Mining Digest 374 – Jan 18, 2019: Amazon and Brexit Situations, Animal Poaching for Medicine, Biofabrication, Birth Surrogates in Canada, Black Life, Border Wall Investigation, Brain Cancer Research, Burundi Human Rights Violations, California Problems, Climate Report Warning, Cuban Infiltrator, Ebola Virus Research, Exosomes, Female Led Revolution, Google and Amazon Operations, Greyhound Diaries, Innovator Henry Sutton, Instant Noodle History, Investment Myths, Investment Strategies, Jamal Khashoggi Murder, Ladies’ Landmine Agency, Loan Forgiveness Program Is Broken, Loneliness, Palm Oil Problems, Plastic Recycled Into Roadways, Psychedelic Research, Radio La Colifata in Argentina, Reading Wars, Red State Blue State, Regeneration Research, Renewable Energy Retailer, Social Media Impact, Soup Kitchen Operations, Stroke Treatment, Successful Investment Strategy, Syrian Survivor, Taxation Changes Discussion, Vertical Farming with Trump Jr, Veselnitskaya Indictment, Vicky Phelan Activist, Vietnam War, White House Press Access, Women Reporters

Exercise your ears: the 68 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 444 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 23,756 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 157GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 496 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Amazon and Brexit Situations 50 mins – “Slate Money talks Amazon’s new headquarters, mayhem with Brexit, and Steve Cohen getting more billions. ” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal Poaching for Medicine 11 mins – “Bears, tigers, rhinos, pangolin. They are all in poachers’ sights, slaughtered and cut to pieces, then smuggled to hubs of traditional Chinese medicine such as Hong Kong. The pressure is so intense that many species face extinction in the near future. And for what? For treatments for which there is little evidence of effectiveness. Peter Hadfield visits Kazakhstan where the Asian antelope, the Saiga once numbered in their millions. Recently, males have been hunted for their horns, and the species is now close to collapse. Work is being done to find substitutes for animal parts, but it’s an uphill battle against tradition. And now the Chinese government is supporting traditional Chinese medicine by setting up teaching and clinical centres outside China, increasing demand for pieces of animals facing extinction.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronomer George Ellery Hale 27 mins – “A celebration of the amazing work of the little known astronomer (the world’s first astrophysicist) George Ellery Hale. He covered the peak of Mount Wilson with a constellation of instruments for observing the sky. His first objective – to study one particular star, our Sun. Hale’s monumental discovery in 1908 – that the Sun generated powerful magnetic fields – has been a source of inspiration for the world’s astronomer’s. During his life (born Chicago 1868, died Pasadena 1938) he founded several major observatories and introduced novel telescope designs that saw further and deeper into space. In fact, breakthroughs in astronomy in the first decades of the 20th Century are largely due to Hale’s instruments – he actually built the world’s largest telescope four times. He also established the internationally renowned university known as CalTech and brought scientists from different disciplines together in global co-operative research organisations that still operate today. And the publication he started in the 1890s, the Astrophysical journal, has become the leading forum of its kind – in the world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Australian Science Writing 4 mins – “Physicist and Australian of the Year Michelle Simmons reflects on how scientists view the world, and how this is illustrated in the short stories featured in this year’s The Best Australia Science Writing 2018.At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bernie Sanders Interview 82 mins – “Most Americans support progressive policies, and Bernie Sanders wants to give them what they want.” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Biofabrication 10 mins – “Engineer Mathilde Desselle shows some applications of biofabrication, brought about by combining 3D scanning, modelling and printing. An injured skull has a specifically designed implant to plug the hole, following injury. A model of a patient’s heart shows doctors what they’ll see during an operation. And prosthetics are produced for children with deformed ears. As Mathilde Desselle explains, these were examples shown to students during a recent STEM camp run by QUT where high school students are shown the surprising applications which arise from studying STEM subjects.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Birth Surrogates in Canada 27 mins – “In Canada, many women volunteer to give birth to a stranger’s child and do not get paid in return. Under Canadian laws, gestational surrogates receive only expenses in exchange for getting pregnant and carrying a baby for nine months. There is an altruistic surrogacy model in place, radically different from commercial surrogacy in other countries. This forward-thinking country has seen a dramatic increase in surrogacy, with an estimated 400% growth over the last decade, and has welcomed intended parents from all over the globe, who get matched to a Canadian surrogate to go on a life-changing journey together. Surrogates in Canada are part of a tight-knit community: they get together to share experiences and exchange advice, as the country debates changes in its legislation to respond to the increasing demand of women who volunteer as gestational carriers. But why do they do it? The BBC’s Valeria Perasso follows them as they navigate the emotional challenges of giving life to a baby that they will say goodbye to after birth, and meets the families who will welcome home these special babies.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Black Life 60 mins – “Reniqua Allen examines whether the “American Dream” is attainable today. She’s interviewed by [The Root] editor-in-chief Danielle Belton.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Reniqua Allen” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. “

Border Wall Investigation 47 mins – “There is growing chaos at the southern border, as some officials say the Trump administration’s focus on deterrence at the border has left them unable to handle and properly house thousands of families. We’ll get a reality check on the ground.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Cancer Research 4 mins – “Andrew Olle was a highly respected journalist presenting 4 Corners on ABC TV and morning current affairs on ABC Sydney for many years. In 1995 he died from a brain tumour which was not diagnosed until he was rushed to hospital following a massive stroke and collapse. He didn’t regain consciousness and died within a week. The Olle Fund for Brain Cancer Research was established by Annette Olle to honour the memory of her late husband. Each year a dinner is held to remember Andrew and raise money for the fund. Kerrie McDonald, an Australian scientist working on brain cancer research spoke at the dinner. Her specialty is matching the right treatments to the right patients using genomics. This is an excerpt from Kerrie’s McDonald’s address.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burundi Human Rights Violations 27 mins – “An investigation into the ‘killing machine’ of one of Africa’s most repressive and secretive countries. Three years ago there was widespread unrest in the East African country of Burundi when the country’s president ran for a third term. Protestors said he was violating the constitution that limits presidential terms to just two. Since then street protests have ended but a BBC investigation has now uncovered evidence of government sponsored torture and killings designed to silence dissent. The government has always denied any human rights violations, and declined to comment on the allegations in this programme. Reporter Maud Jullien. Producers Charlotte Atwood and Michael Gallagher.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

California Problems 50 mins – “President Trump took to the airwaves Tuesday night to make his case for a wall spanning the country’s Southern border. We get reactions. Plus, KPCC’s new podcast The Big One is meant to be a wakeup call about preparing for a major earthquake along the San Andrea fault. And, we check in with Montecito mudslide victims one year later.” At the link click the play button, then right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cambodia Surrogate Mothers in Trouble 27 mins – “In a Cambodian hospital, a group of terrified new mothers nurse tiny babies under the watch of police guards. They’re surrogates, desperately poor women promised $10,000 to bear children for parents in China. But they were arrested under new anti-trafficking rules, and now they face an agonising choice: either they agree to keep children they didn’t want and can’t easily afford to bring up, children who aren’t genetically theirs – or they honour their surrogacy contracts, and face up to 20 years in jail. Tim Whewell reports on the suffering as country after country in Asia cracks down on commercial surrogacy – and asks whether the detained mothers are criminals – or victims.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Climate Report Warning 5 mins – “The 2018 Emissions Gap Report released this week by UN Environment shows global emissions have hit an historic high and are showing “no signs of peaking”. Australia is among several countries currently not on track to meet their unconditional Paris carbon emissions reduction targets by 2030. The report says global efforts need to be tripled by 2030 to hold warming at 2C and ramped up five-fold for warming to remain at 1.5C. Nick Kilvert speaks to one of the report’s lead authors, Dr Joeri Rogelj.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Infiltrator 31 mins – “When Jack Boyles signed up for the Navy in the early 1960s he was excited to work aboard the USS Shangri-La. As the ship’s only yeoman he had access to top secret information so he knew before most people why the ship was docked off of Cuba. But little did he know what was in store for him.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Virus Research 79 mins – “Brianne and Vincent tackle two studies that utilize infectious viruses to examine zoonotic potential of Bombali virus, a new ebolavirus from an insectivorous species in Sierra Leone, and a human mumps-like virus from an African flying fox in DRC” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Exosomes 79 mins -”The TWiM-opods consider two stories about exosomes, vesicles that are shed from cells: those that eliminate airway pathogens, and those from the plants we eat that shape our gut microbiome” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Female Led Revolution in Argentina 27 mins – “Argentina is on the brink of a female-led revolution, and in Buenos Aires women are fighting for an equal footing everywhere from the institutions of government to the Tango hall. Since 2015 political pressure around women’s rights has peaked, following a string of horrifying femicides. It spawned a social media movement #NiUnaMenos, and continent wide strikes and protests. This year the almost-unthinkable happened in the birthplace of the Pope, a bill to legalise abortion reached the upper house of parliament. But the abortion bill was defeated. Is the fight for gender equality in one of the most macho cultures in the world a case of two steps forward one step back? Katy Watson speaks to the activists who started this latest feminist wave, to women who have escaped violence, to a self-proclaimed reformed macho man, and explores how tango – the proud national dance of Argentina is being re-interpreted with equality in mind. The old Tango songs about a woman slighting a man and having bloody revenge exacted upon her are increasingly taboo, and female dancers have started their own feminist collective. Katy also speaks to one of the famous “Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo” about how she feels about the latest surge of public protest.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Google and Amazon Operations 45 mins – “Workers at Amazon fulfillment centers in Minneapolis are fighting for better conditions. And Amazon is starting to come to the table.” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Greyhound Diaries 50 mins – “Stories from the travelling underbelly of America, collected on Greyhound buses by traveler and musician Doug Levitt. Singer-songwriter Doug Levitt hears the stories of America’s struggling people as they ride across the country on long-haul coaches – and turns their tales into songs. For twelve years and 120,000 miles, he’s crossed the United States by Greyhound, guitar on his back, and notebook in his pocket. The people on the margins ride Greyhound, the only form of long distance travel they can afford. It makes for a singular community of people on the move, looking for work, dealing with family emergencies and taking leaps of faith in pursuit of transformation, redemption and healing. He meets travellers like Kat, whose boyfriend is in jail and who is heading back home to see her daughter. There’s Jay, who’s taking his two-year-old son back to his former partner after a two-week visit under their joint custody arrangement. There’s the traveller known as the Sombrero Man, who’s become a full-time campaigner against many causes including gun control – and who tells us a story of a man who tried to help him. And Sam, who got addicted to painkillers after being hit by a car. Doug composes songs based around his fellow passengers’ life stories, and pays a visit to the hometown of his inspiration, the songwriter Woody Guthrie, in Okemah, Oklahoma.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Hubble Trouble 27 mins – “As federal employees many US scientists have been affected by the US government shutdown. They are not being paid, can’t talk about their work or go to scientific conferences. We look at how this US political stand-off is affecting scientific research. One of the casualties is the Hubble space telescope, in need of repairs, which cannot start until its federal employed engineers can get back to work. Meanwhile, in Antarctica a US led team have extracted microbes, water and rock samples from a subglacial lake covered with kilometre thick ice. Their live samples may have evolved in the depths and dark of the lake, hidden from view for thousands of years. And just how are we to feed the world in the future? One team of scientists have successfully increased the yield of their experimental plants by 40 percent. They are hoping to repeat the technique with food crops. This comes at the same time as an investigation into China’s future food needs. While demand is going to increase, researchers offer an optimistic view, more efficient farming methods might mean China could be self-sufficient in food in years to come – and even use less land to grow it on than they do currently.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indias Online Porn 53 mins – “Politicians in parliament, colleagues in the office, commuters on the bus… the sight of someone watching porn on their mobile phone in India does not surprise anyone anymore, even if it does anger many. Access to pornography though mobile phone has been sudden and widespread in the country – some say way too sudden for a conservative society and blame this for the sexual violence against women. But when legal attempts are made to ban pornography, a strong resistance emerges in the name of freedom of expression, including sexual expression. Others argue that online pornography is the wrong target, pointing out that around a third of porn viewers in India are women. But what do Indian men themselves make of this? The BBC’s India Women Affairs correspondent Divya Arya travels the country to meet men from all backgrounds to find out.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Innovator Henry Sutton 27 mins – “eHenry Sutton was born in Ballarat in 1855. He built some of Australia’s first automobiles, developed wireless radio, and pioneered the technology behind television. He stood as an equal alongside Alexander Graham Bell, Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison. Although applauded around the world in his day for his remarkable achievements, Henry Sutton went largely unnoticed in Australia. Only when his enormous body of work is documented in one place do you gain the true picture and depth of the remarkable achievements that remained unrecorded, until now. 106 years after his death, the forgotten innovator is finally being remembered in a book written by his great granddaughter, Lorayne Branch. Robyn Williams reports from the launch of Henry Sutton The Innovative Man in Ballarat, Victoria. Below you find a link to the publisher and information on how to obtain the book.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Instant Noodle History 53 mins – “What is the most traded legal item in US prisons? Instant Noodles. According to the World Instant Noodles Association, 270 million servings of instant noodles are eaten around the world every day. Annually, that’s 16 to 17 portions for every man, woman and child. At the turn of the millennium, a Japanese poll found that “The Japanese believe that their best invention of the twentieth century was instant noodles.” The Taiwanese-Japanese man who invented them (Momofuku Ando) was convinced that real peace would only come when people have enough to eat. In the bleak wreckage of post-war Japan, he spent a year in a backyard hut, creating the world’s most successful industrial food. Crucially, he wanted the noodles to be ready to eat in less than three minutes. That convenience has since become a selling point for noodles that are consumed by students, travellers and, yes, prisoners the world over. Instant noodles first went on sale in 1958, and they’ve changed little since. Sixty years on, Celia Hatton explores the story behind instant noodles. It’s a journey that starts in Japan, at the nation’s instant noodle museum, and then takes her to China, still the world’s number one market for “convenient noodles” as they’re known there. Chinese sales of instant noodles are falling, though, as the country becomes wealthier. But noodles are still on sale in every food store in the country. The story ends with Celia being shown how to make a “prison burrito” by an ex-prisoner from Riker’s Island prison in New Jersey, in the US. We hear why instant noodles have emerged as the prisoners’ currency of choice. Momofuku Ando’s invention lives on.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Investment Equity Strategies 46 mins – “Since the market started making noises like a baby bear, more investors are asking,”What is the appropriate percentage of equities in my portfolio?” Paul addresses this question from the points of view of a young investor, a pre-retiree and a retiree, and also considers the dangerous probabilities of bad advice from commission-based advisors.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Lies 57 mins – “Paul discusses 9 different lies, or myths, that keep millions of investors from investing in stocks. Some of these lies are created by the “fake news and advertising” from Wall Street, and some by the natural fear of loss.  In one example of an investment myth — “Investing is risky” — he compares the worst results of stocks with the worst returns of bonds. The outcome may suggest that bonds are more risky than stocks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Myths 45 mins – “In this lively conversation, Paul talks with Tim Ranzetta of NextGen Personal Finance about index funds, dispelling common myths young people have about money, how to build a portfolio for life, target date funds, the importance of diversification, the commitment to helping people help themselves, and more. NGPF.org provides an abundance of financial education resources for teachers and parents. Tim’s article, “10 Money Milestones for Parents Who Want to Teach Their Kids About Money” was featured in Paul’s last bi-monthly newsletter. (If you’re not yet a free subscriber, sign up at PaulMerriman.com ).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Strategies 43 mins – “In wishing listeners a Happy Thanksgiving, Paul shares some of the reasons for his gratitude, and 12 important decisions/choices that every first-time investor will make. He provides a few reasons why one path is likely to lead to a better financial outcome. Attached is a list of the choices he recently used to teach high school students, as well as a few 30-somethings. Paul’s hope is that this podcast and list will be helpful in sharing your knowledge and care with your loved ones. One day they will surely thank you for this.  Click here for “The Only 12 Things You Need to Know to be a Successful Investor for Life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investments and Elections 66 mins – “This podcast, recorded before the market opened on Election Day in the U.S., begins with Paul’s advice on how to respond to the election results. He then answers the following questions from his readers and listeners: Why are bond funds losing money? Are individual bonds better than bond funds? How has mid-cap value performed compared to small-cap value? What international funds do you recommend? Should I put more money in equities if all my bond funds are in a stable value fund? What will Do-It-Yourself investors do if you stop giving your recommendations? Which do you prefer, ETFs or regular mutual funds? Does your foundation accept donations?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jamal Khashoggi Murder 27 mins – “Saudi’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has come under intense scrutiny since the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, with many believing he may have been behind it. Mohammed bin Salman has condemned the act. But a secret source has told the BBC that they believe Khashoggi’s killing wasn’t the first to be carried out by people close to the Crown Prince. With BBC Arabic we investigate these allegations and ask if Mohammed bin Salman can survive the furore over Jamal Khashoggi’s killing.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Ladies’ Landmine Agency 27 mins – “we follow a unique group of Sahrawi women working alongside the world’s longest minefield, the 2,700km sand wall or berm built by Morocco across the region. We join Baba, Minetou, Nora and the team working in temperatures exceeding 42°c (107°f), hundreds of miles from even rudimentary medical care, as they risk their lives in Western Sahara’s so-called “Liberated Territories” east of the Berm, clearing some of the seven million landmines and unexploded bombs left over from the still unresolved conflict between Morocco and the ethnic Sahrawi liberation movement, the Polisario Front. Despite decades of paralysis in the UN-led decolonisation and referendum process, and some little scepticism in their own society, over sweet Sahrawi tea and camel pizza we learn how these young women have realised universal aspirations to an education, a family and a vocation, and beyond those goals to act as role models in a community exiled and forgotten deep in the Sahara for over 40 years. Dreaming of a day they might reside freely in an independent homeland, but living in an era defined by calls to “Build That Wall”, Number One Ladies’ Landmine Agency reveals a story of hope and tolerance embodied by a group of young women redefining the stereotype of the veiled, subjugated Arab woman, whose shared mission is to tear down barriers in all their forms.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Loan Forgiveness Program Is Broken 57 mins – “Former co-host and now PM&R Doctor Cole Cheney returns for a discussion of what he’s discovered about the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program, which rewards careers in public service by forgiving student loans after 10 years of qualifying work.  The first 11 years have passed since its inception, and you’ll never guess how many people have had their loans forgiven.  Aline Sandouk, Dylan Todd, Brady Campbell, and financial aid counselor Chris Roling were on hand for a discussion of why you’ll want to have a backup plan to pay off your med school debt….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Loneliness 27 mins – “White Coat Black Art looks at ways of dealing with loneliness in seniors. We visit roommates Cara Duncan, 23 and Lesly Adamson, 92. Dr. Mayur Lakhani, a family doctor and president of Britain’s Royal College of General Practitioners, talks about the social prescribing expert in his office who guides his patients to local community activities. Dr. Helen Kingston, another U.K. doctor, tells Brian about the Compassionate Frome Project, a plan to treat lonely patients in her hometown of Frome.” At the link find the title, ”Prescription for loneliness,” right-click “Download Prescription for loneliness,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Manafort 27 mins – “Virginia Heffernan gets into the gritty details with A.G. of the indie podcast Mueller She Wrote about everything from Paul Manafort to Oleg Deripaska. Also explored: Russian oligarchy ties, Viktor Yanukovych, and Mariia Butina. ” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Health Problems 8 mins – “Sandersan Onie is a PhD student at UNSW in psychology studying attentional biases in anxiety. But today he talks about another area of psychology about which he is passionate. It concerns the prevalence, acceptance and treatment of mental health in his country of birth, Indonesia. There is widespread stigma attached to mental health in Indonesia. In some places it as a taboo topic. People hide away in their rooms suffering alone rather than seeking treatment. In some cultures, people suffering panic attacks, anxiety or depression are hidden, with houses having a cage where relatives sit, cut off from human contact. There is scant recognition of mental health issues from service providers with little research and few options available to those requiring care. Sandersan Onie says culture change is required regarding attitudes to mental health in Indonesia.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbial Genetics 81 mins – “How does an engineer approach microbial genetics? cworks with microbes of all kinds to optimize metabolic and agricultural systems. Here he discusses his work with Rhodobacter to make biofuels and for membrane protein expression, with Agrobacterium and plant pathogenic viruses to make drought-resistant plants, and with Clostridium and yeast cocultures for lignocellulose digestion.” At the link left-click “MP3” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Museum Curator 75 mins – “The next person taking us inside life at MoMA is Sarah Meister, a curator in the museum’s department of photography. Sarah’s work ranges from pitching exhibits, tracking down and acquiring pieces, to writing those words on the wall that let you know what makes a work special. ” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Nigerian Patient Captives 33 mins – “Nigeria: Patients Held For Unpaid Medical Bills Some patients are being forced to remain in hospital for months – because they can’t pay their debts.

O’Neill and Reagan 46 mins – “Republican President Ronald Reagan and Democratic House Speaker Tip O’Neill demonstrate how bipartisanship can lead to compromise when it comes to Social Security.” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Palm Oil Problems 9 mins – “The warnings are becoming more urgent. Time is running out to avoid breaching a 1.5-degree rise in global temperatures, which would see irreparable damage to entire ecosystems and society. So far, our efforts have been insufficient. Emissions continue to rise. Natural forests, especially those in the tropics play a key role in climate stabilization and maintaining biodiversity. But in Southest Asia, in recent years, forests and peatlands have been cleared for palm oil, with production rising from 3 million tonnes in 1970 to 70 million tonnes in 2017. The paradox lies in palm oil being a very efficient crop. It is six times more productive than its nearest vegetable rival oil using less land and growing faster. In addition, more than half the imports to the EU are used for biodiesel, replacing diesel from fossil fuels. Brendan May outlines the dilemma of palm oil and calls for action from various quarters.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plastic Recycled into Roadways 9 mins – “The world is awash with plastic. One type which is often removed from recycling channels is soft plastic. It is used widely in distribution to wrap boxes and items on pallets. Passengers can be seen wrapping their bags with it at airports. Some supermarkets have collection points. The Downer Group makes asphalt for roads. They are running trials using soft plastic to replace bitumen in their asphalt mix. The advantage is a reduction in the use of new hydrocarbons in road making, with the potential to set up a hungry new use for the mountains of soft plastic which are either stockpiled or buried. Dante Cremasco describes the process using soft plastic in asphalt and how the trial is proceeding.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychedelic Research 172 mins– “’I realized people were not having LSD experiences; they were having experiences of themselves. But they were coming from depths that psychoanalysis didn’t know anything about.’ Stanislav Grof Stanislav Grof, M.D., (stanislavgrof.com) is a psychiatrist with more than 60 years of experience in research of “holotropic” states of consciousness, a large and important subgroup of non-ordinary states that have healing, transformative, and evolutionary potential. Previously, he was Principal Investigator in a psychedelic research program at the Psychiatric Research Institute in Prague, Czechoslovakia, Chief of Psychiatric Research at the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, and Scholar-in-Residence at the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, CA. Currently, Stan is Professor of Psychology at the California Institute of Integral Studies (CIIS) in San Francisco, CA, and conducts professional training programs in holotropic breathwork and transpersonal psychology, and gives lectures and seminars worldwide. He is one of the founders and chief theoreticians of transpersonal psychology and the founding president of the International Transpersonal Association (ITA). His publications include more than 150 articles in professional journals and books like Psychology of the Future, The Cosmic Game, and Holotropic Breathwork, among many others.” At the link under the sound bar “Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

Radio La Colifata in Argentina 27 mins – “How is a radio station in an Argentinian psychiatric hospital changing the way people view mental illness? Radio La Colifata – slang for loon, or crazy person – airs from Hospital Jose Borda in Buenos Aires every Saturday afternoon. In-patients produce and present the shows, discussing everything from Argentinean politics and the economy to their own mental health and treatment. Millions of Argentinians tune in and interact with the show as it goes out live, encouraging a dialogue between the La Colifata team and the outside world which otherwise might not happen. Founder and psychologist Alfredo Olivera says, “La Colifata represents a broken space forgotten by others.” The impact of Alfredo’s seemingly simple innovation cannot be underestimated. The programme doesn’t model itself on a traditional radio show. Their goal is not to filter voices but to provide a platform for them to be heard, regardless of how challenging or unconventional they may be. For example, one contributor reflected on a period of intense anxiety and psychosis when she began to rethink the concept of walking on two legs. This opened up a philosophical discussion on the nature of physical movement. By allowing these conversations to happen and for others to be able to listen, Radio La Colifata is changing the dialogue around mental health, encouraging others to start rethinking their approach.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Reading Wars 25 mins – “Researchers say science makes it clear that there’s a direct, systematic way we should be teaching kids to read. But lots of people discount the science of reading. They say teaching kids to sound out words is boring, and kids will learn to read naturally if they’re read to and exposed to lots of books. This is more of an angry argument than a polite debate. It’s been raging for years. And there’s a lot at stake. Millions of American adults are not proficient readers.” At the link find the title, “Reading Wars,” right-click “Play Nowand select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Red State Blue State 10 mins – “The midterm election results seem to deliver conflicting messages depending on where you live. In California, candidates were rewarded for opposing President Trump — critics like California’s new Gov. Gavin Newsom won big. But in West Virginia, Sen. Joe Manchin was returned to office while siding with the president on key issues. What’s going on? Trey talks with Cherry Glazer of KCRW in California in the latest episode of “Red State Blue State,” our weekly chat between Trump Country and the Blue Bubble.” At the link find the title, “EXTRA: Red State Blue State, Ep.7 — Two Views,” right-click “Play Now” an select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Regeneration Research 7 mins – “Normally, an adult frog does not regenerate a leg if it is lost when say bitten off by a predator. But Michael Levin’s lab at Tufts University in Boston has come up with a way of convincing the cells of a frog to produce a new leg, after the initial leg was removed. Mike Levin’s lab studies cell communication and the electrical signals which control cell growth and lead to the building of structures. They removed a frog’s leg and applied a cylinder within which were drugs which stimulated the regeneration process. The drugs were applied for just 24 hours and acted on the cells at the wound site. Nine months later, the leg regenerated. This is seen as an important first step with the aim of developing regenerative human treatments for birth defects and degenerative brain conditions.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Renewable Energy Retailer 10 mins – “Enova is Australia’s first community owned renewable energy retailer, based in northern NSW. As Alison Crook explains, $300 million dollars leaves the region each year as people pay large city-based companies for their electricity. With a local retailer, that money stays within the local community creating employment. And there are other savings. Long distance transmission of energy from large generating plants incurs average losses of roughly 10%. That is eliminated in local production. The local sources are solar, wind and bioenergy, supported by batteries. Smart software allows sharing and metering of energy production, use and accounting.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Risk Assessment 8 mins – “Worldwide, scientists talk of the risk posed by climate change. But action to mitigate the risk is often non-existent, or piecemeal. Despite the world’s climate changing for all future generations, the message isn’t getting through. Elsewhere, people talk of the risk of applying herbicides. But what of the risk of not combatting weeds? Kate Hughes researches hazardous chemicals and remediation. She describes some approaches to explaining risk and says scientists are notoriously poor at this important task.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ruby Ridge Trial 32 mins – “In the final episode of Standoff, our narrative miniseries on the story of Ruby Ridge, host Ruth Graham recaps Randy Weaver’s and Kevin Harris’ prosecutions, and explores how the story of the standoff became legendary among the modern far right. Slate Plus members get a bonus episode of Standoff every week. This week, Graham describes what happened to the Weaver family after the standoff, and how the story continues to resonate. Then, she talks with Tara Westover, the author of the memoir Educated, which describes an upbringing in a family of survivalists in Idaho that wasn’t so much different from the Weavers.” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Objectivity 60 mins – “This week we’re looking back at where some of our modern ideas about science being objective, independent, and apolitical come from. We journey back to the Cold War with historian and writer Audra Wolfe, talking about her newest book “Freedom’s Laboratory: The Cold War Struggle for the Soul of Science”. At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scott Kelly in Space 52 mins – “It hurtles above us at 17,500 miles per hour. It orbits the Earth every 90 minutes. Some say it’s the single greatest project ever completed by humanity. And above all of that, it serves as a home for the privileged few. On this episode of StarTalk, Neil deGrasse Tyson sits down with retired astronaut Scott Kelly – who stayed aboard the International Space Station for almost an entire year – to find out what it’s like to live in space. Joining Neil in-studio is comic co-host Sasheer Zamata and retired astronaut Terry Virts. Scott gives us some background on why academic shortcomings don’t necessarily reflect the potential to do something great. We explore why the danger factor of being a tehttps://paulmerriman.com/the-only-12-things-you-need-to-know-to-be-a-successful-investor-for-life/st pilot is one of the main reasons that people do it. You’ll hear about “The Right Stuff” and if what makes up that “stuff” has changed over time. Learn why the ability to deal with risk is a key factor in selecting new astronauts.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Impact 146 mins – “Your first podcast of the week is the last word in tech. Join the top tech pundits in a roundtable discussion of the latest trends in high tech. What role did Facebook play in the French riots? Tumblr bans porn, Facebook bans vague hints that sex might be a thing that exists. Meanwhile in the UK, Parliament releases sensitive internal Facebook memos and emails. Tik Tok is where all the youngs are at. And then there were 5: Google tries to make sense of its Messaging platforms. Meanwhile, Apple’s iMessage is the one app that could rule them all. Microsoft puts some Chromium in their Edge. Canada arrests Huawei’s CFO for allegedly violating sanctions on Iran. Australia passes a dangerously vague anti-encryption law.” At the link left-click “Download Options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soup Kitchen Operations 48 mins – “In this Thanksgiving bonus episode, Working takes a detour from MOMA to visit one of New York City’s biggest emergency food programs, Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen. Jordan talks to Michael Ottley, the director of operations of the program about tracking down turkeys for Thanksgiving, feeding 1,000 people a day, and how he had to convince Yelp to take down a rave review that was sending hordes of tourists to their kitchen for free meals.” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Spiro Agnew Indictment 48 mins – “Bad Behavior By People In High Office’: Rachel Maddow On The Lessons Of Spiro Agnew” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stroke Treatment 27 mins – “Dr. Brian Goldman speaks to Linda Windross from Castor, Alberta about her husband’s frustrating wait for stroke rehabilitation. Dr. Anita Mountain of Dalhousie University in Halifax and Heart and Stroke’s Patrice Lindsay tell Dr. Goldman that the good news is more patients are surviving strokes, but the bad news, we “haven’t got a system built for that many survivors.” At the link find the title, “Early therapy is best after a stroke, but many rural Canadians are missing out,” right-click “Download Early therapy is best after a stroke, but many rural Canadians are missing out,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Survivor 34 mins – “Kassem Eid had spent two years living in a city under siege.  After he and his neighbors took part in the protests during the Arab Spring in 2011, Syrian President Bashar Al Assad began to punish towns like Kassem’s. His forces bombed them, surrounded them, and starved them. That’s when Kassem decided to fight back. Thank you so much to Kassem Eid for sharing his story with us. Kassem was recently accepted into Columbia University. You can check out his new book, “My Country,” out now. Find him on twitter at @qzakarya. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taxation Changes Discussion 48 mins – “Radical? Or the right thing to do? We’ll analyze the numbers behind Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s proposal to push the top tax rate to 70 percent.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Cure 27 mins – “Our lives are consumed more and more by the online world whether it be for entertainment or every day activities. For some people it becomes too much – and here, musician turned broadcaster Ana Matronic meets some young people whose online use has quite literally taken over their lives. She visits a centre in Seattle, Washington, near where she grew up, which has been set up to help people, mainly young men, who feel their relationship with the online and tech world has become too stifling. The Restart Centre is somewhere these young men can go and quite literally tune out of our all-consuming switched on world. They play board games, listen to and play musical instruments, talk to each other, enjoy the outdoors and the company of animals. Ana discovers a complex mix of emotional stories and hears how the centre looks to help these young people reintegrate back into the online world with confidence and a renewed sense of balance. Ana also hears experts building a new centre in the UK geared to help people who have become too consumed by social media and a constant need to react, respond and seek approval. Meanwhile tech entrepreneurs creating new smart phones aimed at people who want to keep their tech use to the basics tell Ana how it works.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Tony Fadell 10 mins – “Tony Fadell is one of the creators of the iPod and a co-founder of Nest. In his own words, he talks about his start at General Magic and building the iPod.” At the link left click “Download options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vertical Farming with Trump Jr 19 mins – “…Trump Jr. invested in the startup, a company that grows organic lettuce in a hydroponic greenhouse, last year, records show. Those records don’t state how much money — if any —  Trump paid for his 7,500 shares. But the shares would have been worth about $650,000 at the end of last year, based on a formula used by another shareholder in a recent court filing. Neither Trump Jr. nor the company have disclosed his investment publicly. Trump Jr. obtained the stake through a limited liability company called MSMDF Agriculture LLC, which was set up by a Trump Organization employee last fall….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Veselnitskaya Indictment 30 mins – “Veselnitskaya Benjamin Wittes talks to Jaimie Nawaday, a former federal prosecutor in the Southern District of New York, to discuss the indictment of Natalia Veselnitskaya over alleged obstruction of justice in a case Nawaday handled. Nawaday talks about Russian abuse of the American justice system and how Veselnitskaya colluded with the Russian chief prosecutor’s office to frustrate American prosecutors.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Nawaday_mixdown.mp3 and select “save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vicky Phelan Activist 27 mins – “This is the story of Vicky Phelan, a mother of two from Limerick, Ireland. Vicky has cancer of the cervix and in 2017 she was given just six months to live. As she battled to save her own life, Vicky uncovered a scandal that rocked the Irish establishment and exposed a country still coming to grips with radical social upheaval. As part of the ‘BBC 100 Women’ season, Helen Devlin meets the woman who changed Ireland.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Vietnam War 130 mins – “Historian David Parsons joins Breht to talk about the Vietnam War, Ho Chi Minh, American Imperial War Crimes, Historical Memory, and much more!” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

White House Press Access 29 mins – “Dahlia Lithwick is joined by Ted Boutrous, who represented CNN and Jim Acosta in their case against the White House. Jim Acosta’s “hard pass,” or permanent press pass, was revoked by the Trump administration after Acosta clashed with the president at a Nov. 7 news conference. Dahlia Lithwick and Ted Boutrous examine questions of due process and free speech brought up by the case.” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Women Reporters 53 mins – “Women make up roughly 50% of the world but in the 21st Century is the media reporting the issues that matter to them? Do women want to hear more debate around taboo subjects like abortion and domestic violence or do they want to hear more success stories about women in the media? How could the media’s reporting of rape cases be improved? And, as news sources become more diverse, how can the mainstream media reflect the stories being discussed by women on social media? Lyse Doucet hears from female students in India who are frustrated by how women are portrayed in the Indian media. In Bihar, there is anger at how media reports of attacks on women focus more on what the victim was wearing rather than the attacker. In Tamil Nadhu, students believe the news is too negative and sensational. And in Nagpur the young women challenge journalists to write more positive stories about inter-caste marriage. In the second half of the programme Lyse Doucet is joined by three of the BBC’s Women’s Affairs Journalists; Divya Arya who is based in Delhi , Abigail Ony Nwaohuocha who covers West Africa from Lagos, Nigeria and Feranak Amidi who works across the Near East including Iran, Afghanistan, Kurdistan, Uzbekistan and Turkey. They discuss the issues raised in the first part of the programme in a debate recorded before an audience at BBC New Broadcasting House.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

World War One Unknown Soldier 27 mins – “Moira Stuart tells the astonishing story of the idea of the Unknown Soldier: a powerful prism for national grief, a brilliant interplay between anonymity and universal recognition, an icon which spread across the globe. On the second anniversary of the armistice following the end of the Great War, the remains of a single Unknown Soldier were brought home from the battlefields of the Western Front. Given the scale of the carnage and the fact that so many of the fallen were simply unidentifiable, the idea to commemorate the dead through the remains of one anonymous soldier – that would represent them all – was more than just pragmatic. As an idea it had a symbolic, almost poetic, resonance. And so the remains of the Unknown Soldier were interred with full honours in Westminster Abbey in London. The outpouring of grief brought the nation to a standstill. There were extraordinary scenes on the streets of London. Other Allied nations followed suit. Millions paid their respects. But even from the beginning the concept of the Unknown Soldier was not without its critics. Some saw it as emblematic of the callousness of states and their governments in wartime – the Unknown could be read as figure of righteous anger, of the terrible, mass anonymity of countless young men lost without trace. And Moira uncovers a twist in the tale: that the future of the Unknown Soldier as a timeless, abstract memorial is open to doubt for the simple reason that thanks to DNA testing, human remains are no longer unidentifiable. There is even a move to use DNA science to re-identify the remains of existing Unknowns around the world. In this moving feature marking the centenary of Armistice Day, Moira asks whether the Unknown Soldier is finally an icon of war or peace; of sorrow and mourning – or is he a warning to us still?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

WWII Racism 46 mins – “In the second of a two-part program, curator Daniel Greene gave a tour of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum exhibit which uses films, artifacts, and documents to explore how the U.S. public and government officials reacted to Nazi Germany’s persecution of Jews during World War II. The exhibit looks at the “America First” movement to stay out of the war, and sets out to examine two questions: what did Americans know about the Holocaust as it was happening, and what could have been done to save European Jews? The first program focused on the 1930 to 1939 time period and the rise of Nazi Germany, the second – from 1939 to 1945.” At the link you can watch/listen and pay for a download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in the blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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