Media Mining Digest 486: 5G Defined, AI – China vs US, AI and Cyberattacks, AI and Cybercrime, AI and Health, Alibaba Interview with CEO, Bitcoin Defined, Bodycam Use in New New Hampshire, Brain Noise, Business Casual, Child Deaths in Canada, China and Semiconductors, China Chip Industry, Climate Crisis, Combat Shooting Casualty, Covid Impact Personal Finance, Covid in India, Covid Origins, Covid-19 Clinical Update, Covid19 Potpourri, Dark Web, Digital Currency Impact, E-Discovery, Electric Power Grid Upgrade, Electric Power Boon, Facebook Data, Flood Control with Beavers,I-Phone Forensics, Law Firm Security, Long Term for Seniors, Kodak History, Night Police Stories, Ocean Fertilizer, Pandemic Self Care, Polio Prophylaxis, SARS CoV-2 Origins, Shooter Training, Supershedders and Super Vaccinations, Vaccinations in US and Africa, Vaccine Disinformation

Exercise your ears: the 44 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 580 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

5G Defined  14 mins - “The network of the future will manage super-complex tasks that have zero room for lag-time: Think remote surgery. Think driverless cars. That’s the promise of 5G infrastructure — and it’s why China and the U.S. want to control it.”  At the link find the date 21 Apr, where you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.
AI – China vs US  11 mins - “Artificial intelligence is the most important tech frontier, and both the United States and China want to dominate it. We look at how the two countries compare now—and where the race is headed.”  At the link find the date 3 Feb, where you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.
AI and Cyberattacks  4 mins - “Cyberattacks are on the rise. And more and more, artificial intelligence is helping both the attackers and the people combating them.”  At the link find the date 19 Jul, where you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.
AI and Cybercrime  14 mins “Artificial intelligence meets cybercrime — and cyberwarfar “  At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 
AI and Health  21 mins - “Your health could soon depend on artificial intelligence”  At the link find the date 19 Jul, then “Download” to get the podcast.
Alibaba Interview with CEO..12 mins. - “An interview with Alibaba CEO Daniel Zhang “  At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. “Download” at the top of the screen and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Bitcoin Defined  32 mins - “What is Bitcoin?”  At the link find 17 Jul, then click the on the title, then right-click “Download” to get the podcast.
Body Cam Use In New Hampshire  5 mins - “As more police agencies across the country adopt the use of body-worn cameras, and as the footage becomes more and more important in conversations over race and policing in America, police reform advocates in New Hampshire are pushing to expand the use of cameras among local agencies. Morning Edition host Rick Ganley spoke with NHPR's Mary McIntyre about how body cams are currently used in New Hampshire and what changes might be in store.“ At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 
Brain Noise  19 min - “At a sleep research symposium in January 2020, Janna Lendner presented findings that hint at a way to look at people’s brain activity for signs of the boundary between wakefulness and unconsciousness. For patients who are comatose or under anesthesia, it can be all-important that physicians make that distinction correctly. Doing so is trickier than it might sound, however, because when someone is in the dreaming state of rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep, their brain produces the same familiar, smoothly oscillating brain waves as when they are awake. Lendner argued, though, that the answer isn’t in the regular brain waves, but rather in an aspect of neural activity that scientists might normally ignore: the erratic background noise. Some researchers seemed incredulous. “They said, ‘So, you’re telling me that there’s, like, information in the noise?’” said Lendner, an anesthesiology resident at the University Medical Center in Tübingen, Germany, who recently completed a postdoc at the University of California, Berkeley. “I said, ‘Yes. Someone’s noise is another one’s signal.’” Lendner is one of a growing number of neuroscientists energized by the idea that noise in the brain’s electrical activity could hold new clues to its inner workings. What was once seen as the neurological equivalent of annoying television static may have profound implications for how scientists study the brain. Skeptics used to tell the neuroscientist Bradley Voytek that there was nothing worth studying in these noisy features of brain activity. But his own studies of changes in electrical noise as people age, as well as previous literature on statistical trends in irregular brain activity, convinced him that they were missing something. So he spent years working on a way to help scientists rethink their data. “It’s insufficient to go up in front of a group of scientists and say, ‘Hey, I think we’ve been doing things wrong,’” said Voytek, an associate professor of cognitive science and data science at the University of California, San Diego. “You’ve got to give them a new tool to do things” differently or better….” Bradley Voytek, an associate professor of cognitive science and data science at the University of California, San Diego, helped to draw attention to the significance of aperiodic activity in the brain by developing software to study it.  In collaboration with neuroscientists at UC San Diego and Berkeley, Voytek developed software that isolates regular oscillations — like alpha waves, which are studied heavily in both sleeping and waking subjects — hiding in the aperiodic parts of brain activity. This gives neuroscientists a new tool to dissect both the regular waves and the aperiodic activity in order to disentangle their roles in behavior, cognition and disease.  The phenomenon that Voytek and other scientists are investigating in a variety of ways goes by many names. Some call it “the 1/f slope” or “scale-free activity”; Voytek has pushed to rebrand it “the aperiodic signal” or “aperiodic activity.” At the link right-click the last download in a circle, then click on "Save Link" to get the podcast.
Business Casual  41 min - “Let’s face it, the economy feels a little doom and gloom right now. So we’re learning how to protect ourselves financially this week with the help of personal finance advisor Ramit Sethi. Hear him talk with Alice Bradley and Lifehacker’s personal finance writer Lisa Rowan about his practical tips for navigating this economically terrifying time. Ramit is the author of the New York Times bestseller I Will Teach You to Be Rich and founder of IwillTeachYouToBeRich.com.”  At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Child Deaths in Canada 15 min – “Days after Dennis Saddleman was sexually abused as a child at the Kamloops residential school, he found himself standing on the banks of a river, feeling so ashamed that he wanted to disappear. He was around eight years old at the time. “I said ‘River, river, if I jumped in, would you swallow me?'” remembers Saddleman, an Indigenous poet from Merritt, B.C. “The river never said anything, all it did was just flow and flow.”  The former Kamloops Indian Residential School is seen on Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation in Kamloops, B.C. last week. Ground penetrating radar was used on the grounds, and a preliminary report indicated that the remains of 215 children could be buried at the site. (Andrew Snucins/Canadian Press) Saddleman turned away from the river that day, and walked back to the Kamloops Indian Residential School. His abuser had warned him not to tell anyone about what happened, but when the young boy did pluck up the courage to tell the principal, he was accused of lying.  He felt betrayed and abandoned, and took that “shame and anger and rage” with him when he left the school years later. He spent more than a decade struggling with alcohol and drugs, until one day he decided he wanted his life to change.  “I was seeing myself crawling towards an open grave,” he told The Current’s Matt Galloway. “I didn’t want to give the residential school the satisfaction that it killed me. I didn’t want to give the satisfaction to my sexual abuser that he killed me. So I just put my foot down.” In his late twenties, Saddleman embarked on a healing journey with the support of other survivors. He got sober, returned to education, and eventually took writing classes at Penticton’s En’owkin Centre, an Indigenous cultural and creative arts organization.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog post.

Child Deaths in Canada  15 min - “The Cowessess First Nation announced a preliminary finding Thursday of 751 unmarked graves at a cemetery near the former Marieval Indian Residential School in Saskatchewan. Heather Bear, vice-chief with the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations, discusses what needs to happen next, beyond words of support. And Kisha Supernant, director of the Institute of Prairie and Indigenous Archaeology at the University of Alberta, talks about locating these burial sites, and why she thinks it's the most important work she'll ever do. 
Child Deaths in Canada  20 min - “An archeologist says she feels "humbled" to work on locating burial sites at former residential schools, helping relatives find the graves of lost loved ones. "This is the most important work that I will ever do … I couldn't do anything more meaningful with the skills that I've been lucky enough to learn," said Kisha Supernant, who is Métis and the director of the Institute of Prairie and Indigenous Archaeology at the University of Alberta. On Thursday, the Cowessess First Nation announced a preliminary finding of 751 unmarked graves at a cemetery near the former Marieval Indian Residential School, about 140 kilometres east of Regina, Sask. The news comes after the Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation last month announced preliminary findings indicating the remains of 215 children at a burial site adjacent to the former Kamloops Indian Residential School in B.C."
Child Deaths in Canada  20 min - “The remains of 215 children have been found at a former residential school in Kamloops, B.C., after the Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation hired a specialist to investigate the grounds. We talk to Angela Sterritt, a CBC reporter based in Vancouver; and Cindy Blackstock, executive director at the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society." At the link click on 
"Share Link" then select "copy link" to get the podcast.
China and Semiconductors  19 min - “China wants to rival the US in semiconductors. It won't be easy “  At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 
China Chip Industry  19 min - “The U.S.-China tech war has made Beijing realize it needs a strong chip industry. But catching the United States will be a stiff challenge.”  At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 
Climate Crisis   13 min - “Scientists predict climate change will displace more than 180 million people by 2100 -- a crisis of "climate migration" the world isn't ready for, says disaster recovery lawyer and Louisiana native Colette Pichon Battle. In this passionate, lyrical talk, she urges us to radically restructure the economic and social systems that are driving climate migration -- and caused it in the first place -- and shares how we can cultivate collective resilience, better prepare before disaster strikes and advance human rights for all.”  At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 
Combat Shooting Casualty  35 min - “Dr. James Brasiel from Accredited EMS Fire Training comes back to the show to help discuss the recent active shooter incident in San Jose, California. He teaches Tactical Combat Casualty Care (“T Triple-C”) classes to combined Police/EMS/Fire teams, the military, and other groups involved in active response to these incidents. Also on the show was Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Group. Joe just returned from training Texas Rangers SWAT teams on active shooter response. Joe also shares his expertise on the topic of best practices in handling these situations. Meteorologist Dan DePodwin comes in at the end of the show to give an extreme weather update after a spate of severe storms hit the central and eastern United States.”  At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 
Covid Impacts Personal Finance  41 mins - “The thought of getting a $1,200 check in the mail from the government was nothing short of crazy just six months ago. Ask Andrew Yang. But now, that once impossible idea is reality—most Americans will receive a little somethin’ something’ from Uncle Sam as part of the government’s $2.2 trillion COVID-19 relief package.  But what should you do with that money? If your groceries and basic necessities are already covered, should you splurge your Trump Bucks or save them? And what kind of boost—if any—will this program give the U.S. economy?”  At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Covid in India  33 mins - “In this episode of the “First Opinion Podcast,” reporter and editor Kalpana Jain details how India got to today’s crisis with Covid-19. Although some blame hypernationalism, she calls on her two decades of writing about health and health care for the Times of India to show that the real issue is neglect of the health sector during India’s growth and development. One of Jain’s early stories on the health beat involved an investigation into how long patients with heart problems waited in line to see a physician. Neglect of the health care system tends to more strongly affect poorer families in rural areas who lack access to critical care facilities — and sometimes even to basic primary care. Having covered multiple pandemics and epidemics, Jain says that she’s seen the toll it can take on families. In some ways, Covid-19 is different, she says. But in others it’s heartbreakingly the same.”  At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog.
COVID Origins  88 mins - “Peter Daszak, Thea Kølsen Fischer, and Marion Koopmans, members of the WHO team investigating the origins of SARS-CoV-2 join TWiV to explain the work done by the committee during phase one, their conclusions, and the extent of work that remains to be done in phase two.”  At the link right-click “Download TWiV 760” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  
COVID-19 Clinical Update  41 mins - “In COVID-19 clinical update #63, Daniel Griffin reviews cases at child care facilities, estimates of mRNA vaccine effectiveness, risk of reinfection in university students, enhanced antibody generation with extended interval of mRNA vaccination, no benefit of convalescent plasma in hospitalized patients, and risk of clinical sequelae after acute infection.”  At the link right-click “Download TWIV 758,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.   
COVID-19 Clinical Update  41 mins - In COVID-19 clinical update #64, Daniel Griffin covers new guidance from NY on day camps, mitigation and infection rates in schools, testing to sustain in person instruction, Moderna mRNA vaccine highly effective in adolescents, longer storage of Pfizer vaccine, FDA EUA for sotrovimab, and persistent illness in UK children.”  At the link right-click “Download TWIV 761,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 
COVID-19 Clinical Update ..41 mins - “In COVID-19 clinical update #62, Daniel Griffin covers outdoor transmission of the virus, safe use of NSAIDS, expansion of Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine to include 12-15 year olds, post-disease Mucormycosis, and hydroxychloroquine treatment associated with increased mortality.”  At the link right-click “Download TWiV 760,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  
COVID-19 Clinical Update..40 mins. - “In COVID-19 clinical update #65, Daniel Griffin summarizes effects of non-pharmaceutical interventions, updated summer camp guidance from CDC, serology testing not recommended by FDA, antigen tests during a music event, inhibition of vaccine immunogenicity by methotrexate, phase 3 trial results for colchicine, and small airway disease as a post-acute sequelae.”  At the link right-click “Download TWIV 758,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.”  At the link right-click “Download TWIV 764,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.       
COVID-19 Potpourri  114 mins - “TWiV reviews the new nomenclature for SARS-CoV-2 variants, effectiveness of Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine against variants, modified Moderna vaccine against variants, impact of COVID-19 interventions on influenza in China and the US, and binding of RaTG13 spike protein to ACE2 of multiple species.”  At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu. 
Dark Web  31 mins - “The “dark web” is huge and mysterious, but most people have never been there. Beyond the Valley explores it first-hand.”  At the link find the date 5 Feb, where you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.
Digital Currency Impact..32 mins - “Raghuram Rajan, former India central banker and ex-IMF chief economist, explains to "Beyond the Valley" what central bank digital currencies could look like — and what they would mean for commerce.”  At the link find the date 19 Aug, where you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 
E-Discovery  18 mins - “The 2010 Civil Litigation Conference at Duke Law School inspired a lot of chatter on the e-discovery wires. On this edition of Digital Detectives, co-hosts Sharon D. Nelson, Esq.,President of Sensei Enterprises, Inc. and John W. Simek, Vice President of Sensei Enterprises, welcome Magistrate Judge David J. Waxse from Kansas, to reflect on the conference....”  At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.  
E-Discovery Costs  25 mins - “The high cost of e-discovery is a major problem for most small firms and solo lawyers.  On Digital Detectives, co-hosts Sharon D. Nelson, Esq., President of Sensei Enterprises, Inc. and John W. Simek, Vice President of Sensei Enterprises, welcome guest, Bruce Olson, the President of ONLAW Trial Technologies, and discuss cost-effective e-discovery for small cases.”  At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Electric Power Grid Upgrade 28 mins – “How will Britain’s power system need to change for a zero carbon world? Tom Heap investigates.” At the link left-click “Download” then select “Lower Quality” and “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Vehicle Boon  31 mins - “The electric vehicle boom is real — but the road won’t be easy…”  At the link find the date 2 Jun, where you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 
Facebook Data  82 mins - “We have a big-picture conversation today that is a fascinating look at social media, data protection, privacy, accountability and much more. Our guest is Paul-Olivier Dehaye. Paul is a Swiss-based mathematician who helped lift the lid on the Cambridge-Analytica / Facebook scandal. He has extensive expertise in and has conducted research on how social media platforms predict our behaviour and can create dangerous amplification patterns. If you have seen the acclaimed Netflix documentary The Great Hack (and if you haven’t, I highly recommend you do), you will have come across Paul. He was instrumental in helping one of that documentary’s protagonists – New York-based media professor David Carroll – try to obtain the data Cambridge Analytica held about him. He had been looking at how Cambridge Analytica had been violating EU data protection rules well before both the Brexit referendum in the UK and the 2016 US elections. He has subsequently provided testimony to the UK parliament on this topic. He has actually been looking at how social media platforms trade in and handle data for some time – not just by Facebook but several other firms. He is the founder of personaldata.io a non-profit that promotes digital rights and trust the digital world. It aims to help people control their digital identity.”  At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Flood Control with Beavers  28 mins - “Adrian has a big idea. His home of Braunton, a village in North Devon, has a problem with flooding. Over the last decade he has seen it get worse. The village flooded badly in 2012 just after a million pound flood defence scheme was completed, and there was more flooding in 2016. Braunton has since had those defences upgraded, but more work is needed further up the valley. Instead of more expensive schemes, Adrian has an alternative solution - bringing back beavers to do the work for the m. Beavers are nature’s engineers, their dams prevent flooding by holding water upstream and slowing the flow in rivers, while simultaneously creating new wetland habitats for species of insects, amphibians, birds, fish and plants to flourish in. These industrious rodents were hunted to extinction in Britain about 400 years ago, and are now beginning to make a comeback. A record number of beavers will be released by the Wildlife Trusts this year, but so far pretty much all licensed beaver reintroductions have been on individual private estates or within fenced enclosures.”  At the link left-click “Download” then select “Lower Quality” to get the podcast.

I-Phone Forensics 20 mins – “Digital Detectives Sharon Nelson and John Simek welcome Mary Mack and Kaylee Walstad to discuss the current happenings at the Electronic Discovery Reference Model (EDRM). Mary and Kaylee recently acquired the EDRM from the Bolch Judicial Institute at Duke Law School and will continue to collaborate closely with Duke as they move forward. They discuss their new roles, current notable projects in the EDRM community, ways people can get involved, and their plans for the future. ” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog.

Law Firm Security 25 mins – “Digital risk advisor Craig Hoffman talks through the uptick in ransomware attacks and other data security incidents found by BakerHostetler Data Security Incident Response Report.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog.

Long Term Care for Seniors 18 mins – “As Canada grapples with a crisis in the long-term care sector, some experts say we’re missing out on a hidden opportunity to provide seniors with alternative types of care. Naturally occurring retirement communities, or NORCs, are geographic areas where adults 55 and older make up at least 40 per cent of the population, according to Catherine Donnelly, an associate professor and director of the Health Services and Policy Research Institute at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont. NORCs are usually unplanned, she said, and many people don’t even realize they exist. They can be neighbourhoods where young people grew old together because they never moved away, or apartment buildings that have attracted older residents because amenities are located nearby.  And while some NORCs have access to services for older adults, that’s not the case for all of them.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog.

Kodak History  53 mins - “When I was in fifth grade, my class took a field trip to the George Eastman Museum, in Rochester, New York, as the fifth graders at my rural elementary school, 30 minutes south of the city, did every year. Housed in a Colonial Revival mansion built for the founder of the Eastman Kodak Company in 1905, the museum is home to one of the most significant photography and film collections in the world. But our job there was to stare at old cameras the size of our bodies, marvel at the luxury of having a pipe organ in your house, and write down what a daguerreotype is to prove that we’d been paying attention. At the end of the tour—in a second-story sitting room full of personal artifacts—we were presented, matter-of-factly, with a copy of Eastman’s suicide letter, dated March 14, 1932: “My work is done. Why wait?” Eastman shot himself in the heart with a Luger pistol at the age of 77.”  At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog.
Night Police Stories  40 mins - “Retired police officers and authors Chris Berg and Paul James Smith join the Disaster Podcast Team on this week’s show. They share their experiences as police officers and how they responded to incidents and interacted with other first responders. Their books, The Night Police and The Bleeding are available at NightPolice.com. Also on the show was Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Group, as well as co-hosts Sam Bradley and Jamie Davis.”  At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Fertilizer 26 mins – “A controversial experiment is underway to fertilize the Antarctic Ocean with iron sulfate to encourage the growth of phytoplankton which could in turn help reduce global warming. Climate scientists claim the temperature in Europe could be reduced by 1ºC in summer months by growing different crops with more reflective leaves. Environmental scientist Andrew Price talks about the ideas behind his new book, Slow Tech: Manifesto for an Over-wound World. A report from Europe’s most active volcano, Mount Etna in Sicily. Moving matter, atom by atom.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog.

Pandemic Self-Care 16 mins – “What has the coronavirus pandemic taught us about ourselves and our relationships? In a deeply personal and wide-ranging conversation, leadership expert Simon Sinek shares his own experience caring for his mental health as the world shut down. He discusses why we need to nurture friendships (in both good times and bad), explains why anyone can be a leader — and reveals the secret to discovering your “why” in life. (This virtual conversation, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson, was part of an exclusive TED Membership event.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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