MMD446 Media Mining Digest: 5G and Huawei in Canada, Alien and Sedition Acts, American Civil War, Australian Wildfires, Banana Peels Purify Water, Broadband in North Carolina, Canada in Venezuela, Canadian Tech Oilsands, Corona Virus Spread Outside China, Coronavirus and Canadians in Wuhan, Coronavirus in Wuhan, Covid 19 Treatment, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Energy Efficiency, ESL Founder, Fiber in Idaho Falls, Fiber in Ponca City Oklahoma, Fiber to Home in Colorado, Flood Prevention, Food Scene, Food Stylist, Free Trade, Government Today, Happiness Lab, Hearing Protection, Human Screenome Project, Medical Conservative, Money in Early America, Nazi Death Camps, Oil Prices, Partners in Health, Plant Based Meat, Port-Out Fraud, Prisons, Rehab Programs, Republican Party Creation, Resilience and Environmental Justice, Resilience Funding Strategies, Resilience Planning, Slave Labor Economy, Syria Crisis, Take Back White House, Technology Impact, Telehealth, The Last Archive, Thinking Much Bigger, TikToc in Canada, US Constitution, US Western Ecosystem, Walking Exercise, Wildfire Prevention

Exercise your ears: the 60 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 792 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

5G and Huawei in Canada 21 mins – We ask why Canada should trust Huawei to build our 5G network, the next big step in our internet infrastructure. Alykhan Velshi, vice president of corporate affairs for Huawei Canada, says there’s nothing to worry about, but China expert Margaret McCuaig-Johnston isn’t so sure.” At the link find the title, “Should Canada trust Huawei to build our 5G network?” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. (Feb 20, 2020)

Alien and Sedition Acts 38 mins – “The Alien and Sedition Acts consisted of four laws enacted by the United States government in 1798. The United States passed these laws during a time of great uncertainty, a time when many Americans feared for the very survival for their nation. But why did Americans fear for the United States’ existence and why did they think four laws that limited citizenship and freedom of speech would protect and secure their young republic? Terri Halperin, an instructor at the University of Richmond and author of The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798: Testing the Constitution, will help us find answers to these questions by taking us through the Alien and Sedition Acts and how they came to be.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

American Civil War 37 mins – “The American Civil War claimed more than 620,000 American lives. Did you know that it also cost American forests, landscapes, cities, and institutions? Today, we explore the different types of ruination wrought by the American Civil War with Megan Kate Nelson, author of Ruin Nation: Destruction and the American Civil War.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Australian Wildfires 7 mins – “After devastating wildfires in Australia, photographs of green shoots in the burnt-out bush have sparked hope. Photographer Murray Lowe joins us to discuss his images, which went viral when he posted them online.” At the link find the title, “Green shoots in the ashes of the Australian bushfires,” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Banana Peels Purify Water 2 mins – “A study in the American Chemical Society’s journal, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research, reports that minced banana peel performs better than an array of other water purification materials and can do so in a sustainable way.” At the link find the title, “Developing New Materials: Using banana peels to purify water” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Broadband in North Carolina 14 mins – “Last week, we unveiled the new podcast project we’re working on with the nonprofit NC Broadband Matters, whose focus is on bringing ubiquitous broadband coverage to local communities for residents and businesses in North Carolina. The ten episode podcast series, titled “Why NC Broadband Matters,” explores broadband and related issues in North Carolina. In episode two, “Fiber Rich Wilson, Why and What’s Next?”, Christopher talks with Gene Scott, General Manager for Outside Plant for Greenlight, a division of the city of Wilson, North Carolina. If you’ve heard many of our podcasts, you know all about Wilson and their municipal Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) network. We’ve followed the development of the network for years and have reported on many of their innovations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 19 mins – “This is the transcript for episode 4 of the Why NC Broadband Matters series on the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher interviews Jane Smith Patterson about the history of broadband in the state and how it can move forward. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 19 mins – “This week is episode three of the new podcast project we’re working on with the nonprofit NC Broadband Matters, whose focus is on bringing ubiquitous broadband coverage to local communities for residents and businesses in North Carolina.  The ten episode podcast series, titled “Why NC Broadband Matters,” explores broadband and related issues in North Carolina. This week, Christopher and his guests explore mapping in our episode titled, “Broadband Mapping Means Money: Understanding How Data Drives Decisions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 36 mins – “We’re pleased to bring you the first episode from a special bonus series of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast titled “Why NC Broadband Matters.” The series is a collaboration with the nonprofit NC Broadband Matters, whose focus is on facilitating the expansion of ubiquitous broadband coverage to local communities for residents and businesses. We’ll be working with NC Broadband Matters on this series to develop nine more episodes that center around broadband in North Carolina.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 42 mins- “This is the transcript for our special bonus episode of Community Broadband Bits series, Why NC Broadband Matters. In this episode, Christopher talks with Dr. Jeff Cox and Zach Barricklow from Wilkes Community College about improving economic mobility in rural places of North Carolina. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canada in Venezuela 12 mins –As Venezuelan politician Juan Guaidó visits Ottawa, trying to shore up support, we discuss what role Canada should play in breaking the political stalemate in Venezuela.” At the link find the title, “Canada’s role in Venezuela,” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Canadian Teck Oilsands 13 mins – We look at the deep divisions over the proposed Teck Frontier oilsands mine in Alberta, and competing concerns about the economy and the environment. The government must weigh these factors as it decides whether to approve the mine, an enormous facility half the size of Edmonton.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Corona Virus in Wuhan 13 mins – “We hear from people in Wuhan who say the Chinese government has played down the coronavirus outbreak at home.” At the link find the title, “Conditions and frustration in Wuhan,” whichyou can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Coronavirus and Canadian in Wuhan 13 mins – “Amid the coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan, Canadian Wayne Duplessis tells us why he and his family have decided to stay in the city. Plus, we talk to disease ecologist Jonathan Epstein about the theory the disease has originated with bats.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Coronavirus Spreads Outside China 14 mins – “As more coronavirus cases are reported outside of China, what can be done to help countries with less robust health systems respond to the problem? We’re talking to public health reporter Helen Branswell about the situation in Iran; as well as Dr. Michel Yao, the emergency operations manager for the WHO Regional Office for Africa; and Paul Hunter, a professor of health protection at the University of East Anglia in England.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 Treatment 14 mins – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on June 3, 2020, the editors discuss two new studies: one comparing test swabs collected by health care workers with swabs collected by the patients themselves and one assessing hydroxychloroquine treatment in people who had been exposed to Covid-19 but weren’t yet ill. The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal.” At the link right-click “Download” to get the podcast.

Doris Kearns Goodwin 19 mins – “What makes a great leader? This week on Sea Change Radio, we are honored to have Pulitzer Prize-winning presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin here to give us her take on that question. Goodwin’s book, Leadership in Turbulent Times, just released in paperback, re-examines four US presidents she has studied in the past: Abe Lincoln, Teddy and Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson. She discusses the contrast between these presidents’ leadership and the behavior of the current grifter-in-chief, puts today’s impeachment proceedings in historical context, and hypothesize about how past presidents might have addressed momentous issues like climate change and election tampering. Then, we dig into the Sea Change Radio archives and listen to Rebecca Vallas, a Vice President at the Center for American Progress, talk about the Trump administration’s absurd claims that poverty and hunger are now things of the past in this country.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Efficiency 19 mins – “Most environmentally minded folks agree that our shopping habits need to be significantly curbed for the good of the planet. And many often turn to the virtues of efficiency as one answer – on the surface, it certainly seems to make sense to strive for more efficient use of resources. But is the goal of efficiency the right one? On the heels of the Christmas shopping season, what better time to revisit our 2018 Sea Change Radio discussion with Kris De Decker. The founder of Low Tech Magazine, De Decker makes a compelling case for the abandonment of efficiency as the barometer for planetary stewardship. He proposes we use the simpler, but perhaps more painful objective of sufficiency and argues that pursuing greener, more efficient methods and technologies is, more often than not, a fool’s errand. De Decker maintains that the human appetite for comfort, growth, and acquisition tends to turn efficiencies into increased consumption, and that the only way to truly fight climate change is for all of us to recognize that enough is, well, enough.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ESL Founder 16 mins – “Here’s why the 88-year-old founder of ESL [ESL is an abbreviation of “English as a second language.] In-Home of Northern Nevada feels like she’s in her 40s.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Fiber in Idaho Falls 25 mins – “This is episode 390 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher interviews Bear Prairie from Idaho Falls Power and Fiber and Kim McKinley from UTOPIA Fiber about the utilities’ cross-state fiber partnership.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fiber in Ponca City, Oklahoma 18 mins – “People with an interest in municipal networks usually know about Ponca City, Oklahoma’s free municipal fixed wireless network because it’s been around for years. In the summer of 2019, however, community leaders decided it was time to start offering Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) and created Ponca City Broadband.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fiber to Home in Colorado 20 mins – “NextLight, the municipal Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) network in Longmont, Colorado, has been serving residents and businesses in the community since 2014 and offers reliable gigabit connectivity at affordable rates. This week, Director of NextLight, Valerie Dodd, is on the show to discuss the past, present, and future of NextLight with Christopher.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flood Prevention 7 mins – “The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region IX produced the Level Up Audio Project to share stories, case studies, and best practices to inspire hazard mitigation action and strengthen our community of hazard mitigation and climate adaptation professionals. As a resource to state and local governments on climate adaptation and resilience, the Georgetown Climate Center (GCC) partnered with FEMA Region IX to make the audio series available.  Streambeds are vital ecosystems that can both serve and threaten the communities they run through. Because of the sensitivity of the ecosystems and the potential for increased flooding, stream work requires permits. Securing permits can be time consuming and costly. In this episode, Roland Sanford from the Solano County Water Agency in California shares how his agency works with local landowners to provide microgrants for flood mitigation work and technical assistance to aid in the process to secure permits.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Food Scene 34 mins – “Camilla Marcus is one of the most dynamic women on the food scene. Not only is she the founder of west-bourne, the rule-bending, community-minded all-day eatery in SoHo, but she is a change agent pushing the industry to confront the challenges faced by working families. Camilla, who became a mom recently, has partnered with a local child care company and is providing her employees with subsidized access to daycare and nightcare. Tune in to hear how Camilla is making it happen.  Also, learn why blogger Laura Scherb of Page And Plate thinks Emily Nejad of Bon Vivant Cakes is the bombe!  This episode is presented by Sugar Free Three by author Michele Promaulayko.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Food Scene 27 mins – “From pink peppermint ice cream to raspberry jam and a holiday ham, Christine Tobin had to bring the food of Little Women to life on the big screen. As the food stylist for the highly anticipated adaptation by writer-director Greta Gerwig, Christine immersed herself in the life of author Louisa May Alcott and mid-1800s Massachusetts, where Louisa lived and where the book and film are set. Christine is a different kind of food stylist, who avoids movie-magic food tricks in favor of food that actors can actually eat. Tune in to hear her behind-the-scenes take, how she got her start, and what advice she has for aspiring food stylists. Plus, hear why Tara Hankinson the co-founder of TALEA Beer Co. thinks Suellen Tunney is the Bombe! ” At the link you can listen, but not download the file; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Food Stylist 37 mins – “Radio Cherry Bombe stopped in Columbus, Ohio, last year as part of its Food For Thought tour for a live episode at the headquarters of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams. Paula Haines of Freedom a la Cart, Chef Cara Mangini of Little Eater, and Faith Durand of The Kitchn each spoke about what’s on their mind when it comes to the food world. They are followed by a panel featuring Chef Catie Randazzo of Preston’s and Ambrose & Eve, Bidisha Nag of Create Your Curry, Ms. Ena of Ena’s Caribbean Kitchen, Jeni Britton Bauer of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams, and Radio Cherry Bombe host Kerry Diamond. Thank you to Kerrygold for supporting our tour.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Free Trade 46 mins – “Economist and author Kimberly Clausing of Reed College talks about her book Open with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Clausing, a self-described progressive, argues that the United States should continue to embrace free trade but she argues for other interventions to soften the impact of trade on workers and communities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Today 37 mins – “As I catch-up on posting shows that should have been posted several months ago, but are (perhaps sadly) still quite timely, I’m pleased to post Show # 262, May 31, 2017, my interview with Prof. Al Roberts, Director of the School of Public Policy at University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and author of Four Crises of American Democracy: Representation, Mastery, Discipline, Anticipation. Al is one of the nation’s leading scholars on government secrecy, and his recent work has focused on the broad functional challenges faced by governmental institutions today. In our wide ranging discussion, we examined the state of government today, its capacity to withstand the pressures exerted on it by outside forces, and what we can reasonably expect government to do and not do in response. Obviously pressing and critical issues, I always enjoy my discussions with Al, and hope that you do as well!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Happiness Lab 22 mins – “Dr. Laurie Santos, a Yale researcher whose course on happiness is now a worldwide phenomenon, says there’s a cost to self-care and power in giving more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Hearing Protection 18 mins – “Are we paying enough attention to our hearing? Author David Owen is worried that we’re not; he joins us to discuss his new book Volume Control: Hearing in a Deafening World. Then Natalie Phillips discusses her research into the links between hearing loss and cognitive decline.” At the link find the title, “Why it’s important to pay attention to your hearing,” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Human Screenome Project 16 mins – “Do you get screen time reports on your phone — and swipe away without checking? Byron Reeves, a professor of communication at Stanford University, says we should be measuring the impact of screen time, but we need a better way to do it. That’s why he’s co-founded the Human Screenome Project.” At the link find the title, “The Human Screenome Project,” which yoyu can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Medical Conservative 49 mins – “Physician and author Adam Cifu of the University of Chicago talks about being a medical conservative with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Cifu encourages doctors to appreciate the complexity of medical care and the reality that many medical techniques advocated by experts are not always beneficial or cost-effective. The conversation explores the challenges of finding reliable evidence to support medical interventions and the inherent uncertainty surrounding outcomes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nazi Death Camps 24 mins – The CBC’s Susan Bonner reports from Auschwitz as the world marks 75 years since the liberation of the Nazi death camp, and author Andrea Pitzer discusses the history of concentration camps, both before and after Hitler.” At the link find the title, “Legacy of Auschwitz, 75 years after liberation,” which you can can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Oil Prices 19 mins – “On the heels of being impeached by the House of Representatives, Donald Trump unsurprisingly created a diversion, having a key Iranian General assassinated by US drones. But as tensions in the Middle East mounted, the price of oil somehow remained relatively steady. Why was this the case? This week on Sea Change Radio, we talk oil with energy expert Daniel Dicker. We discuss the current state of global oil markets, learn the important differences between sweet and sour crude, and examine Dicker’s contention that the best thing for the environment would be much higher oil prices.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Partners in Health 25 mins – “The founders of Partners in Health share how they’ve brought needed healthcare to more than four million patients around the globe.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Plant Based Meat 16 mins – “Is plant-based “meat” the food of the future, or just another junk food? Author and food journalist Mark Bittman says it’s complicated… but he’s not eating the stuff.” At the link find the title, “Mark Bittman on plant-based ‘meat’,” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Port-out Fraud 10 mins – Port-out fraud lets scammers steal your phone number, and then access everything from your banking information to online shopping apps. Samantha Burnet tells us what happened to her, and the struggle she’s faced in finding help, while digital rights advocate Jesse Schooff discusses what needs to be done about it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Prisons 24 mins – “American prisons are overcrowded. The United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world and nearly 2.5 million Americans are serving prison sentences. Nearly all politicians agree that we need to reform the American prison system, but they disagree on how to do it. Can gaining historical perspective on this present-day problem help us solve it? Today, we investigate early American prisons and prison life with Jen Manion, an Assistant Professor of History at Connecticut College and author of Liberty’s Prisoners: Carceral Culture in Early America.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Rehab Programs 25 mins – “Hoke, the founder of three rehabilitation programs for prisoners, has had to overcome her own battles to find her “generous hustle.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Republican Party Creation 45 mins – “The United States has entered presidential primary season, which means it won’t be long before a Republican presidential candidate or a reporter mentions the birth of the ‘Grand Old Party’ in 1854 and its association with Lincoln. We explore the history of the Republican Party with Heather Cox Richardson, Professor of History at Boston College and author of To Make Men Free: A History of the Republican Party.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Resilience and Environmental Justice 11 mins – “The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region IX produced the Level Up Audio Project to share stories, case studies, and best practices to inspire hazard mitigation action and strengthen our community of hazard mitigation and climate adaptation professionals. As a resource to state and local governments on climate adaptation and resilience, the Georgetown Climate Center (GCC) partnered with FEMA Region IX to make the audio series available.  Hazard mitigation efforts often focus on property and infrastructure, but every community’s most important resource is its people. Lucas Zucker, the policy and communications director for the California-based organization Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy, or CAUSE, talks about ways communities can support low-income and immigrant populations before, during, and after hazard events.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Resilience Funding Strategies 9 mins – “The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region IX produced the Level Up Audio Project to share stories, case studies, and best practices to inspire hazard mitigation action and strengthen our community of hazard mitigation and climate adaptation professionals. As a resource to state and local governments on climate adaptation and resilience, the Georgetown Climate Center (GCC) partnered with FEMA Region IX to make the audio series available.  When you ask emergency managers and city planners what they need to make their community more resilient to disaster, most have the same answer: money. Federal and state grants can help finance projects, but the requirements can be labor intensive and often require a financial match from the community. Carolyn Steffan from the City of Tehama in California stitched together funding from multiple sources—federal and state—to protect residents from flooding by elevating 39 homes in her city.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Resilience Planning 10 mins – “The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region IX produced the Level Up Audio Project to share stories, case studies, and best practices to inspire hazard mitigation action and strengthen our community of hazard mitigation and climate adaptation professionals. As a resource to state and local governments on climate adaptation and resilience, the Georgetown Climate Center (GCC) partnered with FEMA Region IX to make the audio series available.  Most communities develop numerous planning documents to guide growth and development. These plans are often created and adopted in standalone processes, leading to fragmented implementation. Tiffany Wise West, the Sustainability and Climate Action Manager for the City of Santa Cruz, California, managed to avoid that trap and developed a Climate Adaptation Plan in conjunction with the city’s Local Hazard Mitigation Plan. In this episode, she discusses the benefits and challenges of the plan integration process.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Slave Labor Economy 28 mins – “If early Americans desired slaves mostly to produce sugarcane, cotton, rice, indigo, and tobacco, what would happen if Europeans and early Americans stopped purchasing those products?
 Would boycotting slave-produced goods and starving slavery of its economic sustenance be enough to end the practice of slavery in North America? Julie Holcomb, an Associate Professor of Museum Studies at Baylor University and author of Moral Commerce: The Transatlantic Boycott of the Slave Labor Economy, helps us explore answers to these questions by leading us through the transatlantic boycott of slave produced goods.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

SyriaCrisis 14 mins – “Syrian and Russian forces are advancing on the last opposition strongholds in Idlib province and around Aleppo, forcing civilians to flee from the falling bombs. We talk to Dr. Farida Almouslem, who is caught up in the displacement, as well as United Nations representative Mark Cutts, and journalist Kareem Shaheen.” At the link you can listen, but not download the file; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download the file; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. (Feb 10, 2020)

Take Back White House 19 mins – “What can all the money in the world buy you? Thanks to the Beatles, we already know it’s not love, but could it perhaps buy you the most powerful office in the world? We may have an answer to this question as early as Super Tuesday, as one of the wealthiest humans on the planet attempts to buy the US presidency. This week on Sea Change Radio, we talk to author Steve Almond about the state of the Democratic primary. He offers his perspective on what we should be learning from Mike Bloomberg’s political ads that presently blanket our nation’s air waves, how the age of Trump changes the way that people view the field of presidential hopefuls, and what Democrats need to do if the nominee ends up being someone other than their favorite.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Impact 14 mins – “We speak to author and professor Ramesh Srinivasan, who says we need a digital bill of rights, and an alternative to the big tech companies that control so much of our digital lives.” At the link find the title, “Ramesh Srinivasan on big tech,” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Telehealth 19 mins – “In February, Christopher was in North Carolina at the Institute for Emerging Issues Forum at North Carolina State University. While he was there, he had the opportunity to conduct several interviews with people engaged in research, working with boots on the ground to expand broadband, or advocating for better policy so more people have access to high-quality Internet access. One of the people he spoke with was Danika Tynes, Ph.D., a Senior Research Associate from the Georgia Tech Research Institute. One of Danika’s areas of expertise is telehealth, which continues to expand in relevance and application with new innovations and the expansion of broadband access. During the conversation, Danika discusses some of the results of her research, including the elements that help telehealth efforts succeed. She also discusses how telehealth applies in different environments and how data can be used to improve its applications for patients and healthcare professionals. Danika also shares a personal experience that illustrates how telehealth is actually more ingrained in our daily lives than we realize.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

The Last Archive 1 3 mins – “The Last Archive​:​ a new podcast about the history of evidence written and hosted by New Yorker writer, author, and celebrated historian Jill Lepore.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

The Last Archive 2 46 mins – “The Clue of the Blue Bottle – On a spring day in 1919, a woman’s body was found bound, gagged, and strangled in a garden in Barre, Vermont. Who was she?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

The Last Archive 3 47 mins – “Detection of Deception – When James Frye, a young black man, is charged with murder under unusual circumstances in 1922, he trusts his fate to a strange new machine: the lie detector.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

The Last Archive 4 38 mins – “The Invisible Lady – In 1804, an Invisible Lady arrived in New York City.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

The Last Archive 5 43 mins – “Unheard – In 1945, Ralph Ellison went to a barn in Vermont and began to write ‘Invisible Man.’” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Thinking Much Bigger 20 mins – “First, Pallotta raised millions to fight cancer and AIDS by inventing multi-day fundraisers. Now he’s out to change everything you think about charity — and yourself.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

TikTok in Canada 16 mins – “How the TikTok app from China became the most addictive — and potentially lucrative — social media platform.” At the link find the title, “The rise and rise of TikTok,” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

US Constitution 45 mins – “How did the framers draft the Constitution of 1787? What powers does the Constitution provide the federal government? Why do we elect the President of the United States by an electoral system rather than by popular vote? These are some of the many questions you’ve asked since November 2016. And today we’re going to explore some answers. Michael Klarman, the Kirkland & Ellis Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and author of The Founders’ Coup: The Making of the United States Constitution joins us to discuss the United States Constitution and how and why the framers drafted it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

US Western Ecosystems 19 mins – “As we embark upon a new decade, many of us are contemplating ongoing environmental challenges and what may be in store for the earth in the decade to come. Fortunately, there are some excellent journalists out there with their fingers on the pulse, whose mission is to uncover environmental news both alarming and inspiring. This week on Sea Change Radio we are checking in with Bob Berwyn, an Austrian-based environmental journalist who writes for Inside Climate News and is in the midst of a three-month tour of the western United States and Mexico. Berwyn discusses the fragile ecosystems west of the Rockies, tells us about permaculture in Oaxaca, and examines the ethical dilemmas that both skiers and ski resorts are facing as the planet warms and snowfall becomes less consistent.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Walking Exercise 16 mins – “Erling Kagge has reached the North and South Poles … on foot. He explains why, in a world of running around, we need to learn to slow down and walk.” At the link find the title, “The incredible power of walking,” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Wildfire Prevention 8 mins – “The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region IX produced the Level Up Audio Project to share stories, case studies, and best practices to inspire hazard mitigation action and strengthen our community of hazard mitigation and climate adaptation professionals. As a resource to state and local governments on climate adaptation and resilience, the Georgetown Climate Center (GCC) partnered with FEMA Region IX to make the audio series available.  In Butte County, California, much of the natural fuel that allows wildfires to spread is found on private property. Communities must approve, and landowners need to agree, to remove brush from these lands and reduce wildfire risk. This is not unusual—many types of mitigation work involve private property. In this episode, Calli-Jane DeAnda from the Butte County Fire Safe Council speaks about her experience with community outreach and protecting communities and infrastructure from wildfire.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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