Media Mining Digest 196 – Aug 14, 2015: Acts of Man, Aging Reversal, Alzheimer’s Prevention, Amazing Grace, Artificial Intelligence, Automation and Jobs, Bear Markets, Behavioral Economics, Bonneville Salt Flats, Broadband in New Mexico, Building Deterioration, Business Trends, Calcium Hydroxide, Cancer Drugs, Clean Energy, Climate Denial, Climate Legislation, Coal Wars, Comments Uses, Critical Care Commo, Cultural Psychology, Curitiba Brazil Cleanup, Cyber Security, Daily Show, DIY Diagnosis, Ebola Malaria and Polio Vaccines, Failure Psychology, Government Debt, Greek Economy Stories, Green Packaging, Hiroshima Bomb Anniversary, Homestead Economics, Hotshots, Infidelity, Insurance Rate Hikes, Ketamine in China, Marijuana for Dogs, Mentally Ill in Jail, Migration in Europe, Misfits, Mob Murder, Music Reinvention, Polio History, Polonium Trail, Research Funding, Resuscitation Crisis Manual, Robert Saviano, Seafood Restaurants, Sex Affairs, Shoreline Erosion, Small Arms Survey, Solar Farms, Sunshine Hotel, Taxi Medallions Decline, Twitter Jokes, Warfare Future

The following audio files come from a larger group of 300 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 57 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months.  Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Acts of Man 32 mins – “Mother Nature can do a lot of damage. Tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, and droughts destroy landscapes and ruin lives. But what happens when humans are the ones creating these disasters? This episode of Distillations explores the many ways humans have provoked nature’s destructive forces purposefully and inadvertently through history. Our journey begins in Oklahoma, a state that now has more earthquakes than California. Reporter Anna Stitt talks to the people affected by these new quakes and finds out how their lives have changed. Then we talk to historian Jacob Darwin Hamblin about his latest book, Arming Mother Nature: The Birth of Catastrophic Environmentalism. He tells us how Cold War military planners sought to use the environment as a weapon and in the process discovered how vulnerable our planet really is.” At the link right-click “Download” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Reversal 12 mins – “The average American lifespan rose from about 50 years to nearly 80 during the 20th century. Can we live even longer? Harvard Medical School’s David Sinclair has done research that he says may one day allow many of us to live to 120.” At the link find the title, “Pushing the Limits of the Human Lifespan,” right-click “Media files 080815-Sinclair-Aging.mp3,” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimers Prevention 34 mins – “A recent conference held at the Academy asked a downright outrageous question: Can dementia be prevented by making changes to your diet? In this podcast we look at what the answers might be.” At the link find the title, “Can We Prevent Dementia Through Our Diet?” right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazing Grace 49 mins – “Amazing Grace” on Broadway. We’ll hear the music and remarkable story of the composer who went from slave trader to abolitionist. It’s the song of the hour: “Amazing Grace.” Sung this summer by a President, an anthem for civil rights and now, the title of a Broadway show written by a former cop, who started out with no idea how to write music or lyrics and who had no idea where the song came from. Turns out a one time slave trader wrote it before he turned abolitionist. That happened more than 200 years ago. He was British, but “Amazing Grace” today — it’s wholly American. This hour On Point, “Amazing Grace” — the story of the song, the show, and the sentiment.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence 64 mins – “Mark Johnson is the CEO and co-founder at Descartes Labs. He has a track record of translating complex technologies into usable and successful products. Recently he was the CEO of Zite which he sold twice. First time was to CNN and the second time was to Flipboard. Mark was also a product manager who trained at SAP followed by a string of successful search startups.” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Automation and Jobs 52 mins – “ The jobs robots will be able to do in the not so distant future are endless, according to some experts. From painting to directing traffic to fighting fires, many economist and Silicon Valley insiders agree that society is on the verge of significant job displacement. One recent study reported that 47 percent of jobs in the U.S. are vulnerable to automation. In many ways, this story is nothing new — technology has always threatened work. What is different, observers say, is the pace and extent of change. It’s a future, they argue, we need to prepare for now. Guest host Laura Knoy looks at how we think about robots, jobs and work.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Bear Markets 14 mins – “Paul sheds more light on “The 20 things you should know about bear markets”, a MarketWatch.com article by Paul and Rich Buck. Commenting on the impact of inflation and dividends, Paul notes that one force reduces returns and one improves returns. You may be surprised to find out that the biggest long-term bear market was not the Japanese stock market. And, with a little soul searching, you can discover that the only bear market that matters is a personal decision which is solely yours to determine. Paul hopes to help you find it.” At the link fright-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Behavioral Economics 11 mins – “Ever wondered why you kept throwing good money after bad at the poker table? Or why people buy cars with super-high interest rates? Richard Thaler, a founding father of behavioral economics, takes us through the “logic” behind bad decisions, and the surprising ways our irrationality changes the entire economy.” At the link find the title, “The Science of Bad Financial Decisions,” right-click “Media files 0530ThalerWebMix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bonneville Salt Flats 52 mins – “Thursday, we’re talking about the Bonneville Salt Flats’ rip-roaring past and uncertain future. The vast, white expanse is ideal for driving fast, but thinning salt has forced the cancellation* of this year’s big races. Is mining to blame? Or too much rain? Guest host Matt Canham is joined by photojournalist and writer Landspeed Louise Noeth, geologist Brenda Bowen, and the BLM’s Kevin Oliver to discuss what we can and should be doing about the increasingly endangered salt flats.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in New Mexico 23 mins – “ After Santa Fe found its residents and businesses were often paying the same rates for connections at half the speed of peers in Albuquerque, the City began investigating the local broadband market. This week on Community Broadband Bits, Sean Moody joins us to discuss the situation and what Santa Fe is doing to spur more investment. Sean works in the Economic Development Division of the City as a Special Projects Administrator. He explains the bottleneck in middle mile access that allowed CenturyLink to charge higher rates for backhaul than are common in similar communities. The City decided to invest $1 million in a new fiber link that would bypass the choke point and allow various independent companies to have a better choice for access to the wider Internet. Along the way, the City partnered with the state for additional benefits.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Building Deterioration 13 mins – “The Burj Khalifa might be the tallest building in the world, but is it the most advanced? MIT Professor John Ochsendorf thinks that today’s architects should take a page from classical structures.” At the link find the title, “Building Sustainably… The Ancient Way,” right-click “Media files 08012015-Oschendorf-Architecture-FIX-Webmix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Business Trends 58 mins – “The buzz: Crystal ball. Yes, change is inevitable. But today’s unprecedented pace and scale of change presents unique challenges for the future of business. Futurists worldwide are examining and assessing potential business impacts of new and emerging paradigms, energy innovations, physical-digital boundary blurring, business decentralization, and other global drivers. What are the implications for future leaders? The experts speak. Frank Diana, TCS: “We are entering a world where everything we know and understand about the purposes of business and the mission of our own organization will be challenged” (Rohit Talwar). Gray Scott, Futurist: “We are becoming a digitized species…crossing the computational event horizon into a digital black hole.” Timo Elliott, SAP: “Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex. It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction” (E. F. Schumacher). Join us for Emerging Paradigms and the Future of Business.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Calcium Hydroxide 6 mins – “As is often the case with a compound that has long been in use, calcium hydroxide is rich in alternative names. Its best known common description, slaked lime, suggests that it is lime (more properly known as calcium oxide) that has drunk its fill. ‘Milk of lime’ refers to its state before drying, when it is also known as limewater. ‘Hydrated lime’ merely describes its formation by adding calcium oxide to water, while the rather entertaining ‘pickling lime’ shows up one of its less well known uses. Throw in builders’ lime, lime cake, slack lime and choona and you can see that this is an etymological feast….” At the link right-click “Download:…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Drugs 47 mins – “After the diagnosis of cancer, another blow – the often-crippling costs of treatment. We look at the soaring price of cancer drugs. Cancer drugs exist today that can give not just months, but years of life back to patients, which seems like a medical miracle. The catch is what they cost — because prices are soaring — along with every other medical cost. In excess of a hundred thousand dollars a year for some drug, and not all picked up by insurance. Some consider that extortion: your money for your life. Even some cancer doctors are complaining it’s gone too far. So should the market determine the price of life-extending drugs, or should there be limits set? This hour On Point: the financial ethics of miracle medicine.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clean Energy 48 mins – “Tough new carbon restrictions. What the president is proposing, Germany’s already doing. Will the American people buy in? He says he wants America in the lead on fighting climate change, so this week, President Obama announced new rules for power companies that will dramatically reshape the way the US makes electricity in just 15 years. In fact though, it’s Germany who leads the world here — already committed to have its electricity all wind and water-driven by the middle of the century. And Germany’s already started. With the public’s enthusiastic support. While here, debate still rages. So what makes Germany different? And what can we learn? This hour On Point, The President’s Clean Power Act and the debate for hearts and minds.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Denial 60 mins – “In the summer of 2015, it’s another blistering week in North America, and around the world, as weather records fall. It’s 105 degrees, or 40 degrees Celsius outside my studio in British Columbia Canada. The ocean-side city of Portland Oregon experienced back to back days over 100 degrees. A heat wave blasted the East Coast of the United States and Canada. Europe is cooler this week, after a blazing heat wave followed by freakish storms. This same day, a city of 100,000 people in Iran experienced a combination of heat and humidity equal to 163 degrees Fahrenheit, or 74 degrees Celsius. This El Nino year could be the record-shattering jump in global heating we’ve been warning is on the way. Welcome to your hotter world. This week on Radio Ecoshock we turn the tables. Alex Smith is the guest on Post Carbon Radio, as broadcast on KWMR West Marin Community Radio outside San Francisco California. We go for the big picture on shocking climate change, and the eternal question: can we do anything about it? Let’s go to Post Carbon Radio hosts Karen Nyhus and Bing Gong.” At the link and the title, “Alex Smith on Post Carbon Radio,” right-click “Lo-Fi” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Legislation 52 mins – “In a speech Monday, President Barack Obama said that “no challenge poses a greater threat to our future” than climate change. To help address that threat, he announced new federal rules limiting carbon emissions from U.S. power plants. Some critics charge these rules should be stronger given the risks ahead; many others say these rules represent a federal overreach, pose an enormous burden on U.S. coal companies and will mean higher prices for consumers. We look at efforts to cut carbon emissions and America’s role in the international effort to confront the challenges of climate change.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Coal Wars 60 mins – “This week we’re learning more about the fossil fuel that powered humanity’s first industrial age, and helped set us on a course for a looming climate crisis. We’ll speak to Richard Martin, energy editor at the MIT Technology Review, about his book “Coal Wars: The Future of Energy and the Fate of the Planet.” And we’ll explore the environmental impact of coal with Jeff Deyette, assistant director of energy research in the Climate and Energy program at the Union of Concerned ScientistsAt the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Comments Uses 18 mins – “Joseph Reagle discusses what we can learn from reading and thinking about internet comments.” At the link find the title, “MIT Press Podcast- Reading the Comments,” right-click “Media files MITP Reagle0315.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Critical Care Commo 46 mins – “Communicating With Your Doctors and Nurses to Ensure the Best Care: Lessons From Those Who Have Been There” At the link find the title (same as the quote), right-click “Media files 29717.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cultural Psychology 45 mins – “Our guest, Steven J. Heine, was one of the authors of a paper that lead to psychology’s greatest epiphany in decades, many (if not all) of the human universals discovered in all of field’s most famous experiments are actually universals among only one demographic, not the entire human species. It was kind of like biologists suddenly learning they had based their entire science just on the animals living in a single cave in Montana. In this episode, you’ll learn why it took so long to figure out it was studying outliers, and what it means for the future of psychology, neuroscience, and many other fields attempting that study human beings as a whole.” At the link right-click “Download” for “Fifty-Five:…” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Curitiba Brazil Cleanup 10 mins – “Curitiba, the eighth largest metropolis in Brazil and the capital of the state of Paraná, has been called the “best-planned city in the world.” Much of the credit goes to Jaime Lerner, a charismatic architect, urban planner and a former mayor of Curitiba. Now in his eighth decade and retired from politics, Lerner, who was mayor or Curitiba three times and the governor of Parana twice, has traveled the world looking at some of the things cities do to make urban life more vibrant and sustainable. In his new book, Urban Acupuncture: Celebrating Pinpricks of Change that Enrich City Life, Lerner says the path to success is often found in doing simple things quickly that enhance the life of a city, he says….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Security 34 mins – The following topics are presented from the 15 Jul 2015 Crypto-Gram Newsletter are Crypto-Gram 15 July 2015: organizational doxing, encryption, Snowden documents, backdoors in encryption products, DoD psition on backdoors, NSA reforms and intercepts At the link at the Crypto-Gram 15 July 2015 title right-click “Media files crypto-gram-15-07.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Daily Show 41 mins – “After more than 16 years as America’s funny, biting and fake newsman, Jon Stewart leaves The Daily Show. We’ll look back. He is America’s premier fake newsman — or was till last night. Jon Stewart took his curtain call, with a status rarely achieved by a guy who calls himself a comedian. His going out was treated a national event, and with good reason. Stewart has been a critic, sometimes a conscience and always a touchstone, at least when he was at the desk of “The Daily Show.” But he had a life before “The Daily Show,” and he has a lot of career yet to come. Why he stopped now, and where he might go next. This hour on Point. Jon Stewart, before and yet to come.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DIY Diagnosis 15 mins – “Forget pregnancy tests – in the near future, you could diagnose dozens of diseases, from AIDS to cancer, in the comfort of your home. Dr. Eugene Chan and Professor Andrew Ellington discuss what that means for doctors, patients, and healthcare costs.” At the link find the title, “DIY Diagnoses,” right-click “Media files 0523-BFIX2REAL-WEB.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola, Malaria and Polio Vaccines 28 mins – “Claudia Hammond and her studio guest Dr Sneh Khemka look at the new headline-making Ebola vaccine and other vaccines under development against the virus which has killed more than 11,000 people since its outbreak last year in West Africa. Also in the spotlight, the world’s first malaria vaccine received its first regulatory green light. But is it effective and protective enough to roll out in low-income countries? Kenyaan global health expert Tabitha Mwangi isn’t convinced. Plus an immunisation success story from Nigeria. A decade ago Nigeria became one of the world’s last hotspots for polio after vaccination boycotts in the north of the country. Happily, in the past year, there has not been one reported case of polio in the country. Former Nigerian minister of health Dr Muhammad Pate and medical anthropologist Heidi Larson talk about how this dramatic turnaround came about.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Failure Pychology 47 mins – “’Fail fast, fail often” goes the zeitgeist . But should we have such optimism for failure? When you have a dream — your own business, a great marriage, a career as an artist or an athlete — and you try for the dream but don’t reach it, we call that failure. It hurts, failure. On the other hands. in places like Silicon Valley, failure is seen as good. It’s practically a fetish, where never failing suggests you’re not trying hard enough. And yet it seems only the winners preach that lesson. Are there times when giving up the dream makes the most sense? This hour On Point: failing — how we handle not getting what we want.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Debt 58 mins – “Cato Institute Fellow Michael Tanner talks about the growing national debt in his latest book, [Going for Broke: Deficits, Debt, and the Entitlement Crisis].” At the link find the title, “After Words with Michael Tanner,” right-click “Media files program.401581.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Greek Economy Stories 19 mins – “On a visit to Greece, we talk to a guy who found an ingenious place to hoard his cash, a government-protected milk peddler, and a would-be olive oil tycoon.” At the link find the title, “#639: Where To Hide €50,000, And Other Stories From Greece,” right-click “Media files 20150717 blog pmpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Packaging 56 mins – “Be Green Packaging is the only food and beverage packaging company with Cradle to Cradle™ certified products. Their clients include Whole Foods, Gillette, P&G, 7 Eleven, Wolfgang Puck and many more. In addition to designing, manufacturing, and distributing compostable packaging that is certified by BPI, the company is a champion of social responsibility. Be Green Packaging has been certified by Intertek for the ethical treatment of workers and social conditions at their plants. Their facility in Richland, SC is one of the first factories in the United States to be based upon Cradle to Cradle™ manufacturing protocols. Features of the facility include: Water Recycling System, Composting System, Recycling System, and Zero-Waste-Manufacturing. Our guest today is Ron Blitzer, Co-Founder of Be Green Packaging. @BeGreenPkg “ At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hiroshima Bomb Anniversary 28 mins – “Since the first atomic bomb was dropped on the Japanese city of Hiroshima, scientists have been studying the effect of that huge dose of radiation on survivors. Seventy years on, professor Richard Wakeford tells Roland Pease that researchers have found a surprising lack of hereditary mutation risks, along with many lessons that can be learned about long term radiation risk.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homestead Economics 106 mins – “Joe Mooney is a passionate advocate for becoming more self-reliant and learning through DIY self-education. While a firefighter by trade, he is a DIY project junkie and amateur homesteader by passion. Growing up in both rural and urban areas around the US, Joe now calls his rural ‘homestead’ in the Arizona desert home. He and his family live off of 90% rainwater, collected from their roof and are always looking for new ways to become more self-reliant and live a more satisfying and healthy life. Joe maintains a YouTube channel called “Homesteadonomics” that chronicles many of his DIY projects and homesteading activities. He considers his channel a means to teach others how he does projects on his homestead as well as increasing his own self-education in the process. …In true homesteading fashion, Joe’s projects and homesteading activities also serve to provide additional income as well as hone future skill sets in various disciplines. In addition to making videos, Joe has written articles for backwoods home and sometimes moonlights as a craftsman of odd projects that he sells on craigslist.com.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hotshots 52 mins – “Two years ago, a wildfire ignited near a small town in central Arizona. The 20 elite firefighters of the Granite Mountain Hotshots were sent to fight the blaze. Only one of them survived. Not since 9/11 had so many firefighters been killed in the line of duty. Friday, the journalist Kyle Dickman joins us to talk about his new book that tells the story of the Granite Mountain crew and the tragic Yarnell Hill Fire they died trying to put out. It’s also a window into the intense world of wildland firefighting. Kyle Dickman is a former editor at Outside magazine and a former member of the Tahoe Hotshots. He fought wildfires in California for five seasons. His new book is called On the Burning Edge: A Fateful Fire and the Men Who Fought ItAt the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infidelity 22 mins – “Infidelity is the ultimate betrayal. But does it have to be? Relationship therapist Esther Perel examines why people cheat, and unpacks why affairs are so traumatic: because they threaten our emotional security. In infidelity, she sees something unexpected — an expression of longing and loss. A must-watch for anyone who has ever cheated or been cheated on, or who simply wants a new framework for understanding relationships.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Insurance Rate Hikes 52 mins – “In a speech Monday, President Barack Obama said that “no challenge poses a greater threat to our future” than climate change. To help address that threat, he announced new federal rules limiting carbon emissions from U.S. power plants. Some critics charge these rules should be stronger given the risks ahead; many others say these rules represent a federal overreach, pose an enormous burden on U.S. coal companies and will mean higher prices for consumers. We look at efforts to cut carbon emissions and America’s role in the international effort to confront the challenges of climate change.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Ketamine in China 27 mins – “ China has become a top maker and taker of underground ketamine. Celia Hatton sees the impact of the drug and explores The Fortress – the drug village at the centre of the trade.” At the link find the title, “China’s Ketamine Fortress,” right-click “Media files p02yy48d.mp3” and select “Save Link As” fro the pop-up menu.

Marijuana for Dogs 18 mins – “Watching a pet suffer through an illness can be heartbreaking, but can cannabis be a therapeutic to alleviate pain in animals? On this episode, Darlene Arden discussed medical cannabis for animals.” At the link right-click “VBR MP3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mentally Ill in Jail 52 mins – “President Barack Obama and some members of Congress are pushing for reforms in our criminal justice system. In particular, there’s bipartisan support to give judges more discretion in sentencing, but some say an even bigger problem is the fact that our jails and prisons are crowded with many people who don’t belong there in the first place. They pose no threat to public safety, but suffer from untreated mental illness. In some communities police, attorneys, judges and mental health service groups are working to change this: Join us to discuss new efforts to help people with mentally illness stay out of jail and get into treatment.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Migration in Europe 47 mins – “The migrant crush at the Chunnel, linking France and England, puts a spotlight on Europe’s migration crisis. We’ll go there. They’re poor, they’re desperate, and they’re not wanted: the waves of African and Middle Eastern men — they’re mostly men — flooding into Europe to escape brutal wars at home. Risking all to get across Europe’s soft borders for safety and freedom, only to find fences going up. Hungary’s literally building a wall against the migrants. French police are nightly battling thousands trying to slip into the tunnel under the English Channel that leads to Britain. It’s the summer’s biggest and most heartbreaking story in Europe, with no clear right answer. This hour On Point: Europe’s migrant crisis, and the limits to sanctuary.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Misfits 13 mins – “The mafia, pirates, gangs, and hackers. What can we learn from them? According to author Alexa Clay, turns out a whole lot — including creativity.” At the link find the title, “The Lessons Pirates and Gangsters Can Teach Us,” right-click “Media files 08012015-Clay-Misfits-Webmix.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mob Murder 27 mins – “Farkhunda, a 28-year-old Afghan woman and religious scholar, was beaten to death in the streets of Kabul in March this year. She had reportedly been arguing with a Mullah about the practice of selling charms in front of a mosque. He accused her of burning the Koran.” At the link find the title, “The Killing of Farkhunda,” right-click “Media files p02yt7xq.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Reinvention 13 mins – “The market for recorded music has undergone at least three major reinventions since the dawn of the Internet. …The combination of ubiquitous Internet connectivity and bottomless consumer appetite for music has led to the success of applications like Pandora, Spotify, and Rdio which allow users to access entire music catalogs from virtually anywhere for next to nothing. Streaming has worked. …Where does the money go? A recent study from Berklee College of Music’s Institute for Creative Entrepreneurship showed that 20 to 50 percent of music revenues might never make it to their rightful owners. In some cases artists might get 20% or less of the already tiny dollar amounts coming in from streaming services. But no one knows for sure. …On this week’s episode of the podcast we try to find out if we can crack into the stream and figure out where the money is flowing.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Polio History 52mins – “For a certain generation of Americans, polio is a very scary word. Serious outbreaks of the disease began appearing in the U.S. in the late 1800s. President Franklin Roosevelt contracted polio in 1921. Over the next several decades, tens of thousands of Americans a year were debilitated by the poliomyelitis virus. In 1952, polio killed some 3,000 people in the U.S. and paralyzed many more. Then came Dr. Jonas Salk’s vaccine. Schoolchildren across the country were inoculated, saving untold Americans from contracting the disease. Today, because of aggressive public health efforts, polio has been nearly wiped out globally. We look at the history of polio and the ongoing battle to finally eradicate it worldwide.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Polonium Trail 27 mins – “Former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko died in a London hospital in 2006, after drinking tea poisoned with the highly radioactive material – polonium. But who wanted him dead, and why? And where did his killers get the polonium from?” At the link find the title, “The Polonium Trail,” right-click “Media files p02yhzvg.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Research Funding 36 mins – “Dr. Kathie Olsen discussed the current budgetary crunch in scientific funding and how it affects researchers in the United States.” At the link right-click “VBR MP3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Resuscitation Crisis Manual 5 mins – “A while ago on the podcast, I featured a book called the Anesthetic (Anaesthetic) Crisis Manual by David Borshoff. David is an anesthesiologist and a pilot, so it was natural that he would want the same sort of no-bullshit crisis checklist he used in a plane to be present in the operating theater. Hence the Anesthetic Crisis Manual.At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robert Saviano 49 mins – “Roberto Saviano made a rare appearance in the UK in July 2015 when he came to the Intelligence Squared stage. In conversation with Intelligence Squared’s very own Robert Collins, Saviano talked about his life in hiding and his beginnings as a reporter on the streets of Naples. He revealed his latest work of investigative reporting, ‘Zero Zero Zero’, in which he delves into the sprawling network of the global cocaine trade. He traced how the $400 billion a year generated by drugs trafficking filters into the international banking system through money laundering from Wall Street to the City of London. The cocaine trade isn’t just a playground for criminals, Saviano argued. It is part of the structure of our global economy where some of the biggest players — the banks — have profited without facing a single criminal conviction.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Seafood Restaurants 64 mins – “Seafood is highly perishable and supply is often uncertain. Roger Berkowitz, CEO of Legal Sea Foods talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the challenges of running 34 seafood restaurants up and down the east coast. Berkowitz draws 22 mins – “on his 22 year tenure as CEO and discusses how his business works day-to-day and the question of sustainability.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Affairs 22 mins – “Infidelity is the ultimate betrayal. But does it have to be? Relationship therapist Esther Perel examines why people cheat, and unpacks why affairs are so traumatic: because they threaten our emotional security. In infidelity, she sees something unexpected — an expression of longing and loss. A must-watch for anyone who has ever cheated or been cheated on, or who simply wants a new framework for understanding relationships.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shoreline Erosion 52 mins – “In their natural state, beaches constantly change shape. They absorb the impacts of storms; dunes and shorelines come and go. But much of coastal development is designed to be permanent. And many scientists warn these buildings, roads and seawalls along the shore harm the beaches that attracted people to the area in the first place. Rising sea levels, devastating storms and pollution further complicate efforts to preserve coastal areas. A discussion about the state of the world’s beaches and efforts to protect the coastline for this month’s Environmental Outlook.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Small Arms Survey 2015 18 mins (2 parts) – “The Small Arms Survey 2015: Weapons and the World explores the theme of weapons and the environment, as well as offering case studies on a range of aspects of small arms and armed violence. In the first of this two-episode podcast, Senior Researcher Khristopher Carlson and Yearbook Coordinator Glenn McDonald discuss five of the book’s chapters, covering weapons and the environment, trade in weapons, and measures to regulate and control small arms. [In the second part]… Yearbook Coordinator Glenn McDonald and Researcher Claudia Seymour introduce the four case studies discussing armed actors, focusing on their procurement and use of small arms, and their stockpile management practices.” At the link find the title, “Small Arms Survey 2015: Weapons and the World – Part 1,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part 2.

Solar Farms 29 mins – “Is your home one of the millions that haven’t been able to get solar because you’re a renter? The cost of solar panel installation is half of what it was just five years ago, which should be opening up opportunity everywhere. But many homes and businesses are locked out because they don’t own their rooftops. The good news is that policymakers are starting to look for creative ways to expand solar access — just recently, the Obama Administration announced a $520 million initiative for community solar farms which could allow everyone to get on board the renewable revolution. This week on Sea Change Radio, we talk about this community solar initiative in a panel discussion with Adam Browning and Katherine Bagley. Browning is the executive director of the non-profit solar advocacy organization, Vote Solar, and Bagley is an environmental reporter for Inside Climate News.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sunshine Hotel 28 mins – “The Bowery, in lower Manhattan, is one of New York’s oldest neighborhoods. It’s been through a lot of iterations. In the 1650s, a handful of freed slaves were the neighborhood’s first residents. At the time, New York was still a Dutch colony called New Amsterdam, and the Lower East Side was farm land. In the early 1800s, The Bowery had become a bustling thoroughfare with elegant theaters, and taverns, and shops. But by the late 1800s it had become a much seedier place, full of saloons, and dance halls, and prostitution. By the 1940s, The Bowery had become New York’s skid row—a place where down-and-out men could go and rent a cheap room for the night in one of the neighborhood’s many flop houses.Now, of course, the Lower East Side affords no room for a skid row. The Bowery, like the rest of that area, is full of expensive places to live, and fancy grocery stores.But back in 1998, before the last of the flop hotels closed their doors, David Isay and Stacy Abramson spent months documenting one of the last of these places: The Sunshine Hotel.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taxi Medallions Decline 15 mins – “Gene Freidman built a taxi empire in New York City. Now his empire is starting to crumble.” At the link find the title, “#643: The Taxi King” right-click “Media files 20150731_blog_pmpod2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Twitter Jokes 16 mins – “With 316 million users posting 500 million tweets a day, someone is bound to write an unoriginal tweet now and then. But there are some Twitter users whose entire existence relies completely on plagiarizing tiny jokes and relatable observations created by other Twitter users. Many plagiarizing accounts have follower numbers ranging from the thousands to the millions. Meaning their exposure can lead to career opportunities and sponsorships built on the creativity of others who are just getting started in their writing careers. So it was not without excitement that Twitter users found out last week that they can report plagiarizing accounts to Twitter under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, and have these copied tweets removed. But now we’re forced to ask the question: are jokes protected under copyright? We asked Andy Sellars of Harvard Law School’s Cyberlaw Clinic to weigh in.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Warfare Future 46 mins – “P.W. Singer and August Cole imagine World War III in a new novel where the battlefront goes deeply cyber. It’s the classic lament of military historians. That armies are always training to fight the last war, when they should be figuring out what war will look like next time. Well, if that’s the case, a book called called “Ghost Fleet” may be the remedy. So vividly does it depict the shape of World War III — and how technologies that are part of our world already from wearable technology  to driverless cars to Walmart’s cutting distribution system — may hold the keys to victory or defeat. It’s a novel by the way — fiction — but not really. That’s why it’s the novel everyone in the Pentagon is talking about. This hour On Point: “Ghost Fleet” and the face of warfare in the not so distant future.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic library of 7000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 250 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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