Media Mining Digest 473: Abraham Lincoln Lessons, AI Decisions, AI Governance, AI Predictions, Artificial Intelligence, Black Canada, Code Red, Covid and Immigration, Covid and Migrants, Covid-19 and International Effects, Defense Department, Fateful Triangle, Green Card Use, Human Rights in Iran, India and Cash, Inventions Shaped Humanity, Machines that Can Think, Melinda Gates on Gender Equality, Mental Illness History, Poison Squad, School Closures, Silicon Valley Story, Unconventional Diplomat, Venezuelan Migrants, White Nationalism, Work Future, Working in Space

Exercise your ears: the 30 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 499 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Abraham Lincoln Lessons 19 mins – “In 1863, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln wrote a scathing letter to his top Union general, who had squandered a chance to end the Civil War. Then Lincoln folded it up and tucked it away in his desk. He never sent it. Lincoln understood that the first action that comes to mind is often counter-productive. In the third episode of a four-part special series on leadership, HBR Editor in Chief Adi Ignatius and Harvard Business School professor and historian Nancy Koehn explore Lincoln’s career both before and during America’s greatest crisis. They discover lessons on how to learn continuously, communicate values, and exercise emotional self-control.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

AI Governance 38 mins – “As technology becomes more sophisticated, artificial intelligence (AI) is permeating into new parts of society and being used in criminal justice to assess risks for those in pre-trial or on probation. Predictive analytics raise several questions concerning bias, accuracy, and fairness. Observers worry that these tools replicate injustice and lead to unfair outcomes in pre-trial hearings, detention, and incarceration. On February 19, Governance Studies at Brookings hosted an event to address the challenges of federal risk assessment instruments in the criminal justice system. Panelists discussed the implications of AI on criminal justice and ways to improve criminal justice reform initiatives….” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Predictions 17 mins – “AI and robots seem to be everywhere, handling more and more work, freeing humans up — to  do what? In this 3-part serie, contributor Jill Eisen explores the digital revolution happening in our working lives. Artificial intelligence is on the verge of replacing our own intelligence. It took decades to adjust to machines out-performing human and animal labour. What will happen when robots and algorithms surpass what our brains can do? Some say digital sweatshops—repetitive, dull, poorly paid and insecure jobs—are our destiny. Others believe that  technology could lead to more fulfilling lives.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

AI Predictions 16 mins – “Avi Goldfarb, a professor at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, explains the economics of machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence that makes predictions. He says as prediction gets cheaper and better, machines are going to be doing more of it. That means businesses — and individual workers — need to figure out how to take advantage of the technology to stay competitive. Goldfarb is the aIcoauthor of the book “Prediction Machines: The Simple Economics of Artificial Intelligence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Artificial Intelligence 36 mins – “AI and robots seem to be everywhere, handling more and more work, freeing humans up — to  do what? In this 3-part serie, contributor Jill Eisen explores the digital revolution happening in our working lives. Artificial intelligence is on the verge of replacing our own intelligence. It took decades to adjust to machines out-performing human and animal labour. What will happen when robots and algorithms surpass what our brains can do? Some say digital sweatshops—repetitive, dull, poorly paid and insecure jobs—are our destiny. Others believe that  technology could lead to more fulfilling lives. **This episode is Part 1 of series. Part 2 airs Tuesday, July 31; Part 3 airs Tuesday, August 7. **This episode originally aired September 13, 2017. The digital age is transforming the way we work. Some would even say that artificial intelligence, robots, and automation are destroying it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Black Canada 36 mins – “Canada’s history of suppressing Black activism is coming to light like never before, thanks to researchers like PhD student Wendell Adjetey. Wendell’s historical research uncovers evidence of clandestine government surveillance in the 20th century, while also bringing to life overlooked parts of this history. His work highlights the struggles and setbacks of Black activists in the 20th century, helping us understand the ripple effect of those legacies today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Code Red 50 mins – “Broad and principled opposition to Donald Trump’s presidency has drawn millions of previously disengaged citizens to the public square and to the ballot box. But if progressives and moderates are unable—and unwilling—to overcome their differences, they could not only enable Trump to prevail again but also squander an occasion for launching a new era of reform. Will progressives and moderates feud while America burns, or will they take advantage of the greatest opportunity since the New Deal era to strengthen American democracy, foster social justice, and turn back the threats of the Trump era? In his new book, “Code Red: How Progressives and Moderates Can Unite to Save Our Country,” Brookings Senior Fellow E.J. Dionne Jr. calls for an alliance between progressives and moderates to seize the moment and restore hope to America’s future for the 2020 presidential election.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid and Immigration 40 mins – “Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, globally interconnected economies and societies are navigating uncharted waters. The pandemic and its aftermath present policymakers with two crucial challenges: how to manage the spread and hopefully eradication of the disease and how to deal with the economic devastation caused by stay-at-home orders, travel bans, and other measures taken to halt the spread of the virus. Currently migration and mobility have come to a relative standstill. Will migration levels return to pre-pandemic levels? And as most countries’ labor systems and economies are linked to immigration, might this public-health crisis result in a fundamental realignment of economic relationships? Will it stimulate a rethink of migration systems, where policymakers seriously re-examine the role and composition of the foreign-born workforce and approaches to immigrant integration? Or post-pandemic, will countries just revert to their previous approaches to migration, or possibly surge further towards protectionism and restrictionism?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 International Effects 29 mins – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on January 20, 2021, the editors are joined by NEJM colleagues Krista Nottage, a surgeon in the Bahamas, James O’Connell, an infectious disease physician in Ireland, and Gary Wong, a pulmonologist in Hong Kong, to discuss the impact of Covid-19 around the world and the international response to it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Defense Department 48 mins – “Foreign policy is the domain of the executive branch, but Congress plays a key constitutional role by passing budgets and conducting oversight. As the Department of Defense reorients its strategy and outlook to deterring, and if necessary, defeating near-peer great competitors, Congress must ensure that the department is building a force that will address the nation’s security challenges while also stewarding U.S. taxpayer resources. On March 2, Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, joined Senior Fellow Michael O’Hanlon in a conversation on defense policy. Now in his final term, Rep. Thornberry is the ranking member of the House Armed Services Committee and a distinguished former chairman. An advocate of on-time annual defense budgets, Rep. Thornberry was instrumental in realizing the Trump-era increases in defense spending, and in advancing the Obama-era “Third Offset” to enhance U.S. competitiveness before that. Their conversation spanned the defense budget, the role of Congress in overseeing the Defense Department, and the wide range of security challenges confronting the United States.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fateful Triangle 60 mins – “In what is being called the “Asian century,” there has been increasing focus on the fate of the rivalry between China and India. The U.S. relationships with the two Asian giants are now seen to be intertwined, after having followed separate paths during the Cold War. In her new book, “Fateful Triangle: How China Shaped U.S.-India Relations During the Cold War,” Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy and Director of the India Project Tanvi Madan argues that China’s influence on the U.S.-India relationship is neither a recent nor a momentary phenomenon. Drawing on archival documents from India and the United States, Madan traces how American and Indian perceptions of, and policy toward, China significantly shaped U.S.-India relations during the Cold War. She highlights the lessons that this history offers for both the present and future of the triangle and offers insights on the possibilities and limits of U.S.-India cooperation in the face of a rising China….” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Card Use 36 mins – “On this webinar, MPI experts discussed the public-charge rule and released estimates of the populations that could be deemed ineligible for a green card based on existing benefits use. They examined the far larger consequences of the rule, through its “chilling effects” and imposition of a test aimed at assessing whether green-card applicants are likely to ever use a public benefit in the future. And they discussed how the latter holds the potential to reshape legal immigration to the United States. 

Human Rights in Iran 1 36 mins – “The COVID-19 pandemic has scrambled just about every aspect of human mobility. It led governments around the world to close their external borders and, in some cases, impose internal border restrictions. It brought international travel to near shutdown in the early months, with a halting recovery since. And it placed much of migration on ice. The repercussions of this dramatic halt to mobility will be profound, and will almost certainly lead to transformations and innovations that will reshape travel and migration for the foreseeable future—maybe even permanently. Moving Beyond Pandemic explores the questions and challenges confronting policymakers, airport and other transportation hub operators, travelers, and others as mobility slowly resumes. Listen to the podcast and subscribe wherever you usually listen to your podcasts or do so directly on this website.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Human Rights in Iran 2 12 mins – “By the time Shirin Ebadi won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2003 – the first woman from the Islamic world to so – the Iranian lawyer and human rights activist had already paid a steep price for her convictions. Shirin Ebadi had been Iran’s first female judge, but was dismissed following the 1979 revolution and spent subsequent years defending those persecuted by authorities, only to be jailed herself for criticizing the system.The newest wave of unrest that has seized Iran in recent weeks has sparked an exceptionally brutal response that left thousands of victims in its wake. At least 208 people have been killed and 7,000 arrested in protests since mid-November, according to UN human rights monitors and the latest estimates are likely far below the real numbers. The Trump administration believes as many as 1,000 have been killed in the ruthless crackdown. In a year when Iran celebrated the 40th anniversary of the revolution that ushered in the Islamic regime, some activists believe it is on the verge of another revolutionary moment. The evidence, says Nobel Prize-winning human rights activist Shirin Ebadi, is in the scale of the protests and the subsequent crackdown — as well as the identity of the protesters themselves.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

India and Cash 16 mins – “Bhaskar Chakravorti, the dean of global business at The Fletcher School at Tufts University, analyzes the economic impact of India’s unprecedented demonetization move in 2016. With no advance warning, India pulled the two largest banknotes from circulation, notes that accounted for 86% of cash transactions in a country where most payments happen in cash. Chakravorti discusses the impact on consumers, businesses, and digital payment providers, and whether Indian policymakers reached their anti-corruption goals. He’s the author of the article “One Year After India Killed Off Cash, Here’s What Other Countries Should Learn From It.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Inventions Shaped Humanity 15 mins – “Materials scientist and science writer Ainissa Ramirez talks about her latest book The Alchemy of Us: How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Machines that Can Think36 mins. – “Stephen Hawking thought that artificial intelligence could spell the end of humanity. But Roger Melko of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics thinks we could be on the cusp of a wonderfully transformative age. When computers are taught to learn and dream the result can be inspiration, or it can resemble something like dog spaghetti. That’s what happens when machines are programmed to think like humans — at least according to Roger Melko, a professor of physics at the University of Waterloo, and Canada Research Chair. He works on a supercomputer developing algorithms to study quantum matter.  Show a computer photos of dogs and spaghetti and the algorithm may spit out a bizarre image. Feed it information to solve a difficult problem, and it might find a valuable answer.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Melinda Gates on Gender Equality 23 mins – “Melinda Gates, cochair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and founder of Pivotal Ventures, is committing $1 billion over the next ten years to advance gender equality. She says evidence shows it’s the best way to drive economic development in nations and performance in companies. She shares her own stories as a female executive at Microsoft, a working mother, and a nonprofit leader learning from women around the world. Gates is the author of the HBR article “Gender Equality Is Within Our Reach.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Mental Illness History 37 mins – “Anne Harrington puts it plainly: “We don’t understand any major mental disorder biologically.” The Harvard historian of science takes no pleasure in relating this surprising fact. She knows that people with depression, schizophrenia and bipolar conditions want better treatments for their symptoms. She also acknowledges that psychiatrists and researchers ARE “working hard to change that situation.” But her book, Mind Fixers: Psychiatry’s Troubled Search for the Biology of Mental Illness, surveys a flawed medical field that has been unable to come to any clear consensus around the causes of — or cures for — mental illness.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Poison Squad 27 mins – “We talk to science journalist Deborah Blum about her new book The Poison Squad: One Chemist’s Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the Twentieth Century.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

School Closures 40 mins – “Mass school and university closures have been among the most shocking signs of COVID-19’s power to drive a global shutdown. This blog begins the discussion on quantifying the long-term impact of lost earnings on young people and the future global economy of this unprecedented, near universal, policy response. In mid-April, UNESCO reported 192 countries had closed all schools and universities, affecting more than 90 percent of the world’s learners: almost 1.6 billion children and young people. While some governments are starting to order teachers and students back to work, education—one of the most important drivers in human capital investment—continues to be largely closed for business.

Silicon Valley Story 27 mins – “A Totally Fictional but Essentially True Silicon Valley Story: We talk to Jessica Powell, a writer and former VP of Communications for Google, about here new book, “The Big Disruption: A Totally Fictional but…” At the link you can listen, but clicking “A totally Fictional but….”; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Unconventional Diplomat 36 mins – “Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein is perhaps best known as the outspoken UN High Commissioner for Human Rights — considered the world’s moral-arbiter-in-chief — from 2014 to 2018. But he refused to run for a second term because he says it might have meant  “bending a knee in supplication” before the five permanent members of the UN Security Council: United States, France, Russia, China and the United Kingdom.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Venezuelan Migrants 41 mins – “Fleeing crisis, nearly 4 million Venezuelans have moved to other Latin American and Caribbean countries over the past few years. This webinar marked the launch of a Latin American and Caribbean Migration Portal, and a report examining the migration and integration policy responses in the region.” AT the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.  

White Nationalism 41 mins – “The language of racism and white supremacy is all around us; people are getting hurt, and also killed. But racism also pervades our public policies. To address these issues and how to move forward, this episode features a discussion with two Brookings experts: Andre Perry, David M. Rubenstein Fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, and Vanessa Williamson, senior fellow in the Governance Studies Program and also in the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Women at Work 31 mins – “In this special episode, HBR IdeaCast host Sarah Green Carmichael introduces Harvard Business Review’s new podcast “Women at Work,” about women’s experiences in the workplace. This episode about being heard tackles three aspects of communication: first, how and why women’s speech patterns differ from men’s; second, how women can be more assertive in meetings; and third, how women can deal with interrupters (since the science shows women get interrupted more often than men do). Guests: Deborah Tannen, Jill Flynn, and Amy Gallo.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Work Future 1 36 mins – “The biggest innovation in the world of work in the last decade has been the rise of online platforms which connect workers and customers. Uber and Airbnb are the most well known, but there are dozens of others. Upwork connects businesses with independent professional, TaskRabbit, handy and jiffy are platforms for various home services, Amazon Mechanical Turk is on-line marketplace for small computer tasks called micro-tasks, and the list goes on. You can find everything from graphic designers to people who will walk your dog or assemble your Ikea furniture. These platforms have been well received by customers, but for workers, they often have a dark side. And they present a major challenge for governments who are grappling with how to regulate them. Contributor Jill Eisen looks at the digital revolution happening in our working lives. ** This episode is part 2 of a 3-part series.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Work Future 2 36 mins – “The future of work has become one huge, nerve-wracking question mark. Technology was once believed to be our deliverance. We’d be working shorter hours, and about the only stress we’d have would be to figure out what to do with all our leisure time. But technology hasn’t quite delivered on that promise. We’re working longer hours, there are fewer jobs and and a lot less job security. In Part 3 of her series on the future of work, Jill Eisen looks at the promise of technology — and how it can lead to a better world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Working in Space 13 mins – “Scott Kelly, a retired U.S. astronaut, spent 520 days in space over four missions. Working in outer space is a lot like working on earth, but with different challenges and in closer quarters. Kelly looks back on his 20 years of working for NASA, including being the commander of the International Space Station during his final, yearlong mission. He talks about the kind of cross-cultural collaboration and decision making he honed on the ISS, offering advice that leaders can use in space and on earth. His memoir is “Endurance: A Year in Space, a Lifetime of Discovery.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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