MMD472 Media Mining Digest: Activist Otto Sharmer, AI and Criminal Justice, AI Principals, Artificial Intelligence, Ayahuasca, Black Business Devaluation, Brown Skinned, Caffeine Use, Chernoble Trends, China and India Areas, China-Australia Relations, Climate Crisis, Coffin Making, Corruption in China, Covid in Jails, Cyberlaw Worldwide, Democracy Fails, DHS Compiles Intelligence on Journalists, Digital Threat Counters, Einstein, Electoral College Abolishment, Ethiopia Conflict, Fauci Article, Fauci Discussion, Film Editors, Foreign Interference, Free Trade, Genetic Experimentation and Innovation, Guantanamo, Hong Kong Protests, Houdini, Human Rights Crisis in Xinjian, Intelligence Innovation, Iranian Assassination, ISIS in America, Longer Life, Managing Older Workers, Mitch McConnell, Molecular Genetics and Genomics, Nazism, Planning Your Post Retirement, Poisoning of Alexei Navalny, President and COVID Infection, Prison Abolition, QAnon Discussion, Rural Broadband Politics, Secondhand Goods, SIGINT Intelligence, Social Media Weaponization, Spymasters, Super Rich, Talented Women, Tranformational Change, Uighurs in China, US in China, Vaccine Misinformation, Vindman Conversation, White Power Violence, Wikinomics

Exercise your ears: the 61 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 802 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Activist Otto Sharmer 38 mins – “It’s no secret that our world today is full of dire crises ranging from ecological to societal. We’ve built a world with the mindset of maximizing “me,” creating catastrophic results that benefit no one. But what to do? As Albert Einstein observed, “We cannot solve problems with the same kind of thinking that created them.” If we want to change the way the world works, we need to update the thinking that created the systems, institutions and economies around us. Otto Scharmer has developed a framework and strategies for guiding this shift in our thinking from an ego-centric awareness to an eco-centric one — from considering what’s best for me to considering what’s best for the whole, including me. Tune in to find out why embracing this shift is at the core of the leadership the world needs.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI and Criminal Justice 38 mins – “As technology becomes more sophisticated, artificial intelligence (AI) is permeating into new parts of society and being used in criminal justice to assess risks for those in pre-trial or on probation. Predictive analytics raise several questions concerning bias, accuracy, and fairness. Observers worry that these tools replicate injustice and lead to unfair outcomes in pre-trial hearings, detention, and incarceration. On February 19, Governance Studies at Brookings hosted an event to address the challenges of federal risk assessment instruments in the criminal justice system. Panelists discussed the implications of AI on criminal justice and ways to improve criminal justice reform initiatives.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however,a copy is included in this blog archive.  

AI Principals 39 mins – “This virtual talk features Jessica Fjeld, assistant director of the Cyberlaw Clinic and lead author on the “Principled AI” report, in conversation with Ryan Budish, an assistant research director at Berkman Klein and a member of OECD’s AI Governance Expert Group, which proposed high-level AI principles. Fjeld and Budish discuss AI principles both generally (the high-level landscape in which they exist) and in practice (the creation and implementation process for principles.) “ At the link you can listen,but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive..

Artificial Intelligence 32 mins – “Darrell West is vice president of the Brookings Institution and director of Governance Studies at Brookings. John Allen is the president of the Brookings Institution and a retired U.S. Marine Corps four-star general. Together, they are the authors of the book, “Turning Point: Policymaking in the Era of Artificial Intelligence,” a broad look at the impact that artificial intelligence systems are likely to have on everything from the military, to health care, to vehicles and transportation, and to international great power competition. They spoke with Benjamin Wittes about the book and the question of how we should govern AI systems. What makes for ethical uses of AI? What makes it scary? What are the anxieties that people have about artificial intelligence, and to what extent are the fears legitimate?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence 52 mins – “Computer Scientist and author Melanie Mitchell of Portland State University and the Santa Fe Institute talks about her book Artificial Intelligence with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mitchell explains where we are today in the world of artificial intelligence (AI) and where we might be going. Despite the hype and excitement surrounding AI, Mitchell argues that much of what is called “learning” and “intelligence” when done by machines is not analogous to human capabilities. The capabilities of machines are highly limited to explicit, narrow tasks with little transfer to similar but different challenges. Along the way, Mitchell explains some of the techniques used in AI and how progress has been made in many areas.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ayahuasca Use 19 mins – “Growing numbers of tourists are travelling to the Peruvian Amazon to drink ayahuasca, a traditional plant medicine said to bring about a higher state of consciousness. Foreigners come looking for spiritual enlightenment or help with mental health problems like trauma, depression, and addiction. But not everyone is happy about Peru’s booming ayahuasca tourism industry. A group of indigenous healers are fighting back against what they see as the exploitation and appropriation of their cultural heritage by foreigners – who run most of the ayahuasca retreats popular with tourists. This coming together of cultures has thrown up another serious problem too: vulnerable women being sexually abused while under the influence of charismatic healers and this powerful psychedelic.” At the link left-click “Download,” select “Lessor quality” then “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Brown Skinned 36 mins – “In a compelling conversation, acclaimed journalist and author Kamal Al-Solaylee discusses all things brown, from the psychology of the colour, to why he says, it’s always ‘a bridesmaid, never the bride,’ in the constructed hierarchy of human skin tone.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Black Business Devaluation..83 mins.- “In 2018, research from the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program (Brookings Metro) and Gallup showed that homes in Black-majority neighborhoods experience devaluation due to racial bias at a rate of 23% on average, when compared to similar homes in otherwise similar white neighborhoods. Now, in a related study, the authors offer evidence for the devaluation of businesses. The report, titled “Five-star reviews, one-star profits: The devaluation of businesses in Black communities”, finds that highly rated businesses in Black neighborhoods (measured by Yelp ratings) experience slower revenue growth than poorly rated businesses in otherwise similar neighborhoods. This unrealized growth results in a total devaluation of more than $1.3 billion in lost revenue annually.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however,a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Caffeine Use 26 mins – “’Omnivore’s Dilemma’ author Michael Pollan talks about his audiobook, ‘Caffeine: How Coffee and Tea Created the Modern World.’ He describes caffeine as the world’s most widely-used psychoactive drug.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Chernoble Trends 13 mins – ”Ninety year old Galina is one of the last witnesses to the wild natural world that preceded the Chernobyl zone in southern Belarus. ‘We lived with wolves’ she says ‘and moose, and elk and wild boars.’ Soviet development destroyed that ecosystem. Forests and marshland were tamed and laid to farmland and industrial use. But when the Chernobyl reactor exploded in 1986, the human population was evacuated; their villages were buried beneath the earth as though they had never existed. A generation on, it seems that the animals Galina knew are returning. But how are they are affected by their radioactive environment? And what can we infer about the state of the land? Monica Whitlock visits the strange new wilderness emerging in the heart of Europe” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive..

China and India Areas 11 mins – “Michael Silverstein, cofounder of The Boston Consulting Group’s global consumer practice and coauthor of “The $10 Trillion Prize.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

China-Australia Relations 47 mins – “In the first part of this episode, Jordan Schneider, the host of ChinaTalk, sat down with Yun Jiang, a former Australian government official and an editor at the Australian National University’s China Story blog, for a deep dive into the Australia-China relationship, providing much needed context on why tension has boiled over in recent months. In the second part, we excerpt a conversation that Jordan had with Wendy Cutler, a long-time USTR official and current vice president and managing director of the Asia Society Policy Institute. They talked about how the Biden administration could address China on trade, and she offers her take on Yun and Jordan’s policy proposals for shoring up Australia.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Crisis 21 mins – “On February 23 at the Hammer Museum in LA, Laura moderated a discussion about the future of environmental justice featuring actor and activist Jane Fonda and community organizer Janet Valenzuela.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coffin Making 19 mins – “Accompanying her neighbour Betty to a funeral, Linda encounters a mislaid eco warrior. Comedy series written by and starring Linda Smith.” At the link you cannot download the episode; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Corruption in China 42 mins – “Why has modern China prospered in spite of vast corruption? On this episode of ChinaTalk, Jordan Schneider talks with Yuen Yuen Ang, associate professor of political science at the University of Michigan, about her new book, “China’s Gilded Age: The Paradox of Economic Boom and Vast Corruption.” She draws comparisons between U.S. history and the China of today, arguing that access money in China functions like campaign finance in the States. They also discuss the implications of corruption for regime stability.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Covid in Jails 33 mins – “Chesa Boudin’s radical leftist parents were imprisoned when he was a toddler. Now he’s working to reduce the inmate population in San Francisco — and worrying about his dad, who remains in prison.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyberwar Worldwide 53 mins – “In today’s interview, I spar with Harriet Moynihan over the application of international law to cyberattacks, a topic on which she has written with clarity and in detail. We disagree politely but profoundly. I make the case that international law is distinct from what works in cyberspace and is inconsistent with either clarity or effectiveness in deterring cyberattacks. Harriet argues that international law has been a central principle of the post-1945 international system and one that has helped to keep a kind of peace among nations. It’s a good exchange….” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Fails 26 mins – “Anne Applebaum is a columnist, writer, historian and most recently, the author of “Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Lore of Authoritarianism,” a book that explores why authoritarian ideologies are on the ascendance in countries as diverse as Poland, Hungary, Spain, the United States and Great Britain. Benjamin Wittes spoke with Anne about the themes of the book: Why are all of these authoritarian ideologies on the rise now? What is the role of social media in their rise? What are the major themes that they have in common, and how different are they location by location? How did conservative ideology come to fracture the way it has over so brief a period of time? And how is the modern wave of authoritarianism different from earlier iterations of it?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

DHS Compiles Intelligence on Journalists 36 mins – ““What if J. Edgar Hoover Had Been a Moron?” That’s the question Lawfare’s editor-in-chief Benjamin Wittes asks in a new article about his experience learning that his tweets had been written up in an intelligence report by the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Intelligence and Analysis. After reporting on an internal DHS document and publishing other documents to Twitter, Wittes learned that I&A had distributed intelligence reports about those tweets along with the tweets of New York Times reporter Mike Baker. After Shane Harris reported on I&A’s activities at the Washington Post, DHS announced that it was halting the practice of collecting information on journalists and the head of the office was reassigned. Quinta Jurecic discussed the bizarre story with Wittes and former Assistant Attorney General for National Security David Kris.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Threat Counters 31 mins – “This week on our Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Alina Polyakova and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Shane Huntley, the director of Google’s Threat Analysis Group—a team that leads Google’s efforts to track threats from nation states and hacker groups. If you’ve ever received a notification from Google that a state-sponsored actor is trying to access your email account, you’ve heard from the Threat Analysis Group. The group examines everything from attempts to steal cryptocurrency to what Google calls “coordinated influence campaigns.” Recently, the Threat Analysis Group has begun putting out blog posts with updates on their work against coordinated influence campaigns. Alina and Quinta asked Shane about his “bulletin” for the first quarter of 2020, but since they spoke, Google has published another post for the second quarter—detailing actions against campaigns from Iran, Russia and China.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Electoral College Abolishment 33 mins – “Jesse Wegman, author of ‘Let the People Pick the President,’ says the Electoral College’s winner-take-all rule is not mandated by the Constitution: “There’s nothing keeping us from changing it.” Wegman talks about how winner-take-all came to be, attempts to change it, and how the Electoral College disproportionately affects people of color.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrows and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Einstein 25 mins – In 1905, when Albert Einstein worked as a patent office clerk, he published a series of academic papers that revolutionized physics and our thinking about space and time, mass and energy. His ideas were a great leap forward. Panelists at the Stratford Festival discuss how Einstein revolutionized how we live our lives today.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Ethiopia Conflict 37 mins “It’s not something that has gotten a lot of attention amid a busy U.S. news cycle, but much has been happening in Ethiopia over the past two months. Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, who just last year won the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to bring unity between Ethiopia and neighboring Eritrea, led a military battle against domestic forces in the northern Ethiopian region of Tigray. The fighting has caused the significant displacement of people living in the region and has involved reports of atrocities. In early December, the Prime Minister claimed victory, but concerns remain about how long tensions will endure—or at least continue to simmer. It’s a complicated situation with major implications for stability in the East Africa and Horn of Africa region. To break it all down, Jacob Schulz talked with two different experts. First, to get a sense of what’s going on and how we got to this point, he spoke with Emmanuel Igunza, a reporter in East Africa for BBC News; then, he spoke with Beza Tesfaye, the director of research and learning for migration at Mercy Corps, about the humanitarian problems implicated by the crisis.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Fauci Discussion 27 mins – “President Trump’s daily briefings on the COVID-19 pandemic have introduced millions of Americans to Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. At times, the specialist in infectious diseases has differed with the president during the briefings, correcting him on the seriousness of the virus or on the timeline for developing a vaccine. That’s fueled speculation that Fauci’s tenure might be cut short. But New Yorker writer Michael Specter doesn’t think Fauci needs to worry about job security. “Trump can’t fire him,” Specter says. “He can kick him off the coronavirus task force … but he can’t fire him from his job.” Specter has known Fauci for decades — covering his work and the way he’s handled the role of presidential adviser through six different U.S. presidents and the AIDS epidemic. Specter chronicles those ups and downs in the New Yorker article, How Anthony Fauci Became America’s Doctor.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Film Editors 21 mins – “What are you watching? There’s a good chance it was edited by a woman. This time on the Laura Flanders Show, we talk with avant garde filmmaker and cinema studies professor Su Friedrich about the hidden sheroes of film editing, the names you don’t know but ought to know from Hollywood to Bollywood and beyond. Aside from Blanche Sewell, the editor of The Wizard of Oz, and Thelma Schoonmaker, Martin Scorsese’s editor for over fifty years, there’s Renu Saluja, who edited many classics of 1990s Indian cinema, and Mexico’s Gloria Schoemann, one of the most prolific editors in history with over 227 film credits to her name. Music in the Middle: “My Passion” by Mikki Afflick featuring Miranda Nicole courtesy of Soul Sun Soul Music.” At the link right-click “Download MP3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foreign Interference 28 mins – “It’s been a wild couple of days of disinformation in the electoral context. Intelligence community officials are warning about Russian and Iranian efforts to influence the U.S. presidential election—and claiming that Iran is responsible for sending threatening emails from fake Proud Boys to Democratic voters. What exactly is going on here? To talk through the developments and the questions that linger, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Scott R. Anderson, Susan Hennessey and Quinta Jurecic.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Free Trade 46 mins – “Economist and author Kimberly Clausing of Reed College talks about her book Open with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Clausing, a self-described progressive, argues that the United States should continue to embrace free trade but she argues for other interventions to soften the impact of trade on workers and communities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Experimentation and Innovation 37 mins – “Genetic experimentation and innovation immediately conjures up dystopian visions — just look at our predilection for movies and books about science gone terribly wrong. And then there’s the tendency we humans have to resist change. So often when we hear news of a significant development in genomics, we reflexively ask: “Shouldn’t there be a law against that?” Bartha Knoppers, professor and director of the Centre of Genomics and Policy at McGill University, is all too familiar with this response. She refers to it as the ‘prohibition reflex’. She says it may be natural, but it isn’t necessarily helpful. Instead, she argues, we need to quell our initial fears about genetic innovation so that we can conjure a more fruitful response.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however,a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Guantanamo 32 mins – “Jasmine El-Gamal is a nonresident senior fellow with the Middle East program at the Atlantic Council. Between 2008 and 2015, she served as a Middle East advisor in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and as a special assistant to three undersecretaries of defense for policy. She is the author of a recent article in Newlines magazine entitled, “Lost and Found in Guantanamo Bay: Two encounters with two different men in the most notorious detention facility in the world shaped my faith – and my life – forever.” She joined Benjamin Wittes to talk about the article, how she ended up as a young woman as a translator at Guantanamo and in Iraq, what she’s done since, and how the experience of Guantanamo shaped her later policy career, as well as her view of America, Islam and counterterrorism.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Hong Kong Protests 51 mins – “Jordan Schneider, the host of ChinaTalk, sat down with Antony Dapiran, Hong Kong-based lawyer and author of two books on protests in Hong Kong. They discussed the history and legacy of the 2019 protests on the anniversary of one of the largest protests in human history, when two million Hongkongers marched against the extradition bill. They talked about the lead-up to and aftermath of that day, how protests grew increasingly violent, the new national security law, and how these protests compare and contrast to Black Lives Matter.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Houdini 57 mins – “Journalist and author Joe Posnanski talks about his book, The Life and Afterlife of Harry Houdini, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Posnanski explores the enduring fame of Houdini who remains an iconic cultural figure almost a century after his death. Topics discussed include the nature of celebrity, the nature of ambition, parenting, magic, and the use of public relations to create and sustain reputation and celebrity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Rights Crisis in Xinjiang 27 mins – “There is a human rights crisis going on in the Chinese province of Xinjiang. The Chinese government has been rounding up minority groups, most notably the Uighurs, and putting them into forced labor and reeducation camps. The government has gone to great lengths to keep Xinjiang away from international attention, and it has had some success in doing so. Jordan Schneider, the host of the ChinaTalk podcast, wrote an essay on Lawfare last week outlining how the U.S. can respond and push back on the Chinese government’s abuses in the region. During a live event for ChinaTalk, Jacob Schulz talked through Xinjiang and potential U.S. responses with Schneider and Sheena Greitens, an associate professor at UT Austin’s LBJ School of Public Affairs.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Innovation 30 mins.- “This month, the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence’s Subcommittee on Strategic Technologies and Advanced Research released a report entitled, “Rightly Scaled, Carefully Open, Infinitely Agile: Reconfiguring to Win the Innovation Race in the Intelligence Community.” Susan Hennessey sat down with Subcommittee Chair Congressman Jim Himes of Connecticut to discuss the challenges the United States is facing with near-peer national competitors in science and technology and the impact on the intelligence community. They talked about the role of China, stemming intelligence community brain drain, the need for basic research and how Congress can heal itself to become part of the solution.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Iranian Assassination 33 mins – “The top Iranian nuclear scientist has been killed, apparently in an Israeli strike. Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, who has long been the mastermind of the Iranian nuclear program, was gunned down in an attack with a remote control machine gun. Iranian reprisals are expected, although their timing and nature is not clear. It also puts the incoming Biden administration, which is looking to bring back the Iran nuclear deal, in a bit of a pickle. To chew it all over, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Scott R. Anderson, international law specialist and Lawfare senior editor; Suzanne Maloney, the vice president and director of the Foreign Policy Program at the Brookings Institution and an Iran scholar; and Natan Sachs, director of the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings where he focuses on Israeli policy. They talked about why the Israelis would conduct this operation, how effective its killing of Iranian nuclear scientists has been, whether any of it is legal and what it means for the future of U.S.-Iran relations.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS in America 36 mins – “The Islamic State in America is a topic that once garnered front-page headlines, but it has fallen a bit out of public attention in the past year or so. Jacob Schulz sat down with Seamus Hughes, the author with Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens and Bennett Clifford of “Homegrown: ISIS in America.” They talked about the book, how the Islamic State has attracted American followers, how the organization operates differently in the U.S. versus Europe, the FBI and the role it plays in countering homegrown extremism, and what Seamus is most concerned about going forward.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Longer Life 38 mins – “Today, the average person in the United States lives nearly ten years longer than he or she would have 50 years ago. What does that extra decade at the end of life look like? What are the implications of a longer life span on families, the health care system, retirement planning, government benefits and more? Now that retirement lasts not just a few years but is a whole new life phase extending a decade or two (or three!), how should middle-aged adults prepare for this era of life? Companies, government agencies and individuals are making changes to adjust but there’s more work to do to ensure that seniors live healthier, more enriching lives than in the past. Join Debra Whitman, Executive Vice President of Policy and Strategy at the AARP and host Kate Ebner on June 23 to dig deep into the future of aging in America.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Managing Older Workers 10 mins – “Peter Cappelli, Wharton School professor and coauthor of “Managing the Older Worker: How to Prepare for the New Organizational Order.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Mitch McConnell 33 mins – “’New Yorker’ staff writer Jane Mayer talks about how the Senate majority leader has thrown his support behind the President, and allowed the president to diminish congressional power — in spite of the fact that Trump and McConnell are opposites in several ways. Mayer says McConnell’s refusal to rein in Trump is looking riskier than ever. Also, TV critic David Bianculli bids farewell to ‘Homeland’ and welcomes back ‘Penny Dreadful’ on Showtime.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Molecular Genetics 8 mins – “The breathtaking progress in molecular genetics that has occurred over the past five decades and the transition to genomic medicine would have been difficult to imagine in 1970, when the Institute of Medicine (IOM), now the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), was formed. The term “genomics” hadn’t yet been coined, the tools and technologies that are the foundation of modern biotechnology were in their infancy, and methods for sequencing even a few nucleotides were barely workable.1” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nazism 33 mins – “This year, 2020, sees the 75th anniversary of the end of World War Two. Its legacy remains. Nowhere more so than in Germany, where the rise of Nazism led to the war, and terrible crimes against humanity. Chris Bowlby explores how post-war Germans have faced this inheritance and discovers how a search for justice in relation to Nazi crimes has continued, despite heavy pressure to stop. Alongside that, a powerful culture of remembrance has emerged, as each new generation makes its reckoning with the past. We meet the little-known small team of Nazi crime investigators, working discreetly behind walled premises in Ludwigsburg in Southern Germany. They used to carry guns for self-protection, such was hostility to their work. Through their research they have identified more than 28,000 Nazi crime scenes. But soon those who lived through the Nazi period will all be dead. What difference will it make when there are no more victims alive to tell their stories, no more prosecutions or trials? Will this history still be remembered and understood? And we hear from a new, young and diverse generation of Germans what they think about their country’s Nazi past.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive..

Planning Your Post Retirement 10 mins – “Marc Freedman, founder and CEO of Civic Ventures and author of “The Big Shift: Navigating the New Stage Beyond Midlife.” Retiring to go play golf in Florida isn’t the draw it used to be. In a 2014 Bank of America Merrill Lynch survey, 72% of employees over age 50 reported that they’d like to continue working in retirement. Partly that’s a response to the Great Recession and a need to compensate for diminished savings; a Conference Board study showed that in the past eight years, nearly two-thirds of 45-60 year-olds experienced a 20% or greater decline in their assets.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Poisoning of Alexeia Navalny 22 mins – “Alexei Navalny is Russia’s most prominent dissident, opposition leader and anti-corruption crusader—and the latest such person to be poisoned by the Vladimir Putin regime, which, of course, it denies. When we recorded this episode, Navalny’s condition was improving as he received medical treatment in Germany. To discuss Navalny’s career and why Putin chose now to attack him, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Alina Polyakova, president and CEO of the Center for European Policy Analysis. They talked about how Navalny has become such a thorn in the side of the Putin regime, why Putin keeps poisoning people as opposed to killing them by other means and why the Russians are so ineffective at poisonings when they undertake them.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

President and COVID Infection 32 mins – “President Trump is at Walter Reed with the COVID virus. A large number of executive and legislative branch officials have also tested positive. What happens when the president is seriously ill? What happens when the president is incapacitated? And what happens when a presidential candidate falls seriously ill—after people have already started voting? These are not all questions entirely answered by the law, but they are all questions on which the law has something to say. To talk it all through, Benjamin Wittes spoke with an all Lawfare panel including managing editor Quinta Jurecic, founding editor Jack Goldsmith and chief operating officer David Priess.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Abolition 35 mins – “Prison abolitionists say prison is a failed social policy. Ultimately what it does is address the expected consequences of inequality and marginalization. So, maybe, the time has come to get rid of prisons altogether. If that’s the case, how do we move forward?” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive

QAnon Discussion 35 mins – “This week on our Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Ben Collins and Brandy Zadrozny, reporters at NBC News. Writing at NBCNews.com, they report on disinformation and misinformation in health and politics. Their work covers a lot of ground, but for this episode, they discussed one increasingly prominent issue on that beat: QAnon, a conspiracy theory built around anonymous posts on an internet forum claiming that Donald Trump is waging war against a deep state and a vast network of child sex traffickers. The conspiracy theory has inspired acts of violence and is becoming increasingly mainstream, with several candidates for U.S. Congress being QAnon believers. They talked about how QAnon started, why we need to take it seriously and how the internet—and big technology platformpops—have allowed the theory to spread.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Retaining Talented Women 12 mins – “Hello, and welcome to the HBR IdeaCast from Harvard Business Online. In this week’s program, HBS press editor, Melinda Merino, talks with Sylvia Ann Hewlett, president of the Center for Work Life Policy and author of the new book, Off Ramps and On Ramps: Keeping Talented Women on the Road to Success. And in our HBR In Brief segment, Leadership That Gets Results.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Rural Broadband Politics 35 mins – “Rural broadband is currently having a moment in American political discourse. No less than 5 presidential candidates have released plans to connect the country’s rural places, and the FCC has recently announced a $20billion funding program for fixed broadband and a $9billion program for 5G deployment in rural America. Despite these initiatives and interests, however, rural America remains woefully disconnected from a digital world that the urban and wealthy take for granted. Worse yet, the digital divide is growing, not shrinking despite billions of dollars of yearly investment and dozens of legislative proposals. This talk explains the policies that help and hinder broadband deployment in rural America. Christopher Ali argues that our current policy architecture grossly over-privileges incumbent telephone companies and systematically discourages new entrants from offering broadband, and demonstrates how the largest telecommunication companies have an economic incentive to keep the digital divide alive.” At the link you can listen,but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Secondhand Goods 46 mins – “Journalist and author Adam Minter talks about his book Secondhand with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Minter explores the strange and fascinating world of secondhand stuff–the downsizing that the elderly do when they move to smaller quarters, the unseen side of Goodwill Industries, and the global market for rags.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

SIGINT Intelligence 42 mins – “The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland has been conducting and regulating signals intelligence, SIGINT, since before the United States was born. To talk about how they do it across the pond, David Kris sat down with two experts on UK SIGINT and SIGINT regulation: Michael Drury and Tony Comer, both veterans of Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), the British counterpart to the U.S.’s National Security Agency. Michael was GCHQ’s first full-time legal advisor from 1996 to 2010, when he joined the private sector, and Tony was GCHQ’s historian until his retirement earlier this year. They compared and contrasted the U.S. and UK experience with SIGINT, SIGINT regulation, popular support for SIGINT and intelligence in general, and also some cutting-edge issues, including how SIGINT works today, synergies between SIGINT and cyber, GDPR encryption and online harms.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Weaponization 38 mins – “On this episode of Lawfare’s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek spoke with Maria Ressa, a Filipino-American journalist and co-founder of Rappler, an online news site based in Manila. Maria was included in Time’s Person of the Year in 2018 for her work combating fake news, and is currently fighting a conviction for “cyberlibel” in the Philippines for her role at Rappler. Maria and her fight are the subject of the film, “A Thousand Cuts,” released in virtual cinemas this summer and to be broadcast on PBS Frontline in early next year. As a country where Facebook is the internet, the Philippines was in a lot of ways ground zero for many of the same dynamics and exploitations of social media that are currently playing out around the world. What is the warning we need to take from Maria’s experience and the experience of Philippine democracy? Why is the global south both the beta test and an afterthought for companies like Facebook? And how is it possible that Maria is still, somehow, optimistic?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Spymasters 35 mins – “What is the proper relationship between the CIA director and the president? How should directors handle arguably illegal orders? How important is the director’s role as the nation’s honest broker of information during times of crisis? To get at these questions, David Priess sat down with Chris Whipple, a documentary filmmaker, journalist and the author of two books about the people around the president. “The Gatekeepers,” based upon his documentary of the same name, examines White House chiefs of staff, and his new book, “The Spymasters: How the CIA Directors Shape History and the Future,” is based on the Showtime documentary “The Spymasters: CIA in the Crosshairs,” for which Whipple was the writer and executive producer. They talked about CIA directors through the last several decades and how they’ve impacted U.S. history and national security.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Super Rich 18 mins – “An interview with Chrystia Freeland, editor of Thomson Reuters Digital and author of Plutocrats: The Rise of the New Global Super-Rich and the Fall of Everyone Else.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Transformational Change 36 mins – “Can people really change? Coaches Chris Wahl and Kate Ebner explore this age-old question on June 16th. Join them for a deep investigation into the nature of personal transformation. They will explain the concept of transformational change, offer suggestions and personal stories, and illuminate how visioning can hold the key to a successful shift in your life. If you are wondering how to create lasting change in your life and your way of being, don’t miss this episode.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uighurs in China 39 mins – “We talk a lot about Chinese policy in Hong Kong, but there’s another human rights crisis going on in China in the province of Xinjiang. It concerns the Turkic minority known as the Uighurs whom the Chinese government has been rounding up and putting in reeducation camps. It is an ugly story—one that the Chinese government has gone to great lengths to keep from international attention, with some degree of success. To walk us through the situation in Xinjiang, Benjamin Wittes spoke with Jessica Batke, a senior editor at ChinaFile; Darren Byler, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Colorado at Boulder whose research focuses on Uighur dispossession; and Maya Wang, a senior China researcher for Human Rights Watch, who has written extensively on the use of biometrics, artificial intelligence and big data in mass surveillance in China.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

US in China 30 mins – “Jordan Schneider, the host of the ChinaTalk podcast, sat down with H. R. McMaster, President Trump’s former national security advisor. They talked about his time in government; the origins of the 2017 national security strategy, which focused the U.S. government on China; how he thinks history is best applied to policymaking; and even why he considers himself to be the funkiest NSA in U.S. history.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccine Misinformation .34 mins – “This week on Lawfare’s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Claire Wardle, the co-founder and leader of the nonprofit organization First Draft and a research fellow at Harvard University’s Shorenstein Center. First Draft recently released a report on the information environment around the development of vaccines for COVID-19, and Claire talked about what she and her team found in terms of online discussion of the vaccine in English, Spanish and French. What kinds of misinformation should we be ready for as vaccines begin to be administered across the world? Why might fact-checking and labeling by platforms not be effective in countering that misinformation? And why is Claire still pessimistic about the progress that platforms and researchers have made in countering dis- and misinformation over the last four years?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Vindman Conversation 1 33 mins – “Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman (Ret.) is now the Pritzker Military Fellow at the Lawfare Institute, the newest member of the Lawfare team. You’ve heard his story, likely in his testimony in the impeachment proceedings for President Trump. But Benjamin Wittes sat down with him for a different reason—his substantive expertise in Eastern Europe policy, Russia matters and great power competition. They talked about the challenges the Biden administration will face as it tries to pick up the pieces the Trump administration has left it, how democracies can hang together and harden themselves against attacks from authoritarian regimes, what a good Russia policy looks like, how China fits in and how we can rebuild traditional American alliances.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Vindman Conversation 2 36 mins – “Following his appearance on Friday on the Lawfare Podcast, Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman, the Pritzker Military Fellow at the Lawfare Institute, appeared on Lawfare Live for a live video conversation and audience Q&A. It was a very good conversation—so good that we thought we would bring you an edited version of it as Part Two of our conversation with Alex Vindman. He discussed how one becomes an NSC director while serving in the active duty military, what risks the transition period has in foreign relations, whether he has any regrets about his decision to speak out during the impeachment and much more.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

White Power Violence 37 mins – “Elizabeth Neumann served as the assistant secretary for threat prevention and security policy at the Department of Homeland Security. She has recently been speaking out about President Trump and, among other things, his failure of leadership with respect to the threat of white supremacist violence. In the course of doing so, she made reference to a book by Kathleen Belew, a historian at the University of Chicago: “Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America,” a history of violent white power movements in the modern United States. Elizabeth and Kathleen joined Benjamin Wittes to discuss the interactions of policy and the history that Belew describes. Why have we underestimated this threat for so long? How has it come to be one of the foremost threats that DHS faces? And what can we do about it, given the First Amendment?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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