Media Mining Digest 479: 5G Innovations, 1918 Flu Epidemic, AI Development, Average Student, Benford’s Law, Biogeomicrobiology, Biological Science Research, Black Boys and Men Challenges, Breathing, Countering Online Terrorism, Covid Care for Migrant Workers, Covid Economic Impact, Crypto Currency Basics, End of Life Care, Epidemics, Facial Recognition, Fish Farming Future, Gene Patents, Heat Stress Control, Medical Exports During Covid, Medical Innovations During Pandemic, Migrant Employment, Mini PC’s, Plymouth Colony, Presidential Powers, QAnon Understanding, Recycling in Schools, Song Writing, Swamp Gravy, Truman Presidency

Exercise your ears: the 29 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 401 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

1918 Flu Pandemic 33 mins – “With the an apparent second wave of COVID-19 in full force, the media are sounding the alarm on a deadly virus growing out of control. But during the Spanish Flu 100 years ago, the media downplayed the pandemic. On this week’s show, a look at how the Spanish Flu vanished from our collective memory. Then, how Shakespeare, a British icon, became an American hero.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

5G Innovations 25 mins – “Our guest this week comes from a similar industry as mine. We share many mutual connections. Mo Katibeh, the EVP-Chief Product & Platform Officer of AT&T Business, joins us to discuss 5G innovations. He’s on the show to discuss about what is real versus what is hype when it comes to innovation in 5G capabilities, […]” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

AI Development 41 mins – “Artificial intelligence (AI) is the transformative technology of our time. It is being deployed in many different sectors, analyzing data in real time, and making intelligent decisions based on that analysis. Yet despite its widespread utilization, AI has aroused a number of fears concerning fairness, bias, privacy, security, and human safety. On November 17, the Center for Technology Innovation hosted a webinar to discuss the future of AI, how it is being deployed, and the policy and legal issues being raised. Speakers explored ways to mitigate possible concerns and how to move forward safely, securely, and in a manner consistent with human values.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Average Students 16 mins – “You may know Todd Rose from his bestselling book, “The End of Average.” He was formerly a professor at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education, but recently left to focus on his own nonprofit, Populace. It’s a think tank devoted to finding new ways to measure the views of individual Americans on issues like education. He says he knows what it feels like when grades and tests suggest you’re not good enough. “It culminated in high school where I had just failed so many times,” he says. “So I dropped out.” He found his way back to college years later, first in a night program where he graduated as honor student of the year, and later getting his Ph.D from Harvard University.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the playback block and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Benford’s Law 40 mins – “Lies, liars, and lie catchers. This hour of Radiolab asks if it’s possible for anyone to lead a life without deception. We consult a cast of characters, from pathological liars to lying snakes to drunken psychiatrists, to try and understand the strange power of lying to yourself and others.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Biogeomicrobiology 29 mins – “Denise Akob discusses her studies of microbial communities of contaminated and pristine environments using life science and earth science techniques. She discusses how to figure out “who’s there,” how to optimize select natural microbial activities, and her career path into government research.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Biological Science Research 36 mins – “Distinguished Professor Antoine van Oijen at the University of Wollongong has been awarded a NSW Premier’s Prize for Excellence in Medical Biological Sciences. Professor van Oijen has pioneered the visualisation of complex molecules such as proteins. He has also developed a research program that has transformed our understanding of how bacteria copy and repair their DNA and how these processes play a role in the development of drug resistance. His leadership has led to an $80 million University of Wollongong investment to establish a world-class molecular life sciences institute, Molecular Horizons, where interdisciplinary research will tackle the world’s most pressing health challenges.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Boys and Men Challenges 41 mins – “In an effort to reclaim and refocus the day on November 19, the Future of the Middle Class Initiative and the Race, Prosperity, and Inclusion Initiative at Brookings will host an event to highlight the evidence for the very specific disadvantages faced by Black boys and men.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Breathing 33 mins – “Take a breath. Like, right now. Did you use your nose or your mouth? Turns out, that matters. Journalist and author James Nestor is our guest this Friday at 11 a.m. His book is Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art and he wants to help us breathe better. Specifically, he wants us to breathe through our noses more. Sleep apnea, fatigue, clogged sinuses — many times, these issues arise because too often, we’re breathing through our mouths. And get this: our ancestors? They didn’t have these problems. They used their noses to breath. By the end of the hour, you’ll be hunting for surgical tape to keep your mouth closed when you go to bed. Really.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Countering Online Terrorism 36 mins – “On this episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on platforms and disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Nick Rasmussen, the Executive Director of the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism (also known as GIFCT). The GIFCT is an organization working to facilitate cross-industry efforts to counter the spread of terrorist and violent extremist content online. It was founded in 2017 by four platforms, but is now transitioning to a new life as an independent organization, which Nick is heading up. Online violent extremism is one of the most difficult problems of the internet age, and collaboration between companies and governments may be the only way to effectively tackle it. But how can the GIFCT balance this with the need to respect legitimate free speech concerns? How is Nick thinking about the transparency and accountability problems that such collaboration might exacerbate? And why might the GIFCT be one of the most important institutions for the future of online free speech?” At the link right-click “Direct download: Collaborating_to_Counter_Violent_Extremism_Online.mp3,” and select :Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Covid Care for Migrant Workers 19 mins – “Mobile clinic set up on farm to address accessibility challenges, encourage workers to prioritize health When you take a bite out of a locally grown apple or a slice of tomato, it’s a good time to consider the well-being of the person who picked it — especially during the global pandemic, say health-care professionals who provide care for farm labourers. Another round of COVID-19 outbreaks among migrant workers on Canada’s farms highlights a crack in the health-care system that leaves the people who put food on our tables especially vulnerable, said Eliseo Martell, a health promoter and educator in Brantford, Ont. “The accessibility to the workers has decreased a lot. They are not allowed to leave their farms [because of COVID]. And so for us to reach them has been very, very challenging in these times,” he told White Coat, Black Art  host Dr. Brian Goldman. At least 10 workers tested positive at Schuyler Farms, a major grower of apples and sour cherries near Simcoe, Ont., earlier this month. Each year, it employs more than 200 migrant workers, in addition to Canadian staff. Another 40 workers were infected in nearby Elgin County at Martin Family Fruit Farms. During the first wave of COVID-19, outbreaks at other southwestern Ontario farms led to around 500 cases and three deaths. All told, there have been more than 1,000 cases among migrant farm workers in Ontario alone. Tight living quarters make physical distancing difficult, PPE may be in short supply, and fear of losing income may make some workers reluctant to come forward for testing. On Monday, Ernie Hardeman, Ontario’s minister of agriculture, introduced a new strategy for curbing the spread of COVID-19 among migrant farm workers, but advocacy groups say the plan falls short by leaving employee feedback out.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Economic Impact 19 mins – “Economist Nouriel Roubini explains why the economic impact of the COVID-19 coronavirus will be different than anything we have seen before, and a mental health expert gives tips on staying sane. Nouriel Roubini is a professor of economics at the Stern School of Business New York University and chairman of Roubini Global Economics an economic consultancy. Economist Nouriel Roubini was one of the first to predict the current economic crisis. In his new book, Crisis Economics: A Crash Course in the Future of Finance, he argues that such crises are predictable.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

End of Life Care 30 mins – “Rob Orman steers a conversation on skillful ways to discuss code status, comfort care, intubation, and whether or not dying debilitated patients should go to the ICU.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

End of Life Care 10 mins – “Communicable disease has haunted humanity for all of history. As such, the responses to coronavirus in our midst have a grimly timeless quality. In fact, to one scholar, epidemics are a great lens for peering into the values, temperament, infrastructures and moral structures of the societies they attack. Frank M. Snowden is a professor emeritus of the history of medicine at Yale and author of Epidemics and Society: From the Black Death to the Present. An epidemic, he writes, “holds a mirror” to the civilization in which it occurs. In this podcast extra, he speaks to Bob about what we can learn about ourselves from the infectious diseases we’ve faced, from the bubonic plague in the 14th century to the Ebola outbreak in 2014 to COVID-19 today.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Epidemics 10 mins – “Communicable disease has haunted humanity for all of history. As such, the responses to coronavirus in our midst have a grimly timeless quality. In fact, to one scholar, epidemics are a great lens for peering into the values, temperament, infrastructures and moral structures of the societies they attack. Frank M. Snowden is a professor emeritus of the history of medicine at Yale and author of Epidemics and Society: From the Black Death to the Present. An epidemic, he writes, “holds a mirror” to the civilization in which it occurs. In this podcast extra, he speaks to Bob about what we can learn about ourselves from the infectious diseases we’ve faced, from the bubonic plague in the 14th century to the Ebola outbreak in 2014 to COVID-19 today.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facial Recognition 34 mins – “MIT researcher Joy Buolamwini was working with facial recognition software when she encountered a problem: The robot she was programming could not detect her own female, dark skinned face. Shalini Kantayya’s documentary, Coded Bias, explores the fallout from Joy’s discovery that AI is neither racially nor gender neutral and introduces us to the rebels and misfits of data science. As the creators of the Algorithmic Justice League, Joy and her team work to increase awareness – including calling for legislation – about facial recognition technology that officials often use in surveillance, policing and much more. We’ll talk with Shalini ahead of our screening about what happens when technology starts to encroach on our liberties, this Friday at noon.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fish Farming Future 24 mins – “These days, about half of the protein the world’s population eats is from seafood. Staff Writer Erik Stokstad joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how brand-new biotech and old-fashioned breeding programs are helping keep up with demand, by expanding where we can farm fish and how fast we can grow them. Sarah also spoke with Jan Claesen, an assistant professor at the Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute, about skin microbes that use their own antibiotic to fight off harmful bacteria. Understanding the microbes native to our skin and the molecules they produce could lead to treatments for skin disorders such as atopic dermatitis aDnd acne. Finally, in a segment sponsored by MilliporeSigma, Science’s Custom Publishing Director and Senior Editor Sean Sanders talks with Timothy Cernak, an assistant professor of medicinal chemistry and chemistry at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, about retrosynthesis—the process of starting with a known chemical final product and figuring out how to make that molecule efficiently from available pieces.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gene Patents 17 mins – “In 2005, Chris Hansen, a lawyer at the ACLU, heard that a biotech company called Myriad Genetics had identified a gene responsible for most types of inherited breast and ovarian cancer… and then patented it. With its patent, Myriad could effectively block anyone else from doing comprehensive testing or in some cases even doing research on the gene. And Chris thought that this was definitely not okay. Today on the show, the story of the rise and fall of gene patents, and how the Supreme Court answered the question: Who do your genes belong to? It’s Big Biotech versus the right to the information encoded in our very DNA, and how that fight went all the way to the Supreme Court. Come for the deoxyribonucleic acid — stay for the chocolate chip cookies and baseball bats.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heat Stress Control 22 mins – “This week the whole show focuses on keeping cool in a warming world. First up, host Sarah Crespi talks with Senior News Correspondent Elizabeth Pennisi about the latest research into how to stay safe when things heat up—whether you’re running marathons or fighting fires.  Sarah also talks with Po-Chun Hsu, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Duke University, about the future of cooling fabrics for everyday use. It turns out we can save a lot of energy and avoid carbon dioxide emissions by wearing clothing designed to keep us cool in slightly warmer buildings than we’re used to now. But the question is, will cooling clothes ever be ‘cool’?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Innovations During Covid 38 mins – “Throughout the show’s history, we’ve done interviews with medical professionals and those pursuing innovations in the medical field. This week’s guest created a breakthrough product used during this global pandemic. Clive Smith, the CEO and founder of Thinklabs joins us on the show. We will discuss a medical innovation and what he’s doing to disrupt […]” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Migrant Employment 50 mins – “Following the arrival of large numbers of migrants and asylum seekers in Europe from 2015 onwards, many non-traditional actors—from tech start-ups to social enterprises—have pioneered innovative solutions to foster the social and economic inclusion of newcomers. In the context of this experimentation, business has played a fundamental role, with companies on both sides of the Atlantic leveraging their potential as employers, donors, and partners in innovative alliances. This two-day conference reflected on how innovative initiatives for refugee inclusion can grow beyond pockets of good practice and inspire large-scale, long-term change. The event brought together a diverse group of public officials, business leaders, service designers, social entrepreneurs, civil society organisations, and refugee initiatives from Europe, the United States, and Canada. This workshop on Employer Engagement: Innovative Approaches to Training and Hiring Refugees featured:  Chair: Laurent Aujean, Policy Officer, Unit Legal Migration and Integration, DG Home, European Commission Sayre Nyce, Executive Director, Talent Beyond Boundaries, United States Peter O’Sullivan, Resettlement Officer, UNHCR, Bureau for Europe Mustafa Alroomi, Web Developer & Askim Kintziger, Innovation Consultant, Cronos Groep, Belgium” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Mini PC’s 40 mins – “Suppose we told you that solutions to the world’s most intractable problems are possible in the next decade. Poverty. Inequality. Climate change. You’d probably say impossible, preposterous, unthinkable. We’ve heard that about our predictions before. But we have been proven right. Now, we are predicting the fastest, deepest, most consequential technological disruption in history and with it, a moment civilization has never encountered before. In the next 10 years, key technologies will converge to completely disrupt the five foundational sectors—information, energy, food, transportation, and materials—that underpin our global economy, and with them every major industry in the world today. Costs will fall by 10 times or more, while production processes become an order of magnitude (10x) more efficient, using 90% fewer natural resources and producing 10 times to 100 times less waste. These technological disruptions are turning the prevailing extraction and exploitation, scarcity and central control model of production on its head, driving a new model of localized creation from limitless, ubiquitous building blocks—a world built not on coal, oil, steel, livestock, and concrete, but on photons, electrons, DNA, molecules and (q)bits.” At the link right-click “https://podnutz.com/mini116/,” and select “Play Now” to hear the podcast. (It is also included in this blog archive.)

Presidential Powers 13 mins – “When President-elect Joe Biden takes office in two months, the Senate will likely be controlled by Republicans. Biden will probably be facing a start of term mired in congressional gridlock. What this means: don’t expect many laws to get passed in the next couple years. Still, there’s quite a bit that Biden can do even without Congress. At the top of the list are some of the arguably most urgent items, like rejoining the World Health Organization as the world enters what looks to be a harsh pandemic winter. But there’s much more, especially when it comes to economic policy. Today on the show, we ask experts about the actions Biden can take without Congress that could have a big effect on Americans’ economic lives. It’s about banks, bureaucrats, billions (in tariffs), and the ‘burbs.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

QAnon Understanding 16 mins – “EXTENDED VERSION (includes content we had to leave on the cutting room floor to make the interview fit into the broadcast) It’s been two weeks since Trump lost the election to Biden. But he and his followers are still claiming victory. Jeff Sharlet, who has been covering the election for Vanity Fair, credits two Christian-adjacent ideas for these claims. The first is the so-called “prosperity gospel”: the notion that, among other things, positive thinking can manifest positive consequences. Even electoral victory in the face of electoral loss. But the problem with prosperity gospel, like day-and-date rapture prophecies, is that when its bets don’t pay off, it’s glaringly obvious. As prosperity thinking loses its edge for Trump, another strain of fringe Christianity — dating back nearly two millennia — is flourishing. Jeff Sharlet says an ancient heresy, Gnosticism, can help us understand the unifying force of pseudo-intellectualism on the right. Sharlet explains how a gnostic emphasis on “hidden” truths has animated QAnon conspiracies and Trump’s base.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recycling in Schools – “Schools are vital hubs to their local communities and are uniquely positioned to teach students waste reduction behaviors. Students can learn waste reduction at schools and bring that messaging home to their families, caregivers, and all those with whom they come in contact. Schools and universities generate about 562,442 tons of waste each year in California. Almost half of school waste is comprised of organic materials like paper, cardboard, and uneaten cafeteria food. Much of the waste generated in the California education system is recyclable. Many school districts have been successful in improving their economic and environmental performance through the implementation of waste reduction initiatives. Today we will speak with the leaders of the CalRecycle Schools Team who provide resources to help California schools reduce waste, and help educate students and adults about why this is so important to the state’s future.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up- menu.

Song Writing 15 mins – “Wilco singer/guitarist Jeff Tweedy has been busy. He has a new solo album out called Love is the King. And his new book How to Write One Song has a lot of advice for aspiring songwriters. But it’s also about a lot more than that. Nerdette host Greta Johnsen spoke with Tweedy from his recording studio in Chicago.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Swamp Gravy 21 mins – “For a particularly difficult Thanksgiving, we thought we’d bring our listeners one of the most heartwarming economic stories from the vault, with a little update. Colquitt, Georgia has a population of about 2,000 people. And like a lot of small towns in America, Colquitt had been struggling with a shrinking population, and the departure of manufacturing, and the decline of farming, and all the other economic troubles that plague small towns. And then Joy Jinks stumbled across a bizarre way for the town to try and save itself: they’d stage a musical! On today’s show: how a homespun theater production helped revitalize a struggling peanut-farming town in southwestern Georgia.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Truman Presidency 30 mins – “With the formal transition of power process finally underway, President-elect Joe Biden can now access the reins of government as he prepares to step into the White House in January. But Donald Trump hasn’t conceded, and some close to him say he may never do so. It’s part of an effort to undermine the legitimacy of the election and make governing as hard as possible for his successor and Diane’s guest, Joe Scarborough, says looking to our country’s 33rd president, Harry Truman, can offer lessons to Joe Biden on how to navigate this rocky transition. Truman’s foreign policy helped create the “American Century”, a vision President Trump has used his four years in office to reject. Joe Scarborough’s new book is “Saving Freedom: Truman, the Cold War, and the Fight for Western Civilization.” He co-hosts MSNBC’s “Morning Joe”.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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