire ecosystem! Because nutrients are readily available, the cell concentration in surface waters can reach nearly 1,000,000 cells/ml. …SAR11 is small in both physical size and genome size (0.37–0.89 µm and 1.3 million base pairs, respectively). It is nevertheless the most abundant organism on the planet, with more than 1028 cells estimated to exist worldwide. These cells convert between 6-37% of the carbon fixed in the oceans daily.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbe Research 36 mins – “Microbial interactions drive microbial evolution, and in a polymicrobial infection, these interactions can determine patient outcome. Deb Hogan talks about her research on interkingdom interactions between the bacterium Pseudomonas and the fungus Candida, 2 organisms that can cause serious illness in cystic fibrosis patients’ lung infections. Her research aims to better characterize these interactions and to develop better diagnostic tools for assessing disease progression and treatment. Links for this Episode: Deb Hogan Lab Website Demers EG et al. Evolution of Drug Resistance in an Antifungal-Naive Chronic Candida lusitaniae Infection. PNAS. 2018. Lewis KA et al. Ethanol Decreases Pseudomonas aeruginosa Flagella Motility through the Regulation of Flagellar Stators. Journal of Bacteriology. 2019. Gifford AH et al. Use of a Multiplex Transcript Method for Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Gene Expression Profiles in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung. Infection and Immunity. 2016. Grahl N et al. Profiling of Bacterial and Fungal Microbial Communities in Cystic Fibrosis Sputum Using RNA. mSphere. 2018. Microbiology Resource of the Month: The Aeminium ludgeri Genome Sequence HOM Tidbit: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0065216408705628 HOM Tidbit: The Frozen Potential of Microbial Collections” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Mold Control 7 mins – “Linda Kinkel describes the important relationships between plants and microbes and her research on Streptomyces that protect against plant pathogens.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then left-click “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Neuroscience History 49 mins – “This episode of Brain Science is an interview with neuroscientist Matthew Cobb author of “The Idea of the Brain: The Past and Future of Neuroscience.” Cobb approaches the history of neuroscience from a different perspective than previous writers. He writes from the perspective of a working scientist with a deep interest in the history of ideas and the interaction between science and culture. This approach makes for a fascinating discussion. Through out history assumptions about the brain have been influenced by both culture and contemporary science. For example, before the discovery of electricity it was impossible to image that the brain uses both chemical and electrical signals to communicate. Similarly, our current understanding is heavily influenced by the computer metaphor, which actually misses much about how real brains function. Another aspect of our discussion involves several ongoing debates with neuroscience such as the importance of localization versus network properties. We also touch on the tendency toward neuromythology, which is the tendency to think that understanding the brain is the only tool for understanding what it means to be human. Dr. Cobb reminds of the importance of being aware of the work in a wide varieties of fields include science and the humanities.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Numbers Instinct 49 mins – “BS 170 is an interview with Andreas Nieder, author of A Brain for Numbers: The Biology of the Number Instinct. We talk about the surprising discovery that a wide variety of animals have a number instinct, which is called the approximate number system. This appears to provide the basis for the more abstract mathematical abilities that are seen in humans. We also explore the relationship between mathematics and language.” At the link “Right Click to download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Water Microbes 37 mins – “The most abundant organism on Earth lives in its seas: the marine bacterium SAR11. Steve Giovannoni describes how the origins of SAR11 provided its name, and the ways that studying SAR11 have taught scientists about ocean ecology. He also discusses how the different depths of the ocean vary in their microbial compositions and what his big questions are in marine microbiology. Different depths of the ocean have different habitats, but the microbes vary continuously, based in part on light availability: Surface light facilitates photosynthesis by algal cells. These primary producers fix carbon for the entire ecosystem!” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this archive.

Plant Diseases 42 mins – “How can the intricate relationship between soil microbiota and plants be managed for improved plant health? Linda Kinkel discusses new insights into the plant rhizosphere and the ways that some Streptomyces isolates can protect agricultural crops against bacterial, fungal, oomycete, and nematode infections.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Prion Proteins 33 mins – “Can a protein be contagious? Jason Bartz discusses his work on prion proteins, which cause spongiform encephalopathy and can be transmitted by ingestion or inhalation among some animals. He further discusses how prions can exist as different strains, and what techniques may help improve diagnosis of subclinical infections.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Prosperity Paradox 27 mins – “Emerging markets are challenging and hostile environments for many mature businesses. Corruption; poorly developed infrastructure; a lack of basic services. In established markets, much has been written about innovation, most notably by Clay Christensen with The Innovator’s Dilemma in 1997: this influential book constituted a roadmap used by many of the world’s most successful companies both to plan their innovation journeys and at the same time avoid being disrupted by agile new competitors. But little has been written about how innovation really works in the developing world. Recently, all this changed with the publication of Clay’s latest book, The Prosperity Paradox, co-authored by Efosa Ojomo and Karen Dillon, one of the most eagerly awaited business books of 2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Prosthetic Vision 46 mins – “This week neuroscientist Stephen Macknik returns on Brain Science 166 to discuss an exciting new approach to prosthetic vision. Unlike traditional approaches electrodes are not required. He explains how this work is based on recent discoveries in vision research along with techniques like optogenetics.” At the link “FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download),” then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pseudomonas and Candida Interaction 36 mins – “Microbial interactions drive microbial evolution, and in a polymicrobial infection, these interactions can determine patient outcome. Deb Hogan talks about her research on interkingdom interactions between the bacterium Pseudomonas and the fungus Candida, 2 organisms that can cause serious illness in cystic fibrosis patients’ lung infections. Her research aims to better characterize these interactions and to develop better diagnostic tools for assessing disease progression and treatment.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rape of Chanel Miller 31 minsAuthor Chanel Miller reflects on her journey to healing—and the role of art in her past, present, and future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Robert Wong 36 mins – “Robert Wong ditched accounting and pursued his artistic dreams, criss-crossing the world before co-creating the innovative Google Creative Lab.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Robin Williams 25 mins – “Robin Williams donned many characters in his lifetime. From sweaty standup riffs to sitcom mayhem as an alien named Mork, or from an Academy Award-winning performance in Good Will Hunting to a Disneyfied blue Genie, Robin was constantly pushing his craft. But behind these displays of brilliance was an isolated and truly misunderstood man. In the epic biography Robin, journalist Dave Itzkoff details the fragmentation of one of America’s most beloved comics. In its debut season, Knowing combines interviews with Robin’s family and friends with Itzkoff’s fresh research and poignant insights to paint a true depiction of the man behind the screen.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Rotavirus and Norovirus 36 mins – “Viral gastroenteritis around the world causes 200,000 deaths globally each year. Mary Estes talks about her work on 2 gastroenteritis-causing viruses, rotavirus and norovirus, and tells the story of her discovery of the first viral enterotoxin. She also describes how noroviruses have changed from human volunteer studies to studies using “miniguts,” a system now used with many enteropathogenic microorganisms.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Seaweed Farming 15 mins – “For countries like Malaysia, Tanzania and the Philippines, seaweed agriculture is a major industry. However, these countries still see significant crop losses due to disease and pests. So what role does microbiology have in helping these countries’ growth in the industry?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Spontaneous Brain 47 mins – “BS 174 is an interview with neuroscientist and philosopher Georg Northoff about his fascinating book The Spontaneous Brain: From the Mind–Body to the World–Brain Problem. We explore the significance of the growing evidence that most of the brain’s activity occurs independently of external stimuli with a focus on the implications of this finding for our understanding of how the brain generates consciousness. We recently explored the importance of the brain’s spontaneous activity with György Buzsáki (BS 172), but Northoff suggests a surprising implication. He proposes that if mental features such as consciousness and our sense of self are generated by the brain’s alignment with the world then perhaps we should abandon discussion of the so-called Mind-Body (or Mind-Brain) problem and instead consder the relationship between the world and the brain. This is what he calls the World-Brain problem.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Capitalism 16 mins – “The list of harms perpetuated by Facebook is at this point well-known: quieting dissent, ignoring incitement, and profiting from distortion, to name a few. But, according to Harvard professor emeritus Shoshana Zuboff, author of The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, the bill of indictment can’t merely be a list of harms. To understand the damage being wrought by Big Tech, we must recognize a vast, sinister matrix that not only exploits markets and human frailty, but steals our very selves as fuel for the machine. It’s what Zuboff calls “surveillance capitalism” — and it’s not just Facebook, or even just the tech companies. It’s, increasingly, and broadly, the economic world we live in. Zuboff explains to Bob just how pervasive and pernicious surveillance capitalism is, and why curbing its excesses will involve rethinking how we regulate our data and our markets.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tosh Hall 33 mins – “From breaking down outside of a Kinko’s to being named one of AdAge’s Top 50 creatives, Tosh Hall talks about the highs and lows of a life in branding and design.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Trump Administration Book 35 mins – “Debbie talks with author and investigative journalist David Cay Johnston about his childhood that inspired him to pursue justice and truth in life, his groundbreaking financial reporting, the state of journalism today and, of course, Donald Trump—the subject of his new book, It’s Even Worse Than You Think: What the Trump Administration is Doing to America.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Unconscious 45 mins – “In Are You Sure? The Unconscious Origins of Certainty Dr. Ginger Campbell sharesc the implications of one of the most surprising recent discoveries of neuroscience: most of what our brain does is unconscious. This means it is outside both our awareness and control. In particular she shares the work of retired neurologist Robert Burton who was featured on several early episodes of Brain Science. Burton presented the evidence that mental sensations, like what he called “the feeling of knowing” emerge from “hidden layers” of the brain. One implication of this is that we do not choose what we believe! This is why Dr. Campbell describes Are You Sure? as a plea for compassion and tolerance.” At the link right-click “Part 1 was read by Dr. Campbell in BS 173” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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