Media Mining Digest 312 – Nov 3, 2017: 3D Printing in Disasters, Addiction Story, Authority and Power, Aviation Jobs, Background Music, Berkeley Free Speech, Blind Teenager, Brain Research, Burnout in Medicine, Cargo Bikes, Citrus Greening Disease, Climate Change Resistance, Coal Community Problems, Concussions in Teen Sports, C-Section Phenomenon, Domestic Violence in Peru, Dyslexia Problem, Education Innovation in Tasmania, Electric Vehicle Trends, EPA War, FDA Operation, Ferguson Incident, Food Activist, Food Storage in Africa, Fred Korematsu v. U.S., Free Speech, Genocide, Guardianship Problems, Hospital Response to Disasters, Human Rights Researcher, Hunger Worldwide, Investing Fundamentals, Journalists vs President, Koch Brothers Mystery Hour, Mass Incarcerations, Mass Shooting Prevention, Men of Steel, Mental Health Industry, Messy Men vs Women, Microsoft CEO, Mountain Rescues, Muhammad Ali, North Korea Capitalists, NRA Politics, Nursing Profession, Opioid Refugees, Organ Transplants, Orphan Diseases, Pollution Control, Presidential Libraries, Prison Rules, Privacy and Surveillance, Producer Darren Aronofsky, Psychology of Hate, Puerto Rico Economics, Redhat’s Blockchain Initiative, Seal Team Leader, Sex Assault Prevention App, Sexual Harassment, Smart Phone Generation, Tech Megatrends, Tribal Marijuana, Trump as a Distraction, Venezuela in Crisis, Voter Fraud in New Hampshire, Willie Grimes Saga,

Exercise your ears: the 112 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 551 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 17,430 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 86GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 400 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

3D Printing in Disasters 30 mins – “Tom and Tracy reads out a statement by Dr. Eric James of Field Ready to spread the word and get some help for their GoFundMe for those who feel so inclined to donate. It would help the use of 3D printing in disaster zones that Field Ready is working with right now due to the recent hurricanes. To send us a message, go to 3dstartpoint.com or shoot us a message at info@3dstartpoint.com or on our facebook or twitter!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Addiction Story 53 mins – “Cocaine, heroin, marijuana, and opiates. Learn how these drugs can affect our lives, with guest host Geoff Turner. Feat: Love + Radio, On Drugs, Stoner, Note to Self, Embedded, The Mortified Podcast” At the link find the title, “Podcast Playlist is on Drugs,” right-click “Download Podcast Playlist is on Drugsand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Affordable Care Act 57 mins – “After the Graham-Cassidy Bill proposed by Republicans — their latest Repeal and Replace effort — failed to garner enough votes recently, patients, healthcare providers, and insurers still face plenty of uncertainty before open enrollment begins November 1. Meanwhile, Senator Bernie Sanders’s single-payer proposal continues to gain fans. We’ll get the latest on how national politics is shaping the health care debate across the country.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Overview 56 mins – “In 2016, the world champion Lee Sedol was beaten at the ancient boardgame of Go – by a machine. It was part of the AlphaGo programme, which is a series of artificially intelligent systems designed by London-based company DeepMind. AlphaGo Zero, the latest iteration of the programme, can learn to excel at the boardgame of Go without any help from humans. So what applications could AI learning independently have for our day-to-day lives? Katie Haylor spoke to computer scientist Satinder Singh from the University of Michigan, who specialises in an area within artificial intelligence called reinforcement learning.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arianna Huffington 98 mins – “Arianna Huffington (@ariannahuff) is the founder and CEO of Thrive Global and founder of The Huffington Post. She has been named to Time magazine’s list of the world’s 100 Most Influential People and Forbes’ Most Powerful Women list. Originally from Greece, Arianna moved to England when she was 16 and graduated from Cambridge with an M.A. in economics. In late 2005, she launched The Huffington Post, a news and blog site that quickly became one of the most widely read, linked to, and frequently cited media brands on the Internet. In 2012, she won a Pulitzer Prize for reporting. In August of 2016, she launched Thrive Global with a mission of ending the stress and burnout epidemic by offering companies and individuals sustainable, science-based solutions to well-being. Arianna serves on a lot of boards — including Uber and The Center for Public Integrity — and she is the author of 15 books, including Thrive: The Third Metric to Redefining Success and Creating a Life of Well-Being, Wisdom, and Wonder and The Sleep Revolution: Transforming Your Life, One Night at a Time. This is a wide-ranging conversation, and we get into plenty of tactics. Arianna is an expert storyteller and very funny – enjoy!” At the link find the title, “Arianna Huffington, Media Maven, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 5df0860b-2537-4101-a5c0-834586573b3a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Authority and Power 51 mins – “Thursday, we’re talking about the relationship between the police and the public. Last week, Alex Wubbel’s arrest video went viral. She’s, of course, the nurse that wouldn’t allow Salt Lake Police Detective Jeff Payne to draw blood from an unconscious patient without a warrant. The video showed what many saw as unreasonable escalation on Payne’s part. We’re using this as a jumping off point to explore how power and authority are wielded by American police, and what that means for those they are called to protect. At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aviation Jobs 39 mins – “What Would You Do Different In Your Career? Welcome to the informational, inspirational, and transparent podcast about aviation careers. In this episode, Robert Guyer and Carl Valeri answer your questions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Background Music 31 mins – “Public bathrooms are noisy, poorly designed, and often nonexistent. What to do?” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Berkeley Free Speech 53 mins – “Universities are supposed to be dedicated to the exchange of ideas. But according to social psychologist Jonathan Haidt, campuses now skew so far to the left that they’ve become “political monocultures” . At the ink find the title, “The Politics of the Professoriat: Political diversity on campus, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170908_46795.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biochar 120 mins – “Today my guest Gloria Flora will helps shed some light on the reality of biochar. Gloria’s the founder and past director of the US Biochar initiative, so she has an extensive knowledge base when it comes to biochar, but she’s also worked for the US Forest Service and she’s a permaculturalist, so she gets how biochar fits into the larger whole.” At the link find the title, “VOC235: Practical Tips, Ideas and Technologies for Homescale Biochar with Gloria Flora, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files VOC_235_GloriaFlora.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Teenager 38 mins – “At just four-years‐old, Molly Burke’s world became a little bit darker: she was diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa, a rare retinal disease causing loss of vision. Despite this, and the ensuing obstacles and hardships she faced, it wasn’t long before she began bringing light into the lives of others. Molly began public speaking at the age of five as an ambassador for The Foundation Fighting Blindness Canada. Since then, she has inspired hundreds of thousands with her story. Over the years, as Molly’s vision deteriorated, her confidence and optimism only strengthened; but not without struggle or adversity. As a student she was tormented by bullies, and struggled with depression and anxiety. It wasn’t until she found the strength to face her challenges, and the courage to reach out to others, that she came to find her purpose – bringing hope to others Read more on Molly’s About Page and be sure to check out her entire web site MollyBurkeOfficial.com.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Lymphatic System 27 mins – “The discovery of the brain’s “waste disposal” system could transform our understanding of neurological conditions. Until now there was no evidence of the lymphatic system in the human brain – that’s the network of vessels which also transports part of the immune system around the body. The American researchers hope that this knowledge may eventually add to our understanding of brain conditions like multiple sclerosis. It’s Divali this week – and the Hindu festival is celebrated with prayers, food and fireworks. But in India firecrackers have become so popular that there is a spike in air pollution – serious for anyone with lung problems like asthma. The sale of firecrackers has been banned in Delhi – in the hope of preventing a toxic smog from blanketing the city. But some residents are more concerned with everyday pollution from cars and industry. A drug trial for an eye condition called uveitis has been stopped early because it was working so well. It affects one in six children who have juvenile idiopathic arthritis – where the immune system attacks the lining of the joints. This new treatment could stop children going blind but the cost may be too high for patients in some developing countries.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Research 127 mins – “The TWiVers discuss the declining readability of scientific texts, and review the use of self-inactivating rabies virus for tracing neural circuits. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Guest: Brianne BarkerAt the linkright-click “TWiV 461” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brewmaster 24 mins – “Science degrees can be found in the most intriguing careers. This week we talk with Becca Ransohoff, an analytical chemist for MadTree Brewing in Cincinnati, Ohio. In June, MadTree released Entropic Theory (a hoppy, juicy IPA) with a special can launch party whereby a portion of the proceeds were donated to iSPACE, a local non-profit that promotes education of science,  engineering, technology and math for kids.  Also a product of science and research, MadTree invested over two years of planning and testing to develop Entropic Theory.  Becca joins us to talk about Entropic Theory and the science behind its creation, while describing her job as an analytical chemist at MadTree Brewing.” At the link right-click “download the mp3” on top of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Buddhism 46 mins – “We talk to journalist, scholar, and prize-winning author Robert Wright about his latest book Why Buddhism is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment.” At the link find the title, “Why Buddhism is True, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 73bedac7-4caa-437f-ac3f-aca5f21742b6.mp3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burnout in Medicine 57 mins – “While the role of a physician has always been demanding – there’s a spike now in doctors who say they’re overwhelmed, and spending more time in front of computers than tending to patients. That’s contributing to a burnout epidemic, leading to high turnover, early retirement, and greater malpractice risk. We’ll find out how doctors in New Hampshire are coping.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

C-Section Phenomenon 28 mins – “Brazil is the C-section capital of the world. In a country where caesareans account for over half of all births and 88% in the private sector. BBC correspondent Julia Carneiro investigates what some call the “C-section epidemic” and examines recent government measures to counter a C-section culture which remains dangerously strong.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cargo Bikes 24 mins – “Our guest this week is Nicole Harkin. Nicole lives in Washington, DC with her family. She recently published her first book, Tilting: A Memoir, and she’s currently working on a mystery set in Berlin. She also runs a small photography business focused on family portraiture. She is from Montana and before becoming a writer worked in government oversight.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charter Schools 58 mins – “Progressive Policy Institute senior fellow David Osborne examines the charter school movement and offers his outlook on the future of public education in his book, [Reinventing America’s Schools]. He is interviewed by Chester Finn.” At the link find the title, “After Words with David Osborne, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.484772.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Citrus Greening Disease 46 mins – “Florida’s orange industry is feeling the squeeze from disease, hurricanes, and climate change. Can it be saved?” At the link find the title, “The Squeeze On Florida’s Orange Crops, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_555981398.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Deniers 56 mins – “Global warming is “Fake News”, a “Chinese Hoax”. So says a richly funded Conservative movement that’s become a world-wide campaign. In her book, “The Merchants of Doubt”, Naomi Oreskes traces how this propaganda war started and how to fight it.” At the link find the title, “Decoding the resistance to climate change: Are we doomed? Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170914_66265.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Resistance 56 mins – “The evidence is everywhere: forests retreating, glaciers melting, sea levels rising. And we’re only just beginning to feel the strain of climate change. Despite all of these dire events and projections, the attacks continue — on climate scientists.” At the link find the title, “Are We F–ked? Decoding the resistance to climate change, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170907_37544.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Community Problems 29 mins – “Residents of coal country are getting sick, but not everyone is convinced of the cause. Our Newsy colleague Zach Toombs explains what the science says and what the government is — or is not — doing about it.” At the link find the title, “216: A coal community divided,” right-click “ Media files 4f1062e3-14a5-4d1b-aff2-fb78c2fcb3ad.mp3” and select “ave Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Comedian Bill Burr 75 mins – “This episode of the podcast features Bill Burr (@billburr). Many of you know Bill as a standup comedian. I know him as one of the funniest humans alive, and someone that many of you requested for years. Rolling Stone called Bill “the undisputed heavyweight champ of rage-fueled humor,” and when we were finally able to talk, he did not disappoint. In this wide-ranging conversation we explore: How Bill found his way into standup comedy Why he enjoys going for an encore after he’s been booed The transformation from a “squeaky clean” comedian to offending everyone How learning can serve as powerful therapy The importance of enjoying success And much, much more ….” At the link find the title, “Bill Burr — The Comedian’s Comedian, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 57237382-d25d-4608-a5b8-63afd50fccfd.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communicators Roundtable 24 mins – “Three reporters who cover telecommunications and technology talk about this fall’s top telecommunications and technology issues facing the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Congress and communications companies.” At the link find the title, “Communicators Reporters Roundtable, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.486602.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Repair Business 55 mins – “A Show for Computer Repair Techs by Computer Repair Techs interviews MikeWise from Clockwork Networks. At the link right-click “Direct MP3 Download: Podnutz Daily #490 – Mike Wise from Clockwork Networks” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concussions in Teen Sports 58 mins – “The research keeps piling up about concussions and contact sports, especially football, and some parents are reconsidering whether to let their kids play the game.  We discuss the latest research and its ramifications for parents, athletes and athletic trainers. Plus, current thinking on the recovery process, and how schools are assessing whether students are ready to return to play – or to the classroom.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crime Writing 54 mins – “Murder mysteries are conventionally thought of as staples of beach and cottage reading – not particularly taxing on the intellect. But that belies the depth and variety of crime writing today, as well as its ubiquity in both pop and literary culture.” At the link find the title, “The art of crime fiction & what it says about human nature, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170905_78437.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diet and Health 49 mins – “We all want to make good health decisions, but every day a new study comes out that seems to change the game. Fat’s bad for you; then it’s good. Count calories. Don’t. Add in all the marketing and news media, and it’s hard to tell the good stuff from the snake oil. James Hamblin is a doctor-turned-journalist, and in his writing for The Atlantic magazine he wades through the noise to find the signal. He joins us Tuesday to help us better understand how to listen to and take care of our bodies. James Hamblin is an MD and a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about behavioral health, nurition, culture, and preventative medicine. He’s also the host of a video series and a book, both of which are called If Our Bodies Could Talk At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Domestic Violence 27 mins – “Indonesia has just conducted its first ever national survey on domestic violence. It found that 41% of women had experienced some form of domestic abuse. We hear about the work of a pioneering crisis and counselling centre offering holistic support, the first organisation of its kind in Indonesia. In Behind Closed Doors Claire Bolderson reports from three different countries: Kenya, Peru and Indonesia. The issue that unites them all is domestic violence. It’s not that the problem is unique to these countries – the World Health Organisation estimates that one third of women worldwide suffer physical or sexual violence by a partner – but in each of the three countries, we hear about different and often inspiring solutions aimed at combating it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drummer Stewart Copeland 72 mins – “Stewart Copeland (@copelandmusic) is a Grammy Award-winning musician, considered by Rolling Stone Magazine to be one of the top ten drummers of all time. He’s a founding member of The Police, and an inductee into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. In this conversation, we delve into lessons for surviving the music industry, why entrepreneurs (and self-directed artists) never get a day off, how The Police developed their unique sound, the decision that changed everything, and much more….” At the link find the title, “#262: The CIA, The Police, and Other Adventures from Stewart Copeland, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 438e7af7-6545-48d1-99a3-f21bc272f2d0.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dyslexia Problem 53 mins – “Public schools are denying children with dyslexia proper treatment and often failing to identify them in the first place.” At the link find the title, “Hard to Read: How American Schools Fail Kids with Dyslexia, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files hardtoreaddoc_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Innovation in Tasmania 10 mins – “The national average for young people entering university is about 40%. In Tasmania it has been 5%. The University of Tasmania has been somewhat invisible, with many people oblivious to it being a major employer, unaware of its contribution to Tasmanian industry, and unaware of the options which open up for graduates. To turn this around, the university is offering a new style of course, the two-year Associate Degree, being cheaper and shorter than a bachelor’s degree, with clear vocational outcomes. Vice-Chancellor Peter Rathjen describes what led to the new courses being offered and what the university hopes to achieve.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Vehicle Trends 45 mins – “General Motors lays out an all-electric future. Twenty new electric car and truck models by 2023. Are gas and diesel engines going the way of the horse and buggy?” At the link find the title, “Zooming Toward An Electric Car Future, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_555639412.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

EPA War 58 mins – “How Scott Pruitt went from fighting the Environmental Protection Agency to running it and rolling back years of policy.” At the link find the title, “War on the EPA ,Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 347351215-frontlinepbs-war-on-the-epa.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fact v Fantasy 29 mins – “It might seem increasingly difficult to separate fact from fiction these days, but Studio 360 host and author Kurt Andersen says the dilemma is old — and one that’s exacerbated by unique characteristics of America. Oh, and cosplay and the Internet. Andersen sat down with Nerdette to discuss his new book, Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History. He’s also obsessed with maps, so we put him on the phone with geographical expert Anne Knowles, who told us all to get lost — in the literal sense.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FDA Operations 58 mins – “Join Dan & howard as we talk with Dr. Jeanmarie Perrone (@JMPerroneMD) about the FDA and taking on “Big Pain” during her time on the FDA Drug Safety and Risk Management committee. Don’t drink the raspberries . . . Brought to you by BrownApron. Stay healthy true believers!” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Ferguson Incident 28 mins – “Going beyond the headlines of the Ferguson story. We’ll talk with one of the directors of the documentary Whose Streets?. As the news cameras left Ferguson, Missouri, after the police killing of Michael Brown, Sabaah Folayan and her team stayed on to document what happens to people subjected to police violence as a matter of routine. And an F Word from me on surveillance. If you’re not outraged, you’re not paying attention and if you are, well the feds know about it.” At the link right-click “Download this Incident” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Activists 38 mins – “A high school basketball team organizes a canned food drive. A church volunteer group restocks the local pantry with donations from Walmart. Both examples are seemingly positive portrayals of American civic engagement… So what’s wrong with this picture? Playing for Team Human today is Andy Fisher, author of Big Hunger: the Unholy Alliance Between Corporate America and Anti-Hunger Groups. In the book, Fisher tackles the big question of why chronic hunger and food insecurity persist despite the efforts of food banks, pantries, and charity. Fisher’s suggests that our effort to solve hunger with charity is missing a crucial component that would transform stopgap measures into long-term solutions. Join Douglas and Andy as they take a critical look at the what Fisher calls the “non-profit industrial complex,” while looking toward a future where social equity figures into the equation of ending hunger in America. Purchase Big Hunger from your favorite local book seller or at bighhunger.org.” At the link find the title, “Ep. 59 Andy Fisher “Big Hunger” right-click “Media files 59e405139739f65d3b024738.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Storage in Africa 25 mins – “Simple solutions can sometimes have tremendous impacts. In this episode Bret Rierson from the World Food Programme discusses a solution to enhancing food security in Africa and around the world. Most African farmers are small acreage subsistence farmers. They eat and trade what the produce. A simple hermetically-sealed, in-home grain silo can protect a harvest from insects, preserving the yield for longer term use, or sale in more favorable market windows. This solution can aid in the transition from subsistence farming to surplus farming. This simple solution changes the lives of those in need, and ensures food security throughout the developing world.” At the link right-click ‘Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forest Preservation P2 51 mins – “The Siamese Rosewood tree is now so valuable that two small pieces carried in a rucksack are worth $500. This kind of money means that armed criminal gangs up to a hundred strong have stripped the forests of Thailand bare of the Rosewood. Nearly all of it is destined for the Chinese rosewood ‘hongmu’ furniture market. And, in the north-west of Thailand, the Karen people are trying to create a ‘peace park’ to preserve their natural habitat. Can they stem the storm of exploitation and destruction and keep their forests alive and vibrant?” At the link right-click “Download: and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fred Korematsu v U.S. 53 mins – “What happens when the Supreme Court, the highest court in the land, seems to get it wrong? Korematsu v. United States is a case that’s been widely denounced and discredited, but it still remains on the books. This is the case that upheld President Franklin Roosevelt’s internment of American citizens during World War II based solely on their Japanese heritage, for the sake of national security. In this episode, we follow Fred Korematsu’s path to the Supreme Court, and we ask the question: if you can’t get justice in the Supreme Court, can you find it someplace else?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Speech 52 mins – “Facebook is under fire for allowing Russian propagandists to buy ads during the 2016 election. This week, how we do and don’t hold tech giants accountable….” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

French Food 39 mins – “Following WWII, France–particularly Paris–became the world’s most stylish tourist destination and capital of fine dining. Americans were smitten. Justin Spring follows the lives of six American writers-adventurers who adopted Paris as their home, and tells how they transformed the way Americans talk and think about food and the way they eat.” At the link find the title, “Episode 283: Gourmands Way…,” right-click “Media files e1b380f1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genocide 49 mins – “ … Norman Naimark, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and an expert on Eastern Europe and genocides throughout history, … considers genocides to be “the crime of crimes, worse than war crimes or crimes against humanity,” Naimark defines genocide as “intentional killing of a group of people as such,” meaning that the intention is to eliminate that group completely. He stresses the difference of this definition from warfare, as in war two sides are killing each other with the intention of subjugation rather than extermination. He goes into detail about a few incidents that he considers genocides, including but not limited to Nazi Germany, Stalin’s genocide of the kulaks, the Armenian genocide in the early 1900s, the Carthage genocide in 146 BC, the Rwandan genocide in the 1990s, and the Yuki genocide in California in the 1850s. Naimark argues that as genocides occur in contemporary society, sovereign states have a responsibility to protect their citizens; if they fail to do so the international community has a moral and civic obligation to step in to stop those genocides from occurring. Granted, he argues, that the cost of intervention needs to be assessed before stepping in but that overall each country has a national obligation to prevent the systematic extermination of people. Interested in buying Norman Naimark’s latest book, Genocide: A World History? “ At the link find the title, “Genocides: A World History featuring Norman Naimark, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171011-naimark.mp3” nd select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guardianship Problems 46 mins – “Court-approved guardians—strangers swooping in and taking over the lives of elderly people who are helpless to stop them. We’ll dig in on who, why and how.” At the link find the title, “Who’s Guarding Against The Guardians? Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_555981372.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hospital Response to Disasters 38 mins – “As the Atlantic Hurricane season continues unabated White Coat, Black Art tells the story of how hospitals cope when natural disasters strike.” At the link find the title, “Floods Fires Hurricanes and Hospitals, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files whitecoat 20170922_64364.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Rights Researcher 53 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University History Department, and is titled “Human Rights and Violent Internal Conflict.” Our speaker is David Cingranelli, Professor of Political Science at Binghamton University.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hunger Worldwide 92mins – “On October 16, the Global Economy and Development Program at the Brookings Institution hosted a public event to coincide with World Food Day, where they provided an update on their Ending Rural Hunger project, which examines food and nutrition security needs, policies, and resources around the world.” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Ideology 75 mins – “ Ideology is an important concept in leftist political philosophy. It has a colloquial meaning as well as a more nuanced philosophical meaning. Brett sits down with two of his comrades, Brendan and Miles, to discuss the concept.” At the link find the title, “Ideology: Capitalism and Liberal Culture, “ right-click “Media files ideology_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing Overview 41 mins – “Paul compares the asset class returns of his recommendations with the average returns of the same asset class funds. An understanding of the last 9 months may or may not give you a peek into the future performance of these ETF selections. He also discusses holding emergency money in a money market account or just as part of the long term portfolio. And he addresses the risk and return of his Monthly Income Portfolio at Vanguard.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing Fundamentals 52 mins – “In this fun conversation between two old friends and colleagues, Tom Cock of Vestory.com and Paul discuss their 401k Project, John Bogel, and answers to listener/investor questions about newsletters, currency, IRAs, annuities and more. Tom and Paul produced a radio show together for more than a decade. You can also access Vestory’s free video courses on “Real Retirement Investing” online at TalkingRealMoney.com.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalists vs President P1 15 mins – “Last week Brooke was at the Texas Tribune Festival, an annual event that gathers hundred of speakers and thousands of citizens to discuss big issues of the day, ranging from education to climate change to politics. She moderated a couple of sessions: One with two great journalists from two very different places with two very different briefs. One of those journalists was Amy Chozick, a national political reporter for the New York Times, the other was Evan Smith, the  co-founder and CEO of the Texas Tribune. The question at issue turned on President Trumps continuous attacks on the press, and on truth, basic facts. Does it affect the way they practice journalism? And if so, how?” At the link click the circle with three dots and select “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalists vs President P2 26 mins – “When Brooke was at the Texas Tribune festival in Austin last week, she moderated two sessions, one with reporters and one with couple of US Representatives from Texas. Democrat Beto O’Rourke of El Paso, and Republican Will Hurd of Helotes. The two – who didn’t much know each other a year ago –  made headlines in their state when, stranded by a snowstorm, they found themselves sharing a rented Chevy Impala for the sixteen-hundred mile drive from San Antonio to Washington. Brooke asked them roughly the same question she asked the reporters; how do the constant attacks by the President on journalism, on facts, influence how you do your job and how you deal with the press? Does it affect your point of view?  **Correction: At one point, Representative Will Hurd refers to a recent missile launch by Iran as an example real news that is worth reporting. In fact, it was the opposite.**” At the link click the circle with three dots and select “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kellogg-Briand Pact 45 mins -”The Kellogg-Briand Pact is often remembered as a failure; signed in 1928 to outlaw war, it was followed in just over a decade by one of the deadliest conflicts in history. But Oona Hathaway and Scott Shapiro see the Pact differently. In their new book, “The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World,” they argue that though it did not successfully end all war, the Pact changed the way states resolve disputes, reduced the likelihood of conquest, and set of a chain of events that led to the modern world order. On September 11, they sat down with Jack Goldsmith at the Hoover Book Soiree to discuss their book and its implications.” At ” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Puerto Rico Economics 15 mins – “Following Hurricane Maria’s landfall on Wednesday morning, we have only scarce images and reports from which to comprehend the scale of devastation in Puerto Rico right now. Perhaps due to disaster fatigue, perhaps due to the territory’s second-class status, the media coverage has been perfunctory.” At the link click the circle with three dots and select “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Koch Brothers Mystery Show P1 14 mins – “The American Dream is under attack! Join boy detectives The Koch Brothers as they use their billions of dollars in corporate revenues and shadowy government influence to solve the country’s most harrowing crimes – crimes they themselves most certainly didn’t commit! Chuck and Davey are trapped in time-out, dreaming of the ungoverned land rights that continue to elude them. But when they heed the beckoning call of a mysterious trickster, our heroes are about to get a whole lot more than they bargained for!” At the link right-click “Download MP3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Koch Brothers Mystery Show P2 24 mins – “It’s the thrilling conclusion of Episode 11: The Precarious Peril of the Public Parks! In the land rights utopia of Never-Ever-Federal Land, Chuck and Davey are quickly finding that it’s more haunt than jaunt! Can they escape the dastardly roughrider Teddy Roosevelt before the National Parks system extends its icy grip around the neck of freedom?” At the link right-click “Download MP3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lion Fish Invasion 51 mins – “As part of the BBC Life Stories season, exploring our relationship with the natural world, we travel under the sea in pursuit of a major ecological threat to Western Atlantic coasts – the Lionfish. The species, which recently spread from its natural territory in the Pacific to Atlantic waters, is aggressive, exotic and very, very hungry. How did the lionfish go from being an aquarium favourite to the scourge of an aquatic ecosystem that eats everything in its path?” At the link right-click “Download: and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martin Luther 52 mins – “Thursday, we’re talking about Martin Luther. In the 16th century, he ignited a movement to rethink the traditions and beliefs of Christianity. He came to be seen as a heretic or revolutionary, but the historian Craig Harline said Luther never set out to be either of those things. He began as a cranky friar who obsessed about the fate of his soul. He went looking for answers, and when he found them, refused to keep his mouth shut. Harline has just written a new book called A World Ablaze. Craig Harline is a professor of history at Brigham Young University. His book A World Ablaze: The Rise of Martin Luther and the Birth of the Reformation  At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Incarcerations 58 mins – “Harvard University proessor Danielle Allen examines mass incarceration through the lens of her cousin Michael A., who served 11 years in prison at age 15. Her book, [Cuz], traces both their journeys growing up. She’s interviewed by author Wes Moore.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Danielle Allen, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.483921.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Shooting Prevention 62 mins – “Las Vegas becomes the site of the worst mass shooting in American history, Trump attacks hurricane victims in Puerto Rico, and Tom Price’s flights of fancy come to an end. Then Ta-Nehisi Coates joins Jon, Jon, and Tommy to talk about his new book, We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy.” At the link find the title, ““What’s your plan to stop mass shootings?” Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 82bb27c0-45ac-4c35-8c54-.d41e209d1232.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Shooting Reporting 8 mins – “On Sunday night, a gunman opened fire on an outdoor music festival in Las Vegas, NV. Since then, reports of deaths and injuries have been mounting, making for what’s being called “the deadliest mass shooting” in modern American history. Amid the tragedy, we’re seeing a spate of familiar media tropes: from offers of “thoughts and prayers” and tussles over the appropriate time to talk about gun control to mis-identification of perpetrators and publication of unconfirmed reports. Brooke recalls some points from On the Media’s Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook: Active Shooter Edition to remind us that, while this latest tragedy might feel unique, the media is recycling a playbook that we’ve seen all-too-many times before.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Massey Lectures 58 mins – “In 1970, outspoken Harvard biologist George Wald became the first natural scientist to give the CBC Massey Lectures. Lewis Auerbach produced the 1970 Wald lectures. He tells the remarkable backstory of Wald and his Massey talks.” At the link find the title, “Choose Life: The Lost Massey Lecture by George Wald, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20171004_36425.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Men of Steel 51 mins – “On the next Snap…”Man of Steel.” When an immovable object meets an unstoppable force, what is left standing? [with] Sharp Dressed Man – Glynn discovers discovers the man behind the man he wants to be. Producer: Pat Mesiti Miller The Price Of Silence – How did Ben Holmes disappear and then reappear with a bang? Producer:Davey Kim Sound Design: Renzo Gorrio Old Time Strong Man – What happens when a five-foot-seven, 42-year-old from Queens decides to become a superhero? This story comes from the documentary Bending Steel. Also check out Chris Wonder Schoek and Unconventional Athletes. At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Mental health Industry 60 mins – “Investigative journalist Art Levine reports on the mental health industry in his book, [Mental Health, Inc]. Mr. Levine is interviewed by Dr. Jeff Lieberman, psychiatry director of the New York State Psychiatric Institute and author of [Shrinks].” At the link find the title, “After Words with Art Levine, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.484819.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Messy Men vs Women 48 mins – “ Are men actually messier than women? Or is that just some sexist stereotype? E&B break down the surprising research behind who makes more ‘ew.’” At the link find the title, “ Are Men Messier Than Women? Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-10-18-smnty-messy-final.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Metric System 27 mins – “Back in the late 1990s, NASA launched the Mars Climate Orbiter to further explore the mysteries of the red planet. The satellite cruised for close to a year, then fired its main engines to enter orbit around Mars. It disappeared behind the planet and never reappeared. The Orbiter had crashed into Mars.Scientists at NASA began to pour over the data, looking for clues about what went wrong. They eventually discovered that a simple conversion error was to blame. NASA was using the metric system, the international standard, for its calculations. But one of their contractors was using U.S. Customary Units, which is the proper term for the American system of inches, pounds, and gallons. Years of planning and hundreds of millions of dollars were lost, all because someone did the right calculation but in the wrong units….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microsoft CEO 60 minsSatya Nadella is one of the world’s most inspirational business leaders, as much a humanist as a technologist and executive. On September 28th, he comes to the Intelligence Squared stage to discuss his personal journey from a childhood in India to becoming CEO of Microsoft, the culture change that he has driven inside his legendary technology company, and the transformation that is coming to all our lives as we face the most disruptive wave of technology humankind has experienced: artificial intelligence, mixed reality, and quantum computing. While many people worry about the negative impact of exponential digital growth – from automation taking over our jobs to the increasing power that algorithms are having over our lives – Nadella will proffer his optimistic vision of the future, which he sets out in his forthcoming book Hit Refresh. He will argue that, as technology upends the status quo, the very human quality of empathy will become increasingly valuable. And he will explain how people, organisations and societies must transform in their quest for new energy, new ideas, relevance and renewal.” At the link right the title, “Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on hitting refresh and seizing the opportunity of the digital revolution, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Million Dollar Question P2 27 mins – “What’s the best way to spend $100 million to fix one huge problem in the world today? That is the challenge laid down by the MacArthur Foundation in Chicago, distributors of the “genius grant”. Ed Butler and a panel of expert guests hear the details of four of the final eight challengers, with ideas to transform the quality of the food we eat and to train eye surgeons to restore sight to vast numbers in Nepal, Ethiopia and Ghana. Is $100 million enough to tackle these challenges and what are the consequences, intended or not, of philanthropy on such a big scale?” At the link right-click “Download: and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mountain Rescues 57 mins – “N.H.’s beautiful Presidential Range attracts hikers in all seasons. Mt. Washington holds the dubious distinction of having “the world’s worst weather” yet hikers and climbers are attracted year-round to the challenging terrain. It’s also been the scene of hundreds of accidents, including the one that took the life of Kate Matrosova in 2015. We examine Matrosova’s story and the lessons learned about risk-taking and decision-making.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muhammad Ali Biography 50 mins – “Jonathan Eig talks about his new biography of Muhammad Ali, which draws on hundreds of interviews and previously unreleased FBI and Justice Department files. Linguist Geoff Nunberg says 50 years after the ‘Summer of Love,’ we’re still using language popularized by hippies. Roz Chast talks about her new book of cartoons, ‘Going into Town: A Love Letter to New York.’” At the link find the title, “Best Of: The ‘Radical’ Life Of Muhammad Ali Cartoonist Roz Chast, Oct, 2017, click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Capitalists 24 mins – “Capitalism isn’t supposed to exist in North Korea. But all over the country, small businesses are popping up, growing the nation’s economy. And much of that money is going straight to the country’s nuclear program.” At the link find the title, “#800: North Korea’s Capitalists,” right-click “Media files 20171013_pmoney_pmpod800.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Northern Hydro-electric Project 58 mins – “The decision on the hydro-electric transmission project, which would bring power from Canada to New England, has been postponed yet again. We review the goals of this $1.6 billion proposal and examine how the debate around it has changed since it was first presented in 2010.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nostalgia 29 mins – “Is nostalgia an emotion that’s bitter, or sweet? Why are we so often pulled into memories of the past? This week on Hidden Brain, we talk about what prompts us to feel nostalgic, and the harms and benefits of this emotion. Plus, how Donald Trump employed nostalgia to win the 2016 presidential campaign.” At the link find the title, “The Good Old Days, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171016_hiddenbrain_hb_clay_routledge-mix_5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

NRA Politics 50 mins – “Journalist Mike Spies says the NRA’s push to allow guns on college campuses, in daycare centers and in bars is part of an effort to “normalize gun carrying as much as possible in public life.” Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews the album ‘Trip’ from singer/songwriter Jhené Aiko. Film critic David Edelstein reviews ‘Blade Runner 2049’ starring Ryan Gosling.” At the link find the title, “NRA-Backed Gun Laws & The State Legislature, Oct 2017,” right-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nursing Profession 29 mins – “On this edition of Science Studio, we feature a different kind of guest – a nurse! The first nurse to ever be in the studio with us, Pat Castiglia, former Dean of Nursing at the University of Texas at El Paso, shares with us her extensive study and practice in the nursing field as well as what her future endeavors hold in this science realm.” At the link right-click the play buton and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open The Books.com 58 mins – “Adam Andrzejewski discusses Open The Books, a watchdog organization he founded that tracks government spending at the federal, state, and local levels.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Adam Andrzejewski, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.484504.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Refugees 58 mins – “As overdoses and deaths continue, New Hampshire physicians are responding to criticism that they’ve overprescribed. Now, some patients with chronic pain find themselves cut off from access to medications, left without other treatment options, and feeling that the anti-opioid push has gone overboard.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Organ Transplants 57 mins – “The organ donation system is complex, and often misunderstood – with a waiting list that is long, and constantly shifting. But living donations, high-risk donors, and new scientific developments in tissue growth are making new strides in addressing the need.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Orphan Diseases 27 mins – “Ian Stedman had red eyes, migraines,skin rashes and joint pain all his life. Dozens of MDs failed to diagnose him. So, he lived with it. When his daughter was born with the same symptoms, he turned to “Dr. Google” and diagnosed his own rare disease.” At the link find the title, “One in a million, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files whitecoat_20171005_13331.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Cartoons 60 mins – “[Washington Post] Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist Ann Telnaes talks about her work and how it has changed since the rise of social media sites like Twitter and Facebook.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Ann Telnaes,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Comedy 40 mins – “From Jimmy Kimmel on health care to Trevor Noah on police shootings, late night comedy is getting serious.” At the link find the title, “Late Night Television Turns From Funny To Somber, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_556202238.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pollution Control 27 mins – “Gina McCarthy, former EPA Administrator, and Commission leads Philip Landrigan and Richard Fuller join Gavin Cleaver for a discussion of the problems of pollution and the solutions available.” At the link find the title, “The Lancet Commission on Pollution and Health: October 19, 2017,” right-click “Media files 19october_pollution.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

President Chester Arthur 58 mins – “Journalist Scott Greenberger discusses his book, [The Unexpected President: The Life and Times of Chester A. Arthur].” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Scott Greenberger, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.486171.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Libraries 59 mins – “Author and former congressional staffer Anthony Clark discusses his book, [The Last Campaign], in which he takes a critical look at U.S. presidential libraries and the National Archives and Records Administration, which operates them.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Anthony Clark, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.484478.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Rules 30 mins – “The color of your skin influences your life in prison, from sharing food to celebrating birthdays. Meet Andrew Sabatino (Drew Down) and Arthur Snowden (AR), two guys whose close friendship often challenges the unwritten rules of race relations on the inside. Thanks to Drew Down and AR for sharing the story of their friendship. It’s a big deal to talk about race in prison, so thanks also to Lonnie Morris, Lemar, Phil Melendez, Wayne Boatwright, Charlie and Mesro El-Coles for stepping up.” At the link find the title, “Unwritten, Sept 2017,” right-click “Media files Unwritten_A.mp3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Privacy and Surveillance 56 mins – “More and more our lives are online. Wherever we go, whatever we do, we leave a digital trail. Cameras follow us as we walk through the city. Financial transactions are recorded be it banking or buying groceries, buying anything. And some people choose to document their lives on social media. Our data is valuable. Profiles are assembled. What about privacy? Does it exist anymore? A human right or an outdated custom?  When political messages are unregulated and targeted, is democracy under threat? This discussion was held as part of Brisbane’s World Science Festival 2017.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Producer Darren Aronofsky 128 mins – “Darren Aronofsky (@DarrenAronofsky) is the founder and head of production company Protozoa Pictures. He is the acclaimed and award-winning filmmaker behind both cult classics and blockbusters, including Pi (which earned him a Best Director award at the 1998 Sundance Film Festival), Requiem For a Dream, The Wrestler (the third U.S. film in history to win the esteemed Golden Lion award), Black Swan (which won Natalie Portman the Academy Award for Best Actress and garnered four other Oscar nominations), Noah (His biblically inspired epic that opened at number at the box office and grossed more than $362,000,000 worldwide), and his latest, mother!, a psychological horror-thriller film starring Jennifer Lawrence, Javier Bardem, Ed Harris, and Michelle Pfeiffer. In this episode, we explore a wide range of topics, including: His creative process and “nomadic writing” Work environment and highly unusual desks The “Month of Fury” How to navigate tough conversations over creativity and control Psychedelics Dealing with critics And much more….” At the link find the title, “#263: Filmmaker Darren Aronofsky — Exploring Creativity, Ignoring Critics, and Making Art, “ right-click “Media files d1969bd1-650c-448e-b4a2-273e3d81619b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychology of Hate 56 mins – “We talk to clinical psychologist Ali Mattu about the psychology of dehumanization and hate.” At the link find the title, “The Psychology of Hate, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 1dd1dc50-5e32-4fac-8fa8-31183df17027.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Utility Commissions 30 mins – “Mark Jamison, a conservative visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, discusses how technological advances such as 5G and apps lessen the significance of the net neutrality debate.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Mark Jamison, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.486083.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Puerto Rico Economics 15 mins – “Following Hurricane Maria’s landfall on Wednesday morning, we have only scarce images and reports from which to comprehend the scale of devastation in Puerto Rico right now. Perhaps due to disaster fatigue, perhaps due to the territory’s second-class status, the media coverage has been perfunctory. While the coverage to date has focused on the flooding and widespread power outages on the ravaged island, Rutgers professor Yarimar Bonilla says there’s an important context to the problems with the electric grid. She and Bob discuss how the damage from Maria is related to the debt crisis, and how it may provide an excuse to justify another wave of privatization on the island.” At the link click the circle with three dots and select “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Redhat’s Blockchain Initiative 21 mins – “RedHat is a global software company providing open-source software solutions to enterprises. I spoke with Rich Feldmann who is the Global Director of Financial Services and is in charge of RedHat’s Blockchain initiative. In this episode, we discuss: RedHat’s Blockchain strategy; An interesting project RedHat is working on with BlockApps, a “Blockchain-As-A-Service” company, And how cryptocurrency exchanges could leverage RedHat’s expertise, if the conditions are right” At the link find the title, “017: How RedHat is Quietly Transforming Enterprise Blockchain with Rich Feldmann,” right-click “Media files Richard_Feldman_final.mp3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reporter in Turkey 58 mins – “[New York Times Magazine] contributor Suzy Hansen reports on the world’s view of America’s power and influence and her own view of the U.S. in her book, [Notes on a Foreign Country]. She’s interviewed by Elmira Bayrasli of the New America Foundation.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Suzy Hansen, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.483799.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seal Team Leader 68 mins – “Jocko Willink (@jockowillink) takes over the show for a special episode. As I learned during our first interview, he is one of the scariest human beings imaginable. In this episode, Jocko shares lessons from his new book Discipline Equals Freedom: Field Manual. Trust me, it’s fantastic. In this talk he discusses: The success mindset; How to stop laziness and procrastination; Behaviors that lead to failure; His exact workouts; How he adapts his training when he’s on the road; And much, much more …Jocko enlisted in the Navy after high school and spent 20 years in the SEAL Teams, first as an enlisted SEAL operator and then as a SEAL officer. During his second tour in Iraq, he led SEAL Task Unit Bruiser in the Battle of Ramadi–some of the toughest and sustained combat in the SEAL Teams since Vietnam. Under his leadership, Task Unit Bruiser became the most highly decorated Special Operations Unit of the entire war in Iraq and helped bring stability to Ramadi. Jocko was awarded the Bronze Star and a Silver Star. Jocko is also the co-author of Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win — which I loved.” At the link find the title, “Discipline Equals Freedom — Jocko Willink, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 95fe892c-1309-421a-be21-7297b0698dd1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Assault Prevention App 5 mins – “A free smartphone app developed at the University of New Hampshire to help prevent sexual assault and provide assistance to victims is now available nationwide. The app – uSafeUS – was unveiled at an event on the UNH campus in Durham last week. It’s a national version of an app that was made available to students on 21 college campuses across New Hampshire last fall. Sharyn Potter is a professor of sociology and executive director of research at the Prevention Innovations Research Center at UNH, and helped develop the app. She joined NHPR’s All Things Considered.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment 66 mins – “Gretchen Carlson may have been fired last year from her job at Fox News, but it hasn’t slowed her down one bit. After filing and settling a sexual harassment lawsuit against her former boss at Fox for a reported $20 million, Gretchen has transitioned from journalism to advocacy. She joins Katie and Brian to discuss her new book, the recent bombshell allegations against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein, and her advice for others facing sexual harassment at work. Plus, she recalls what it was like to be crowned Miss America at age 22 and the nerve-racking prank that unexpectedly launched her career in television.” At the link find the title, “41. Gretchen Carlson Takes Her Power Back,” right-click “Media files d9d73e7b-88a9-4fee-9294-1bbf2892e876.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smart Phone Generation 51 mins – “Five years ago, psychologist Jean Twenge noticed that teenagers were acting differently than the Millenial generation that preceded them. They were more depressed, and more suicidal. They sought less independence from their parents, hung out less with friends, and were less interested in sex. All these behaviors coincide with a pivotal cultural moment: 2012 was the first year a majority of Americans owned smartphones. Twenge joins us Wednesday to explain what she’s learned about today’s super-connected kids. Jean Twenge is a professor of psychology at San Diego State University. Her new book is called iGen: Why Today’s Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy—and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood—and What That Means for the Rest of Us At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tech Megatrends 39 mins – “Technology megatrends, or what some call long range technology roadmaps, are an important input into your strategic thinking as you build your innovation pipeline. I’ve been researching, tracking and presenting on technology megatrends for the last 30 years of my career.During a live show broadcast on Facebook, a member of the audience asked about what technology trends would have major impact on businesses. Rather than just giving a quick off hand answer, I took on objective of giving you insight into the technology megatrends that I’m tracking. The megatrends will have significant impact on society, governments, businesses industries and career.” [PDF with slides is also available when you submit your name and email.] At the link click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Tom Paxton 33 mins – “Tom Paxton joined us to select a few tunes for The Folk Show and to talk about some of his early influences during his fifty plus years as a folksinger. He’ll be coming this way for appearances in Manchester, New London and Sandwich this autumn.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trees in Trouble 58 mins – “The fall foliage season is sweeping through New Hampshire, causing residents and leaf-peepers to appreciate anew the forests in the state. The colors of the season are a function of forest health, and we look closely at efforts to restore and protect three iconic tree species: elm, ash, and chestnut. And a new report finds that New England is losing 65 acres of forestland per day.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tribal Marijuana 43 mins – “In recent years, many Native tribes have found a measure of prosperity in casinos and hotels. However, some tribes missed out and were unable to capitalize on that industry for a variety of reasons. Often, their location was a factor and being far from population centers made casino profits difficult to realize. Now there is a new industry popping up, the Marijuana production, distribution, and sale. Many tribes are jumping headfirst into Marijuana, determined not to again miss out on what could be the next big thing for tribal prosperity. Then, we discuss the Cleveland Indians and Chief Wahoo. They have had many protestors over the caricaturized mascot over the years, but when one of the protest leaders is arrested for defrauding the very people he claims to represent, it can hurt your cause considerably. Finally, we discuss the New World tapestry which was hand woven by the British royals, and while it professes to show the history of the ‘New World’ (America), it also shows dozens upon dozens of incredibly stereotypes and incorrect depictions of Tribal Natives. Of course, the royal family is standing by their creation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at tne end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Trump as a Distraction 44 mins – “We talk to renowned psychiatrist Allen Frances about his latest book Twilight of American Sanity: A Psychiatrist Analyzes the Age of Trump.” At the link find the title, “A Psychiatrist Analyzes the Age of Trump, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files a3c12b7c-e755-46f2-84c5-64ac0a798040.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Lobbyists 49 mins – “‘New York Times’ reporter Nicholas Confessore explains how Trump’s election was a boon to those with access to the president. “If you had a Trump connection, you could write your own ticket,” he says. Film critic David Edelstein reviews ‘American Made’ starring Tom Cruise.” At the link find the title, “Lobbying In Trump’s Washington, Sept 2017,” right-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Attorneys 58 mins – “Former federal prosecutor and George Washington University Law School professor Randall Eliason, who writes the “Sidebars” blog at Sidebarsblog.com, talks about the corruption trial of Senator Bob Menendez (D-NJ), as well as other prominent cases.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Randall Eliason, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.486529.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela in Crisis 58 mins – “Dr. George Ciccariello-Maher is an American political theorist, commentator, and activist. He is an Associate Professor of Politics and Global Studies at Drexel University in Philadelphia and Visiting Researcher at the Institute for Social Research at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). He is the author of three books: We Created Chávez: A People’s History of the Venezuelan Revolution, Building the Commune: Radical Democracy in Venezuela, Decolonizing Dialectics. Brett interviews Dr. Ciccariello-Maher on the history of, and the current situation in, Venezuela. Topics Include: Hugo Chavez, the Constituent Assembly, the opposition, the Venezuelan Communes, the concept of dual power, Jacobin Magazine, the Bolivarian Revolution, and much more.” At the link find the title, “Venezuela in Crisis: Defending the Bolivarian Revolution, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files Venezuala.L.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam by Ken Burns 30 mins – “Award-winning filmmaker Ken Burns joins Chuck Todd to talk about “The Vietnam War,” his latest film produced with Lynn Novick. He talks about shedding pre-conceived notions, and about the reverberations of the war today.” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save file” from the pop-up menu.

Voter Fraud in New Hampshire 58 mins – “It’s not primary season, but voting is top of mind in New Hampshire these days. With the passage of the controversial new voting law SB 3 and its first test in the courts and at the polls earlier this week, Granite State voters are split on whether or not the law is necessary, or simply a tactic to suppress students (and others) from casting ballots. As that story continues to develop, Secretary of State Bill Gardner’s participation on President Trump’s election commission continues to generate controversy. That group met in New Hampshire this week amid protest from activists and pushback over new, unfounded claims of voter fraud in the state during the 2016 election. On this episode of The Exchange, we take a look at the continuing debate over SB 3, dive into the data behind those unproven fraud claims, and invite listeners to weigh in with thoughts and questions about the integrity of New Hampshire’s election process.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wikipedia Future 89 mins – “Katherine Maher, Executive Director of the Wikimedia Foundation, joins Harvard Law School professor Yochai Benkler for a conversation about the future of Wikipedia and global crowdsourced knowledge.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Willie Grimes Saga 57 mins – “A new book by Concord native Benjamin Rachlin, Ghost of the Innocent Man, tells a story of wrongful conviction and exoneration. We learn about the saga of Willie Grimes, imprisoned for 24 years for a rape he did not commit, and his legal fight for freedom. Rachlin says it’s one of many similar cases in recent years, thanks to expanded use of DNA evidence.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Wide Web Creation 4 mins – “The early 1990s were an exciting time for computer scientists as they witnessed the growth of what amounted to a shiny new toy: the internet. It was a giant erector set; an ever-expanding collection of computers linked together and ready to talk. But by itself, the internet was nothing more than an electronic delivery service. It was good at getting packages from here to there, but it had no interest in their contents. That left the door open for creative minds to experiment with what to put inside those packages.One pretty obvious idea was text; for example, research papers. But sending text alone wasn’t enough. Pages of text have titles and paragraphs and all manner of formatting information. To reconstruct a page required instructions. And in 1989, while working at the European research agency CERN, Tim Berners-Lee devised the Hypertext Markup Language for just that purpose. It seemed like a good start, though other alternatives were being floated at the time. Still, Berners-Lee had high hopes for his creation. He went so far as to propose a name for computers that would share information using his newly defined packages: the World Wide Web….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 3145” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yeast, etc 42 mins – “Join top food writer Chris Nuttall-Smith for an obsessive, fascinating journey through the hidden stories of the things we eat. Like the importance of yeast in our diet….” At the link find the title, “New and Notable: Get Cozy Edition, Best podcasts for fall 2017,” right-click “Download New and Notable: Get Cozy Edition” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 310 – Oct 20, 2017: Actor Bill Macy, Addiction Story, Aging and Disease-Gawande, American Chestnut, Asthma Commission, Atheism, Bankruptcies, Bitcoin ATMs, Blackout Preparation, Boosting, Cancer Drugs Questions, Canola Makes Fish Oil, Chatbots, Christian Socialism, Clean Technology, Climate Action Plan in California, Common Carrier Law, Conservative Writer Shapiro, Coomassie Blue Dye, Cryptocurrency Trade, Cuban Revolution, Depression Control, Diagnosing Multiple Diseases, Education Crisis, Egoism, Employment Decline, Equifax Hack, Extreme Weather Hospitals, Farming and Cancer, Farming Poultry, Farming Tomatoes, Flood Insurance Program, Food Maps Tampering, Fraud Prevention, Gun Control, Health Globally, Heifer International, History Value, Hurricane Harvey Response, Hurricane Sex Trafficking, Immigration, Indigenous Canadian Anniversary, Individualism, Johnny Appleseed, Kurdish Repression, Life Extension, Medical Effectiveness, Medical Scribes, Mexicans in Court, Microsoft CEO, Middle East Crisis, Monetary Policy, National Security, Pre Kindergarten Importance, Pregnant in Prison, Racism in Medicine, Relationships, Rest and Relaxation, Sex Columnist Savage, Sex.com Lawsuit, Sleep Needs, Survival Farming, Syrian Reporter, Trump Psychology, Vegetative State, White House Counsel, Woolly Mammoth, Work Future, WWII Shanghai

Exercise your ears: the 124 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 431 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 17,430 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 86GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 400 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Actor Bill Macy 89 mins – “In one of their funniest episodes to date, Gilbert and Frank are joined by veteran actor Bill Macy (“Maude,” “The Jerk,” “My Favorite Year”) for a highly entertaining look back at his seven-decade career and his collaborations with everyone from Bea Arthur to Norman Lear to Steve Martin. Also, Bill praises Carl Reiner, understudies Walter Matthau, ticks off Tony Curtis and shares the screen with Art Carney (and Lily Tomlin). PLUS: “Oh! Calcutta!” Remembering Joe Bologna! Gilbert plays a Spaniard! William H. Macy changes his name! And Bill convicts Bialystock and Bloom!” At the link find the title, “#172 Bill Macy, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 7890695d-999d-4780-9527-759bf5320229.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Actor Rob Paulsen 105 mins – “Gilbert and Frank dial up legendary voice actor Rob Paulsen (“Animaniacs,” “The Tick,” “Pinky and the Brain”) for a compelling discussion of essential topics, including the generosity of Mel Blanc, the meticulousness of Steven Spielberg, the versatility of Mark Hamill and the professionalism of June Foray. Also, Roddy McDowall holds court, Orson Welles hits the sauce, Sir John Gielgud cuts to the check and Rob stars in a $500,000 “in-joke.” PLUS: Lorenzo Music! Robert Ridgely! The man behind The Brain! Gilbert tangles with the Ninja Turtles! And Paul Williams “meets” Michael Caine!” At the link find the title, “#173 Rob Paulsen, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files e5af8528-36e9-4744-bf16-56aa31937902.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Addiction Story 46 mins – “In a new documentary, filmmaker Jenny Mackenzie offers a deeply personal examination of the trials and extraordinary costs of opiate addiction. It’s about the lives of several young people struggling to get and stay clean. It’s about a family grieving the loss of their son to an overdose. And it’s about the doctors and therapists fighting to save lives. Mackenzie will join us to talk about her film and the harsh reality faced by a generation of young people struggling to survive America’s opioid crisis. On Tuesday, September 26, RadioWest and the Utah Film Center are hosting a screening of Jenny Mackenzie’s film Dying in Vein: The Opiate Generation. That’s at the Main Downtown Library in Salt Lake City at 7 p.m. It’s free and open to the public, and Doug Fabrizio will host a post-film Q&A with Ms. Mackenzie and several of the film’s subjects.At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging and Disease-Gawande 49 mins – “NHPR and The Music Hall present Writers on a New England Stage with Atul Gawande recorded live at The Music Hall in Portsmouth. He is a surgeon, public health researcher, and has written four New York Times bestsellers including most recently, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. Inside Being Mortal, Gawande opens up about how medical school taught him to fight disease and infirmity but not how to talk with patients about the slow decline of aging – or how to approach the end of life. The book journeys through the history of “medicalizing” death to new, innovative approaches that create more autonomy in the lives of our aged population without sacrificing safety.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Chestnut 37 mins – “The American Chestnut dominated the Appalachian landscape, ranging from Georgia all the way to Maine.  In the late 1800’s a pathogen imported on a tree to the Bronx Zoo spread rapidly into wild populations, destroying millions of trees, and radically changing the forest.  There are natural sources of resistance to the pathogen that are being introduced to the American Chestnut with traditional breeding.  Transgenic solutions have also been developed.  Dr. Jared Westbrook is leading breeding efforts to integrate the multiple types of resistance with the hopes of restoring this important tree in North American ecology.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Archeologists in Transportation 22 mins – “Almost every infrastructure system has its foundation in the earth, and the earth can hide interesting and important secrets from the past. This creates what is perhaps a surprising role for archeology in infrastructure construction. To anticipate, identify and preserve valued subsurface finds, many infrastructure agencies engage archeologists as full-time professionals or contractors. In this interview we learn about the archeology-infrastructure connection from James Robertson, who is senior archeologist with the Michigan Department of Transportation.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asthma Commission 20 mins – “Discussion with two authors of a new Lancet Commission about the need for a new approach to prevent, manage, and cure asthma.” At the link find the title, “Asthma Commission: The Lancet: September 11, 2017,” right-click “edia files 11sept_asthmacommission.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atheism 75 mins – “Dan Arel is an award-winning journalist and best-selling author of The Secular Activist; and Parenting Without God. He has also written for The Hill, The New Arab, CounterPunch, CommonDreams, AlterNet, Time Magazine, Salon, and many others. He hosts the Danthropology Podcast, a weekly show that covers politics, religion, and current events. Dan can be found around the country speaking on issues such as social justice, political activism, and secular issues. Topics Include: Atheism, Differences between the far left and far right, doxing, The October Revolution, different leftist tendencies, talking to regular working class people, leftist podcasters, hip hop, and more!” At the link click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, then select “Save File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bankruptcies 22 mins – “It might just be the secret weapon of the U.S. economy.” At the link find the title, “#648: The Benefits of Bankruptcy, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171004_pmoney_pmpod648rerun.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Berkeley Free Speech Week 25 mins – “Alt-right provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos recently released a list of speakers for his upcoming “Free Speech Week” at University of California Berkeley, a four-day event featuring Steve Bannon, Ann Coulter, and a host of other conservative voices. Yet, according to Berkeley officials, the Berkeley Patriot, the on-campus student publication that invited Yiannopoulos in the first place, has flubbed basic logistical planning and put “Free Speech Week” in jeopardy. And if it falls apart, says historian Angus Johnston, then it will look like Berkeley had planned to censor the event all along. He and Brooke speak about why news consumers should focus less on the issue of campus free speech and more on Yiannopoulos’s PR strategy.” At the link right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin ATMs 26 mins – “To celebrate The Blockchain Show’s 50th Episode, The Blokechain Boys,  Mark & Ian, meet up in South London and go hunting for Digital Gold in them thar Surrey Hills. ” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blackout Preparation P1 204 mins – “Steven Harris returns to TSP for his 9th visit. Today he joins us to discuss how to deal with a large scale black out like the North Eastern United States is currently dealing with. Steven Harris is a consultant and expert in the field of energy. He is the founder and CEO of Knowledge Publications, the largest energy only publishing company in the USA. Mr. Harris came to his current position to do full time work on the development and implementation of hydrogen, biomass and solar related energy systems after spending 10 years in the Aero-Thermal Dynamics department of the Scientific Labs of Chrysler Corporation. Steve is always full of great ideas, knowledge and projects we can use to improve our personal energy independence and today is no exception. Once again we ate up the entire hour with out covering Steve’s entire outline so he will be back for Part 2 in this series soon.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blackout Preparation P2 210 mins – “ …Today we continue on yesterday’s topic and focus on recharging batteries, keeping cell phones and computers running, keeping the TV set operating and more. Steve is always full of great ideas, knowledge and projects we can use to improve our personal energy independence and today is no exception. Once again we ate up the entire hour with out covering Steve’s entire outline so he will be back for Part 3 in this series soon.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Uses 34 mins – We present the past month’s price fluctuation in CryptoCurrencies and the blockchain blockade in China in the Queen’s English for y’all as the frightfully British Blokechain Boys are back to keep Ethan company.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Preservation 32 mins – “Our guest this week is Rebecca Romney. Rebecca is a rare book dealer at Honey & Wax Booksellers in Brooklyn. She got her start with Bauman Rare Books, managing their Las Vegas gallery. She is known for her appearances on the HISTORY Channel’s show Pawn Stars, where she evaluates books as the show’s only female expert.” At the link right-click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boosting 24 mins – “Eric’s always had an affinity for Polo Ralph Lauren. But he discovers a group of boosters in Brooklyn that took their love for Polo to another level.” At the link find the title, “On That Lo Life $hit,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain vs the Chip 65 mins – “The field of neuroscience has been collecting more and more data, and developing increasingly advanced technological tools in its race to understand how the brain works. But can those data and tools ever yield true understanding? This episode features neuroscientist and computer scientist Eric Jonas, discussing his provocative paper titled “Could a Neuroscientist Understand a Microprocessor?” in which he applied state-of-the-art neuroscience tools, like lesion analysis, to a computer chip. By applying neuroscience’s tools to a system that humans fully understand (because we built it from scratch), he was able to reveal how surprisingly uninformative those tools actually are. Julia and Eric also discuss the related question: what kind of tools would we need to really understand the brain?” At the link right-click “Download audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Louisville 28 mins – “Back in June, Louisville had a close call with missing a key opportunity to build municipal fiber to local anchor institutions at a substantially reduced cost. An anti-muni broadband group pushed hard to disrupt the project but city staff educated metro council-members and moved forward with a unanimous vote. Louisville Chief of Civic Innovation Grace Simrall and Civic Technology Manager Chris Seidt join us for episode 273 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast to discuss the project and the importance of educating local decision-makers well in advance of they decisions. We talk about the network extensions Louisville is building to connect key anchor institutions and internal city offices. The network will not only save on connectivity costs by reducing leased lines but also provide increased security and opportunities for efficiency. We also discuss the key points Grace and Chris made to the Metro Council in arguing for this investment.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from here.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Drugs Questions 24 mins – “The majority of cancer drugs approved in Europe between 2009 and 2013 entered the market without clear evidence that they improved survival or quality of life for patients, finds a study published by The BMJ today. Even where drugs did show survival gains over existing treatments, these were often marginal. To discuss that, we’re joined by Huseyin Naci, assistant professor of health policy at the London School of Economics.” At the link find the title, “There’s no clear evidence that most new cancer drugs extend or improve life, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 345498216-bmjgroup-theres-no-clear-evidence-that-most-new-cancer-drugs-extend-or-improve-life.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canola Makes Fish Oil 37 mins – “Andry Andriankaja is an agronomist that specializes in the field of plant biotechnology. Carl Andre is the research manager for the EPA-DHA Canola project at the BASF Plant Science Department who studied how plants convert simple sugars to oil as well as plant lipid metabolism.  They are working together on a big project in biotechnology that will innovate the way we eat and provide our body with nutrients: making the typical canola plant naturally produce EPA and DHA, two types of Omega 3 fatty acids. We all know what Omega 3 fatty acids are and what they can do for the body, but we’re often forced to either eat their food sources or buy fish oil supplements. What if we can consume omega 3 fatty acids in products we’re already eating? Andry and Carl are now working on that answer and have been working on it for the past 10 years.In this episode, Andry and Carl discuss their big project, why they chose the canola plant as their host, and what it took for them to get this far. They also discuss  their vision with regards to the importance of plant biotechnology in the near future.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chatbots 38 mins – “Goodbye Websites, Hello Chatbots – September 22nd, 2017 by Kym McNicholas On Innovation” At the link find the title, “Goodbye Websites, Hello Chatbots – Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 343603736-kym-mcnicholas-on-innovation-goodbye-websites-hello-chatbots-september-22nd-2017.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Christian Socialism 69 mins – “Matt Bernico is the assistant professor of Media Studies at Greenville College, where his teaching and research concerns cultural studies, media theory, and the history of science and technology. Dean Dettloff is a Catholic PhD candidate at the Institute for Christian Studies, where his research deals with the intersections of media theory, religion, and politics. Together, they host the Christian Socialist podcast “The Magnificast”. Brett sits down with Matt and Dean to discuss the philosophy of Christian Leftism. Topics include: Key figures on the Christian Left, Marxist Materialism, political violence and pacifism, Nietzsche, New Atheism, and much more.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, then select “Save File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clean Technology 23 mins – “The management and removal of industrial waste is a concern that faces companies and governments around the world. In this podcast you’ll hear from entrepreneurs in New York participating in the state’s Proof of Concept Centers program, who are creating technologies focused on the handling of industrial waste. This podcast is made possible by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), PowerBridgeNY, and NEXUS-NY.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Action Plan in California 51 mins – “Some environmentalists said the law extending California’s cap and trade system to 2030 is a sellout to the oil industry and it shortchanges disadvantaged communities that breathe the dirtiest air. How do California’s climate moves play into national politics and policy? Will climate and energy play a meaningful role in the upcoming midterm elections? Will companies make energy policy more of a priority? We look back at how Gov. Schwarzenegger set the tone and how his past leadership continues to influence California’s policies today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Climate Change in Alaska 6 mins – “Alaska has warmed more than twice as fast as rest of the country — winters in Anchorage are 6 degrees warmer than they were 70 years ago. And that’s impacting life there in many ways, from commerce to recreation to the city’s ability to take in climate migrants. Consider commerce. The Port of Anchorage is a lifeline for Alaska. “Ninety percent of all inbound cargo coming into Alaska comes via marine vessel; about half of that cargo comes through the Port of Anchorage,” says Jim Jager, the port’s spokesperson. The port has a big problem: Its steel pilings are crumbling, being eaten away by microbes.  “Our challenge is getting the docks replaced before they rust away,” says Jager, who estimates that the port has about 10 years to fix the problem. The port is spending $700 million on the project, with funding coming from a range of sources. The problem isn’t being caused by climate change, but warming temperatures are making things trickier.  Alaska’s warming weather means nearby glaciers are retreating fast. Those glaciers don’t just hold water frozen in place; they hold rocks, sand and dirt. “In a traditional Alaskan winter, all of that sedimentation is kind of frozen in place, and what comes down off the glaciers is minimized,” says the port’s director, Steve Ribuffo. But the warmer things get, the more silt flows down into the port. And that can mean more time and money devoted to dredging. Then, there’s the threat from rising sea levels.” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Common Carrier Law 29 mins – “The modern fight over network neutrality isn’t a few years old. It is well over 1,000 years old across a variety of infrastructures and is totally wrapped up in a legal concept known as common carriage that has governed many kinds of “carriers” over the years. Few, if any, are as conversant in this subject as Barbara Cherry – a lawyer and PH.D in communications. She has worked in industry for 15 years, at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for five years, and is currently a professor in the Media School at Indiana University. One of the key points of our conversation is regarding the problems with media shortening the Network Neutrality policy fights as turning the Internet into a “public utility.”  Barbara helps us to understand how common carriage is distinct from public utility regulation and why common carriage regulation is necessary even in markets that may have adequate competition and choices. We also talk about the history of common carriage and the importance of what might seem like outdated law from the days of the telegraph.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from here.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Conservative Writer Shapiro 52 mins – “When he speaks at universities across the country, conservative pundit Ben Shapiro draws fierce opposition for his strongly held opinions. He despises identity politics, opposes the ideas of safe spaces and microaggressions, and rejects the concept of white male privilege. He relishes attacking liberals, but has himself been targeted by the alt-right. Shapiro is speaking at the University of Utah this week, and he joins us Tuesday to discuss his thinking on society and politics. Ben Shapiro is the editor-in-chief of The Daily Wire, a conservative news and opinions web site. He’s also a nationally syndicated columnist, the host of the podcast The Ben Shapiro Show, the former editor-at-large of Breitbart News, and the author of several books, including Bullies: How the Left’s Culture of Fear and Intimidation Silences AmericansAt the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coomassie Brilliant Blue Dye 6 mins – “Kat Arney explains how an attractive blue dye, with a name inspired by the British Empire’s military exploits, became the basis of a fundamental lab technique” At the link find the title, “Coomassie brilliant blue: Chemistry in its element, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files Ciie_Coomassie_blue.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cryptocurrency Trade 51 mins – “Sarah imagines there’s no countries and cuts the head off the snake whilst Mark boldly goes where no-one (apart from many thousands of Trekkers) has gone before and Ian takes on Brum and ‘Bama and we round up the Blockchain events heading to your town (if you live in Dublin, Barcelona, London or Orlando) in the next two weeks.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Revolution 72 mins – “Brett sits down with repeat guests Phil (from our first ever episode) and Brendan (From our episode entitled “Ideology: Capitalism and Liberal Culture) to discuss Phil’s recent trip to Cuba, the gains of the Cuban revolution, US imperialism, and the future of socialism in Cuba (and the world!).” At the link click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, then select “Save File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

D.B. Cooper 42 mins – “For more than four decades, one of America’s most astonishing whodunits has gone unsolved. “D.B. Cooper” was on a flight from Portland to Seattle when he handed over a bomb threat. The airline gave him $200,000 and the hijacker parachuted from the plane, never to be seen again. Cooper evaded one of the most extensive manhunts of the 20th century and has become the stuff of legend. Investigative journalist Geoffrey Gray joins Doug to separate myth from fact in the case of D.B. Cooper. (Rebroadcast) Geoffrey Gray is an investigative journalist with New York Magazine and the author of Skyjack: The Hunt for D.B. Cooper At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

David Axelrod Interview 88 mins – “David Axelrod is a renowned Democratic political strategist, most notably for Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012. These days, he runs the nonpartisan Institute of Politics at the University of Chicago and hosts a hit podcast, The Axe Files, where he interviews major political figures. In this special crossover episode, Katie and Brian turn the tables on “Axe” and get his own story, including his early days in gritty Chicago journalism, his father’s death from suicide, and his family’s efforts on behalf of his daughter, Lauren, who has epilepsy. Plus, they discuss his former client, Hillary Clinton, and the future of the Democratic party.” At the link find the title, “39. David Axelrod: Axe Files Crossover, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 5ee815e8-b1b4-4084-8566-5c412b2862bf.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democratic Party Failures 77 mins – “Chelsey Gentry-Tipton is the Nebraska Democratic Party Black Caucus Chair and Anthony Walraven is an activist from Peoria, Illinois who recently ran for City Council in his city. They sit down with Brett to discuss the modern history of the Democratic Party, Bill Clinton’s Third Way strategy, the Hillary vs. Bernie primary, the role of race and class in the party, the limitations of the Democratic Party, lessons learned from the humiliating loss to Trump in the 2016 presidential election, the future of the party, and much more.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, then select “Save File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Depression Control 35 mins “In the USA, when googling “depression” patients will be presented with a link to the PHQ-9 screening test. Google has developed this in collaboration with the National Alliance on Mental Illness – and Ken Duckworth, the alliance’s medical director, debates the merits of this approach with Simon Gilbody, from the Department of Health Sciences at the University of York. Also joining this podcast is David Gilbert, mental health services user and director of InHealth Associates, who argues that it’s only through patient involvement that real improvements to mental health can be obtained.” t the link find the title, “Googling depression, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 341875774-bmjgroup-googling-depression.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diagnosing Multiple Diseases 6 mins – “Recent advances in science and technology are making it possible to simultaneously test for multiple infections at the same time. We talk about the potential benefits to patients and challenges with bringing this technology to a doctor’s office near you.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu, or “Learn More” for more details.

Disease Global Burden 29 mins – “In this special podcast we talk to GBD guru Chris Murray, representatives from exemplar countries Ethiopia, Nepal, and Peru, and The Lancet’s editor Richard Horton.” At the link find the title, “Global Burden of Disease 2016: The Lancet: September 16, 2017,” right-click “Media files 14sept_gbd.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Earthquake Research 52 mins – “The devastation wrought in Mexico City by a recent massive earthquake may have rattled more than a few nerves along the Wasatch Front. Salt Lake City is, of course, overdue for a significant seismic event. So are other places in the United States, such as Los Angeles, the Pacific Northwest, even New York City. In a new book, science writer Kathryn Miles tours the country in search of the latest research on America’s next big earthquake and what’s being done to address the threat. She joins us Wednesday to talk about it. Kathryn Miles is the author of several books, including her newest, Quakeland: On the Road to America’s Next Devastating Earthquake.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economist Larry Summers 50 mins – “He’s been U.S. Treasury Secretary, a chief economist for the Obama White House and the World Bank, and president of Harvard. He’s one of the most brilliant economists of his generation (and perhaps the most irascible). And he thinks the Trump Administration is wrong on just about everything.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Crisis 89 mins – “On October 4, Brookings co-hosted a panel discussion on Education and Learning for a changing world. The event opened with a presentation on LEARNING to Realize Education’s Promise, the topic of the World Bank’s World Development Report 2018. A panel featuring experts on system-wide reforms to improve education quality, funding for global education, and delivering basic education in poor countries followed.” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.  

Egoism 75 mins – “Dr. Bones is an Egoist, Communist, Insurrectionary Anarchist, Conjurer, and Gonzo Journalist. He joins Brett on the podcast to discuss his philosophy of Egoist-Communism inspired by the works of Max Stirner. Topics Include: Egoism, The Union of Egoists, Insurrectionary Anarchism, The G20 riots in Hamburg, critiques of Marxism and Anarcho-Communism, an open invitation for Brett to come to Florida to eat Alligator and drink copious amounts of alcohol in a graveyard, and MUCH much more.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, then select “Save File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Employment Decline 4 mins – “For the first time in seven years, the economy has lost jobs – 33,000 of them in September, according to numbers out today from the Labor Department. Economists say the weather may be to blame, specifically hurricanes Harvey and Irma. Bad weather meant hundreds of restaurants and bars closed down and food service workers couldn’t work. Meanwhile, the unemployment rate continued to shrink. It’s now at 4.2 percent. Economists say a rate that low – basically anything below 5 percent – represents full employment. But that average may hide some things, namely the disproportionate level of unemployment experienced by African-Americans.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equifax Hack 20 mins – “For most of our lives, Equifax has been slurping up our financial data. Now the company’s been hacked and our data is loose. Today, we trace this mess back to two brothers and one fateful decision.” At the link find the title, “#798: Bad Credit Bureau, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171006_pmoney_pmpod798.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Extinction Reversal 56 mins – “In labs around the world, scientists — using the latest biotechnology — are trying to bring extinct animals back to life. Britt Wray delves into the science, the ethics, and the implications of de-extinction for all animals, including us humans.” At the link find the title, “Undoing Forever: The implications of de-extinction (Encore June 19, 2014), Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170929_65600.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Extreme Weather Hospitals 37 mins – “As the Atlantic Hurricane season continues unabated White Coat, Black Art tells the story of how hospitals cope when natural disasters strike.” At the link find the title, “Floods Fires Hurricanes and Hospitals, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files whitecoat 20170922_64364.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Small for Chefs 64 mins – “Utilizing his experience as a chef Evan Chender has set out to produce niche crops for chefs such as edible flowers and more exotic cultivars and types of vegetables. It’s this niche approach which has given him an edge in his market place. While a lot of other farmers just grow salad mix, Evan stands out because he produces crops that others don’t. . Learn how to start a microgreens business in Chris Thoreau’s Build Your Microgreen Business Workshop. Keep learning with these two great audiobooks: The Market Gardener by JM Fortier The Urban Farmer by Curtis Stone  Increase farm efficiency with the Paperpot Transplanter.” At the link find the title, “FSFS115: Knowing and Growing What Chef’s Want and What’s Profitable with chef and farmer, The Culinary Gardener Evan Chender,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Small Productivity 79 mins – “Farmer and consultant Michael Kilpatrick joins me to talk about improving farm productivity and profitability through better processes….Learn how to start a microgreens business in Chris Thoreau’s Build Your Microgreen Business Workshop. Keep learning with these two great audiobooks: The Market Gardener by JM Fortier The Urban Farmer by Curtis Stone  Increase farm efficiency with the Paperpot Transplanter.” At the link find the title, “FSFS113: Increasing Farm Productivity and Efficiency with Michael Kilpatrick, right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Small vs Large 56 mins – “In this episode Ray Tyler of Rose Creek Farms will talk about how his farm has dealt changes on the farm as it evolved.  He’ll also talk about how they tackle farm problems and deal with season extension.  It’s a practical look at what happens behind the scenes – because things always don’t go as planned and that tool that you bought, doesn’t always work as well as expected. …KLearn how to start a microgreens business in Chris Thoreau’s Build Your Microgreen Business Workshop. Keep learning with these two great audiobooks: The Market Gardener by JM Fortier The Urban Farmer by Curtis Stone  Increase farm efficiency with the Paperpot Transplanter.” At the link find the title, “FSFS114: Start with What You Can and Grow – Season Extension, Farm Tools, and Improving Processes with Ray Tyler,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming and Cancer 32 mins – “Lou Roman talks about his experience being diagnosed with cancer and starting a farm after he found out.” At the link find the title, “GFL75: Overcome: Battling Cancer While Starting a Farm with Lou Roman, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files GFL_75_2017_LouRoman.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Poultry 60 mins – “Today Darby Simpson and I will take a deeper look at poultry feed, current prices, current customer perceptions, and how that might change what Darby is doing on his farm.” At the link find the title, “GFL73: Which Poultry Feed Is Best – Inside the Numbers and the Ideology – Grass Fed Life, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files GFL_73_2017_Darby.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Tomatoes 88 mins – “Dave Chapman got his start at Long Wind Farm in 1984 with a team of oxen, a diverse array of vegetables, and a roadside stand in East Thetford, Vermont. Today, he only grows tomatoes – and lots of them! With 2.5 acres of greenhouses, Dave and his crew produce certified organic, soil-grown tomatoes all year ‘round. Dave digs in to the nuts and bolts of producing tomatoes in protected culture. He shares the details of his high-tech greenhouse system, Long Wind Farm’s fertility management strategies, and how Dave learned to get out of the way of his farm’s success while managing business and personal goals that were often in conflict with each other. Dave also shares his views on the current state of the National Organic Program, organic hydroponics, and the organic livestock rules, and talks about the action being taken to try to change the situation.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flood Insurance Program 21 mins Bill Pennington’s house floods a lot: Three times in the last three years. And every time his house floods, the government pays to help him repair the damage. Is something wrong here?” At the link find the title, “#797: Flood Money, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170929_pmoney_pmpod797.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flood Maps Tampering 30 mins – “The Federal Emergency Management Agency maps flood plains across the country. The maps are intended to show which areas are likely to flood so that local governments can better plan for disasters. They also determine who must buy flood insurance, and at what rates. But there are problems: Many of them are outdated and don’t take into account the anticipated effects of climate change. And if you have enough money and enough political power, you can get your condo or your city moved off the map, even if you are in the eye of a storm. Host Jimmy Williams talks to two experts on why these maps don’t tell the true story of where floods are happening now and in the future.” At the link find the title, “211: The problem with FEMA’s flood maps, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files c982a5d1-dd70-49f8-9283-d34183dd5476.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fraud Prevention 13 mins – “Each year, one in seven large corporations commits fraud. Why? To find out, Alexander Wagner takes us inside the economics, ethics and psychology of doing the right thing. Join him for an introspective journey down the slippery slopes of deception as he helps us understand why people behave the way they do.” At the link find the title, “What really motivates people to be honest in business Alexander Wagner, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files AlexanderWagner 2016X.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gay Hero vs President Ford 64 mins – “One morning, Oliver Sipple went out for a walk. A couple hours later, to his own surprise, he saved the life of the President of the United States. But in the days that followed, Sipple’s split-second act of heroism turned into a rationale for making his personal life into political opportunity. What happens next makes us wonder what a moment, or a movement, or a whole society can demand of one person. And how much is too much?  Through newly unearthed archival tape, we hear Sipple himself grapple with some of the most vexing topics of his day and ours – privacy, identity, the freedom of the press – not to mention the bonds of family and friendship.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grape Flavor 27 mins – “So we have a treat for you – The Nod (another show from Gimlet Media) did a great episode on the science of purple drink. We wanted to share it with you so the next time you’re eating Jolly Ranchers or Skittles you’ll know what you’re tasting. Enjoy!” At the link find the title, “Science Vs Presents: I Want That Purple Stuff,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gritty People 7 mins – “How can disadvantaged students succeed in school? For sociologist Anindya Kundu, grit and stick-to-itiveness aren’t enough; students also need to develop their agency, or their capacity to overcome obstacles and navigate the system. He shares hopeful stories of students who have defied expectations in the face of personal, social and institutional challenges.” At the link find the title, “The boost students need to overcome obstacles Anindya Kundu, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files AnindyaKundu_2017S.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Control 22 mins – “In the wake of the Las Vegas shooting, Rosanne Cash is calling out country musicians who get too cozy with the NRA.” At the link find the title, “Oct 5 | Las Vegas shooting: what’s the impact on country music, gun culture and NRA? 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171005_69203.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Globally 29 mins – “In this special podcast we talk to GBD guru Chris Murray, representatives from exemplar countries Ethiopia, Nepal, and Peru, and The Lancet’s editor Richard Horton.” At the link find the title, “Global Burden of Disease 2016: The Lancet: September 16, 2017,” right-click “Media files 14sept_gbd.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heifer International 44 mins – “David Norman is the Senior Vice President of Investments Programs at Heifer International, a company that promotes a “pay it forward” approach to sustainable agriculture. Their mission is to end world hunger and poverty while also taking care of the planet by working with communities. This approach seems to be a great answer to the issue of food security and sustainability, as Heifer is driven by the “teach a man to fish” philosophy which ensures the families they help are all able to contribute to eradicating world hunger.In this episode, David explains what Heifer International is all about, it’s humble beginnings, and its mission. He also shares the different challenges they face with every program as well as some of the successes that made it all worthwhile.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

History Value 56 mins – “Has the future ever looked like the past? Sailing in the 21st century, perhaps we are in uncharted waters. A discussion from the Stratford Festival, featuring historian Margaret MacMillan, former politician Bob Rae and journalist Karin Wells.” At the link find the title, “Rear View Mirror, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170821_84676.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Harvey Response 37 mins – “In this episode, we look at the weather remnants of Hurricane Irma and the final tally of flooding and wind damage across the southeastern United States. We then pivot and return to Texas to look at the recovery and rebuilding efforts from Hurricane Harvey. On the show this week are Kyle Nelson, our disaster weather expert; B.J. Schneider, author, paramedic, and Katrina survivor; and Kevin Reiter from WildSafety.com. Kevin and B.J. both had experiences to relate regarding the recovery efforts in Texas and Louisiana. Kevin worked to rebuild critical networking infrastructure in Rockport, Texas as he rewired police, fire department, and other important structures to return internet capabilities to the cities first responders and 911 center. B.J. has been cycling plant safety professionals into east Texas to give local safety experts an opportunity to tend to their personal affairs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane on Vieques PR 5 mins – “A New Hampshire mother is still trying to get ahold of her daughter after Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico last week. Valerie Mowbray, from the town of Holderness, has been unable to make contact with her daughter Moria since the category 5 hurricane hit the Island of Vieques. Outside of a few Satellite phones, there is no way for those stranded to communicate with anyone off the island. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Mowbray by phone on Monday.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Recovery in Houston 99 mins – “Mike Centex on Hurricane Harvey and CAC Teams – Mike is a PermaEthos founder and MSB member, a past presenter at TSP workshops and more recently a new Citizens Assisting Citizens team member when he found himself at ground zero of Hurricane Harvey in Houston, TX. Upon hearing the “Get Out, Get Out, Get Out” warnings from Jack Spirko, Mike, knowing he was based in a high elevation, flood free area, set up the first CAC Team safe haven/FOB in Houston the Day Harvey made landfall. He and his entire family spent the next 10 days coordinating CAC Team efforts to direct rescuers, donations and supplies, safely, to the accessible locations in need around Houston and the Beaumont/Port Arthur area. Having lived in the area a lifetime, his knowledge of the area and roadways was extremely beneficial to CAC Team responders coming in from out of state. With the assistance of Steven Harris and the entire CAC team nationwide, Mike and his family housed CAC responders, maintained constant contact on current needs and impacted areas, personally accompanied delivery of over 5,000 pounds of donated supplies to Houston area evacuation shelters. Mike monitored flooding and road conditions around the Beaumont impacted area and he helped the CAC Team to guide additional tons of supplies to CAC responders on the ground in and around the flooded areas of Beaumont. At the same time, Mike’s Wife and children assembled 100’s of emergency hygiene and disaster cleanup kits on their dining room table, that were immediately distributed to flood victims in the Humble/Kingwood area of Houston. Mike Video Chronicled the events from the day before landfall through the aftermath on his YouTube channel “Mike Centex Life”. Mike journaled extensively during the disaster and has learned many valuable lessons on how best to respond, communicate, and manage internal and external operations in the middle of an ongoing disaster area. He also shows how clear communications with those coming into a disaster area can make the difference between delivering the supplies needed by victims and not showing up from a multi-state commute with prom dresses and winter coats for victims of a summer hurricane.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Sex Trafficking 6 mins – “The Caribbean and the American South are struggling to recover in the aftermath of devastating hurricanes. Food has to be delivered, houses rebuilt, roads cleared and electricity restored. But for law enforcement, there’s another concern after a place gets pummeled by a natural disaster: It becomes ripe grounds for human trafficking.” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Hydroponics 45 mins – “Joe Swartz is the Vice President of Commercial Sales and Technical Support at American Hydroponic, a.k.a AmHydro. AmHydro is a small company in the United States that designs and builds innovative hydroponic systems, a soil-free way to grow plants, and have been doing so for the last 30 years. Joe Swartz himself came from a family of farmers, and started researching the science of hydroponics when he saw the traditional methods of farming were no longer paying the bills during the real estate boom of the late 80s. After purchasing the family farm from his father, Joe put his formal education and passion in agriculture  to good use and invested time and money into researching and experimenting with different hydroponics system operations. Some said he was a genius, some called him otherwise. Regardless, with hydroponics AmHydro has slowly and steadily made a huge and growing impact towards preserving the environment. In this episode, Joe tells us all about hydroponics, its advantages and disadvantages, why hydroponics farming is still farming, and how to turn it into a profitable business.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Enforcement 68 mins – “In a highly polarized atmosphere on immigration where federal lawmakers are largely paralyzed on policy change, states and localities in recent years have increasingly taken on a larger role in challenging Washington’s immigration authority. With the Trump administration focused on cracking down on “sanctuary” cities and enticing law enforcement agencies to take a greater role in immigration enforcement, politicians and policymakers in communities across the United States are lining up on opposing sides of the issue. Even as some states and cities are declaring themselves sanctuaries, others are rushing to bar jurisdictions from noncooperation with federal immigration authorities. In this panel, the President of the Major Cities Chiefs Association and the President of the National Sheriffs’ Association discuss immigration enforcement on a panel with immigration attorneys. Themes include the growing patchwork of stances on immigration from states, counties, cities, and even universities and local school boards; what is driving the pattern of increasingly active and litigious states in the immigration space; what the legal landscape is for state/local action; and how the administration may seek to further engage state and local jurisdictions in immigration enforcement. ” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Mapping 78 mins – “During the first six months of the Trump administration, arrests of noncitizens identified for removal rose nearly 40 percent over the same period a year earlier. At the border, apprehensions fell by nearly 50 percent from the first half of 2016, as fewer people sought to enter without authorization. And the White House announced plans to seek funding for thousands of Border Patrol agents and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) personnel, and build new immigrant detention facilities. In this panel, a high-ranking ICE official, the Deputy Legal Director of the American Civil Liberties Union, and a senior Department of Homeland Security official discuss the many immigration law enforcement and detention policy changes that have been occurring under the Trump administration.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Policy Under Trump 82 mins – “Within days of taking office, President Trump ordered sweeping changes to immigration enforcement both at the border and within the United States, kicking off dramatic changes in how unauthorized immigrants, would-be refugees, and international travelers are handled. In this discussion, a high-ranking former Bush administration Department of Homeland Security official, former Mexican Ambassador to the United States, and Brookings Institution scholar examine the administration’s initiatives, ranging from the contested travel ban and reductions in refugee resettlement to changes in enforcement policy and practice, repointing the legal immigration system into one focused on “merit-based” admissions, building a border wall, and more. This fast-paced panel, moderated by MPI’s Doris Meissner, discusses the policies and ideas, challenges in their implementation, and responses from states, Congress, the judicial branch, and other actors.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Relief Problems 85 mins – “More than 1 million people in the United States receive temporary forms of humanitarian relief. Additionally, each year, tens of thousands are granted asylum or admitted as refugees. The Trump administration has sought to reduce these protections, by temporarily halting refugee admissions and reducing the number of refugee admissions to less than half of the prior level. Other forms of humanitarian relief, including Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and Temporary Protected Status (TPS), are under threat from the administration, the courts, and Congress. In this panel, the Presidents of Kids in Need of Defense (KIND) and HIAS, joined by the head of Hispanic and Migration Affairs at the Mexican Embassy, discuss the current state of humanitarian relief and the implications of the administration’s policy decisions for the most vulnerable immigrants, including refugees, TPS recipients, and children.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigenous Canadian Anniversary 56 mins – “Three Indigenous PhD students (Réal Carrière , Keri Cheechoo and Cherry Smiley) share their insights at a public forum hosted at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The theme: “The Next 150, on Indigenous Lands.” At the link find the title, “Decolonization: The Next 150 on Indigenous Lands, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170919_54234.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Individualism 63 mins – “David Bosworth is a professor in, and the former director of, the University of Washington’s Creative Writing Program. His fiction, poetry, and literary and cultural essays have been published in numerous journals. His collection of short fiction, The Death of Descartes, was selected by Robert Penn Warren for the Drue Heinz Literature Prize and won a special citation from PEN and the Ernest Hemingway Foundation. His novel, From My Father, Singing was a recipient of the Editors’ Book Award. Bosworth’s work has been reviewed or discussed in Newsweek, New York Times Book Review, U.S. News and World Report, The Washington Post, The Nation, and elsewhere. He has given readings, lectures, held workshops, and conducted colloquia at various locales, including Harvard University, Pomona College, Boston College, University of Louisville, and the New America Foundation. Brett and David sit down to discuss American Individualism, its philosophical roots, and its cultural manifestations. Topics include: The Enlightenment, American culture, The philosophical and historical roots of Individualism, the connections between individualism and capitalism, Ronald Reagan, Thomas Paine, and how 40 years of capitalist decadence has given rise to Donald “The U.S. Id Monster” Trump.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, then select “Save File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Johnny Appleseed 43 mins – “The image of Johnny Appleseed walking around in rags, barefooted with a bindle, planting apple trees and moving on is actually pretty accurate.” At the link find the title, “SYMHC Classics: The Life of Johnny Appleseed, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-09-30-symhc-classic-johnny-appleseed.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kurdish Repression 75 mins – “Brett sits down with Dr. Thoreau Redcrow, an expert on these issues, to discuss The Rojavan Revolution, the history of Kurdish repression in Turkey, and how the Kurds in Northern Syria (i.e. Western Kurdistan) are building socialism against all odds. Dr. Redcrow is an American with a Ph.D. in Conflict Analysis with a concentration in Global Conflict. He did his dissertation while embedded with the PKK in Kurdistan in 2014, coinciding with the emergence of ISIS.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, then select “Save File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Life Extension 29 mins – “Brain Science on Living as Long as Possible – John Medina is a developmental molecular biologist and research consultant. He is an affiliate Professor of Bioengineering at the University of Washington School of Medicine, was the founding director of two brain research institutes: the Brain Center for Applied Learning Research, at Seattle Pacific University, and the Talaris Research Institute, a nonprofit organization originally focused on how infants encode and process information.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linguistic Diversity 41 mins – “We explore votes for English, Indonesian, and … Esperanto! The search for a common language goes back millennia, but so much still gets lost in translation. Will technology finally solve that?” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up men

Linux Disc Cloning 36 mins – “We discuss backup and disaster recovery options that involve cloning your computer’s entire hard drive. We discuss five Linux-based options for cloning hard drives. We make our recommendations of which to use, but we don’t quite agree.” At the link right-click MP3” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mars Mission 56 mins – “The day might well be approaching when humans set foot on Mars. We’ll be driven by a desire to find life — or what remains of it — and to colonize the planet.” At the link find the title, “Generation Mars- Part One, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170825_69011.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mars Mission 80 mins – “Today’s guest on STEM-Talk is Dr. Chris McKay, a leading astrobiologist and planetary scientist with the Space Science Division of the NASA Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley. Chris’s interview covers a diverse range of topics ranging from the origins of life to the possibility of manned missions to Mars. For the past 30 years, Chris has been advancing our understanding of planetary science. He graduated from Florida Atlantic University in 1975 with a degree in physics and earned a doctorate in astrogeophysics at the University of Colorado in 1982. He was a co-investigator on the Huygens probe to Saturn’s moon Titan in 2005, the Mars Phoenix lander mission in 2008, and the current Mars Science Laboratory mission. His research at NASA has focused on the evolution of the solar system and the origin of life. He also has been heavily involved in NASA’s Mars missions including the current Mars rover — Curiosity. In addition, Chris has thought deeply about the human exploration of Mars. He has spent considerable time studying polar and desert environments to better understand how humans might survive in Mars-like environments. His research has taken him to the Antarctic Dry Valleys, the Atacama Desert, the Arctic, and the Namib Desert. In 2015, the Desert Research Institute named Chris the Nevada Medalist, which is the highest scientific honor in the state.” At the link right-click “Episode 46: NASA’s Chris McKay talks about the search for life in our solar system and travel to Mars, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 046_STEM-Talk_McKay.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martha Stewart Interview 63 mins – “Martha Stewart has dominated all things domestic for nearly 35 years. But what about the woman behind the empire? Katie and Brian pay a visit to Martha’s pristine office for a candid conversation over some apple-cranberry crisp. Martha recalls what it was like growing up in New Jersey as one of six kids, getting her first book deal, serving time in prison and what it was like to work on a TV show with Donald Trump. Plus, she discusses her new cookbook and her collaboration with Snoop Dogg. Nothing is off-limits. It’s a good thing.” At the link find the title, “40. Martha Stewart Speaks Her Mind, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files fd93efc9-d245-472d-8991-3838cef78021.mp” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Care Effectiveness 56 mins – “On Wednesday, October 4, Brookings hosted a group of panelists to discuss why the government’s response to problems in the U.S. health care system has been inadequate, and what can be done to ground health care in firm, reliable science.” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.  

Medical Scribes 27 mins – “As part of CBC’s Workshift series: medical scribes making a doctor’s job easier, a family MD who records office visits so patients can listen back from home and Dr. Brian Goldman weighs in on the fax machine.” At the link find the title, “From ER to office How the practice of medicine is changing, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files whitecoat_20170929_60927.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexicans in Court 43 mins – “Civil rights case Hernandez v. Texas was the first case to be argued before the Supreme Court by Mexican American attorneys.” At the link find the title, “Hernandez v. TexasHernandez v. Texas, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-09-27-symhc-hernandez-v-texas.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microsoft CEO 26 mins – “We fundamentally believe that Dreamers are part of our society and participate in our economy in a very productive way.” At the link find the title, “Oct 2 | Why Microsoft is challenging Donald Trump in court: CEO Satya Nadella, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171002_35042.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Middle East Crisis 97 mins – “On October 5, the Foreign Policy program at Brookings hosted an event examining the crises across the Middle East and North Africa. Panelists included Brookings experts John Allen, Daniel Byman, Mara Karlin, and Federica Saini Fasanotti. Michael O’Hanlon, Brookings senior fellow, moderated the discussion.” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.  

Monetary Policy 96 mins – “On October 4 at the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, former Federal Reserve Governor Daniel Tarullo reflected on his years as a monetary policymaker, particularly his questions about the usefulness of some often-used concepts and tools of monetary policy that rely on variables that are unobservable, such as the gap between actual and potential output and inflation expectations.” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

National Security 76 mins – “When it comes to Russia, Iran and North Korea, the world’s hotspots do not lend themselves to easy solutions. Veterans of the Obama administration join Chuck Todd live on stage at the 92Y to discuss the prospects for the Trump White House. Featuring insights from Adm. James Stavridis (Ret.), Former Amb. Mike McFaul, Former Amb. Wendy Sherman & Jeremy Bash, this audio recording has been lightly edited for clarity and pacing.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ozone Project 29 mins – “This week, we feature a bevy of scientists in our studio: Dr. David Dubois, professor of Plant and Environmental Science at NMSU and New Mexico’s State Climatologist, Dr. Michael DeAntonio, professor of Physics at NMSU, and Dr. Gary Morris, professor of Physics at St. Edward’s University. Their latest collaborative project is centered around testing air quality and ozone levels through the use of weather balloons.” At the link right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paul Ehrlich 30 mins – “Though they lived decades apart, Adolphe Dessauer and Abdelwahhab Azzawi share similar stories. They were both esteemed physicians who faced violence and persecution in their home countries. They both sought refuge abroad and found safety, only to find themselves facing a new struggle—getting permission to practice medicine in their new homes. Dessauer, a Jewish doctor, fled Germany for the United States in 1938. Azzawi, a 36-year-old ophthalmologist from Syria, found asylum in Germany in 2015. Both men’s lives were spared through the generosity of their new countries, but they had to struggle to give back in the most meaningful way they could—by sharing their medical expertise. In 2016 every American Nobel laureate in science was an immigrant. And it wasn’t just that year; U.S. winners often are born abroad. Yet as global an enterprise as science has become, navigating bureaucracy and straddling boundaries seems to be as difficult in the 21st century as during World War II. This podcast was inspired by a painting once owned by Adolphe Dessauer.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Peace Keeping 56 mins – “We have the best communications in history, except for the kind that matters — nations and states understanding each other. Jennifer Welsh, Paul Heinbecker, Peter Boehm, Arne Kislenko and Daniel Eayrs in conversation from the Stratford Festival.” At the link find the title, “The Challenge of Peace, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170814_66151.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Permaculture Business Success 106 mins – “Today’s show is another remarkable story of another entrepreneur, a permaculture entrepreneur. It’s the story of someone who went from being an anti-money activist to running a $1M permaculture design and build business. A business that catches millions of gallons of water, builds soil on hundreds of acres, plants hundreds of useful trees every year, restores native habit, redesigns our cites our schools and new developments. If you don’t think that permaculture based business can be profitable or be big, here’s an example of one to change your mind…” At the link find the title, “REPLAY: Building A Million Dollar Permaculture Business – Ecologically, Socially, and Financially Sustainable with Erik Ohlsen [CD5], Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files CD5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Philosophy History 56 mins – “Naheed Mustafa tells the story of philosopher-physician Ibn Tufayl who wrote the first Arabic novel “Hayy ibn Yaqzan”. It may be the most important story you’ve never heard.” At the link find the title, “The Self-Taught Philosopher (Encore May 16, 2017), Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170921_95477.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phosphorus Chlorides 8 mins – “Brian Clegg on a hugely useful group of compounds that have a distinct dual personality – from household products to chemical weapons” At the link find the title, “Phosphorus chlorides: Chemistry in its element, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files CiiE_Phosphorus_chlorides.mp3,” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Pre Kindergarten Importance 49 mins – “There is no debate that a good education is a critical component of raising smart, well rounded, successful children. But cutting-edge research has proven that early childhood education is crucial for all children as young as 3 years old to gain the academic and emotional skills they need to succeed later in life. In essence, pre-K may actually be the most important year. Children who attend quality pre-K programs have a host of positive outcomes including better language, literacy, problem-solving and math skills down the line, and they have a leg up on what appears to be the most essential skill to develop at age four: strong self-control. In this episode, Harvard education researcher Suzanne Bouffard explains the sometimes surprising ingredients that make for a great pre-k program. What should you look for in a classroom? How should a teacher interact with young children? What can you do at home to help support a young child’s learning? All this and more in this episode of Smart People Podcast.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pregnant in Prison 36 mins – “How should we be treating imprisoned pregnant women? Perhaps we could start by not shackling them to the hospital bed during labor.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Producer Brian Koppelman 50 mins – “Brian Koppelman makes media. A lot of media. Films, tv shows, podcasts, records. As for movies he co-wrote Oceans 13, and Rounders. He produced The Illustionist and The Lucky Ones, and he’s directed many others. His podcast on Slate, which covers pop culture and politics is called The Moment. He’s the co-creator and show runner for the TV show Billions, which is about to start it’s second season on Showtime. If that’s not enough Brian Koppelman for you, he’s also a prolific and verocious tweeter. On this podcast, Debbie talks to Brian Koppelman about why he became a writer after years as a record promoter and producer. “I realized I would become toxic, and that something would die in me. And that if I allowed that to happen, that toxicity would spread to those that I loved.” At the link find the title, “Design Matters from the Archive: Brian Koppelma” right-click “Media files Archive-Brian-Koppelman.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Profanity 56 mins – “Profanity was once considered rude and crude — a linguistic last resort. Not so these days. Younger generations use swearing as everyday slang, and academics study it as an ever-evolving form of creative and cultural expression.” At the link find the title, “Expletive Repeated: Why swearing matters (Encore March 16, 2017), Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files dieas 20170922_76575.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Puerto Rico Post Hurricane Maria 15 mins – “Following Hurricane Maria’s landfall on Wednesday morning, we have only scarce images and reports from which to comprehend the scale of devastation in Puerto Rico right now. Perhaps due to disaster fatigue, perhaps due to the territory’s second-class status, the media coverage has been perfunctory. While the coverage to date has focused on the flooding and widespread power outages on the ravaged island, Rutgers professor Yarimar Bonilla says there’s an important context to the problems with the electric grid. She and Bob discuss how the damage from Maria is related to the debt crisis, and how it may provide an excuse to justify another wave of privatization on the island.” At the link right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in Medicine 18 mins – “Rebecca Cooney is joined by Mary Bassett, Tené T Lewis, Nwando Olayiwola, Esther Choo, Jennifer Okwerekwu, and Barron Lerner.” At the link find the title, “Listen in—the conversations we need to have about racism, health, and medicine: September 1, 2017,” right-click “Media files 01sept2017.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Relationships 60 mins – “Stories about mysteries that exist in relationships we thought couldn’t possibly surprise us, the strangeness of putting our wants on the line with someone who may not share them at all, and how much we’re willing to risk for someone we may never see again.” At the link you can listen and purchase the audio file; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Resistance in the 60s 74 mins – “Doug Paterson is a lifelong revolutionary who has been active as an organizer and agitator since the 1960s. He is an absolute fountain of wisdom and experience. Brett sits down with Doug to discuss theater-as-resistance, campus activism in the 60s, fighting cops in the streets, the anti-war movement during the Vietnam War, draft dodging, parallels between the 60’s and today, how to reach out to (and organize in) rural areas, and the continued relevance of Karl Marx in today’s world.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, then select “Save File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rest and Relaxation 50 mins – “Friday, we’re talking about the value of rest. Of taking a break. From everything. For most of us, overwork is the new normal and rest is an afterthought. But the scholar Alex Soojung-Kim Pang says that by dismissing the importance of rest in our lives we stifle our ability to think creatively and truly recharge. Pang will join us to talk about why long walks, afternoon naps, vigorous exercise, and “deep play” stimulate creative work and sustain creative lives. Alex Soojung-Kim Pang is a visiting scholar at Stanford University. His writing has appeared in Scientific American, the Atlantic, and Slate.com, among many others. He’s the founder of the Restful Company, a consulting group inspired by his book Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less [Indie bookstores|Amazon]. Also, check out his blog Deliberate Rest.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Health Care 12 mins – “Michel Kazatchkine joins us to talk about Russia’s health system and struggles with HIV/AIDS in the context of its unique history.” At the link find the title, “Russia—history and health: The Lancet: Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 28september_russia.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scientific Fraud 29 mins – “On paper, the Japanese anaesthesiologist Yoshitaka Fujii was a dazzling model of scientific productivity. Over two decades, he held posts at five institutions, associate positions at two more, and published more than 200 papers. In some years, he published a dozen randomised control trials – and it was this superhuman publication record that started to arouse suspicion among some of his colleagues. But it was only when a British doctor began scouring through the statistics in his papers that the phenomenal scale of Fujii’s scientific fraud became clear. In 2012, an inquiry by the Japanese Society of Anaesthesiologists concluded that he had fabricated a total of 172 papers over the past 19 years – making him, by numbers, the biggest scientific fraud in recorded history. In many cases, they found no records of patients and no evidence medication was ever administered. “It is as if someone sat at a desk and wrote a novel about a research idea,” they wrote in their report. This week, Hannah Devlin speaks with some of the statistical vigilantes who are scouring datasets to identify cases of fraud and poor scientific practice. These include the consultant anaesthetist John Carlisle, from Torbay Hospital in Devon, who details his role in the Fujii scandal. Hannah also speaks to a PhD student from Tilburg University in the Netherlands, Michèle Nuijten, about software she has helped develop to “spell-check” statistics found in psychology papers. And finally, we hear from the University of Cambridge’s Winton professor for the public understanding of risk, David Spiegelhalter, who is also president of the Royal Statistical Society, about the dangers of statistical malpractice.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Columnist Savage 63 mins – “Dan Savage has dished out love and sex advice in his syndicated Savage Love column for over 25 years. He’s blunt, hilarious and empathetic– and not just in his writing! Dan joins Katie and Brian to discuss working at Ann Landers’ desk, being “monogamish” and the sex questions he gets asked the most. He also recalls what it was like to come of age during the AIDS epidemic. Plus, two words that Katie never expected to hear on the podcast.” At the link find the title, “38. Dan Savage: Sex and Candor, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 8ca59587-82c3-41f2-8118-441e6f412200.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex.com Lawsuit 33 mins – “Gary Kremen owned one of the most valuable domain names in the history of the internet. And then one day, he lost it in the most unusual way. For years, Gary fought to win back his domain “sex dot com.” The legal battle transformed the way the courts treat virtual property. But in the end, was his lengthy and expensive crusade worth it?” At the link find the title, “Sex Dot Con (Season 6, Episode 2),” right-click “GLT5434788376.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep Needs 31 mins – “If you could compare the person you were before you became sleep deprived to the person after, you’d find you’ve definitely become…lesser than. When it comes to sleep deprivation, you can’t trust yourself to know just how much it is affecting you. You feel fine, maybe a bit drowsy, but your body is stressed in ways that diminish your health and slow your mind. In this episode, we sit down with two researchers whose latest work suggests sleep deprivation also affects how you see other people. In tests of implicit bias, negative associations with certain religious and cultural categories emerged after people started falling behind on rest.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 110-Sleep_and_Bias.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Small Farm Concepts 107 mins – “In this episode Brian Bates of Bear Creek Organics joins me to talk about greens production, employees, and learning from big farms…. Keep learning with these two great audiobooks: The Market Gardener by JM Fortier The Urban Farmer by Curtis Stone  Increase farm efficiency with the Paperpot Transplanter.” At the link find the title, “FSFS116: Continuous Improvement – Lessons Learned on Farm and on Other Farms with Brian Bates of Bear Creek Organics,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sodium Dichromate 7 mins – “Discover the compound at the heart of a multi-million dollar legal case and an Oscar–winning role for Julia Roberts” At the link find the title, “Sodium dichromate: Chemistry in its element, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files Ciie_Sodium_dichromate.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Power in New Hampshire 5 mins – “The town of Brentwood, which has a population of about 4,500, celebrated its transition from fossil fuels to solar energy Saturday, Sept. 16. A public ribbon cutting commemorated the recent installation of a ground-mounted solar array that will offset nearly 100 percent of the town’s municipal electric load. Malcolm Allison is member of both the solar and budget committees in Brentwood. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with him by phone.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sports Bra History 26 mins – “Among the most important advances in sports technology, few can compete with the invention of the sports bra. Following the passage of Title IX in 1972, women’s interest in athletics surged. But their breasts presented an obstacle. Bouncing breasts hurt, as women getting in on the jogging craze found out. Then some friends in Vermont had an idea to stitch a couple jock straps together to build a contraption to keep things in place. This featured story was produced by Phoebe Flanigan and edited by Peter Frick-Wright, with music by Robbie Carver and Dennis Funk. XX Factor: How the Sports Bra Changed History was originally aired on the Outside podcast, a production of Outside Magazine and PRX.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Survival Farming 84 mins – “Here are Nine Mile Farm we have pretty much settled into our selected systems on a lot of things at this point almost 5 years into the journey.  Our ducks run on a clock work like system, feeding, paddock shifting, egg collection, etc are all quite fine tuned at this point. The trees require very little maintenance and most of our desired infrastructure is now installed.  Still we are constantly trying and testing out new things.  This year we have found some really great gems of knowledge and we have also come up with some quite refined plans for our future. A lot of the new stuff is going to be built in winter, because here in north Texas that is the most pleasant time of year for construction work and out door projects.  Today I am going to do an old school sort of “chat with Jack” episode on what has worked well this year and where we are taking that knowledge to in the future.” [Mention is made of Ipomoea aquatica as good food source.] At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Reporter 18 mins – “Despite having fled her country after being shot, Reem al-Halabi has set up a new radio station outside Syria.” At the link find the title, “Oct 6: Journalist who risks life in Syrian war shares her story, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171006_76383.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Stories 48 mins – “Destruction and displacement — that’s the story of Syria today. Paul Kennedy talks with three Syrians who believe in other Syrias, with stories about love, and laughter, and smell of jasmine and tarragon” At the link find the title, “Savign Syria: Keeping war-torn culture alive (Encore March 24, 2017), Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170925_30243.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and the Press P1 25 mins – “Last week Brooke was at the Texas Tribune Festival, an annual event that gathers hundred of speakers and thousands of citizens to discuss big issues of the day, ranging from education to climate change to politics. She moderated a couple of sessions: One with two great journalists from two very different places with two very different briefs. One of those journalists was Amy Chozick, a national political reporter for the New York Times, the other was Evan Smith, the  co-founder and CEO of the Texas Tribune. The question at issue turned on President Trumps continuous attacks on the press, and on truth, basic facts. Does it affect the way they practice journalism? And if so, how?” At the link right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and the Press P2 26 mins – “When Brooke was at the Texas Tribune festival in Austin last week, she moderated two sessions, one with reporters and one with couple of US Representatives from Texas. Democrat Beto O’Rourke of El Paso, and Republican Will Hurd of Helotes. The two – who didn’t much know each other a year ago – made headlines in their state when, stranded by a snowstorm, they found themselves sharing a rented Chevy Impala for the sixteen-hundred mile drive from San Antonio to Washington. Brooke asked them roughly the same question she asked the reporters; how do the constant attacks by the President on journalism, on facts, influence how you do your job and how you deal with the press? Does it affect your point of view? **Correction: At one point, Representative Will Hurd refers to a recent missile launch by Iran as an example real news that is worth reporting. In fact, it was the opposite.**” At the link right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Impact on Law 45 mins – “President Trump’s conduct in office draws a sharp contrast between laws that formally restrict the presidency and the institutional norms that presidents have historically followed. For the October 2017 issue of The Atlantic, Jack Goldsmith addressed that distinction in his article Will Donald Trump Destroy the Presidency? To help answer that question, Benjamin Wittes interviewed Goldsmith last week on his latest article, discussing President Trump’s errant behavior in office and its impact on future presidencies, the difference between violations of norms and violations of law, and the changing landscape of journalism under the Trump presidency.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Draft_Audio.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Trump Psychology 54 mins – ““Calling Trump crazy allows us to avoid confronting the craziness in our society—if we want to get sane, we must first gain insight about ourselves. Simply put: Trump isn’t crazy, but our society is.” – Dr. Allen Frances This week on the show we interview one of the men who literally wrote the book on mental illness as we answer the question – Is Trump crazy? And what does it say about America that he was elected to the highest office in the land? Psychiatrist Dr. Allen Frances analyzes the national psyche, viewing the rise of Donald J. Trump as darkly symptomatic of a deeper societal distress. Drawing on his vast experience, Dr. Frances explains American society’s collective slide away from sanity and offers an urgently needed prescription for reclaiming our bearings. Dr. Allen Frances chaired the task force that produced the fourth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental disorders, which is is published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) and offers a common language and standard criteria for the classification of mental disorders.  He then became critical of later versions, and he warned that we are currently “over-treating” mental disorders and finding problems where there are none. Dr. Frances is professor emeritus and former chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at Duke University School of Medicine.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

VA Medical Center Quality 6 mins – “Health care quality measures provide standard data that help inform consumers about which providers are most likely to deliver high quality care. They also help providers improve the care they give patients. To help veterans make informed choices, Veterans Affairs reports on 110 of these measures for VA medical centers on its website (as of June 2017). We found that information on these measures is in two separate parts of the site. The easily-accessible page contains 15 of the 110 measures. The other, older page contains 100 measures, but is hard to find and to understand.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu, or “Learn More” for more details.

Vegetative State 26 mins – “In this edition of Science Weekly, Ian Sample explores whether it is possible to communicate with those in a ‘vegetative’ state – and what are the ethical and legal ramifications?” At the link find the title, “The grey zone: reaching out to patients with disorders of consciousness – podcast, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 06-40637-gnl.sci.170906.ms.the_grey_zone.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White House Counsel 36 mins– “Last month, Lawfare and Foreign Policy hosted an event on lawyering for the Trump presidency. Susan Hennessey spoke with former White House Counsels Bob Bauer, who served in the Obama administration from 2010 to 2011, and A.B. Culvahouse, who served in the Reagan administration from 1987 to 1989, in a lively discussion on providing legal support when your client is the president. They talked about the distinction between a president’s personal counsel and White House counsel, the challenges of defending a president during an investigation, and the quotidian aspects of the role of the White House Counsel.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 10072017_Bar Review Live.mp3” and select “ave Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Woolly Mammoth Project 51 mins – “What if you could take the DNA of an ancient creature and bring it back to life? It sounds like the plot of Jurassic Park, but you can’t actually rebuild a dinosaur. You could to it with a woolly mammoth though. The writer Ben Mezrich has a new book about the scientists and researchers who are working to insert DNA from a mammoth hair sample into an elephant embryo. Wednesday, he joins Doug to tell the story, and to explain how the results could actually help save the world. Ben Mezrich is the author of 18 books, including The Accidental Billionaires , which was the basis for the film The Social Network and Bringing Down the House, which was made into the film 21. His new book is called Woolly: The True Story of the Quest to Revive One of History’s Most Iconic, Extinct Creatures.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Work Future P1 48 mins – “AI and robots seem to be everywhere, handling more and more work, freeing humans up — to do what? Contributor Jill Eisen takes a wide-angle lens to the digital revolution happening in our working lives. Part 1 of 3.” At the link find the title, “Artificial intelligence, robots and the future of work, Part 1, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170913_76872.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Work Future P2 48 mins – “Digital platforms have been well received by customers, but for workers, they often have a dark side. And they present a major challenge for governments who are grappling with how to regulate them.” At the link find the title, “The Future of Work, Part 2: The highs and lows of digital platforms,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170920_16728.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.

Work Future P3 48 mins – “In Part 3 of her series on the future of work, Jill Eisen looks at the promise of technology — and how it can lead to a better world.” At the link find the title, “Less work and more leisure: Utopian visions and the future of work, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170927_35568.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWII Shanghai P3 19 mins – “The Japanese are unloading men and material at a frustratingly slow rate, due to the tides. Until they are ready to launch their assault, their navy and air force keep Chiang Kai-Shek’s forces pinned down.” At the link right-click ‘Direct download: Episode_203-10317_8.38_PM.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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Media Mining Digest 309 – Oct 13, 2017: African Knowledge Crisis, African Migrant Trail, Aging Research, Barbara Kingsolver on Climate Change, Big Data Conspiracy, Blind Podcaster, Broadband Problems and Trends, Cardiac Surgeon, Cerebral Palsy Teen Qeen, Cervical Cancer, Chinese Teaching Methods, Civil War Soldier Life, Classical Music Exams, Computer Coders, Conservation and Technology, Constitutional Crisis, CPR Improvement, CRISPR Ethics, Cyber Security, Equifax Breach, Every Student Succeeds Act, Farming in the U.S., Fear Control, Forensic DNA Searches, Forest Preservation, GMO Food Hazards, Greece Report, Green Sports Alliance, Hate Speech, Homeless Natives, Hurricane Islands Crisis, Hurricanes and Health, Impeachment, Income Disparities in U.S., Inequality and Race, Informal Anarchists, Institutional Power, Irrational Voting, Israel Visit, Ivanka Trump, Mushroom Poisoning, NASA Future, Nomadic Life in U.S., North Korea Prisoner Story, Populism, Puerto Rico Post Hurricane, Putin’s Background, Racial Reconciliation, Racism Discussion, Seaweed Solution, Sinclair Broadcasting Takeover, Vaccine Use Resistance, Vegan Lifestyle, Venezuela Turmoil, Waste Control in Texas, Whale Rescues, White Supremacist Movement, Work Future, Zapatistas

Exercise your ears: the 132 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 588 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 17,430 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 86GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 400 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

African Knowledge Center 12 mins – “How can Africa, the home to some of the largest bodies of water in the world, be said to have a water crisis? It doesn’t, says Olúfẹ́mi Táíwò — it has a knowledge crisis. Táíwò suggests that lack of knowledge on important topics like water and food is what stands between Africa’s current state and a future of prosperity. In a powerful talk, he calls for Africa to make the production of knowledge within the continent rewarding and reclaim its position as a locus of learning on behalf of humanity.” At the link find the title, “Why Africa must become a center of knowledge again Olúfẹ́mi Táíwò, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files OlufemiTaiwo_2017G.mp4” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African Migrant Trail 28 mins- “Panorama investigates the African migrant trade and reveals the extraordinary scale of people-smuggling across sub-Saharan Africa – a multibillion-pound industry described by some as a new ‘slave trade’. As the EU desperately tries to cut the number of migrants crossing the Mediterranean, reporter Benjamin Zand investigates how hundreds of millions of euros of EU funding is being spent and asks if EU efforts to tackle the smugglers could be leaving some migrants in an ever more dangerous limbo. He reveals how hard it will be to stop the trade, which employs millions of people in some of the world’s poorest countries. Ben traces the smuggling route from the shores of Libya, the gateway to Europe and one of the most brutal places on the migrant trail, back through the ghettos in the deserts of Niger, where the local economy is dependent upon human trafficking. He finishes the investigation in Nigeria, where many begin their journey and where young girls are committing themselves to years of prostitution to pay their way to Europe. On his journey Ben hears the tragic stories of the migrants themselves and confronts the smugglers making fortunes from this criminal trade.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Research 27 mins “In 2015 Liz Parrish performed a risky experiment – on herself. She took a gene therapy entirely untested on humans in the hope of “curing” what she says is a disease: ageing. Her gamble was criticised by some in the scientific community, but she is not the only one that thinks scientific advances will help humans live longer healthier lives.” At the link find the title,”Forever Young, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files p05glv3v.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Research 28 mins – “Fish and flies young again by Ian Woolf, Patrick Wang talks rocket science with SpaceOps Australia.” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Future 42 mins – “Aidan Connolly has been with Alltech for 27 years and is currently its Chief Innovation Officer (CIO). Alltech is a company that helps farmers feed the world, raise healthy animals, and protect the environment. He works with the company’s research department focused on developing nutrition-based technologies that will capitalize on insights gained through Alltech’s investment in nutrigenomics. Aidan’s main tasks as CIO is to spearhead Alltech’s projects in multiple facets of the agricultural industry, make sure they’re always on the cutting edge when it comes to current technology, as well as incorporating new technologies into how food is produced in the future. On today’s episode, Aidan shares how he became Alltech’s CIO and how the company decides which innovation to invest in. He also explains the disruptive technologies that will greatly affect the agricultural industry in the near future.” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Agronomist Interview 44 mins- “Do we take basic decision making for granted? Do we just assume that our practices in the past should be our practices in the future? Using data based information, there may be ways to become more efficient and productive while saving money and resources. Dr. Curt Livesay from Dynamite Ag is one of those people who questions basic assumptions. He focuses on agronomy or soil management and crop production. He has been a guest on a past episode, but we mostly discussed the cannabis industry. Today, Dr. Curt Livesay shares his data based process especially around the subject of nitrogen use. We look at nitrogen efficiency and getting the desired amount of nutrients without creating waste. We also talk with Scott Wettstein, a farmer from Lidgerwood, North Dakota. If you like thinking for yourself, this is a great episode for you.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Rules of Engagement 12 mins  – “Science fiction visions of the future show us AI built to replicate our way of thinking — but what if we modeled it instead on the other kinds of intelligence found in nature? Robotics engineer Radhika Nagpal studies the collective intelligence displayed by insects and fish schools, seeking to understand their rules of engagement. In a visionary talk, she presents her work creating artificial collective power and previews a future where swarms of robots work together to build flood barriers, pollinate crops, monitor coral reefs and form constellations of satellites.” At the link find the title, “What intelligent machines can learn from a school of fish | Radhika Nagpal, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files RadhikaNagpal_2017.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ai Weiwei’s Documentary 33 mins – “”This is by every aspect [a] human crisis … The world let this happen right in front our eyes.” At the link find the title, “Sept 28 | ‘Human crisis’: Ai Weiwei’s documentary showcases plight of refugees, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170928_13449.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Al Capone 48 mins – “The gangster Al Capone had a short, famed time on top. The Brooklyn kid who went to Chicago in the heart of Prohibition, built a crime empire there, had hundreds murdered, made a mint, and ended up in Alcatraz. What he wanted, says biographer Deirdre Bair, was the American Dream. What he got was bootlegging, brothels and infamy. And the syphilis that killed him. This hour On Point, Al Capone’s story from the inside, the family side, with biographer Deirdre Bair.” At the link right-click the down-point arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazon Relocation 46 mins – “Cities across the country court Amazon for its new headquarters. Wisconsin signs a $3 billion deal to snag Foxconn. We look at the competition for marquis employers.” At the link find the title, “From Amazon To Foxconn: Major Companies Making Moves, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_552399867.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Exceptionalism 57 mins – “Orthodox kookiness: the true American exceptionalism? Writer Kurt Andersen and host Jason Gots discuss America’s 500 year old tendency toward passionate belief in the preposterous in this, Big Think’s latest brain-fertilizing podcast. Writer and media polymath Kurt Andersen is the NY-times bestselling author of the novels Heyday, Turn of the Century, and True Believers, and he’s the host and co-creator of the Peabody-award winning public radio show Studio 360. Kurt’s latest book Fantasyland – How America Went Haywire – is a 500 year history of a different kind of American exceptionalism.” At the link find the title, “117. Kurt Andersen (writer) – The Sleep of Reason, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP8695786131.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atheist Comedian Shaffir  59 mins  – “ Today’s guest Ari Shaffir is a stand-up comic and the host of Skeptic Tank – a super popular weekly podcast that’s on its 299th episode (at this writing). Ari grew up orthodox Jewish, spent two years in a yeshiva in Israel, and then turned into an atheist comedian who did an outrageous web video series called “The Amazing Racist” and runs a yearly “Shroomfest” where he’s like a benevolent Dionysus, presiding over a worldwide three-day celebration of psilocybin mushrooms. He co-created and hosts Comedy Central’s storytelling series “this is not happening”. And he got a two part comedy special on Netflix called “Double Negative”.Ari and Jason talk about outrageousness in comedy, bipartisan e-rage on social media, growing up and growing out of bad habits, the transgender bathroom debate, and much, much, much more.” At the link find the title, “111. Ari Shaffir (Comic) – The Golden Age of Trolling, Aug, 2017,” right-click “ Media files PP9971540246.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autistic Jobs 22 mins – “The Tricky Path to Employment Is Trickier When You’re Autistic” by Sarah Carr | Sept. 22, 2017” At the link find the title, “Slate Voice: “The Tricky Path to Employment Is Trickier When You’re Autistic,” right-click “Media files PPY2483621797.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Avocado History 27 mins – “The avocado is the food that unites a nation but could it be facing the political fight of its life? From guacamole and chips at fast food chains to wellness bloggers and movie stars – avocados are eaten by all demographics in the US. The little fruit are big big business with about four billion consumed a year. But, the US consumer’s appetite depends on imports and the biggest producer is directly south of the border – Mexico. With uncertainty over Nafta (North America Free Trade Agreement) and no weakening of President Trump’s rhetoric over the douthern Border, is the avocado facing a less certain future.” At the link find the title, “The Avocado Wall, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files p05hhfzg.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Backing Up Hard Drives 36 mins – “In today’s world of Internet insecurity, it’s more important than ever to maximize your safety and privacy, both on line and off. That’s why we think that you should use a computer that runs Linux — because it’s safe. Well it’s safer, at least, than the two other most popular operating systems, Microsoft’s Windows and Apple’s MacOS. In this episode we provide an overview as well as some specific recommendations.” At the link find the title, “Going Linux #309 · Today’s Security Technology,” right-click “Media files glp309.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bannon-Moore-Trump 49 mins – “Alabama’s U.S. Senate primary. Moore vs Strange. Bannon vs Trump. We’ll unpack the results from Alabama’s special election.” At the link find the title, “What Roy Moore’s Alabama U.S. Senate Primary Win Means For The GOP, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_554027265.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Barbara Kingsolver on Climate Change 24 mins – “Because climate change is really, really terrible, let’s face it. This is not going to end well.” At the link find the title, “Sept 27  ‘This is not going to end well’: Author Barbara Kingsolver on climate change, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170927_63661.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bertrand Russell 22 mins – “Michael Sandel on Bertrand Russel, Significant international thinkers deliver the BBC’s flagship annual lecture series” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Data Conspiracy 24 mins – “This week we examine the debate over regulating some of the biggest tech companies in the world including Facebook, Google and Amazon. Our guest is David McCabe, who covers the intersection of technology, policy, and politics for Axios.” At the link find the title, “Episode 29: David McCabe on Regulating Technology Companies, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SBMCC0929.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Podcasters 64 mins – “Allison Hartley and Jeff Thompson join Bryan Fischler on this 7th Episode of That Blind Tech Show. With the release of the iPhone 8 and the 8 Plus, a lot of people are interested in stepping up and shining their new apples. With the new iPhones came the release of the new iOS 11 and it’s all about the accessibility on this episode of That Blind Tech show. From Allison’s new Apple Watch Series 3, to the New High Sierra on Jeff’s iMac to Bryan’s Demonstration of NFB Newsline on Amazon’s Echo Dot, this episode brings out more than just Apples, yup, the entire orchard is coming out.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in California 28 mins – “With the right policies and local investment, Spiral Internet could bring high quality Internet access to much of northern California. Spiral is a small private company and its CIO, Michael Anderson, talks with us today for episode 267 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from here” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Michigan 40 mins – “When policy and decision makers discuss how to improve connectivity in the U.S., they often compare Internet access in other parts of the world to connectivity in America. We can learn from efforts in other places. Benoit Felten, CEO of Diffraction Analysis, has analyzed business models, approaches, and infrastructure development all across the globe. His company has studied infrastructure and Internet access from short-term and long-term perspectives through the multi-faceted lens of international economies. Benoit joins us for episode 266, his second appearance on the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In addition to development of infrastructure, Christopher and Benoit get into competition, quality of services, and how it varies from place to place. Benoit has recommendations based on his years of analysis from different communities and cultures around the world. Be sure to also check out episode 21, in which Benoit and Christopher discuss Stokab.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from here” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Problems and Trends 26 mins – “After a friendly coup in the offices of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, Hannah has taken the podcast host chair from Christopher for episode 271 of the Community Broadband Bits. Hannah grills Christopher on where he has recently traveled, interesting lessons, and recent news around community broadband….The conversation starts with a discussion of why recent travels strengthened our belief that full fiber-optic networks are the best approach for the vast majority of America in the long term. Christopher and Hannah discuss the future of low-latency networks and what is more cost-effective over decades rather than just over the first few years. They go on to discuss their fears of the FCC legitimizing satellite and mobile wireless connectivity as good enough for carrier of last resort in rural regions. The show wraps up with a discussion about One Touch Make Ready in Louisville and Madison’s RFP for a fiber network partner.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from here” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Bryan Clay 33 mins – “Bryan Clay trains hard, and works hard. It’s what earned him a gold medal at the Olympics, and the title of “Greatest Athlete in the World.” But his training only prepared him to win – it didn’t teach him to deal with failure. That’s something he had to learn on his own. With no coach. No spotlight. And no money.” At the link find the title, “Up From the Ashes: Bryan Clay, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY1748634017.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Building with Mud 13 mins – “”There are a lot of resources given by nature for free — all we need is our sensitivity to see them and our creativity to use them,” says architect Anna Heringer. Heringer uses low-tech materials like mud and bamboo to create structures from China to Switzerland, Bangladesh and beyond. Visit an awe-inspiring school, an elegant office and cozy social spaces — all built from natural materials — in this delightful talk.” At the link find the title, “The warmth and wisdom of mud buildings Anna Heringer, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files AnnaHeringer_2017.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cardiac Surgeon 58 mins – “Dr Nikki Stamp takes us into the amazing world of our hearts — revealing how they function, how we can look after them and shows us the latest science she uses to help fix them when they go wrong. Nikki is one of Australia’s elite group of female heart surgeons and she passionately believes that many of her patients could have avoided becoming another ‘heart casualty’ — if only she could have shown them earlier how to take care of the one remarkable organ that makes us all tick. She takes us behind the scenes in her operating theatre to give us a privileged look at what happens in these high-stakes operations and we meet the patients who are hoping to have their lives transformed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ‘save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cerebral Palsy Teen Queen 56 mins – “Joyce welcomes 13-year-old Autumn Bishard to the show. Autumn, who lives with cerebral palsy, was named National American Miss Pennsylvania Junior Teen for 2013, while also winning the spirit award and being named the fourth runner-up for the spokes model competition. She will discuss her recent title, and how she plans to use the platform to empower all girls to be the best they can be no matter what struggles or obstacles get in their way.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cervical Cancer 20 mins – “Malawi, in Sub-Saharan Africa, has the highest incidence and mortality of cervical cancer in the world. Nearly all cases of cervical cancer are caused by human papillomavirus, or HPV. Earlier this year, the Microbiology Society funded one of our members, Dr Ramya Bhatia, to travel to Malawi as part of a research collaboration between Nkhoma Hospital and the University of Edinburgh. In this podcast, Ramya talks to us about her time in Malawi, and Nkhoma’s highly successful cervical cancer screening programme.” At the link click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Teaching Methods 22 mins -”Journalist Lenora Chu compares cultures and classrooms in her book, Little Soldiers: An American Boy, a Chinese School, and the Global Race to Achieve.” At the link find the title, “Sept 29 | What the West could learn from Chinese teaching methods: author Lenora Chu, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170929_11990.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Citizen Science 12 mins – “255 – Citizen Science with NASA GLOBE” At the link find that title, right-click “Media files ede_255-vk4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil Society 27 mins – “Civil society, I think, has to provide the seedbed for these spaces of richer public discourse.” At the link find the title, “Sept 25 | ‘Create a national public discourse that is open’: Harvard philosopher Michael Sandel, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170925_25614.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil War Soldier Life 177 mins – “We mostly get the view from the top when it comes to the American Civil War – that is, the view from the political leaders and generals. We usually get only scattered glimpses of what it was actually like to be an enlisted man or lower-level officer in a Civil War Army. In this episode, we’re zooming in on the perspective of the common soldier.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Classical Music Exams 28 mins – “British music schools run the largest instrumental exams around the world, with well over a million candidates each year taking grades from Trinity College London and the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music. Russell Finch follows an examiner to one of the fastest growing markets for music exams -Thailand – where he meets some of the candidates taking British music exams today. He hears their stories and finds out what they want to get out of their music learning, and why the grading system is important. He explores the reasons why British institutions are dominating music education internationally and the effect of this worldwide, homogenised approach to music learning.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Coders 17 mins – “Silicon Valley has a gender issue. That’s hardly breaking news. But things have escalated recently. Some examples from the last few weeks: The Ellen Pao saga. The James Damore memo at Google. The ouster of Uber’s CEO. The frat-house behavior at SoFi. The utter lack of consequences for VR startup Upload. Sometimes it’s straight-up harassment. And sometimes problems stem from the bro bubble – nice guys, but they’re all the same guys. Everyone else “isn’t a good fit.” Ellen Ullman has seen both. She started programming in 1978, when she wandered past a Radio Shack and taught herself how to code on the first personal computer. Ellen’s new book, Life in Code, is full of great and awful stories. Her love of the work. The joys of hunting down a bug. But also, the client who would rub her back while she tried to fix his system. The party full of young men drinking beer, including Larry Page, who offered her a job on the spot. Forget about appealing to the tech elite, she says. We have to invade the culture. Find allies where we can, and build an army of programmers focused on our shared humanity.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conservation and Technology 64 mins – “There is an accelerating effort among scientists, forest and wildlife managers as well as technologists and interest groups from NASA, Google and the Jane Goodall Institute to harness new technologies. These technologies, which include satellite sensors, drones, camera traps and DNA detectors, can be used to improve and maintain forest and wildlife conservation; fight and expose illegal, unsustainable practices; and prevent the use of dangerous fuels and chemicals. Our panel will discuss what is new and what is working in this area. They will also discuss what 21st century technology might soon be available to protect and create healthy and safe environments in the Bay Area and throughout the world.” At the link find the title, “Can Technology Drive Conservation? Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170927_Can Technology Drive Conservation_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Constitutional Crisis 47 mins – “Was our Constitution made for this much economic inequality? One big thinker says no.” At the link find the title, “Does Our Constitution Hold Up Today?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CPR Improvement 19 mins- “You are doing CPR wrong, or so says Felipe Teran, an ED resuscitation sonographer. Felipe has just started as a Resus/ED attending at University of Pennsylvania..” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CISPR Ethics 28 mins – “Jennifer Doudna’s research has transformed biology. And this is not an understatement. Her work has given us the tools to edit genes more precisely than ever before. Her scientific career began with work to understand the actions of RNA, part of the machinery of every cell. But, after a meeting in 2005 with a colleague at the University of California, Berkeley, where Jennifer is currently a professor of chemistry and of molecular and cell biology, she changed her direction of research. Through collaborations all over the world she’s since developed the gene editing system called CRISPR/cas9. She’s been awarded multiple prizes for her work. The CRISPR/cas9 system has created opportunities that could be used for both for good and for ill. Unlike many scientists who leave the ethical implications of their research to others, Jennifer Doudna has decided to engage with her critics. She talks to Jim al-Khalili about her decision to do this.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Security 27 mins – “Can we Control the Dark Side of the Internet? The Internet is the world’s most widely used communications tool. It’s a fast and efficient way of delivering information. However it is also quite dumb, neutral, treating equally all the data it passes around the world. From data that forms scientific research papers, the wealth of social media to keep us all connected with friends and relatives, entertainment or material we would rather not see- from political propaganda to horrific violence, the Internet makes no distinction. Is it time to change that? And can we? In this programme Aleks Krotoski looks at whether it’s possible to use technological fixes to regulate the internet or whether a more political approach is needed to governance of this vital but flawed communications medium.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

David Remnick on Clinton P1 28 mins – “David Remnick is the editor of The New Yorker. In the first installment of a two-part interview, he sits down with Isaac Chotiner to discuss whether Hillary hatred has gone too far, Ta-Nehisi Coates and writing about race in 2017, and why Obama is cashing in on Wall Street.” At the ink find the title, “David Remnick (Part 1), Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY7437633284.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deportations Impact 9 mins – “Between 2008 and 2016, the United States deported more than three million people. What happens to those left behind? Journalist Duarte Geraldino picks up the story of deportation where the state leaves off. Learn more about the wider impact of forced removal as Geraldino explains how the sudden absence of a mother, a local business owner or a high school student ripples outward and wreaks havoc on the relationships that hold our communities together.” At the link find the title, “What we’re missing in the debate about immigration Duarte Geraldino, Sept 2017,” right-click “Media files DuarteGeraldino_2017S.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Disruption 72 mins – “How do we present and disseminate news to ever-changing consumers, hungry for fast and smart information in the digital age? It’s a question that gnaws at every news organization today, from legacy newspapers like the New York Times to online startups like BuzzFeed. What’s the best way to reach and engage people when there’s an avalanche of information coming their way? To get at this question, our host Tom Ashbrook hosted a panel discussion with a few journalists turned technologists — Washington Post’s director of strategic initiatives Jeremy Gilbert, Vox.com director of programming Allison Rockey, and Gannett SVP & chief transformation officer Maribel Perez Wadsworth — at the Public Radio Content Conference in Washington. They dove into their strategies for engaging digital audiences with information they crave.” At the link right-click the down-point arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Length 34 mins – “In part two of this two-part episode, Dr. Richard Bradley shares some of the special needs for extended incidents like Katrina or the Oso, Washington mudslide incident. He talks about the needs for things like food for responders and safe food storage in a disaster setting. This means that IST managers have to have a good handle on all sorts of logistics from food needs to shelter and more for teams on the ground. Kyle Nelson asks Rich about lessons learned at these major events. Rich shares the important lesson of treating exercises like real disaster events so you can have a handle on what you need to have everything in your kit. He also talks about the importance of training outside your discipline so you can not only be prepared for your own involvement in rescues but also to help you prepare to support others in other disciplines. One of the most important things that Federal USAR and IST groups do is to engage in after action reports and “hot washes” right at the end of the incident to see where improvements can be implemented in future deployments. One of the common places that get dropped is the ongoing documentation needed by each team in their unit logs. It is the only permanent record of what happened deep inside the disaster incident.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Earth Past Extinctions 56 mins – “This week on the show we interview award-winning science journalist Peter Brannen about his new book, The Ends of the World: Volcanic Apocalypses, Lethal Oceans, and Our Quest to Understand Earth’s Past Mass Extinctions. In his book and in this interview, Peter takes us on a tour of the 5 ways that the Earth has died, as well as what may be to come. Part road trip, part history, and part cautionary tale, The Ends of the World takes us on a tour of the ways that our planet has clawed itself back from the grave and casts our future in a completely new light. Peter Brannen is an award-winning science journalist whose work has appeared in the New York Times, The Atlantic, Wired, the Washington Post, Slate, the Boston Globe, Aeon, among other publications. A graduate of Boston College, he was a 2015 journalist-in-residence at the Duke University National Evolutionary Synthesis Center and a 2011 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Ocean Science Journalism Fellow.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emergency Vehicle Preparations 57 mins – “Today’s episode was originally, Episode-283- Emergency Vehicle Preperations and was originally published on September 24th, 2009. The following are the original show notes from that episode. Today we take a look at emergency vehicle preparations. As I discuss these please note that item one is your bug out bag, (BOB) hence something in your BOB such as a first aid kit or pair of gloves, etc won’t be mentioned today. We will be doing another show on BOBs soon. Today we are focused on turing your daily drive in to a proper bug out vehicle (BOV) and making sure you can deal with day to day inconveniences as well.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Enemy Combatants 53 mins – “In this week’s episode, Professors Chesney and Vladeck explore three big national security law developments from the past few days. First up: the news that the FISC, on two separate occasions, issued orders authorizing surveillance of Paul Manafort’s communications.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Enemy Combatants, Drones and Jones’ Act 62 mins – “…In this week’s episode, Professors Vladeck and Chesney do talk at length about various legal issues raised by the devastation in Puerto Rico, including the possibility of an Insurrection Act invocation.  In addition, they renew attention to the as-yet-unnamed U.S. citizen who apparently remains in U.S. military custody as an enemy combatant in Syria or Iraq, urging the media to keep a focus on this important situation.  On a related note, they also explore the significance of the Trump administration’s potential revisions to the Obama-era policy guidance regarding the use of lethal force outside of areas of “active hostilities.”…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-menu.

Equifax and Encryption 129 mins – “This week, Father Robert and Steve follow more Equifax breach fallout, look at encryption standards blowback from the Edward Snowden revelations, examine more worrisome news of the CCleaner breach, see that ISPs may be deliberately infecting their own customers, warn that turning off iOS radios doesn’t, look at the first news of the FTC’s suit against D-Link’s poor security, examine a forthcoming Broadcom GPS chip features, warn of the hidden dangers of high-density barcodes, discuss Adobe’s disclosure of their own private key, close the loop with our listeners, and examine the results of DOM fuzzing at Google’s Project Zero.” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equifax Breach 22 mins – “This much we know: The Equifax data breach is bad. How can the credit bureaus, who have been described as the “plumbing” of our financial system, show so little regard for the people whose data they collect? New York Times columnist Gretchen Morgenson says it’s simple: We are not their customers, we are their product. Morgenson writes the Fair Game column. Her most recent book is Reckless Endangerment: How Outsized Ambition, Greed, and Corruption Led to Economic Armageddon.” At the link find the title, “Credit Where Credit Is Due, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM9451177018.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ET Life Search 59 mins – “Will we soon find evidence of alien life? Scientists are currently in the throes of an unprecedented search for ET — and an answer to this long-pondered question may come sooner than you think. Right now researchers are hunting for extra-terrestrial life on several fronts. To find out just how close we might be to a breakthrough, astrophysicist Dr Graham Phillips visits telescopes, swims among the stromatolites on the remote West Australian coastline, and chats with scientists from around the world. He even talks to an eminent astrophysicist who suggests we may have already inadvertently stumbled on evidence of alien mega technology out in space.” At the link right-=click “Download” and select ‘save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Every Student Succeeds Act 14 mins – “As the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) takes full effect this fall, educators might be curious to know how this new legislation affects STEM education. To help us navigate through ESSA, we welcome James Brown to the show. As executive director of the STEM Education Coalition, James works with the Coalition to raise awareness in Congress, the Administration, and other organizations about the critical role that STEM education plays in enabling the U.S. to remain the economic and technological leader of the global marketplace of the 21st century.  James joins us to talk about ESSA, how it impacts states and STEM education, and how teachers can get more involved as this law rolls out.”At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook Use by Russia 47 mins- “Facebook now reaches a quarter of the world’s population. Two billion people. It’s a mind-boggling number, and it’s growing. So are questions. Abroad, about how Facebook will protect privacy or abet authoritarian oversight. At home, about Facebook’s role in American politics. In the 2016 campaign. About Russian ad buys, propaganda and manipulation. And ads themselves. Targeting hate groups. Up next On Point: Facebook under scrutiny, in politics and the world.” At the link right-click the down-point arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in U.S. 47 mins – “We know the picture book American family farm is sweeter in the book than in the field. Ag is a big, tough business. No farmer is immune to its tough demands. Nebraskan writer Ted Genoways went back to the farm to ask how all that’s working these days. He’s crafted a remarkable portrait of families in far flung fields, completely plugged in to the world. This hour, On Point: Tough issues down on the farm.” At the link right-click the down-point arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fear Control 12 mins – “Divisions along religious lines are deepening, and we’re doubting more and more how much we have in common. How can we stand boldly and visibly together? Inspired by an idea from her collaborator Yazmany Arboleda, place-maker Nabila Alibhai and her colleagues created “Colour in Faith,” a social practice art project that unites people of different religions by getting them to paint each other’s houses of worship yellow, in a show of solidarity. “We’ve proven that the human family can come together and send a message far brighter and more powerful than the voices of those that wish to do us harm,” Alibhai says.” At the link right-click “Why people of different faiths are painting their houses of worship yellow Nabila Alibhai, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files NabilaAlibhai_2017G.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic DNA Searches 79 mins – “Familial DNA Searching: Issues and Answers, Nov, 2011 – Panel at the 2011 NIJ Conference” At the link find the same title as what’s in the quotes, right-click “Media files nijconf2011-familial-searching.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.

Forest Preservation P1 53 mins – “It is Saturday morning in Pontianak in West Kalimantan in Indonesia, at a songbird competition. In every district across Indonesia you’ll find these, large and small. Here there are 60 cages hung up above head height under the corrugated metal ceiling of an open sided building. It is hot here, right on the equator, and over 100 young men are cheering and shouting, focussed, on their birds, and on winning. It sounds like a boxing match with added birds singing at the tops of their voices. This passion for birdsong has swept the country since it was encouraged in the 1970s, by a government keen to build a new leisure activity for Indonesians. No one could have predicted how out of hand it could get. What was once a solitary and poetic pastime, having a songbird in your house or garden, has become an industry in which real money can be made by training a winning bird. It is known here as chirping mania and is one of the biggest threats to Indonesia’s forests which have gradually fallen silent as millions of birds every year are trapped and sold illegally. Can the forest survive without birds?” At the link find the title, “The Silent Forest – Part One,24 Sep 2017,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future Proof Identities 136 mins – “Uber’s new CEO says that there is a “high cost to a bad reputation” after London kicks it to the curb. Apple’s iPhone 8 comes out to less fanfare than usual; Apple Watch has LTE issues. ARKit’s first wave of apps is out, and Robert Scoble is severely underwhelmed. Google aqui-hires HTC’s Pixel team for over a billion dollars. Equifax: what now? CCleaner malware: who was it targeting? Facebook, Google, and Twitter allow ad targeting for racist terms – has the algorithm gone amok? What is the best thing for a nine-year-old to start learning now to keep from being one of the billion people who lose their jobs in the coming decades?” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Food Hazards 86 mins – “Though it’s routinely claimed that producing new foods through genetic engineering is no riskier than traditional breeding—and that questioning the safety is tantamount to denying the reality of climate change—many experts assert that the facts do not support such claims; and according to the analysis in Steven Druker’s book, the claims rely on multiple misrepresentations. The Royal Society of Canada and several other scientific institutions have stated that bioengineering entails higher health risks, and several studies in peer-reviewed journals have detected harm to animals that consumed GMOs. The hazards are especially striking in light of the lessons from computer science about the unavoidable risks of altering human-engineered information systems that are much simpler and far better comprehended than bioinformation systems.Steven M. Druker is a public interest attorney who initiated a lawsuit against the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that revealed the agency had covered up its own scientists’ warnings about the risks of genetically engineered foods and then misrepresented the facts. He has served on the food safety panels at conferences conducted by the National Research Council and the FDA; spoken at numerous universities, including Harvard, Columbia and Cornell; and met with government officials worldwide, including the heads of food safety for the U.K., Canada, France, Ireland and Australia. Druker received his law degree from UC Berkeley, where he was elected to both the California Law Review and the Order of the Coif (the legal honor society).” At the link find the title, “How the Health Risks of GMOs Have Been Underestimated and Misrepresented, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170815_How the Health Risks of GMOs_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Google Gender Memo 34 mins – “This week, we help Alex Blumberg understand why a Google engineer ended up complimenting the KKK, and then Yes Yes No turns bizarro.” At the link right-click “ Media files GLT8821084677.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Great Green Wall 27 mins – “Can Africa’s Great Green Wall beat back the Sahara desert and reverse the degrading landscape? The ambitious 9 miles wide and 5000 miles long line of vegetation will stretch all the way from Dakar in the west to Djibouti in the east. Thomas Fessy is in Senegal where the wall has already begun to evolve into a series of forests and garden communities. He meets the planners, planters, ecologists and local villagers to hear how its early progress is reversing years of poor land use, turning nomads back to farmers, empowering women and creating healthy ecosystems for rain fed agriculture. But can it meet its ambition to stabilize an unstable region, reverse the growing trend of migration, fight the effects of climate change and ensure this big African dream doesn’t die in the sand?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Greece Report 28 mins – “From taking power to making power. This week on The Laura Flanders Show, a special report from Athens, Greece where many are asking if progressives in government can change much at all if people don’t first change society. In 2015, anti-austerity Greeks were disappointed by the progressive left Syriza government, which they’d voted into office after the financial crisis, but the other things they did to meet society’s needs just might be sowing the seeds for transformation.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Sports Alliance  44 mins – “People who are involved in the sports world have seen the benefits of greening their professions. Many athletes and executives gathered at the Green Sports Alliance Summit in Sacramento, CA where they shared ideas for reducing food waste, running stadiums on clean energy and encouraging fans to reduce their carbon impact.” At the link find the title, “The Greening of Professional Sports, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170924_cl1_Greening Pro Sports PODCAST.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on modern Latin American and Mexican history, including more specialized history courses on global capitalism, drugs and narcotics, Latin American revolutions, and the Cold War in Latin America. He to get thesits down with Brett to discuss the Mexican Revolution, Zapatismo, the EZLN, and much more.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow to download the audio file.

Hate Speech 58 mins – “Shannon Gilreath and Keith Whittington join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to discuss if the courts can regulate hate speech.” At the link right-click “Media files PP3823369676.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

History of Man 72 mins – “Today’s guest Peter Frankopan is a historian at Oxford University, where he is Director of the Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research. He works on the history of the Mediterranean, Russia, the Middle East, Persia, Central Asia and beyond, and on relations between Christianity and Islam. Peter’s new book The Silk Roads: A New History of the World, is an international bestseller, described by William Dalrymple as a ‘historical epic of dazzling range, ambition and achievement’. At an anxious moment in Western history, Frankopan encourages us to take a historical perspective, understanding how change happens in societies and how people typically react to it. This conversation unpacks the fascinating and dense history of the Silk Road countries and digs deep into the economic and social forces that shape our lives.” At the link right-click “Media files PP4346682845.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless Natives 44 mins – “…When it comes to homeless, it seems everyone wants to help them and be a part of solving the problem, but ONLY if it doesn’t occur in THEIR neighborhoods. Kitsap County in Washington state has recently made permanent what was a temporary ordinance allowing homeless encampments on religious property and other non profit lands. Unfortunately, no one has actually built any, and no progress has been made. So what about tiny homes situated in a ‘tiny village’? This is what residents of Port Orchard are against, who are faced with the reality of having homeless neighbors. Fortunately, the nearby Suquamish tribe is moving forward as the torch bearer housing homeless from their own tribe, essentially bringing them home and teaching them what they need to be productive in society. We talk about all this and more on this edition of the NativeTalk.net radio podcast.” At the link find the title, “Fall is Here & Homeless Natives in Tiny Homes,Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files fall-is-here-homeless-natives-in-tiny-homes.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

House Design 12 mins – “So this week I have a project update. I told you about the trouble that I had getting my house plan started a few weeks ago in BYHYU 079– My House Plans– Back To The Drawing Board (Literally!) But now, I have a good report. I’ll tell you about the treasures that I’ve found since recording that episode, including a markup tool that I used to tweak my house plan and the person that I’ve got helping me.” At the link click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Irma Impact 47 mins – “The Caribbean after Irma. We’ll look at devastated islands and the way forward.” At the link right-click the down-point arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Islands Crisis 21 mins – “As Caribbean Islands continue to reel in the wake of hurricane Maria and Irma, some leaders are urging the international community to help.” At the link find the title, “Sep 29 | Hurricane-stricken Caribbean islands plea for international help, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170929_49054.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricanes and Health 56 mins- “From the TWiM team, a discussion of Hurricane Harvey microbiology, and a bacterial enzyme that induces eukaryotic mating.” At the link right-click ”TWIM#161” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment 32 mins – “Jacob Weisberg talks to Cass Sunstein of Harvard Law School about his new book, Impeachment: A Citizens Guide, and the complexities involved in removing a President from office.” At the link find the title, “The Fine Points of Impeachment, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM1577635062.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Income Disparities in U.S. 73 mins – “Gabriel Zucman of the University of California, Berkeley talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his research on inequality and the distribution of income in the United States over the last 35 years. Zucman finds that there has been no change in income for the bottom half of the income distribution over this time period with large gains going to the top 1%. The conversation explores the robustness of this result to various assumptions and possible explanations for the findings.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inequality and Race 7 mins – “How can disadvantaged students succeed in school? For sociologist Anindya Kundu, grit and stick-to-itiveness aren’t enough; students also need to develop their agency, or their capacity to overcome obstacles and navigate the system. He shares hopeful stories of students who have defied expectations in the face of personal, social and institutional challenges.” At the link find the title, “The boost students need to overcome obstacles Anindya Kundu, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files AnindyaKundu_2017S.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Informal Anarchists 75 mins – “Content Warning: Descriptions of violence and sexual assault. Please be advised. NSA Disclaimer: Revolutionary Left Radio does not advocate the use of political terrorism, the initiation of violence, or the breaking of any laws. This is a scholarly, journalistic approach to the theory and history of the FAI, not advocacy of them or their methodology. Dr. Bones is an Egoist-Communist, Conjurer, Occultist, and Gonzo Journalist who writes for The Conjure House and Gods and Radicals. Brett sits down with Dr. Bones to discuss the FAI (the Informal Anarchist Federation). Topics Include: Political terrorism, Propaganda of the Deed, Antifa, the history of insurrectionary anarchism, Red Brigades, Nihilism, Cell Structure, and much more.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow to download the audio file.

Institutional Power 28 mins – “Mark Lilla made a lot of liberals bristle with his New York Times op-ed, “The End of Identity Liberalism.” But Lilla insists that what he’s suggesting should not make the bleeding hearts clutch their hemp necklaces in horror. His premise is simple: To make meaningful gains, Democrats need institutional power (i.e., election wins). And far too often, Lilla says, liberals have sacrificed such ends for what he calls “noble defeats.” Lilla’s book is The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics.” At the link find the title, “Mark Lilla’s Advice for Liberals, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM8655960358.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Irrational Voting 44 mins – “Jacob Weisberg, Philip Gourevitch, and Katie Roiphe are back for the Trumpcast Book Club to discuss Arlie Russell Hochschild’s Strangers in Their Own Land.” At the link find the title, “Strangers in Their Own Land, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM6752217286.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Israel Visit 16 mins – “Nathan Englander’s knack for photography lands him in a tricky situation while traveling abroad. Storyteller: Nathan Englander” At the link find the title, “Nathan Englander: Thumbs Up! Sept, 2017, right-click “Media files mp_505_9_19_17.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ivanka Trump 30 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to Vanity Fair’s Sarah Ellison about Ivanka Trump and her husband, Jared Kushner, and just what life in the administration has been like for the First Daughter.” At the link find the title, “The Last Person Standing, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM8523176163.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Japan vs North Korea 48 mins – “With North Korean missiles zooming overhead, how does Japan prepare, defend and respond? Japan’s tough challenges, military and diplomatic.” At the link right-click the down-point arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jeff Garlin Comedian 40 mins – “Today, one of our wildest episodes ever, with comedian Jeff Garlin, who cuts one of our surprise clips short to call B.S. on neuroscience and complexity. Wikipedia succinctly describes Jeff Garlin as a comedian, actor, producer, voice artist, director, writer, podcast host and author. You might know him best from Curb Your Enthusiasm, which he produced and acted in as Larry David’s friend and manager Jeff Greene, whose relationship with his wife was one of the most harrowing things I’ve ever seen on television. Jeff co-wrote, directed, and stars in the 2017 film Handsome: A Netflix Mystery Movie as the befuddled yet capable Detective Handsome.” At the link find the title, “108. Jeff Garlin (Comedian) – K.I.S.S.,Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP5087918517.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kant’s Categorical Imperative 43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss how, in the Enlightenment, Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) sought to define the difference between right and wrong by applying reason, looking at the intention behind actions rather than at consequences. He was inspired to find moral laws by natural philosophers such as Newton and Leibniz, who had used reason rather than emotion to analyse the world around them and had identified laws of nature. Kant argued that when someone was doing the right thing, that person was doing what was the universal law for everyone, a formulation that has been influential on moral philosophy ever since and is known as the Categorical Imperative. Arguably even more influential was one of his reformulations, echoed in The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in which he asserted that humanity has a value of an entirely different kind from that placed on commodities. Kant argued that simply existing as a human being was valuable in itself, so that every human owed moral responsibilities to other humans and was owed responsibilities in turn.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kurdish Independence 35 mins – “ Iraqi Kurds voted overwhelmingly to seek national independence – and their neighbors, as well as the Baghdad government, have responded with a rapidly escalating war of words. Iraqi politics expert Bilal Wahab joins us to explain what comes next, whether armed conflict can be avoided, and how the United States can best approach the rising tensions between its vital partners, the Iraqi Kurds and the Iraqi national government. Near East PolicyCast: Conversations on Middle East issues from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lady Lamb 49 mins – “Lady Gaga danced large at the Super Bowl. But we’re talking with a different lady today. Lady Lamb. Singer, songwriter out of Maine and Brooklyn. Now she tours the world. A kind of indie mystic visionary. An ecstatic seer. A new psalmist. Her new album is “Tender Warriors Club.” She’s singing that we need to be tender – with ourselves and others – to be truly strong.” At the link right-click the down-point arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leadership Qualities 39 mins – “Have you noticed leaders in your organization sound and look different from other employees? It’s not always true for all organizations, but leaders often talk differently — they are optimistic when they speak, they ask insightful questions, and they tend to focus on what is most important. To explore the topic of what leaders sound like – also known as, how to talk like a leader, I spoke with Tom Henschel, a professional actor who is now an executive coach. He works with clients primarily on achieving the look and sound of leadership. He’s a communication skills coach and has been running his company, Essential Communications, since 1990.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leopard Seals 28 mins – “Marine ecologist Tracey Rogers talks to Jim Al Khalili about her research on one of Antarctica’s top predators. This is the leopard seal – a ten foot long killer which glides among the ice floes in search of prey ranging from other seals to penguins to tiny krill. Tracey’s research has encompassed the animal’s prolific and eerie underwater singing to radical changes in its diet that appear to be linked to climate change. Now a senior researcher at the University of New South Wales in Australia, Tracey first encountered the species as a less than successful seal trainer at a zoo in Sydney. There she met a giant female leopard seal named Astrid. Astrid’s singing one Christmas day in the early 1990s set Tracey on the path to become the world’s authority on this Antarctic species. Tracey tells Jim how her first expedition to study leopard seals was met with almost universal scepticism until she dropped an underwater microphone into the water. In the following 25 years, she has worked to decode the meanings and qualities of the leopard seal song and explored the changes being forced upon the species by climate change. Tracey describes what made her return to Antarctica again and again and tells the story of how she almost met her end in the perilous shifting world of the pack ice. And then there’s the time a leopard seal mistook her for a penguin. There is a longer version of this interview in the podcast of this episode – more on the seal vocalisations and how Tracey saved the life on a young colleague who fell into the freezing sea.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Love Online 24 mins – “So you’ve finally matched with someone you like on Tinder. Your chats are funny, smooth, comfortable. When you meet in person, you sit at a bar for five hours without noticing the time. “That was so fun! Let’s do this again!” “Yeah, sure!” “How about next Tuesday?” Then… radio silence. Ghosted. Or maybe the fadeaway is more subtle. You try to make plans, and they’re into it, but they’re so busy. A project needs to be finished at work, then friends are in town. Yeah, you’re being simmered. Online dating has given us a lot of new ways to get dumped. Or, you know, not. Esther Perel is our guide to this treacherous terrain. She is a renowned psychotherapist and author. Her new book is called The State of Affairs: Rethinking Infidelity, and her podcast is Where Should We Begin. She’s giving us a two-part therapy session on how tech is changing romance, relationships, and our expectations of each other. So listen in, even if you’re like Manoush and met your partner over 10 years ago, when things weren’t so complicated.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Manafort Investigation 21 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to former FBI special agent & current CNN Legal and National Security analyst, Asha Rangappa, about the Manafort wiretap & the more detailed account of the raid on his home earlier this summer.” At the link find the title, “Cornering Manafort,, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY6699217340.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martial Arts 40 mins – “Chuck Nice and Gary O’Reilly get schooled on the martial arts by two fighting physicists: Jason Thalken, who has a Black Belt in Hopkido, and Prof. John Eric Goff, who has a Black Belt in Karate.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Menstruation 28 mins – “Periods are a taboo subject in many parts of the world. But for some Tanzanians, like BBC reporter Tulanana Bohela, a girl’s first period is celebrated. When she got her first period her female relatives gathered round to shower her with gifts. They sat her down and gave her life lessons on how to be a woman. One of those lessons was that she must keep her periods secret.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mind Diet 44 mins – “Nutritional science might be about the toughest subject to study in the world.

Multiple Sclerosis Treatments 48 mins – “Dr. Tommy Wood is a U.K. trained MD/PhD who now lives in the U.S. He has spent most of his academic career studying ways to treat babies with brain injuries, but has also published papers on multiple sclerosis, as well as nutritional approaches to sports performance and metabolic disease. Today’s conversation is the first of a two-part interview we did with Tommy. Part two will upload to iTunes on Oct. 10….” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Mushroom Poisoning 58 mins – “Join Howard & Dan as they welcome Dr. Bryan Judge to discuss the problems with the sex organs of the world’s largest organism. Also, Bryan shares his very special recipe for “sun tea”. At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar to download the audio file.

NASA Future 53 mins – “Continuing with our Let’s Make America Smart again series, we answer fan-submitted Cosmic Queries on the past, present, and future missions of NASA with Neil deGrasse Tyson, comic co-host Chuck Nice, and former NASA chief scientist Ellen Stofan.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nomadic Seniors in U.S. 46 mins – “Older Americans, on the road. Looking for work, for a living. Out of campervans and trailers. We’ll talk with the author of “Nomadland.” At the link find the title, “On The Road With America’s Nomadic Seniors, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_554039342.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Leadership 31 mins – “As tensions with North Korea rise, this week we examine the history of that country’s ruling Kim family. We spoke to Jean H Lee, author of “Kings of Communism: Inside Kim Jong Un’s Bloody Scramble to Kill of His Family” in the September edition of Esquire Magazine. She also led the Associated Press’s coverage of the Korean Peninsula as bureau chief from 2008 to 2013 and opened the AP’s Pyongyang bureau in January 2012. We spoke with Ms. Lee about the Kim family’s rise to power, the idea of North Korea as an absolute monarchy, and the message Kim Jong Un sent with the assassination of his brother in February.” At the link find the title, “Episode 25: Jean H. Lee on the Rise and Rule of North Korea’s Kim Dynasty,” right-click “Media files SBLEE0825.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Prisoner Story 12 mins – “In March 2009, North Korean soldiers captured journalist Euna Lee and her colleague Laura Ling while they were shooting a documentary on the border with China. The courts sentenced them to 12 years of hard labor, but American diplomats eventually negotiated their release. In this surprising, deeply human talk, Lee shares her experience living as the enemy in a detention center for 140 days — and the tiny gestures of humanity from her guards that sustained her.” At the link find the title, “What I learned as a prisoner in North Korea Euna Lee, Sept 2017,” right-click “Media files EunaLee_2016X.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korean Tactics 46 mins- “The escalating tension between North Korea and the United States has risen to an unprecedented level. Earlier this month, Stephan Haggard, Lawrence and Sallye Krause Professor of Korea-Pacific Studies at UC San Diego, gave a lecture at a private function on the complicated strategic and political risks that North Korea’s missile and nuclear capabilities present. He talked about the complex relationship among North Korea’s allies and adversaries, the impact of sanctions against Pyongyang, and the past and future role of the United States in addressing North Korean aggression.” At the link find the title, “Stephan Haggard on North Korea and the Tactical Divide,’” right-click “Direct download: Steph Haggard Edit Two.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paralympian Story 10 mins -“When Rick Hansen reached out to 10-year-old Patrick Anderson, he inspired a young boy to become the world’s best wheelchair basketball player.”  At the link find the title, ““Sept 28 | How a life-changing phone call from Rick Hansen inspired a legendary paralympian, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170928_94775.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parkinson’s Helped by Exercise 58 mins – “Parkinson’s disease makes it difficult for people to move. In addition to tremors or twitches, people with Parkinson’s often feel stiff and find it difficult to walk easily. Their handwriting shrinks, and their voice may become hoarse or soft. While there are medications to treat Parkinson’s disease, recent research suggests that patients with this condition can benefit greatly from forced exercise: that is, exercising quite a bit faster and harder than they normally would choose. Dr. Jay Alberts tells us how he discovered these benefits on a tandem bike ride with a patient. Then he describes his research and its implications. Patients doing forced intense exercise had about 30 percent improvement in their symptoms compared to those doing voluntary exercise. You’ll learn about a program at the YMCA that is designed to provide forced exercise for people with Parkinson’s disease. Kathy Helmuth explains how she and her colleagues have implemented the program at the Sarasota, FL, YMCA. People with Parkinson’s disease are not the only ones to reap unexpected benefits from intense exercise. Dr. Jordan Metzl tells us about high intensity interval training and how it affects the brain as well as the muscles. In his popular group training in New York City, participants have a huge range of ages and fitness, and all have fun and improve their health.” At the link click “Download the mp3” to get instructions on how to get the free MP3.

Philappino Environmentalism 30 mins – “Meet Gina Lopez, the radical green activist who suddenly found herself appointed Environment Minister for the Philippines. Rodrigo Duterte was elected President with the promise to cut crime by killing thousands of criminals. He lived up to expectations, initiating a vicious war against suspected drug dealers, ignoring the protests of international human rights groups. But Duterte wasn’t just tough on street criminals, he also planned to crack down on the environmental abuses of large corporations perceived to have exploited the people and landscape of the islands. To achieve those ends he offered radical green activist, Gina Lopez the office of Environment Minister. Flushed with sudden and unexpected power Lopez removed licences from mining companies she suspected of abusing the environment. Peter Hadfield tells the story of what happened next.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physics History Report 58 mins  – “Physicist Lawrence Krauss directs the Origins Project at Arizona State University, which fosters scientific research and collaborations on origins – of life, the universe, and everything. His own research focuses on the interface between elementary particle physics and cosmology, including investigations into dark matter and the origin of all mass in the universe. His latest book The Greatest Story Ever Told – So Far is a deeply entertaining and informative account of the progress of knowledge in modern physics. In this episode: To what extent and in what sense does science represent “reality”? You don’t have to paint like Picasso to enjoy a Picasso…so why are non-scientists often reluctant to engage with complex scientific concepts? Is tribalism an essential part of human nature? A passionate, witty back-and-forth with a leading physicist who is also one of our most poetic defenders and explainers of science.” At the link find the title, “ 98. Lawrence Krauss (Physicist) – Lux Ex Machina,” right-click “Media files PP5948523047.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Populism 80 mins – “Author and professor Philip Auerswald of George Mason University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the rise of populism in the United States and throughout the world. Auerswald argues that the rise of cities and the productivity of urban life has created a divergence in experience and rewards between urban and rural areas around the world. Auerswald ties these changes to changes in voting patterns and speculates about the sources of the increasing productivity of metropolitan areas. At the link right-click “Download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PTSD 28 mins – “P.T.S.D.: It’s a major concern within our society, not just for our vets returning from war zones, but for anyone who faces a traumatic experience throughout their lifetime. But we’ve come a long way in understanding how to better treat patients with this chronic problem. Hector Garcia enlightens us on the history of P.T.S.D. and the treatments that have been discovered to be very useful in treating our veterans and other affected individuals.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Puerto Rico Post Hurricane 48 mins – “A flattened Puerto Rico and how Washington is looking out—or not—for the U.S. territory.” At the link find the title, “Washington’s Responsibility To A Devastated Puerto Rico, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_553791221.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Putin’s Background 30 mins – “This week we look into the background of Russian President Vladimir Putin with Sam Greene, the Director of the Russia Institute at King`s College London. We spoke with him about how Putin’s time in the KGB shaped his political philosophy, his rise to power in Moscow, and how Putin views his role in the Russian Government.” At the link find the title, “ Episode 28: Sam Greene on Vladimir Putin,” right-click “Media files SBGRE0922.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racial Reconciliation 20 mins – “In an unmissable talk about race and politics in America, Theo E.J. Wilson tells the story of becoming Lucius25, white supremacist lurker, and the unexpected compassion and surprising perspective he found from engaging with people he disagrees with. He encourages us to let go of fear, embrace curiosity and have courageous conversations with people who think differently from us. “Conversations stop violence, conversations start countries and build bridges,” he says.” At the link find the title, “A black man goes undercover in the alt-right Theo E.J. Wilson, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files TheoEJWilson_2017X.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racial Reconciliation Technique – “Divisions along religious lines are deepening, and we’re doubting more and more how much we have in common. How can we stand boldly and visibly together? Inspired by an idea from her collaborator Yazmany Arboleda, place-maker Nabila Alibhai and her colleagues created “Colour in Faith,” a social practice art project that unites people of different religions by getting them to paint each other’s houses of worship yellow, in a show of solidarity. “We’ve proven that the human family can come together and send a message far brighter and more powerful than the voices of those that wish to do us harm,” Alibhai says.” At the link find the title, “Why people of different faiths are painting their houses of worship yellow Nabila Alibhai, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files NabilaAlibhai_2017G.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism Discussion 22 mins – “Not seeing race does not end racism … We have to see race in order to see how racial power dynamics continue to be perpetuated.” At the link find the title, “Sept 27 | Why journalist Reni Eddo-Lodge is no longer talking to white people about race, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170927_86680.mp3” and select “Save Link As’” from the pop-up menu.

Radio Telescope Pioneer 28 mins – “Octopolis and DolphinAttack by Ian Woolf, Claire Hooker tells the first part of the story of Ruby Payne -Scott, pioneer radio-astronomer.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Part 2 (28m) is here.

Robot Research 56 mins – “Today’s podcast features Ken Ford and Dawn Kernagis interviewing their colleague, Dr. Jerry Pratt, a senior research scientist at IHMC who heads up the institute’s robotics group. In 2015, Jerry led an IHMC team that placed second out of 23 teams from around the world in the first-ever DARPA Robotics Challenge. IHMC also placed first in the competition which featured humanoid robots that primarily walked bipedally and first among all U.S. Teams. Jerry is a graduate of MIT, where he earned a doctorate in electrical engineering and computer science in 2000. As a graduate student at MIT, Jerry built his first robot which was also one of the first bipedal robots that could compliantly walk over rough terrain. As you will learn in today’s interview, it was called “Spring Turkey” and is on display in MIT’s Boston museum. The second robot he built as a graduate student was called “Spring Flamingo,” and is on display in the lobby of IHMC’s Fred Levin Center in Pensacola. After graduation, Jerry and some MIT colleagues founded a small company called Yobotics, which specialized in powered prosthetics, biomimetic robots, simulation software and robotic consulting. He joined IHMC in 2002 and has become a well-known expert in bipedal walking. His algorithms are used in various robots around the world. Recent work on fast-running robots has resulted in ostrich-inspired running models and robot prototypes that are currently believed to be the fastest running robots in the world. Jerry has six U.S. patents and was inducted into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame in 2015. He lives in Pensacola with his wife Megan and their two children. He and he wife founded a science museum called the Pensacola MESS Hall, which stands for math, engineering, science, and stuff. The MESS Hall is a hands-on science museum for all ages that just celebrated it’s five-year anniversary.” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

School Segregation  73 mins – “Across the country, the challenges of growing extremism, xenophobia, violence and filter bubbles, alongside a lack of mutual understanding and collective responsibility, plague communities and the country at large. Can public education be a part of the solution, or will it crumble in today’s political climate? Over the last 30 years, education reform has drastically changed American schools: The slashing of public dollars, the backlash against racial integration, test-and-punish policies, and other shifts have increased inequities and caused other divisions within our public school system. In just the past decade, the per-student funding gap between rich and poor schools has grown 44 percent, and public schools are more segregated by race and class today than they were shortly after the landmark Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision. The Trump administration heralds school choice and vouchers as the best solution to issues facing education, but access to and the quality of these systems are hotly debated. This leaves the American public with lots of questions: Can the promise of public education stand up to the current state of the country? Are there ways to uphold public schools as a bastion of democracy, civic engagement and inclusion? How can parents and citizens help revive the promise of public education? How can choice policies improve to serve disabled students, black children and English learners more equitably? Join Nikole Hannah-Jones, New York Times Magazine journalist, and Kristina Rizga, Mother Jones reporter and author of Mission High, as they reflect on their extensive reporting in schools—as well as their personal experiences. As they look ahead to the future of schools in America, Hannah-Jones and Rizga will highlight the key, largely invisible forces that are slowly eroding the promise of public education and the intentions and money that drive some of these promises.” At the link find the title,”Back to School: What Is the Purpose of Public Education?, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170824_Inforum_Back to School for Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seaweed Solution 56 mins – “Professor Tim Flannery investigates how seaweed is helping to save the world – from growing the foods of the future, helping clean polluted water and even combating climate change. Growing seaweed is now a ten billion dollar a year global industry. Tim travels to Korea to see some of the biggest seaweed farms in the world and meets the scientists who are hoping to create a seaweed revolution here in Australia.” At the link right-click “Download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Sinclair Broadcasting Takeover 47 mins – “The fiery conservative Sinclair Broadcast Group is taking over local TV across the country. The FCC just gave them a bigger green light.Americans are more likely to get their news from local television stations than from cable or network programs. But that could change. The Sinclair Broadcast Group, already the nation’s largest owner of TV stations, is snapping up more. And it’s making them carry Sinclair’s own programming, often with a conservative slant. The FCC so far approves. This hour On Point: Sinclair Broadcasting on the march, and what it means for local TV.” At the link right-click the down-point arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Steven Spielberg   50 mins – “Steven Spielberg doesn’t like to talk about filmmaking much, but he talked (and talked, and talked) to documentary filmmakerSusan Lacy, who sits down with Kurt Andersen to discuss her definitive portrait of the master. Any classical musician will tell you the worst place to hear a concert is not from the nosebleed seats – it’s from the stage. And BoJack Horseman” creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg tell Kurt about how cartoon characters can get away with saying particularly despicable things, and why Harvard Lampoon alumni are not always the smartest or the funniest.” At the link right-click “Harvard’s Full of Morons, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY4961684714.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Strong Island Documentary 50 mins – “Aisha Harris sits down with Yance Ford, director of the stunning and incredibly personal Netflix documentary, Strong Island. And Indiewire editor, Kate Erbland, joins us to discuss the numerous sexual assault allegations connected to both the national theater chain Alamo Drafthouse and the long-running pop culture website, Ain’t It Cool News.” At the link find the title, “#62: “Strong Island” Director Yance Ford, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM5202158300.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Synesthesia  60 mins – “This week we take a closer look at people with brain abilities that appear superhuman. We speak with Craig Stark, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior at the University of California Irvine, about hyperthymesia and people who possess an extremely detailed autobiographical memory. Then we talk with Jamie Ward, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Sussex, about synaesthesia, multi-sensory substitution, and people who see sounds, taste words, and hear colours.” At the link find the title, “#441 Superhuman,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teaching the Disabled  21 mins – “The needs are growing, and they are growing in our ‘average’ students as well … We are expected to take on a far more parenting type of role.” At the link find the title, “Sept 27 | Meeting all students’ needs in inclusive classrooms is challenging, say teachers, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170927_50935.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Trends 12 mins – “We discuss four trends [in Instructional Design, Educational Technology, & Learning Sciences]: hardware and software, instructional design and design in general, online teaching and learning, and security issues.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teenage Murderers 49 mins – “The United States is the only country to sentence children to full life terms in prison. In many states, until recently, under-18s convicted of certain crimes were automatically locked up for life without the possibility of parole. But the US Supreme Court has now banned those mandatory sentences – and the approximately 2,000 Americans who were given them stand a chance of getting out. Elizabeth Davies travels to the United States to meet some of those given life sentences as teenagers. How are they dealing with the prospect of freedom after believing they’d spend their entire lives in prison?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

That Blind Tech Show 60 mins – “Bryan Fischler is joined by Allison Hartley and Jeff Thompson for coverage of the Fall Apple Event where the new iPhone 8, 8+ and the iPhone 10 were announced. The Apple Watch Series 3, Apple TV4K and iOS 11 are all just around the corner.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Travel Ban Impact 31 mins – “Trump’s immigration policies have mucked up a lot of lives. In this episode, SSSS producer Megan Detrie shares some stories from her reporting in Michigan with the Iraqi Christian community. Specifically, the Chaldean Christian immigrants and community leaders who are dealing with the aftermath of an unexpected ICE raid this summer. Four months later, these folks are still in detention, and their lawyers are arguing that they can’t be sent to Iraq because they are likely to face persecution by ISIS. Also! Donald Trump signed a new travel ban this Sunday. So we talk to Baher Azmy from the Center for Constitutional Rights about why he thinks the ban will be struck down again.” At the link find the title, “Episode 35: Banned Again,” right-click “Media files PPY2148923465.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccine Use Resistance 36 mins – “Last week we explored the science behind vaccine safety. This week we try to understand where these fears came from, and why they persist. We speak to three historians: Prof. Nadja Durbach, Prof. Elena Conis, and Prof. Robert Johnston. And a concerned mom named Noelle.” At the link find the title, “The Rise of Anti-Vaxxers, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT1489776495.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vegan Lifestyle 54 mins – Did you know what we put on our plates has a major impact on our planet’s health? The kinds of foods we grow, produce, and eat have the biggest environmental impact of any human activity. Tune in today as we talk with Meg Donahue, co-founder of MamaSezz, as we discuss the environmental and human health benefits of a plant-based diet.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela Turmoil 26 mins – “Earlier this month, President Trump addressed the deepening political and economic crises in Venezuela stating that the U.S. may consider “military options” if the situation gets worse. This week we spoke to Francisco Toro, a Venezuelan journalist and the Executive Editor of English-language blog Caracas Chronicles, about the current state of affairs in Venezuela and the rapidly deteriorating quality of life for those who remain in the country.” At the link find the title, “Episode 24: Francisco Toro on the Crisis in Venezuelaright-click,” right-click “Media files SBTOR0818.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Waste Control in Texas 59 mins – “Keep Texas Beautiful (KTB) is not messing around when they ask people not to litter in the Lone Star state! In 2010, more than 840 litter cleanup events were held across the state, featuring more than 74,100 volunteers. All told, 6,219 miles of highway were cleared of litter and debris, totaling a little more than eight million pounds of trash! But that’s only one of many outstanding programs run by KTB, and today, we’ll talk with their Executive Director, Cathie Gail. We’ll discuss their education and training opportunities; their impressive affiliate network; and even their clay shoot fundraiser with the Texas Legislative Sportsman’s Caucus.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Use Engineer 26 mins -”This week we hear stories on how a bat varies its heart rate to avoid starving, giant wombatlike creatures that once migrated across Australia, and the downsides of bedbugs’ preference for dirty laundry with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks Jocelyn Kaiser about her guide to preprint servers for biologists—what they are, how they are used, and why some people are worried about preprint publishing’s rising popularity. For our monthly book segment, Jen Golbeck talks to author Sandra Postel about her book, Replenish: The Virtuous Cycle of Water and Prosperity.” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whale Rescues 26 mins – “Why Canadian whale rescuers say they’re drowning in bureaucracy over a new government policy.” At the link find the title, “Sept 26 | New whale rescue policy drowning in bureaucracy, say critics, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170926_96447.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White Supremacist Movement 47 mins – “Charlottesville was rough enough. Now, far-right rallies are planned for nine more cities across the country this weekend. White supremacists have expressed gratitude for and encouragement from President Trump’s remarks this week. Steve Bannon has now called them clowns, but he’s encouraged them in the past. Who are they? Charlottesville saw old-fashioned swastikas and KKK regalia. But also polo shirts and chinos. This hour On Point: Who is the white supremacist movement now?” At the link right-click the down-point arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Work Future 47 mins – “Making a living in a digital future. Featuring: Planet Money, Raw Data, Cited, Marketplace, Containers…” At the link find the title, “The Future of Work,” right-click “Download The Future of Work” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wuthering Heights 48 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Emily Bronte (1818-1848) and her only novel, published in 1847 under the name ‘Ellis Bell’ just a year before her death. It is the story of Heathcliff, a foundling from Liverpool brought up in the Earnshaw family at the remote Wuthering Heights, high on the moors, who becomes close to the young Cathy Earnshaw but hears her say she can never marry him. He disappears and she marries his rival, Edgar Linton, of Thrushcross Grange even though she feels inextricably linked with Heathcliff, exclaiming to her maid ‘I am Heathcliff!’ On his return, Heathcliff steadily works through his revenge on all who he believes wronged him, and their relations. When Cathy dies, Heathcliff longs to be united with her in the grave. The raw passions and cruelty of the story unsettled Emily’s sister Charlotte Bronte, whose novel Jane Eyre had been published shortly before, and who took pains to explain its roughness, jealousy and violence when introducing it to early readers. Over time, with its energy, imagination and scope, Wuthering Heights became celebrated as one of the great novels in English.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zapatistas – Alexander Avina is an assistant professor of history at ASU. His research focuses on twentieth-century Mexico, primarily the post-1940 period.  His first book, titled Specters of Revolution: Peasant Guerrillas in the Cold War Mexican Countryside is a political history of rural guerrilla movements led by schoolteachers that emerged in the state of Guerrero during the 1960s and 70s.  His next book project explores the links between counterinsurgency, state terror, and the development of a transnational narcotics economy in the southwestern Mexican highlands in the 1960s.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zero Waste International Assoc – “Imagine a world where nothing is discarded into the land, air or water that could harm humans, animals or the planet. That is the goal of a “zero waste” philosophy. Today we are joined by Leslie Lukacs, who has presented at the Zero Waste International Association (www.zwia.org) conference for the past 3 years, and is a founder and principal of L2 Environmental (www.L2environmental.com). Leslie will help us understand how businesses, communities, and venues can implement zero waste principles, and what everyday people can do to make strides toward a zero waste lifestyle.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 308 – Oct 6, 2017: 9-11 Injuries, AI Use at Paypal, American Empire, American Enemies, Apartheid Decline, Automation Disruption, Blindness Story, Bone Health, Brain Protein Calendars, Brazilian Indian Massacre, Canvas Strategy, Capitalism Upgrade, Climate Change Deniers, Cold War History, Corruption Control, Cyberlaw, Dalai Lama, Degradable Bags, Democracy at Risk, Digital Doctors, Disaster Recovery, Equifax, European Future, Extreme Weather, Facebook Etiquette, Fake News in Ukraine, Farming on 2.25 Acres, Fungal Diseases, Go Green Initiative, History by Malcom Gladwell, Hookup Culture, Houston Hurricane Recovery, Human Trafficking, Hurricane Damage Costs, Independent American Voters, Information Aversion, Investigative Reporter Apuzzo on Trump, Investment Principles by Dalio, Islamic Politics, Japanese Cool Tools, Jazz Artist Fred Hersch, Katy Tur, Lead Hazards, Legal System Flaws, Medicare Discussion, Mortgage Fraud, Moth 500th Episode, Nanoparticles in Water, No Wanks, North Korea Nukes, Not Dead Yet, Opioid Epidemic in Ohio, Palliative Care Specialty, Postsecondary Education, Prison Radio, Qatar Crisis, Rape Kit, Refugees in Uganda, Robot Training, San Quentin life, Saudi Arabia in Transition, Sex Assaults on Campus, Sleep Needs, Solar Power Paint, Somalia Story, Stewardship, Suicide Prevention, Super Size Me 2, Sustainability Development Goals, Synchphonia App, Tales from the South, Terrorism Prevention, Transgender Stories, Turkey-Russia Relations, Universal Basic Income, Venomous Bites and Stings, Virtual Reality, Work Trends

Exercise your ears: the 138 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 500 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 17,430 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 86GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 400 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

3D Scanning Problems 44 mins – “Scott Tarcy of CAD Design Help is an expert in doing engineering and CAD work in general. Scott has a lot of experience working with CAD files in his CADDesignHelp.com company. He has a unique perspective and has a lot of experience. Scott was very interested on our recent episode on the Matter and Form desktop 3D scanner. He was surprised that we were so pleased with it and that it actually worked for us because his experience with desktop 3D scanners has really not been that great. We’re going to talk about that in this episode. Also about really the details, ins and outs of working with CAD files that have been 3D scanned and how you can and cannot work with them. He’s also going to tell us about this new 3D Print The Future TV Show that they filmed several episodes of the first season and it launches on Amazon Instant Video. You’re going to hear about that as well.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

9-11 Injuries 51 mins – “Following the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, first responders rushed to ground zero in Manhattan, where they braved dangerous conditions to rescue people buried in the rubble, retrieve the remains of the dead and clear the debris. Among them was demolition supervisor John Feal. Feal arrived at ground zero on Sept. 12; just five days later, he was seriously injured when an 8,000-pound piece of steel fell and crushed his foot. He became septic from the deeply infected wound, and nearly died. The accident cost Feal half his foot — and his job. His despair grew deeper when the government denied him medical compensation for his injury. Honoring The Other Fallen Of Sept. 11: Sickened Ground Zero Volunteers Speaking with other first responders, Feal realized that he was not alone. Not only were others also being denied money to help pay for their injuries and illnesses, but the trauma was ruining people’s lives. “They were losing their homes,” he says. “They were getting divorced, or separated, or their kids were in rehab for drugs because Daddy or Mommy were miserable.” Feal formed the FealGood Foundation, which advocates on behalf of emergency personnel. He also began working to pressure Congress to pass a bill that would provide compensation for medical care and monitoring for first responders. On Dec. 22, 2010, the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act was passed.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Afghanistan Status 58 mns – “A month after the attacks on Sept. 11, President Bush authorized strikes against Al Qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan.  Those limited attacks have since grown into an enormous commitment, amounting to thousands of American lives and billions of dollars. Meanwhile, President Trump recently renewed American involvement there, vowing victory….” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Use at Paypal 23 mins – “The next time you don’t recognize a transaction listed on your monthly Paypal statement, rest assured: AI will likely identify the culprit and help ensure it won’t happen again. With advances in machine learning and the deployments of neural networks, logistic regression-powered models are expanding their uses throughout PayPal, Vadim Kutsyy, a data scientist at the online payments company, told host Michael Copeland on this week’s edition of the AI Podcast.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alvin Chipmunks Creator 58 mins – “Years after his father created a hit singing group of anthropomorphic rodents called The Chipmunks, Ross Bagdasarian Jr. made it his mission to revive his dad’s beloved characters. Over the last 40 years, Ross Jr. and his wife Janice have built The Chipmunks into a billion dollar media franchise – run out of their home in Santa Barbara, California. PLUS in our postscript “How You Built That,” how Daniel Clark-Webster and his three friends came up with RompHim – a company specializing in male rompers.” At the link findthe title, “The Chipmunks: Ross Bagdasarian Jr. & Janice Karman, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170915_hibt_chipmunks.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Empire 53 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center, and is titled “The True Flag: Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain and the Birth of American Empire.”  Our speaker is author and journalist, Stephen Kinzer.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Enemies 47 mins – “As tensions rise with North Korea, Brian, Ed, and Nathan return to our episode on enemies. What distinguishes friend from foe – both at home and abroad – and how has America dealt with our adversaries across time?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apartheid Decline 32 mins – “Back in the 1980’s, when Louis Smuts was growing up in Johannesburg, South Africa, his family couldn’t go outside together without risking arrest. “My mother would always walk behind [my father] wherever they went,” he recalls. And in the car, she would sit in the back and pretend to be the family maid. At the time, Smuts didn’t understand that only white people could move freely in the city, while black South Africans were pushed to the outskirts. The country’s white-ruled government called this system by the Afrikaans word “apartheid,” meaning “separateness.” Under apartheid, white people had access to the best schools, jobs and healthcare. Smuts’ father was white and his mother was colored—a South African term for people of mixed race. They had gotten married in neighboring Swaziland, but back home their marriage was illegal. Apartheid leaders claimed that segregated cities were better for everyone, and apartheid was strictly enforced. Police would patrol neighborhoods to make sure that white people and black people weren’t living together. But the system was never airtight, and people found creative ways to slip through the cracks.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apocalypse Alternative 57 mins – ”For this week’s Team Human, Douglas is out on the road in Austin, Texas where he caught up with longtime friend and cyberculture pioneer, Jon Lebkowsky. Jon and Douglas first look back on the promise of the early cyber revolution, and then look forward to the ways in which those quirky fringe elements might be folded back into the work of promoting justice, solidarity, and even a bit of ambiguity… Whether manifested in platform cooperatives, consensus building tools like Loomio, or in the spirit of Occupy, Lebkowsky and Rushkoff retrieve the thread of radical potential as it has evolved from those early days of the internet. Douglas begins today’s show discussing his recent meeting with a group of billionaires whose fears of future social unrest have left them scrambling for apocalypse strategies to protect their wealth and lifestyle. Find out what the “insulation equation” is as Douglas challenges these executives to forgo the Walking Dead scenarios and join team human!” At the link find the title, “Ep. 55 Jon Lebkowsky “Folding the Fringes,”right-click “Media files 59c1fb320f976e1323e1dd0f.mp3” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Automation Disruption 56 mins – “AI and robots seem to be everywhere, handling more and more work, freeing humans up — to do what? Contributor Jill Eisen takes a wide-angle lens to the digital revolution happening in our working lives. Part 1 of 3” At the link find the title, “Artificial intelligence, robots and the future of work, Part 1, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170913_76872.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autonomous Vehicles Impact 56 mins – “We’re racing down the highway to autonomous cars, whether it takes 10, 20 or 30 years. But what happens to our economy, the shape of our cities, and even our century-old car-centric culture once the vehicles arrive?” At the link find the title, “Autonomy: The unexpected implications of self-driving vehicles, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170912_27705.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biogas Production 6 mins – “The fuel in natural gas and biogas is methane, produced by microorganisms. Mike Manefield has developed a synthetic molecule which when applied to a feedstock as a crystal, substantially increases the production of methane. Feedstocks can be anything organic, be it food waste, animal waste or crop residue. Some experiments using coal have increased gas production by 18 times. While anaerobic digesters are few in Australia, Germany has 16,000. Mike Manefield says 5% of the world’s energy comes from anaerobic digestion which shows the potential of his ‘magic’ synthetic crystals.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blindness Story 39 mins – “Blind Abilities brings you another installment in the series, presented by AT&T and Aira featuring individuals who have influenced the blindness community through their passions and their actions. This installment introduces Belo Cipriani. belo is an author, an eloquent advocate for the rights of people with disabilities, and so much more. Join Jeff and Pete as they explore Belo’s story, beginning with the tragic assault that led to his blindness, to his rehabilitation at Orientation College for the Blind (OCB), finishing his Masters Degree, writing his book: “Blind, A Memoir”, and his life as a gay blind person. Belo offers a deep look at his thoughts, his fears and his noteworthy attitude that its great to be blind.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bone Health 58 mins – “Osteoporosis, weakened bones, affects about 10 million Americans. But low bone density is even more common. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, about half of adults over 50 are at risk for a fracture. …Some of the factors that lead to osteoporosis can’t be avoided. Genetics is chief among these. If your grandparents and parents suffered from weak bones and fractures, your chances of osteoporosis are higher than average. …That doesn’t mean there is nothing you can do, however. It just may mean you’ll have to try harder to keep your bones strong. Getting adequate amounts of vitamin D and calcium is important. Not smoking-or quitting if you do smoke-is just as critical. Exercise throughout our lives sends crucial signals to our bones that we need them and helps keep them strong. To get the best benefit from exercise, it should be something in which the foot hits the ground: walking, skipping, jumping, dancing, tennis, etc. Other forms of exercise such as swimming or biking are also good for your health, but they do less to keep your bones strong. Learn how doctors detect osteoporosis with DXA technology, and how they treat it if they discover you have it. You’ll also find out why men too need to be concerned about bone health. This Week’s Guest: Abby G. Abelson, MD, FACR, is Chair of the Department of Rheumatic and Immunologic Diseases of the Orthopaedic and Rheumatology Institute and Education Program Director in the Department of Rheumatologic and Immunologic Diseases at Cleveland Clinic. Her book is The Cleveland Clinic Guide to Osteoporosis.” Follow the instructions at the web site to download the free MP3.

Bored and Brilliant Project P1 21 mins – “Today, the first book to be born out of a crowdsourced podcasting movement – our movement, dear listeners – is here. In 2015, tens of thousands of you joined me in an experiment. Could we separate from our devices just a bit, and turn them from taskmaster to tool? Could we make space for boredom, and let the brilliance in? Together, we found the answer. YES. Enter Bored and Brilliant: How Spacing Out Can Unlock Your Most Productive and Creative Self. Today, we connect with Liam and Vanessa, who took part of the original challenge, to hear the surprising places the last two years have taken them.Plus a new conversation with tech-star and NTS friend Tristan Harris, a designer once tasked with sucking your eyeballs to the screen. Now, he’s fighting the good fight to reclaim your brain.” At the link find the title, “Attention Please, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files notetoself090517_cms792757 pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bored and Brilliant Project P2 21 mins – “José Cruz is a college student, research scientist, and phone power-user. He spent 6 hours in one day on his screen. So he wanted to cut back, make more time for research, reading, and mental drift. We gave José a copy of Manoush’s new book, Bored and Brilliant: How Spacing Out Can Unlock Your Most Productive and Creative Self. The book has a week of challenges, and José did them all. He recorded the journey. It wasn’t easy, but boy, was there a payoff. Plus, seventh grade teacher-turned-neuroscientist Mary Helen Immordino-Yang explains why José’s week of struggle and revelation makes total neurological sense. And what we can all learn about the link between single-tasking and innovation.” At the link find the title, “Eavesdropping On Epiphany, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files notetoself091317_cms795540_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Damage 24 mins – “This year’s lecturer is Neurobiologist Colin Blakemore. A Professor of Physiology at the University of Cambridge and Director of Medical Studies at Downing College, he is the youngest person to give the Reith lectures. He explores the concepts of the brain in his Reith series entitled ‘Mechanics of the Mind’ and evaluates how our brains have shaped our behaviour and our society. In this lecture entitled ‘The Divinest Part of Us’, Professor Colin Blakemore discusses how the theory of the mind mirrors man’s social development; from Plato’s genetically-controlled meritocracy of the mind, to Franz Joseph Gall’s view of character showing through the shape of the human skull. Professor Blakemore delves into the idea of miraculous mind and explains how the scientific world has not always thought that highly of the brain.” At the link find the title, “The Divinest Part of Us, Nov, 1976,” right-click “Media files p02r7sr3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Protein Calendars 54 mins – “Seth Grant has made a career by combining his skills in molecular biology, medicine and neuroscience. Brain Science listeners may remember him best for his explorations of the evolution of the synapse (BSP 51) and in BSP 101 he told us about how small genetic changes related to synapse proteins can influence learning, but this month he shares a new paper, which describes what he calls the “genetic lifespan calendar.” The key idea is that the genes in both the mouse and human brain appear to follow a predictable schedule. Grant’s team also found that they could predict the age of a brain by looking at its transcriptome (which mRNA is present). It is important to emphasize that this is a surprising new discovery. If it is replicated by other researchers, it could open up entirely new research approaches. In this month’s podcast Dr. Grant explains how the research was conducted and some of its important implications. Dr. Grant has a long time interest in schizophrenia so he is particularly excited about how this research might explain why schizophrenia, which has a larger genetic component, usually emerges in young adulthood. We also touch briefly on the fact that there seems to be different calendars for males and females. Grant observed,”this points to the bigger picture of things. There is an organization, an architecture, that is embedded in our genome, that controls not just where every molecule is in your brain and how they’re all assembled together, but when and how they change throughout the lifespan.  It is truly a most extraordinary programming of the genome that gives this remarkable complexity of the brain in both space and in time.  And I think this is just a fantastically exciting area.”  At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazilian Indian Massacre 15 mins – “By protecting large swaths of the Amazon, this is a climate assurance for all of us.” At the link find the title, “Sept 15 | Why Brazil’s Indigenous land — home to uncontacted tribes — needs to be protected: researcher, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170915_14864.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canvas Strategy 23 mins – “My job is usually to deconstruct world-class performers from business, military, entertainment, politics, or athletics, and then to tease out the routines and habits you can use. In this particular episode, I’m going to share an overarching strategy that has been used by many of the greats. That includes Ben Franklin, legendary NFL coach Bill Belichick, and many, many more. It is also how I built my network, how my first book hit the tipping point, how I became successful at angel investing, and the list goes on. Of course, if you’re interested in the networking part of it, you can also read the blog post and listen to the episode, How to Build a World-Class Network in Record Time. But that is additional credit. The secret to all of the above is the “canvas strategy.” And in this episode, Ryan Holiday, author of the new book, Ego Is the Enemy, will teach you how to apply canvas strategy to your life. (The book is also the newest addition to my book club, which can be found at audible.com/timsbooks.) Please enjoy this excerpt with Ryan Holiday from Ego Is the Enemy.” At the link find the title, “#165: The Canvas Strategy — What Ben Franklin and Bill Belichick Have in Common,” right-click “Media files e2d9fe52-6004-438a-8eaf-0acf355aca34.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Capitalism Upgrade 68 mins – “Sustaining Capitalism: Bipartisan Solutions to Restore Trust and Prosperity – The Committee for Economic Development of The Conference Board (CED) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, business-led public policy organization that delivers analysis and solutions to our nation’s most critical issues. In the 75 years since its inception in 1942, CED has addressed national priorities that promote sustained economic growth and development aimed at benefitting all Americans. These activities have encompassed the Marshall Plan in the late 1940s, education reform in the past three decades and campaign finance reform since 2000. CED’s research findings are coupled with multipronged outreach efforts throughout the country and abroad, achieving tangible impact at the local, state and national levels. With a new administration and Congress in office, and an ever-changing world anxious about its future, join a high-level conversation on how to ensure business and policy leaders can generate prosperity for all and make capitalism sustainable for generations to come.” At the link find the title, “Sustaining Capitalism: Bipartisan Solutions to Restore Trust and Prosperity, May 12, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170512_Sustaining_Capitalism_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cargo Ships 52 mins – “In our globalized world, it only takes a click to buy something from China and have it delivered right to your doorstep. But that product sailed across the ocean on a cargo ship before it got to you. Over 90 percent of global trade travels across the ocean by ship. In this episode, we’ll step on board some of these ships and meet the sailors who work there. What’s it like to live for months at sea, isolated with only your co-workers? And when a ship stops in the USA, how do sailors spend the few precious hours they have on shore?” At the link find the title, “Truckers of the High Seas, Oct, 2014,” right-click “Media files Truckers_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cassini Project Ends 9 mins – “253 EE Why NASA Is Crashing Its Cassini Spacecraft into Saturn…” At the link find the title quoted above, right-click “Media files ede_253-cy5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cassini Project Ends 48 mins – “The Cassini spacecraft and all it’s taught us about Saturn and its many moons before it burns up.On Friday morning, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft takes one last turn over Saturn and dives to a fiery destruction, like a meteor burning up in the atmosphere of the ringed planet. It will be a long-planned end to Cassini’s 20-year exploration of Saturn, its rings and its many moons. Sixty-two moons at latest count. Tracking lunar oceans, lakes, geysers and maybe cradles of life.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China in the Arctic 27 mins – “A Chinese research vessel that went through the North West passage this summer has critics worried about potential consequences to Arctic sovereignty.” At the link find the title, “Sept 15 | Critics fear China’s foray into Northwest Passage endangers Arctic sovereignty,” right-click “Media files current_20170915_89362.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Deniers 56 mins – “Global warming is “Fake News”, a “Chinese Hoax”. So says a richly funded Conservative movement that’s become a world-wide campaign. In her book, “The Merchants of Doubt”, Naomi Oreskes traces how this propaganda war started and how to fight it.” At the link find the title, “Decoding the resistance to climate change: Are we doomed?, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170914_66265.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cold War History 15 mins – “Angela Stent on George Kennan The Reith Lectures Significant international thinkers deliver the BBC’s flagship annual lecture series” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Columbian Bicyclists 28 mins – “Colombia is a country of passionate cyclists. The first bike races took place in Bogota in 1894 and by 1898 it was one of the first countries to have two purpose built velodromes. In the 1950s the great Vuelta a Colombia, a tour of Colombia, was born – 35 cyclists covered an extraordinary 779 miles in 10 stages. All over the country people listened to the commentary on radios and it began to link up Colombians in a common cause.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Commuting History and Data Collection 47 mins – “In this week’s roundtable discussion, Brian, Joanne, and Ed discuss the history behind 3 stories in the news: our lengthening work commutes, the massive data breach at Equifax, and the Census Bureau’s latest numbers on income inequality in America.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pp-up menu.

Corruption Control 174 mins – “On September 18, 2017, Brookings hosted an event to discuss new developments in how transparency, accountability, and participation initiatives can contribute to reducing corruption and achieving sustainable development.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar to download the audio file.

Cyberlaw 61 mins – “Berkman Klein Center Faculty Chair Jonathan Zittrain discusses the development of the Internet — from its earliest stages to its present manifestations — as a technology for good or harm, depending on the human forces that wield it.” At the link find the title,”Jonathan Zittrain on Technology for the Social Good, Sep 2017,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save target as” from the pop-up menu.

Dalai Lama 72 mins – “Though he holds no official worldly rank, the Dalai Lama is widely seen as one of the most insightful leaders of the modern era. His emphasis on nonviolent protest, compassion, and reason are the foundation of his teachings. With these values, Dr. Robert Thurman believes there is a powerful hope for reconciliation, peace and enlightenment. In his book, Dr. Thurman gives the detailed life story of the fourteenth Dalai Lama, from his early childhood and escape into exile, to conflicts with the Chinese Communist Party, and finally, his role as a truly global inspirational figure with special insight on Tibetan culture and identity. Dr. Thurman is the Jey Tsong Khapa Professor of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Studies at Columbia University and president of the Tibetan House U.S. He has popularized the Buddha’s teachings in the West and has authored several books on Tibet, Buddhism and most recently his good friend the Dalai Lama XIV. Dr. Thurman is also the first westerner to be ordained a Tibetan monk by the Dalai Lama.” At the link find the title, “Dr. Robert Thurman: Reflections on Peace and His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170911_Robert_Thurman_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Degradable Bags 6 mins – “When school student Angelina Arora saw all the plastic bags being carried out of a supermarket, she was reminded of the environmental damage produced by these one-use conveniences. She went looking for an alternative and began testing compounds made from everyday chemicals found in the home. She tested 6 substances and ran them through 5 tests. She experimented with different amounts of glycerine for endurance and vinegar as a binder. Angelina’s experiment led her to be chosen as a finalist in this year’s BHP Science and Engineering Awards.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Delusion Disorder 26 mins – “Trapped in a frightening world created by her brain, a person with delusional disorder shares what it’s like to live in fear.” At the link find the title, “Sept 14 | Delusional disorder: The undiagnosed, understudied mental illness, 2-17,” right-click “Media files current_20170914_30489.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy at Risk 68 mins – “Competitive and fair elections are the ultimate guarantor of American democracy. Yet they are facing an increasing number of challenges. The Citizens United decision opened the floodgates to Super PAC and secret money in U.S. elections. The 2016 election cycle witnessed the greatest outpouring of big money in American politics in history. The top 100 donors to Super PACs gave $1 billion, or an average of $10 million per donor, of the $1.8 billion total given to these groups. The massive sums of money raised for elections are not the only threats to their integrity.  Politicians who gerrymander distort electoral districts” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Doctors 76 mins – “Dr. Robert Wachter discusses his book “The Digital Doctor” that explores the complex interaction of medicine and information technology. Medicine is both an enormous business and a distinctly human endeavor which makes the interaction of medicine and information technology very complex. Recorded on 06/01/2017. (#32349)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Recovery 46 mins – “In the wake of NASA’s most recent mission to Saturn, we’re heading out of this world. Spaceships run on several things: fuel, physics and cash. But that last category accounts for a lot of things, like people, equipment, maintenance and time. What’s the breakdown? And what’s the value of the images and info gathered in space? Can we measure it? And, we take a look at why our Social Security numbers are tied to everything and what happens when those nine digits fall into the wrong hands. Plus, when it comes to disasters, should we invest in disaster preparedness or disaster relief? Oh, and we have a special appearance by a fizzy beverage that’s making a comeback.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar to get the audio file.

Diversities and Averages 30 mins – “Professor of Sociology and Director of the London School of Economics Ralf Dahrendorf gives his fourth Reith lecture from his series entitled ‘The New Liberty’. In this lecture entitled ‘On Difference’, Professor Ralf Dahrendorf discusses the concept of diversity and averages. Evaluating the socialist philosophies of different countries, he dissects the averages that are found in society and contemplates what will happen when developing countries try to reassess their status as developed countries.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Power in Hew Hampshire 58 mins – “The decision on the hydro-electric transmission project, which would bring power from Canada to New England, has been postponed yet again. We review the goals of this $1.6 billion proposal and examine how the debate around it has changed since it was first presented in 2010.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equifax 151 mins – “Qualcomm (which is a TWiT sponsor) says Android beats iPhone. Samsung wants a folding phone. Everybody hates Silicon Valley, especially Facebook – most especially, the ex-Googlers who founded Bodega. Oxford commas, “they” as a neutral singular pronoun, and how to pronounce cuneiform. Pharma bro: do not pass go. Blueborn attack could affect 5 billion devices. Equifax – now that none of our information is private, what’s next? Samsung Galaxy Note 8 review. Welcome Alexis Ohanian Jr.” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equifax Mess 47 mins – “The story of how Equifax exposed the personal data of 143 million Americans to a lifetime of fraud and abuse can kind of make your head explode. We have to deal with credit rating agencies to operate in this world. And then, a giant one turns around and effectively throws our security and privacy in the street, and now we all have to scramble to have a prayer of not getting burned. While they still make money. Off us.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

European Future 162 mins – “On September 15, the Center on the United States and Europe (CUSE), in collaboration with the Robert Bosch Stiftung, hosted a half-day conference on the future of Europe and trans-Atlantic relations. Ahead of the critical elections in Germany, and following dramatic elections in France, Great Britain, and the Netherlands, CUSE scholars examined shifting dynamics across Europe and evolving views about the Euro-Atlantic partnership.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar to download the audio file.

Exploration 30 mins – “This year’s Reith lecturer is distinguished Professor of American history, Dr Daniel J Boorstin, the twelfth Librarian of Congress. In his Reith lectures, entitled ‘America and the World Experience’, he explores how the USA developed into the superpower it is today. In this first lecture entitled ‘The Birth of Exploration’, Dr Boorstin explains why the desire to journey to new and undiscovered lands was important in the development of the United States of America. He considers the difference between a ‘frontier’ and ‘the wilderness’ for the first colonisers of the continent and explains how a community spirit of adventure made it all possible.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Extreme Weather 54 mins – “From Katrina and Sandy to Harvey, Irma and José – how is climate change fueling these increasingly destructive hurricanes? Greg Dalton and his guests delve into the politics, costs and human causes of the megastorms pummeling our planet.” At the link find the title, “Harvey and Irma: A Hurricane’s Human Fingerprints, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170917_cl1_Harvey and Irma PODCAST.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook Etiquette 56 mins – “The Internet has been billed as the great equalizer, breaking down barriers and increasing access to information and ideas. At the same time, it has allowed for the proliferation of abuse online – whether in the form of hate, harassment or offensive content. The freedom to express oneself is an important principle, but should it persist unfettered? How and where should we draw the line, and who – or what – should play a role in moderating online debate? Monika Bickert, Facebook’s Head of Global Policy Management, and Jonathan Zittrain, Faculty Director of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society and Harvard professor, discuss online abuse and the role that technology can play in addressing it.” At the link find the title, “The Line Between Hate and Debate on Facebook, Sep 2017” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save target as” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 52 mins – “How did we end up here? How did America get to this post-truth moment, where the line blurs between reality and illusion? In a new book, radio host and author Kurt Andersen lays out a timeline for how we lost our collective mind. And really, it’s nothing new. America, Andersen says, has always been a country of true believers, wishful dreamers, hucksters and suckers, and we’ve always been uniquely susceptible to fantasy. Andersen joins us Wednesday to explore the 500-year history of a country going haywire. Kurt Andersen is the co-creator and host of the radio program Studio 360, which can be heard Sundays at noon on KUER. He’s also a columnist, critic, and the author of numerous books. His newest is Fantasyland–How America Went Haywire: A 500-year History At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Fake News in Ukraine 28 mins – “Fake news from Russia helped spark a real war in Ukraine. What can Ukraine’s fight against fake news teach the US?” At the link find the title, “Ukraine vs. Fake News, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170821_roughtranslation_ep2ukraine.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming on 2.25 Acres 76 mins – “Laura Davis farms about two-and-a-quarter acres of vegetables at Long Life Farm in suburban Hopkinton, Massachusetts, with her husband, Donald Sutherland. Laura started farming after she was laid off from her 30-year career in the medical device business, and she and Donald farm full time, selling their produce to a CSA and two farmers markets. Laura was attracted for farming through a passion for soil science, and has put a lot of effort into re-mineralizing her soils. We discuss her approach to improving the soil in order to improve her crops, and the reduced insect and disease pressure she’s seen on her farm as a result. Laura also shares her experience with a recent foray into no-till production. Laura is also an organic certification inspector, and we discuss the ways that being a certified organic farm from very early on fit into Long Life Farm’s business strategy. Laura shares her tips for record-keeping and staying in your certification agency’s – and your inspector’s – good graces.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.

Farming on 37 Acres 86 mins – “Jeff and Elise Higley of Oshala Farm in southwest Oregon’s Applegate Valley raise 37 acres of medicinal and culinary herbs for the wholesale herb market, as well as for direct- and value-added production. Jeff and Elise provide insights into their business model for working with medicinal herbs, and how they went about getting the business established. We discuss how they balance labor needs, infrastructure utilization, and production cycle for over 70 annual, perennial, and biennial crops, and how they have developed processes that provide their products with stand-out quality and a significant “wow factor” – something that’s surprisingly important even in the wholesale market that forms the economic backbone of their business. We also discuss property selection for medicinal herb production, how they’ve used regulatory changes as an opportunity to grow their business, and employee management in a business that is even scratchier, sweatier, and dustier than vegetable production. We also dig into the impacts of the “green rush” prompted by Oregon’s legalization of marijuana, how that’s affected their farm economics, and how they’ve adapted to those changes.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming on 5 Acres 76 mins –Shawn Kuhn of Vitruvian Farms raises about five acres of vegetables with his business partner, Tommy Stauffer, in McFarland, Wisconsin, just outside of Madison. Vitruvian Farms raises a little bit of everything, and a lot of salad greens, so we dig into the ins and outs producing 1,200 pounds of salad greens a week, from bed shaping and weed control through harvest and delivery. Shawn shares the ways they have – and have not – mechanized their salad production, and how they make this intensive level of production work on a small scale. We also look at the key success factors for their other main crops, oyster mushrooms, tomatoes, and microgreens. Most of Vitruvian Farms’ produce is sold through 45 restaurants in Madison, and Shawn shares how they got started in that marketplace and how they maintain those relationships. We dig into what quality really means when selling to restaurants, and how Vitruvian Farms gets top-notch produce to demanding chefs in a crowded marketplace.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.

Fear Control 46 mins – “In this episode, author and speaker, Akshay Nanavati, joins us to discuss his new book, Fearvana: The Revolutionary Science of How to Turn Fear into Health, Wealth and Happiness, which uses neuroscientific and psychological research to aid personal development. Akshay talks openly about his personal journey, struggle with drugs and alcohol and post traumatic stress disorder diagnosis that led to the research in his concept of Fearvana. Akshay is a Marine Corps Veteran, adventurer, entrepreneur and success coach.At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federal Debt Ceiling 42 mins -[First Item – 11 mins]”A week after President Trump cut a surprise deal with Democrats, and 100 years after it was created, is the debt ceiling still serving its intended purpose? Plus, inside the alt-right idolization of Taylor Swift and medieval history and how some are trying to fight back. Finally, a new book argues that we may need less technology, even–or especially–if it means we become more bored.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Film Producer Aronofsky 127 mins – “Darren Aronofsky (@DarrenAronofsky) is the founder and head of production company Protozoa Pictures. He is the acclaimed and award-winning filmmaker behind both cult classics and blockbusters, including Pi (which earned him a Best Director award at the 1998 Sundance Film Festival), Requiem For a Dream, The Wrestler (the third U.S. film in history to win the esteemed Golden Lion award), Black Swan (which won Natalie Portman the Academy Award for Best Actress and garnered four other Oscar nominations), Noah (His biblically inspired epic that opened at number at the box office and grossed more than $362,000,000 worldwide), and his latest, mother!, a psychological horror-thriller film starring Jennifer Lawrence, Javier Bardem, Ed Harris, and Michelle Pfeiffer. In this episode, we explore a wide range of topics, including: His creative process and “nomadic writing” Work environment and highly unusual desks The “Month of Fury” How to navigate tough conversations over creativity and control Psychedelics Dealing with critics And much more… Many thanks to Peter Attia for making the introduction — check out his three previous appearances on this show here….” At the link find the title, “#263: Filmmaker Darren Aronofsky — Exploring Creativity, Ignoring Critics, and Making Art,” right-click “Media files d1969bd1-650c-448e-b4a2-273e3d81619b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Film Producer Keoghan 95 mins – “Phil Keoghan (@PhilKeoghan) has worked in television for almost thirty years on more than a thousand program episodes in more than a hundred countries. His work has earned him numerous awards, including ten prime-time Emmys. He is perhaps best known as the co-executive producer and host of CBS series The Amazing Race, currently in its twenty-ninth season. But there is much, much more to Phil’s story, including unbelievable bucket lists, near-death experiences, and more. As just one example… In 2013, he decided to retrace the 1928 Tour de France riding an original vintage bicycle, with no gears, to tell the forgotten underdog story of the first English-speaking team to take on the toughest sporting event on earth. This experience was captured and turned into the brand-new film Le Ride, a gorgeous documentary and the first to be shot on a Sony F55 camera in 4K, which is equivalent to Super 35mm film. There are many takeaways from this conversation, and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did!” At the link find the title, “#242: Phil Keoghan — The Magic of Bucket Lists and Amazing Races,” right-click “Media files c5be9004-c63d-4b29-9c79-d9fa6ae542b9.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food and Health 49 mins – “We all want to make good health decisions, but every day a new study comes out that seems to change the game. Fat’s bad for you; then it’s good. Count calories. Don’t. Add in all the marketing and news media, and it’s hard to tell the good stuff from the snake oil. James Hamblin is a doctor-turned-journalist, and in his writing for The Atlantic magazine he wades through the noise to find the signal. He joins us Tuesday to help us better understand how to listen to and take care of our bodies. James Hamblin is an MD and a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about behavioral health, nurition, culture, and preventative medicine. He’s also the host of a video series and a book, both of which are called If Our Bodies Could TalkAt the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fungal Diseases 47 mins – “Raymond St. Leger describes his work on insect pathogenic fungi. Members of this diverse group of fungi can be found as part of the plant rhizosphere, where they provide nutrients to the plant, and can also be deployed as insect control agents. Raymond discusses his work with communities in Burkina Faso, where he works with officials to educate and gain consent for use of mosquito-killing fungi to control the spread of malaria….” At the link find the title, “066: Insect-pathogenic fungi as fertilizers and mosquito control with Raymond St. Leger,” right-click “Media files MTM066.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Pest Control 44 mins – “The diamondback moth is a formidable agricultural pest, causing tremendous losses on farms and requiring significant cultural and chemical-based management on both conventional and organic farms.  Dr. Tony Shelton has studied the diamonback moth for decades, and now has initiated the first open fie2ld trails of a genetically engineered sterile insect technique that could be a helpful solution.  Dr. Shelton discusses the potential risks, benefits, promises and pushbacks from proposing this technology.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Go Green Initiative 55 mins – “Long before “going green” was cool, a bunch of PTA moms banded together to start the Go Green Initiative (www.gogreeninitiative.org). The organization began with no staff, no budget, and no idea that it would soon become the world’s largest environmental education program. What began on a kitchen table in California has now spread to schools and communities in all 50 U.S. States, 36 countries and 5 continents…and we’re just getting warmed up! Tune into Go Green Radio this week to learn more about what makes the Go Green Initiative special, and follow along with a slideshow found on the Blog at http://www.gogreeninitiative.org. ” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

History by Malcolm Gladwell 24 mins – ““History is an awful lot more than statues and names on buildings. If it was that easy to erase, we’d all be in trouble.’” At the linkf ind the title, “Sept 14 | History is ‘more than statues and names on buildings’: Malcolm Gladwell, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170914_52284.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV in Russia 14 mins – “Michel Kazatchkine joins us to talk about Russia’s health system and struggles with HIV/AIDS in the context of its unique history.” At the link find the title, “Russia—history and health: The Lancet: Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 28september_russia.mp3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless Teens 24 mins – “Young adults who age out of the foster system often bring with them a lifetime of trauma. One organization is determined to make them feel at home.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Hookup Culture 26 mins – “We all know casual sex isn’t about love. But what if it’s not even about lust? Sociologist Lisa Wade believes the pervasive hookup culture on campuses today is different from that faced by previous generations. This week on Hidden Brain, we revisit a favorite episode exploring what this culture means for those who choose to participate, and for those who opt out.” At the link find the title, “Just Sex, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170925_hiddenbrain encore of episode_61, just_sex.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Houston Hurricane Recovery 28 mins – “In the wake of Hurricane Harvey, refugees and undocumented immigrants, already scared about deportation and the risks of interacting with government, must seek help from the same authorities they fear might seek to look into their immigration status. As Houston comes together, the city’s mosques and Islamic centres have opened their doors to all who need shelter. Volunteers from all backgrounds have been helping those who need rescue and immediate relief. For a brief moment, prejudices seem to melt away. But can it last through what will be a long process of rebuilding?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Growth Hormone 76 mins – “Aimee Medeiros discusses her book “Heightened Expectations” with Elena Conis. They explore the history of American’s ideas about height and how short stature, particularly in boys, became a “disease” in need of medical treatment – which spawned the multibillion dollar human growth industry. Recorded on 05/11/2017. (#32346)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Trafficking 12 mins – “Rebecca Cooney and Hanni Stoklosa discuss the distinction between human trafficking and smuggling.” At the link find the title, “Difference between human trafficking and smuggling: Sept, 2017” right-click “Media files 19sept_trafficking.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Damage Cost 46 mins -”Underwater. Devastating floods in Texas put the spotlight back on the nation’s troubled flood insurance program. We’ll take it up.The deluge continues in Houston and the flooding aftermath is intense. By the time this storm is over, houses in the region are expected to suffer up to $30 billion in damages. But the National Flood Insurance Program is already in rough shape – heavily in debt and politically at risk. Without it, how will homeowners cover their losses?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Independent American Voters 27 mins – “What is motivating Ohio’s volatile ‘independent’ voters who are not Democrats or Republicans? Michael Goldfarb travels to the key state of Ohio to meet independent voters. He explores the anger that is motivating independents and places their views in the deeper historical context of changes in American society.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Information Aversion 27 mins– “Ignorance is bliss, but knowledge is power…right? In this episode of Hidden Brain, we explore why we sometimes avoid information that’s vital to our well-being.” At th elink find the title, “The Ostrich Effect, Sept,”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170918_hiddenbrain_hb_82, the_ostrich_effect.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence 29 mins – “In 2014, a new research and outreach organisation was born in Boston. Calling itself The Future of Life Institute, its founders included Jaan Tallinn – who helped create Skype – and a physicist from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. That physicist was Professor Max Tegmark. With a mission to help safeguard life and develop optimistic visions of the future, the Institute has focused largely on Artificial Intelligence (AI). Of particular concern is the potential for AI to leapfrog humans and achieve so-called “superintelligence” – something discussed in depth in Tegmark’s latest book Life 3.0. This week Ian Sample asks the physicist and author what would happen if we did manage to create superintelligent AI? Do we even know how to build human-level AI? And with no sign of computers outsmarting us yet, why talk about it now?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investigator Reporter Apuzzo on Trump 23 mins – “New York Times Investigative Reporter Matt Apuzzo joins Chuck to talk about where the Mueller investigation is going, and what to expect in the coming months from the Special Counsel.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow to get the audio file.

Investment Principles by Dalio 126 mins – “Ray Dalio (@raydalio) grew up a middle-class kid from Long Island. He started his investment company Bridgewater Associates out of a two-bedroom apartment at age 26, and it now has roughly $160 billion in assets under management. Over 42 years, he has built Bridgewater into what Fortune considers the fifth most important private company in the U.S. Along the way, Dalio became one the 100 most influential people in the world (according to Time) and one of the 100 wealthiest people in the world (according to Forbes). Because of his unique investment principles that have changed industries, aiCIO Magazine called him “the Steve Jobs of investing.” Ray believes his success is the result of principles he’s learned, codified, and applied to his life and business. Those principles are detailed in his new book Principles: Life and Work. In this interview, we cover a lot, including: How Ray thinks about investment decisions, how he thinks about correlation, etc. The three books he would give to every graduating high school or college senior How he might assess cryptocurrency “ At the link find the title, “#264: Ray Dalio, The Steve Jobs of Investing,” right-click “Media files 12871ab9-f085-4f1e-83db-7b088c4a2d92.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Rules 52 – “In this fun conversation between two old friends and colleagues, Tom Cock of Vestory.com and Paul discuss their 401k Project, John Bogel, and answers to listener/investor questions about newsletters, currency, IRAs, annuities and more. Tom and Paul produced a radio show together for more than a decade. You can also access Vestory’s free video courses on “Real Retirement Investing” online at TalkingRealMoney.com.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

iPhone X 46 mins – “The new iPhone’s out, and it unlocks not with a fingerprint, but with your face. We’ll take a look and see where mobile phone technology and competition are.Like it or not, we live on our smartphones these days. Not everybody, but a lot of people. On Tuesday, from its new spaceship-shaped campus in California, Apple unveiled its latest versions: the iPhone 8, 8 Plus and iPhone X, the first $1,000 smartphone. Facial recognition to unlock it. Wireless charging. New screen. But there is competition. Samsung’s new Galaxy does not explode, and it’s pretty great, too. Up next, On Point: Apple, Samsung, more — and the state of smartphone competition right now.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islamaphobia 32 mins – “President George W. Bush, speaking at a mosque on Sept. 17, 2001: “The face of terror is not the true faith of Islam. That’s not what Islam is all about. Islam is peace.” Donald Trump, campaigning for president on March 9, 2016: “I think Islam hates us.” David Yerushalmi was living in an Israeli settlement near Jerusalem speaking on the phone with his father when the planes hit the towers on Sept. 11, 2001. “We got it wrong,” Yerushalmi remembers telling his father. Before Sept. 11th, Yerushalmi thought terrorism was about nationalism, a fight over land. Afterward, he decided terrorism committed by Muslim extremists was driven by Islam itself — and underpinned by Islamic Shariah law.  So he packed up his family and moved to New York to become part of a fledgling community of conservatives who would come to be known as counter-jihadists. They had an uphill battle to fight: In the aftermath of Sept. 11, President Bush and most Americans, according to polls, did not equate Islam with terrorism. But 16 years later, even though there hasn’t been another large-scale terrorist attack on American soil committed by a Muslim, America’s perspective on Islam has changed — evidenced most notably by the election of a president who believes the religion itself hates the country. Yerushalmi is a big reason for this change of heart. He’s a behind-the-scenes leader of the counter-jihad movement, filing lawsuits pushing back against the encroachment of Islam in the public sphere and crafting a series of anti-Sharia laws that Muslims and civil rights groups decry as Islamophobic. “Do I think that the United States is weak enough to collapse either from a kinetic Jihad, meaning war, or even a civilizational Jihad that the Muslim Brotherhood talks about? No. At least not in my lifetime. But do I think it’s an existential threat that allows for sleeper cells and the Internet-grown Jihadist that we see day in and day out wreaking so much havoc here and in Europe? Yes. Do I see it as a threat to our freedoms and liberties incrementally through their so-called civilizational Jihad where they use our laws and our freedoms to undermine our laws and our freedoms? Absolutely.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islamic Politics 89 mins – “The rapid succession of events of the past four years have challenged conventional wisdom on political Islam. In “Rethinking Political Islam” (Oxford University Press, 2017), Shadi Hamid and William McCants have gathered together the leading specialists in the field to examine how Islamist movements around the world are rethinking some of the their basic assumptions. The contributors, who include Islamist activists and leaders themselves, describe how groups are considering key strategic questions, including gradual versus revolutionary approaches to change; the use of tactical or situational violence; attitudes toward the state; and how ideology and politics interact. On September 25, Graeme Wood of The Atlantic and Kristin Diwan of the Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington joined Hamid and McCants for a panel discussion on the book’s findings and conclusions. After the discussion, the panel took audience questions. A reception and book signing followed.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IT Pioneer 26 mins – “Hannah Devlin speaks with the IT pioneer about her life as a woman in tech, having a son with autism, and how it all led to her later role as a philanthropist. In 1962, Stephanie Shirley – now Dame Stephanie Shirley – set up the computing company Freelance Programmers with just £6. The company was one of the first to commercialise software which, until then, had often been given away for free with computers. And with a gender balance of roughly one man for every hundred women, the company was pioneering in other ways too. This week, Hannah Devlin speaks with Shirley about her extraordinary success in the tech world and her later philanthropic work, which includes setting up a school devoted to children with autism.” At the link right-click “DownloadMP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Japanese Cool Tools 54 mins – “Our guest this week is Craig Mod. Craig is a writer and designer. He’s worked extensively with Silicon Valley and Japanese start ups. He spends about two months each year walking the old pilgrimage paths and ancient highways in the mountains of Japan.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jazz Artist Fred Hersch 35 mins – “Nearly 30 years ago, Hersch was among the first jazz musicians to come out as both gay and HIV positive. His memoir looks back on that time, as well as the time he spent in a medically induced coma.This is FRESH AIR. I’m Terry Gross. You could almost say my guest, Fred Hersch, returned from the dead. He’s a jazz musician and composer who has had HIV for more than 30 years. The diagnosis came at a time when he was thinking he was ready to come out. It’s hard to think of another jazz musician who was out at the time. Hersch’s new memoir “Good Things Happen Slowly” is about what it was like to be closeted in the jazz world, and then come out as gay and as having AIDS.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jones’ Act 16 mins – “The government suspended the Jones Act last week, to allow non-US ships to move fuel to victims of hurricanes in Houston and Florida. Which once again made us wonder why the act even exists.” At the link find the title, “#524: Mr Jones’ Act, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media file 20170927_pmoney_pmpod524rerun-e7a6e46b-e764-45a0-b56d-a077061008ef-cf2a29a6-b9b5-4990-a22e-bf43920eab50.mp3”and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kabul Gardeners 28 mins – “We are all familiar with the picture of the Afghan man with his large beard and Kalashnikov rifle – now meet the men with secateurs and watering cans. Gardening is in their blood and it has been forever. You can see this in Babur’s Garden, which was laid out in the early 16th Century by the man who established the Mughal dynasty in India. Largely destroyed during the civil war of the 1990s, the garden is once more a notable feature of the city, its largest public space. ” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Katy Tur, Correspondent 49 mins – “During Donald Trump’s campaign for president, there were times at his rallies when he singled out one reporter for criticism. Katy Tur, who covered the Trump campaign for NBC News and MSNBC, remembers those instances vividly. Tur was working at a rally on Dec. 7, 2015, in Mount Pleasant, S.C., when suddenly Trump called her name and pointed at her from the podium: “‘Katy Tur, she’s back there. Little Katy … what a lie it was … what a lie she told,'” she recalls him saying. Then, Tur says, “The entire place turns and they roar as one … like a giant, unchained animal.” Men stood on chairs to yell at her, and she began to fear for her safety. She smiled and waved in an effort to defuse the situation. Later, the Secret Service escorted her to her car. As the first network news reporter assigned to the Trump campaign full time, Tur became accustomed to jeers and threats from Trump supporters. Now she’s written a memoir about her experiences on the campaign trail, called Unbelievable: My Front-Row Seat to the Craziest Campaign in American History” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kay Tur on Trump 24mins – “NBC’s Katy Tur says covering Donald Trump’s campaign made her a better reporter, despite being the target for his abuse.” At the link find the title, “Sept 13 | What NBC’S Katy Tur learned from covering Donald Trump’s campaign, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170913_28921.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Language Number Question 43 mins – “There are 7,000 languages spoken on Earth. What are the costs — and benefits — of our modern-day Tower of Babel?” At the link click the circle with the three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lead Hazards 3 mins – “There are toxins throughout our environment that can cause significant harm. Dr. Timur Durrani discusses the metal Lead, a common toxin. (#32858)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Legal System Flaws 62 mins – “Adam Benforado, Associate Professor of Law, Drexel University; Author, Unfair: The New Science of Criminal Injustice …How can we reduce bias in our legal system? Benforado examines this critical issue from both a legal perspective and from someone who has been incarcerated. Benforado says, “The failure of our legal system has been a defining issue in the U.S. over the last year…. To make progress in our fight against abuse, unequal treatment and wrongful convictions, we must come together as a community to consider the psychological biases that share the behavior of judges, jurors, witnesses, lawyers, police officers—and all of the rest of us.” At the link find the title, “Adam Benforado: The New Science of Criminal Injustice, Jun, 2015,” right-click “Media files cc_20150623_benfarado.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Loons in New Hampshire 16 mins – “The iconic call of the loon is one you’ll hear on ponds and lakes throughout the state. We’re checked in with John Cooley, Senior Biologist with the Loon Preservation Committee to learn a bit about the bird and the state of its welfare. Chris speaks with John Cooley at the Loon Preservation Committee about the iconic birds and their future on New Hampshire’s waters. The iconic call of the loon is one you’ll hear on ponds and lakes throughout the state. We’re checked in with John Cooley, Senior Biologist with the Loon Preservation Committee to learn a bit about the bird and the state of its welfare. First off we know there just shy of 300 pairs of loons in New Hampshire, about 200 of those pairs built a nest. And Cooley says they’re all over the state, “from Little Island Pond in Pelham near the Massachusetts border to Third Connecticut Lake just miles from Canada.” Bodies of water are his reference points because that’s where loons are happiest. In fact, that’s almost the only place they can operate with any efficiency. Loons are a little ungainly when taking off and landing, or even just trying to get around on dry land. “They’ve evolved to have their feet far back on their body,” says, Cooley. Unlike geese or other water fowl that can easily walk around on land, the loons leg placement means they flail, using their wings to assist. And so they don’t often leave the water. “They’re only on land if they’re nesting, but they won’t nest farther than a few feet from the water.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mathematics 21 mins – “As educators across the country try to recalculate teaching of math, The Current asks if the problem is calculation or communication.” At the link find the title, “Sept 14 | How anxiety around math hurts student performance, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170914_40976.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Insurance Plans 47 mins – “Democrats are now lining up for and against single-payer health care. Big push. Big battle. We’re on it.Republicans and Democrats are both rolling out health care pushes this week. For the GOP, it’s a last-ditch push to repeal and replace Obamacare. For Democrats, it’s a push completely in the other direction. A push for single-payer health care. Bernie Sanders is out front. Lots of big Democrats are signing on. Lots of Americans are sick of the way things work now. But is single-payer the way to go? It’s a hot question.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Lab Dissection 48 mins – “Donors are very important to universities and medical schools, typically contributing money to further the educational mission. Often, donors get a plaque on the wall, and some even get whole buildings named after them. But we’re also grateful for the donors who get no plaques and whose names aren’t known: those who, after they pass away, donate their bodies to medical schools so that students can use them to learn. On the afternoon of the CCOM Deeded Body Ceremony, Patrick Brau, Mackenzie Walhof, Brady Campbell, and Reed Johnson reflect on the nature of this gift, what it meant to them, and some of the unexpected things they learned. Scientists were surprised this week to find out that jellyfish sleep, perhaps just like we do…which is weird because you’d think that sort of thing would get them killed. And in the spirit of the season (interview season, that is), we discuss evidence for why you probably shouldn’t have your med school or residency interview at 30,000 feet. Would you donate your body to a medical school? Why?” At the link find the title, “The Donors Who Get No Plaques Or Portraits, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 193-the-first-patient.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medicare Discussion 205 mins – “[2 parts] The current focus on improving Medicare physician payment through a variety of Alternative Payment Models (APMs) is widely perceived as a major shift away from fee-for-service, therefore reducing the importance of improving Medicare’s Physician Fee Schedule (PFS). But even if APMs eventually replace the PFS as the dominant payment methods, key aspects of the fee schedule (or an equivalent tool) will remain important and deserve attention. Not only does the PFS continue to govern nearly $90 billion in Medicare payments annually, it also serves as the basis for, among other things, setting payment rates, making real-time payments to providers, and calculating shared savings. On Tuesday, September 26, the Urban Institute, the USC-Brookings Schaeffer Initiative for Health Policy, and the Actuarial Research Corporation hosted a one-day conference on the evolution and state of the PFS and to consider the movement to new payment models. The conference included four sessions and a brief lunchtime address, and feature experts involved in designing and implementing the PFS 25 years ago, those currently working on improvements to the PFS, and those working to design and implement new APMs and other innovations.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. The two parts are: “Session 1- Physician Fee Schedule: Origins and Evolution”, and “Session 2- Relationship between PFS and Alternative Payment Models (APMs)”.

Mortgage Fraud 87 mins – “From acclaimed director Steve James, the little-known story of the only U.S. bank prosecuted in relation to the 2008 financial crisis.” At the link find the title, “Abacus: Small Enough to Jail, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 342902682-frontlinepbs-abacus-small-enough-to-jail.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Moth 500th Episode 57 mins – “On this special 500th episode of the podcast, we dig through our archives and pick some of our favorite stories that have been shared on The Moth stage. Catherine Burns, The Moth’s Artistic Director, and George Dawes Green, The Moth founder, join Dan Kennedy in hosting.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nanoparticles in Water 27 mins – “Professor Thilo Hoffman, University of Vienna Department of Environmental Geosciences, is studying the role of nanoparticles in water. Are they harmful? Is it easy to remove them? How would we remove them? To answer some of these questions, listen in to this edition of Science Studio.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New Hampshire Night Life 51 mins – “The Granite State is graying and has been for decades – so what does that mean for the state’s younger population? Today, we’re taking to the streets to investigate one listener’s question: Why does Portsmouth shut down at 9:00pm? Then, we talk to Stay, Work, Play New Hampshire – whose goal is attracting more 20 and 30 somethings to the state, and we’ll learn about the built-in advantages of living in a state the size of New Hampshire. And we’ll hear from singer and cellist Ben Sollee ahead of his performance in Concord at the Cap Center.” At the link right-click the play button, right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

No Wanks 60 mins – “Right-wing groups like the Proud Boys say they have no tolerance for racism or white supremacist groups. Their leader Gavin McInnes disavowed the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville. But the Proud Boys believe “the West is the best,” which, one of them points out, is not such a big jump from “whites are best.” And one of the Proud Boys organized the Charlottesville rally. (The group now claims he was a spy.) What should we make of groups like this?”At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Norman Mailer on Kennedy 26 mins – “Before anyone foresaw a time when a television celebrity could become president, Norman Mailer wrote in Esquire that John F. Kennedy was a mythical hero who could finally unite the business of politics with the business of stardom. His legendary 1960 reported essay, “Superman Comes to the Supermarket,” about JFK and the Democratic political convention, changed the rules for how we understand our political candidates as brands, and how we’re allowed to write about them. Mailer archivist and biographer J. Michael Lennon joins host David Brancaccio to discuss Mailer’s legacy, what his essay wrought, and how it continues to ripple through our political culture and be proven prescient again and again.” At the link find the title, “Superman Comes to the Supermarket, by Norman Mailer, Nov, 2015,” right-click “Media files Esquire-Classic_-Superman-Comes-to-the-Supermarket-by-Norman-Mailer.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Nukes 45 mins – “New Yorker writer Evan Osnos visited North Korea in August to understand what they really mean when they talk about nuclear war. He found that nuclear weapons are an essential part of their society. This is FRESH AIR. I’m Terry Gross. My guest, New Yorker staff writer Evan Osnos, went on a reporting trip to North Korea at a dangerous time. It was last month, three days after President Trump tweeted that military solutions are now fully in place, locked and loaded should North Korea act unwisely. Osnos went to North Korea to see what he could learn about the country’s leader, Kim Jong Un, and his nuclear strategy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Not Dead Yet 46 mins – “Joyce welcomes Diane Coleman, the president of Not Dead Yet, a national disability rights group which she founded in 1996 to give voice to disability rights opposition to legalization of assisted suicide and euthanasia. She will discuss the mission of this organization in depth, as well as her testimony that she has given four times before Subcommittees of the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate. She is a well-known writer and speaker on assisted suicide and euthanasia topics.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opiate Prescriptions 4 mins – “Dr. Lawrence Poree considers the recent history of prescription painkillers including legal and political aspects. (#32862)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Epidemic in Ohio 47 mins – “We hear all the time about the opioid and heroin crisis. But some of us live that crisis intimately and some of us don’t. If you don’t, a new report from the Cincinnati Enquirer will shake your world. Either way, it will break your heart. Sixty journalists fanned out for one week over greater Cincinnati. They found the drugs, the needles, the despair and depravity everywhere. A flood of its own.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Oppenheimer 29 mins – “Brian Cox on Robert Oppenheimer The Reith Lectures Significant international thinkers deliver the BBC’s flagship annual lecture series” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Killing Spit 2 mins – “Have you ever wondered if Mom’s kissing a boo boo actually makes it better? This is Sandra Tsing Loh with the Loh Down on Science, saying: Score one for mom . . . yes! At least, that’s according to researchers at the Pasteur Institute in Paris. It turns out, human saliva contains a pain killer more powerful than morphine. Called Opiorphin, it works in the nerve cells of the spine. It prevents the destruction of enkephalins, natural chemicals that regulate the body’s response to pain….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Palliative Care Specialty 77 mins – “How can you live well with an incurable disease? Dr. Steven Pantilat, an expert in hospice and palliative care, talks with journalist Katie Hafer about innovative approaches for dealing with serious illness. Recorded on 06/08/2017. (#32350)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Postsecondary Education 105 mins – “Too many disadvantaged college students in America spend time and money on coursework without graduating or earning credentials, while others earn degrees or certificates that hold little labor market value. Many of these students also struggle to pay for college, and some incur debts they have difficulty repaying. In “Making College Work,” a new book from the Brookings Press, Harry Holzer of Georgetown University and the Urban Institute’s Sandy Baum propose a range of policy solutions aimed at alleviating difficulties faced by too many of America’s college students, including weak academic preparation, financial pressures, and institutional failures that create barriers to success. On September 20, the Center on Children and Families at Brookings hosted an event on the need for better and varied pathways to college and the job market. At the beginning of the event, Holzer and Baum provided an overview of their recent book and policy recommendations, including better financial aid and academic supports that target individual students, as well as stronger linkages between coursework and the labor market and more structured paths through the curriculum. A panel discussion with experts and practitioners in the field of education followed. After the program, speakers took audience questions.” At the link right-click “Download the audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pregnant Women with HIV 26 mins – “A new Rapid Recommendation from The BMJ suggests that for pregnant women, they may wish to avoid certain antiviral treatments for HIV. This recommendation differs from the WHO’s, and to discuss why that is, and what makes that difference important, we’re joined by Reed Siemieniuk, a physician and methodologist from McMaster University, and Alice Welbourn, campaigner for gender and sexual and reproductive health rights, in the context of HIV and violence against women. A new Rapid Recommendation from The BMJ suggests that for pregnant women, they may wish to avoid certain antiviral treatments for HIV. This recommendation differs from the WHO’s, and to discuss why that is, and what makes that difference important, we’re joined by Reed Siemieniuk, a physician and methodologist from McMaster University…” At the link find the title, “HIV in pregnancy – “without the big picture, people aren’t going to be able to take the medication, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 342512469-bmjgroup-hiv-in-pregnancy-without-the-big-picture-people-arent-going-to-be-able-to-take-the-medication.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Radio 51 mins – “The United States has the world’s largest prison population. In 2012, there were 2.3 million people in American prisons or jails – and even more under some kind of “correctional supervision.” In fact, if you added up all the people in America in prison, on probation, or on parole, it’d total about 6 million – just a little smaller than the population of New York City. The system is vast, but how well is it working? In this episode, we explore how a few communities across the country have responded creatively to problems with police, courts, and prisons.” At the link find the title, “American Justice, Oct, 2014,” right-click “Media files Justice_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Qatar Crisis 63 mins – “The distinguished panel will discuss the escalation of tensions between Qatar, a tiny, oil-rich state, and the Persian Gulf nations of Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, the UAE and Egypt, all of which broke diplomatic relations with Qatar because of its support of the Islamic State, its sponsorship of Al Jazeera and its close ties to Iran. Adding to the difficult situation is the fact that the United States has a huge airbase and more than 10,000 troops in Qatar.” At the link find the title, “The Qatar Crisis, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170908_Qatar_Crisis_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rape Kit 6 mins – “Hundreds of thousands of women have been raped as part of conflicts in Rwanda, the former Yugoslavia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and elsewhere. Figures are seen as very conservative as only about 10% of rapes are reported. Lisa Smith has developed a self-examination swab designed for women to collect DNA evidence to a standard accepted by courts.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in Uganda 27 mins – “Last year Uganda took in more refugees than any other country. But how do the South Sudanese, fleeing civil war, transform the African Bush into a new home? Ruth Alexander reports.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Relationships 124 mins – “I’ve wanted to speak with psychotherapist Esther Perel for years. In a cover story, The New York Times called her the most important game changer in sexuality and relational health since Dr. Ruth. Her TED talks on maintaining desire and rethinking infidelity have more than 17 million views, and she’s tested and been exposed to everything imaginable in thirty-four years of running her private therapy practice in New York City. In this episode, Esther and I explore: How to find (and convince) mentors who can change your life. What she’s learned from Holocaust survivors. Polyamory and close cousins. Is there such a thing as too much honesty in relationships? Can we want what we already have? Why do happy people cheat? And much more. Esther is the author of the international bestseller Mating in Captivity, which has been translated into 26 languages. Fluent in nine of them (I’ve heard her in person), this Belgian native now brings her multicultural pulse to her new book The State of Affairs: Rethinking Infidelity (October 2017, Harper Collins). Her creative energy is right now focused on co-creating and hosting an Audible original audio series, Where Should We Begin. Show notes and links for this episode can be found at http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/podcast.” At the link find the title, “#241: The Relationship Episode: Sex, Love, Polyamory, Marriage, and More (with Esther Perel),” right-click “Media files e4cf219a-1a1f-4f4d-98b2-b68ef2e87e1e.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Training 24 mins – “The robots that have taken on tasks in the real world – which is to say the world where physics apply – are primarily programmed to do a specific job, such as welding a joint in a car or sweeping up cat hair. So what if robots could learn, and take it a step further – what if they could teach themselves, and pass on their knowledge to other robots? Where could that take machines, and the notion of machine intelligence? And how fast could we get there? Those are the questions our guest Sergey Levine, an assistant professor at UC Berkeley’s department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, is finding answers to.” At the link find the title, “Ep. 37: Sergey Levine on How Deep Learning Will Unleash a Robotics Revolution,” right-click “Media files 340089852-theaipodcast-ai-podcast-sergey-levine.mp3” and select “Save Link As”from the pop-up menu.

San Quentin Life 32 mins – “The color of your skin influences your life in prison, from sharing food to celebrating birthdays. Meet Andrew Sabatino (Drew Down) and Arthur Snowden (AR), two guys whose close friendship often challenges the unwritten rules of race relations on the inside. Thanks to Drew Down and AR for sharing the story of their friendship. It’s a big deal to talk about race in prison, so thanks also to Lonnie Morris, Lemar, Phil Melendez, Wayne Boatwright, Charlie and Mesro El-Coles for stepping up.” At the link find the title, “Unwritten, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files Unwritten_A.mp3”and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Arabia in Transition 89 mins – “Since the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia’s founding in 1932, the royal family has derived its power primarily from the country’s enormous oil wealth. With the country now experiencing an acute economic challenge due to low oil prices, the royal family has generated a new blueprint, known as “Vision 2030,” outlining its plan to modernize its economy and society while allowing it to maintain its hold on power. The plan includes greater integration of women and young Saudis into the workforce, largely out of economic necessity. Meanwhile, Saudi Crown Prince and Minister of the Interior Mohammed bin Nayef has been removed from the royal line of succession and replaced by King Salman’s son, Defense Minister Mohammed bin Salman. The defense minister’s appointment marks the beginning of a new era in royal family power succession. Bin Salman’s appointment also comes as he manages Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen, which has brought malnutrition and starvation to Yemen’s people, and been labeled by the United Nations as the worst humanitarian disaster in the world. In a new paper titled “Saudi Arabia in Transition,” Karen Elliott House, a former Wall Street Journal reporter who has visited Saudi Arabia for nearly 40 years and a current senior fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, analyzes the progress the Saudis have made and the challenges they face in implementing Vision 2030 amidst the recent changes in leadership.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

School Bus Driver Shortage 58 mins – “A school bus driver shortage in New Hampshire, and nationally, is making it difficult for some kids to get to school. It’s forced the Northwood district to struggle with the start of the school day, and the town of Wakefield to delay school for two weeks.  Then there’s the question of when that first day should be: Governor Sununu set off a statewide debate recently, saying he thinks the first day of school should be after Labor Day – we examine that issue as well….” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.   

Sex Assaults on Campus 47 mins – “Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos thinks students accused of campus sexual assault aren’t getting a fair shake. And she’s going to change that.Education Secretary Betsy DeVos moved in big last week on the issue of sexual assault on college campuses, pushing back on Obama-era policy under Title IX that has compelled colleges and universities to get much tougher on sexual assault. The message from DeVos last week is the pendulum has swung too far toward victim’s rights. The rights of the accused need more attention. That is getting attention all over. ” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sight Mechanics 30 mins – “Neurobiologist and lecturer of Physiology at the University of Cambridge explores human sight in his third Reith Lecture from his series entitled ‘Mechanics of the Mind’. We build up a miraculous understanding of the world around us by interpreting the light that enters our eyes. Professor Blakemore explains how the brain interprets these lights to create sight. In this lecture entitled ‘An Image of Truth’, Professor Blakemore argues that our perception provides us with a representation of our world, which we trust as a measure of reality, but what happens when this part of the brain is affected? To answer this question he shows how science uses case studies to investigate and develop our understanding.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep Needs 30 mins – “Neurobiologist and lecturer of Physiology at the University of Cambridge Colin Blakemore explores the human need for sleep in his second Reith lecture from his series entitled ‘Mechanics of the Mind’. In this lecture entitled ‘Chang Tzu and the Butterfly’, Professor Colin Blakemore examines the human need for sleep. The study of human sleep remains the most direct experimental approach to the question of consciousness. Our nightly appointment with death is the most profound loss of awareness that most of us are likely to experience throughout our lives. We shall spend more than 20 years of our lifetime asleep-unconscious, almost oblivious to the demands, the joys and the dangers of the world around us. The problem of human consciousness has stirred up fierce debate between the reductionists and holists and Professor Blakemore asks the question, why do we sleep?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Power Paint 6 mins – “The key element of silicon solar cells is the semiconductor, which is usually a semi-rigid or glass-like material. Researchers at the University of Newcastle have developed a liquid which behaves like a semiconductor. Being a liquid, it can be applied by printing, coating or painting. One substrate being used is very thin PET plastic. The semiconductor is printed straight on the plastic in a series of layers. The result is then laminated. Interestingly this new cell works better in low light conditions than full light and continues to work in cloudy conditions. While the efficiency is low, so too is the cost, making it a contender for cheap mass production. Developer Paul Dastoor says his vision is for every roof of every building of every city in the world covered in a coating which generates power.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Somalia Story 37 mins – “This week, we are presenting a story from NPR foreign correspondent Gregory Warner and his new globe-trotting podcast Rough Translation. Mohammed was having the best six months of his life – working a job he loved, making mixtapes for his sweetheart – when the communist Somali regime perp-walked him out of his own home, and sentenced him to a lifetime of solitary confinement.  With only concrete walls and cockroaches to keep him company, Mohammed felt miserable, alone, despondent.  But then one day, eight months into his sentence, he heard a whisper, a whisper that would open up a portal to – of all places and times – 19th century Russia, and that would teach him how to live and love again.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Starbucks Founder 49 mins – “During his first visit to Seattle in 1981, Howard Schultz walked into a little coffee bean shop called Starbucks and fell in love with it. A few years later, he bought the six-store chain for almost 4 million dollars, and began to transform it into a ubiquitous landmark, a “third place” between home and work. Today Starbucks is the third largest restaurant chain in the world, serving about 100 million people a week. Recorded live in Seattle.” At the link find the title, “Live Episode! Starbucks: Howard Schultz, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170927_hibt_starbucks.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stewardship 56 mins – “In 1968, Paul Ehrlich and his wife, Anne, published the book, The Population Bomb, which shook the world as it discussed the connection between environmental degradation and exponential human population growth. Though critics abound, many subsequent scholars and activists have continued the push for humane, science-based public policy to address the quandary of providing a good standard of living for all while faced with the constraints of earth’s finite resources. Today, Dr. Ehrlich and his co-author, Michael Charles Tobias – CEO of the Dancing Star Foundation http://www.dancingstarfoundation.org, will join us to discuss his newest book, Hope on Earth, which covers some of the most pressing environmental concerns of the moment.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stormwater Management 27 mins – “Managing and treating stormwater is a challenge to many cities. Building treatment plants with sufficient capacity to process large volumes of runoff that occur occasionally is not cost effective. The District of Columbia, facing a Federal consent decree to treat its stormwater, has been building subterranean storage tunnels but is now testing green treatment options that, if they work, could save much money in the long run. This experiment is funded with an unusual bonding arrangement in which lenders are betting on its success. To learn about this approach we talk with George Hawkins, Chief Executive Officer and General Manager of DC Water.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Suicide Prevention 27 mins – “Bonnie Bricker’s son, Reid had serious mental-health problems. When he became an adult, she was often left out of the loop when it came to his care. She’s now working to change the system to help others in distress – and their loved ones.” At the link find the title, “They never should have let him go, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files whitecoat_20170915 75206.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Super Size Me 2 24 mins – “Filmmaker Morgan Spurlock takes aim at the chicken and fast-food industry in the film Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!” At the link find the title, “Sept 15 | Super Size Me director Morgan Spurlock targets ‘Big Chicken’ in his new film, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170915_32612.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainability Development Goals 32 mins – “ When the UN announced its 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and Climate Change, it was clear that the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were even more ambitious than the previous Millennium Development Goals. It was also clear that collaborative partnerships will be the key to achieving them. In this podcast you’ll hear how the Academy, business leaders, academia, and government are working together to help make the world a better place for all. You’ll also hear from young students working on international teams to tackle some of these same challenges, which might inspire you to think about what you can do in your community to help achieve the SDGs.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Swastika 51 mins – “The swastika. Few symbols, few words even, evoke such visceral reactions in the Western world. It stands for genocide and hatred. But it wasn’t always that way. For centuries it symbolized good fortune, success, and well-being. It held deep religious and spiritual meaning for people around the world. Graphic designer Steven Heller has long been fascinated by the swastika, and he joins us Monday to discuss its power and history. Can it ever be seen in its original context again? Steven Heller is the co-founder and co-chair of the MFA Design/Designer as Author and Entrepreneur program at the School of Visual Arts in New York City, where he lectures on the history of graphic design. For 33 years he served as an art director at the New York Times. He’s the author more than 170 books on graphic design and popular culture, including his 2000 title The Swastika: Symbol Beyond Redemption? At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syncphonia App 12 mins – “When children join in orchestra rehearsal at school, responses can be mixed. Those students who keep up with the group enjoy the experience. Those who struggle to keep up feel despondent, are discouraged and may even drop out. Lecturer in music technology Chris Kiefer and Research Fellow Alice Eldridge have designed an app for iPads which helps students keep up with the orchestra. Similar to karaoke, bars and beats are highlighted. Early results suggest students can tackle more complicated pieces, and longer pieces with enhanced enjoyment.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tales from the South 29 mins – “Featuring stories from Jones-Taylor, Robbins, Maia. Music by The Salty Dogs.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Prevention 42 mins – “The White House is hosting an anti-terror summit next week. Summits being what they are, we try to offer some useful advice.” At the link click the circle with the three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Theory of the Mind 30 mins – “This year’s lecturer is Neurobiologist Colin Blakemore. A Professor of Physiology at the University of Cambridge and Director of Medical Studies at Downing College, he is the youngest person to give the Reith lectures. He explores the concepts of the brain in his Reith series entitled ‘Mechanics of the Mind’ and evaluates how our brains have shaped our behaviour and our society. In this lecture entitled ‘The Divinest Part of Us’, Professor Colin Blakemore discusses how the theory of the mind mirrors man’s social development; from Plato’s genetically-controlled meritocracy of the mind, to Franz Joseph Gall’s view of character showing through the shape of the human skull. Professor Blakemore delves into the idea of miraculous mind and explains how the scientific world has not always thought that highly of the brain.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender Stories 50 mins – “It’s estimated that there are nearly 1.5 million people in the U.S. who identify themselves as transgender. That’s more than a million people with families, communities and stories we are only just starting to hear from. When someone transitions, the impact of that decision ripples beyond them to the people often closest to them: their families. In this hour of radio, we tell stories of trans people and their families at many different moments of life, from childhood to adulthood to elders, as parents, as spouses and as kids, themselves.” At the link find the title, “Trans Families, Sept, 2014,” right-click “Media files TransFamilies_Podcast.mp3” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turkey-Russia Relations 95 mins – “The history of Turkish-Russian relations is replete with sudden outbursts of anger and unexpected rapprochements. Even in just the past couple of years, Moscow and Ankara swung from conflict to reconciliation with startling speed. Fewer than six months after Turkey’s downing of a Russian jet near Syria in November 2015, the two countries concluded deals on a gas pipeline and a nuclear plant. Following the assassination of the Russian ambassador in Ankara in December 2016, they collaborated on a framework to stop the fighting in Syria. Moving forward, fluctuations will likely continue to characterize this ever-uncertain relationship. In the latest Turkey Project Policy Paper, “An ambiguous partnership: The serpentine trajectory of Turkish-Russian relations in the era of Erdoğan and Putin,” Pavel K. Baev and Kemal Kirişci explore the main areas of interaction between Ankara and Moscow. They discuss the implications of these shifting dynamics on Turkey’s relations with its trans-Atlantic allies, particularly the United States and the European Union.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Universal Basic Income 30 mins – “The idea of a universal basic income has been around for a long time — Thomas Paine, a founding father of the United States, talked about it centuries ago. As recently as the 1960s and 70s, limited UBI studies were run in parts of the US. President Nixon even brought up the idea of an income floor for families in a State of the Union address. There’s been a lot of recent excitement around the idea, especially after an experiment launched by the Finnish government started in early 2017. It has the public and the media wondering: how will recipients react to getting this unconditional source of income? The experiment itself is fascinating, not just because of what Finland is testing but also how they are testing it. Finland is trying out a unique, design-oriented way of thinking about government. Rather than rolling out laws on a massive scale, they are trying to craft legislation in stages, with user feedback, just as one would create a piece of design.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Utopias 50 mins – “When Mormon pioneers rolled into the Salt Lake Valley in 1847, they brought with them a new theology, a short but intense history of persecution, and dreams of a new kind of society. 166 years later, Salt Lake City remains deeply influenced by Mormon culture, but defies easy categorization. With a large and politically active gay scene, one of the biggest Polynesian populations in the country, and a steady stream of new migrants, the city is full of vibrant contradiction—and sometimes conflict.” At the link find the title, “SortingofAmerica_Podcast.mp3, Salt Lake City: Updating Tradition, May, 2014,” right-click “Media files SLC_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venomous Bites and Stings 43 mins – “In the wilderness there is an obvious danger of being bitten by snakes, insects and arthropods. Dr. Susanne Spano offers advice on what to do in case you meet are bitten by a venomous creature far from medical help. Recorded on 05/24/2017. (#32546)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vikings Decline 65 mins – “In the year 1000 AD, at the annual Althing (national assembly) in Iceland, a decision was made to make Christianity the official religion of the island. The road from paganism to Christianity was not, however, completely smooth, nor did the conversion process happen as abruptly as the political decision implied. A key text describing the declaration at the Althing appears in Njal’s Saga, and it will form the basis for this lecture, along with two medieval Icelandic short stories that illustrate how Christianization began to take shape in the North. The continued presence of the pagan past in modern Scandinavia can be traced in literature, artifacts and enduring cultural practices, indicating that while the Scandinavians eventually embraced Christianity and then secularism, they did not leave their Viking identity behind.” At the link find the title, “The End of the Vikings, Feb, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170223_The_End_of_the_Vikings.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virtual Reality 57 mins – “Imagine you could make a copy of a loved one. A digital clone with a life of its own – their Avatar. That’s the dream of biomechanical engineer, Dr Jordan Nguyen, and he says we have the technology to do it right now in the form of Virtual Reality. VR might be thought as way to play games but as Jordan discovers, it’s so much more. VR is being used to face phobias, to combat trauma and in the case of one Newcastle man, Angus, help to re-verse the effects of a catastrophic spinal injury.” At the link right-click “Download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Work Trends 12 mins “We’ve heard a lot of rhetoric lately suggesting that countries like the US are losing valuable manufacturing jobs to lower-cost markets like China, Mexico and Vietnam — and that protectionism is the best way forward. But those jobs haven’t disappeared for the reasons you may think, says border and logistics specialist Augie Picado. He gives us a reality check about what global trade really looks like and how shared production and open borders help us make higher quality products at lower costs.” aAt the link find the title, “The real reason manufacturing jobs are disappearing | Augie Picado, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files AugiePicado_2017S.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 307 – Sept 29, 2017: 3D Printer Cost, 9-11 Story, Afghanistan Politics, AI and Creativity, Anonymous versus Isis, Arab Stories, Autism vs Vaccines, Battery Powered Britain, Brain Implants, Cancer Research, Chicken Industry, C-ion Cell Batteries, Climate Disinformation, Coal Hogs, Complex Global Law, Computer Security, Convicted Innocents, CT and MRI, Detroit Revitalization, Diagnosis Uncertainty, Dog Rescues, Drone Flying Careers, Ecuadorian Oil Problem, Election Security, Emotional Cognition, Equifax Fiasco, Evangelican Movement, Exercise and Learning, Food Crop Quality, Freedom of Religion, Georgetown University Slaves, Gerrymandering, Gut Research, Hate Speech, Hydrogel Retinas, Hygiene Hypothesis, Impact Investing, Investing Philosophy, Justice in U.S., Katy Tur Correspondent, Larry King Interview, Latin American Trends, Lexicographers, Liberal Democracy, Life Extension Factors, Nation of Islam, Netflix Gigs, North Korea History, NSA Security Counsel, Pink Slime Lawsuit, Prisons and Trump, Privacy Data, Read Between the Trump Lines, Renewable Energy in Texas, Robot Ethics, Robot Safecracker, Supernatural Beliefs, Syrian Refugee Story, Trump and the Press, Trump Controversies, Trump Special Investigation, Truth and Accuracy, Undocumented Students, Volt Solar Energy, Water Usage, Weed Control, Wildfire Future, Womens’ Prison, Zika Update

Exercise your ears: the 158 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 611 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 17,430 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 86GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 400 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

3D Printer Cost 16 mins – “Today, we’re going to talk cheap 3D printers. We were really impressed to find and to learn that there are some really cheap 3D printers out there. If that’s your biggest limiting factor is cost. They’re kits though, we have to be really careful that most of the ones with the cheap prices and the one we’re particularly talking about, the Lewihe. It stands for length, width, height, the first two letters of each. It’s not bad looking for what is a $75 printer. It’s a kit printer.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

3D Printer Necessity 19 mins – “In today’s episode, Tom and Tracy Hazzard talk about the opportunity cost of 3D printing. They go through their own genesis story with 3D printing and how they saw that not buying a 3D printer would cost them a great opportunity. They also go into how 3D printing changes your production process, your design process and it’s helping you with your business that not doing it really is a missed opportunity. Tom and Tracy also discuss how a leap of faith is needed but you have to think about the opportunities that you would be missing if you don’t start now.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

9-11 Story 19 mins – “Jim Giaccone: Memories, Monsters, Mountaintops – A man conquers a nightmare in memory of his brother.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Afghanistan Politics 30 mins – “Episode 26: Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad on the War in Afghanistan President Trump recently announced his plans for the War in Afghanistan, including the deployment of additional US troops to the country. This week we look at the political geography and the recent history of Afghanistan with Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad, who served as U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan (2003-2005) and Iraq (2005-2007). He also served as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations (2007-2009). Ambassador Khalilzad discussed the roots and resilience of the Taliban, Afghanistan’s drug trade, and the importance of re-building Afghan state institutions in order to secure long-term peace in the region.” At the link find the title, “Episode 26: Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad on the War in Afghanistan,” right-click “Media files SBKHA0901.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI and Creativity 39 mins – “As humans, we have some unique abilities. We are self-aware, we exhibit critical thinking and we have the ability to be creative and innovate. Will that always be the case? Some think that artificial intelligence (AI) will someday take over creativity and innovation.” At the link find the title “Will Artificial Intelligence Take Over Creativity and Innovation? S13 Ep25, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files Will_Artificial Intelligence Take Over Creativity and Innovation_S13_Ep25.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Identification 68 mins – “This week, Brian, Joanne, and Nathan wrestle with a long-running tension in our country’s history: what it means to assimilate and “become American.” We’ll explore the 19th-century notions of who could become an American and the ways they were expected to change. Plus, we’ll discuss how much room there was for a hyphenated American identity in the past and if there is room today.” At the link find the title, “The Melting Pot: Americans & Assimilation, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files BKS8300246576.mp3 ” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anonymous versus ISIS 29 mins – “Following the terrorist attacks in Paris, French officials used metadata from a phone they found in a trashcan to gather information that made it possible to raid ISIS safe houses within a week. During these raids they were able to kill the suspected mastermind behind the operation, who was believed to be planning more attacks. Using a combination of cyber forensics and traditional police work, the French identified and successfully raided the purported hideout of the suspected ringleader. Considering our advanced technology, many are left questioning how this happened in the first place? And looking forward, can governments really prevent future acts of terrorism by building backdoors into encryption? In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek discuss the digital forensics of the Paris attacks and the aftermath, including a surfacing argument about cryptic communication, the response from French, British, and American governments, and how Anonymous, the hacker group, has gotten involved. …Stay until the end of the podcast to hear about Anonymous’s war on ISIS and the hypocritical nature of ISIS’s use of social media.” At the link find the title, “Paris Attacks: The Digital Investigation, ISIS, and The Response, Nov, 2015,” right-click “Media files paris-attacks-digital-isis-response.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arab Stories 50 mins – “On the next Snap…”High Crimes and Misdemeanors. When your back is against the wall and you’re all out of options, you don’t want to break the law…but it wants to break you. Featuring the story of an imprisoned Iranian fiancee and a personal story from the Daily Show’s Hasan Minhaj.” At the link click the circle with three dots and right-click “Download this audio” to get the podcast.

Asthma Commission 19 mins – “Discussion with two authors of a new Lancet Commission about the need for a new approach to prevent, manage, and cure asthma.” At the link find the title, “Asthma Commission: The Lancet: September 11, 2017,” right-click “Media files 11sept_asthmacommission.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism vs Vaccines P1 45 mins – “Autism, seizures, and overloaded immune systems. Could these really be side effects of vaccines? This week, we dive into the science to find out how safe vaccines really are. We also talk to public health researchers Prof. Dan Salmon and Prof. Amy Kalkbrenner and neurologist Prof. Ingrid Scheffer.” At the link find the title, “Are They Safe? Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT6426722197.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism vs Vaccines P2 36 mins – “Last week we explored the science behind vaccine safety. This week we try to understand where these fears came from, and why they persist. We speak to three historians: Prof. Nadja Durbach, Prof. Elena Conis, and Prof. Robert Johnston. And a concerned mom named Noelle.” At the link find the title, “The Rise of Anti-Vaxxers,, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT1489776495.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Baby Creation 52 mins – “It’s a timeless question, asked by every kid that’s ever lived: where do babies come from? It turns out even the great scientific minds of the Enlightenment didn’t really have an answer. While navigators and cartographers seemed to have mastered the heavens and the Earth, other scientists were conducting bizarre experiments to put their finger on how exactly humans create life. Science writer Edward Dolnick joins us to tell the story of 250 years of searching and the meandering ways of scientific discovery. Edward Dolnick is the former chief science writer for The Boston Globe and the author of a number of books, including The Forger’s Spell and The Clockwork Universe. His new book is called The Seeds of Life: From Aristotle to da Vinci, from Shark’s Teeth to Frog’s Pants, the Long and Strange Quest to Discover Where Babies Come From.”  At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Battery Powered Britain 30 mins – “New developments in battery technology are changing the way we power Britain. More efficient, higher capacity batteries expand the range of electric vehicles and allow solar and wind power plants to provide smooth, 24 hour electricity. Tom Heap is in Cornwall where power companies and local innovators are developing a new battery-powered economic model that could be rolled out to the rest of the UK. From mining the lithium that makes the batteries to holiday parks producing clean power for the grid Cornwall is leading the way.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bayes Theorem 90 mins – “We don’t treat all of our beliefs equally. For some, we see them as either true or false, correct or incorrect. For others, we see them as probabilities, chances, odds. In one world, certainty, in the other, uncertainty. In this episode you will learn from two experts in reasoning how to apply a rule from the 1700s that makes it possible to see all of your beliefs as being in “grayscale,” as neither black nor white, neither 0 nor 100 percent, but always somewhere in between, as a shade of gray reflecting your confidence in just how wrong you might be…given the evidence at hand.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 073-Bayes_Theorem.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bill Nye Interview 55 mins – At the link find “273. Bill Nye the Science Guy, author of Everything All at Once, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files geeksguide273final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biotech Conflicts 69 mins – “Any podcast’s 100th episode is reason to celebrate.  In Talking Biotech’s 100th episode Chris Barbey interviews its originator, Dr. Kevin Folta, Professor and Chairman of the Horticultural Sciences Department at the University of Florida.  They discuss the current research efforts in Folta’s lab along with his science communication efforts and how activists have reshaped his career– simply because he spoke about science. Also, his new roles in science communication.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

BlocPower Project 30 mins – “Compared with new buildings, older buildings tend to eat up a lot more energy and produce and trap a lot more pollution. Whether it’s an old church, a broken-down community center, an under-funded school building, or public housing, too often these older buildings don’t get retrofitted due to fiscal constraints. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with Donnel Baird, the founder and CEO of BlocPower, a startup that uses technology to retrofit buildings in financially underserved communities. Not only does this work result in long-term energy savings and more humane conditions, BlocPower offers these benefits at a much lower cost than was previously available. Baird explains BlocPower’s business model, tells us what inspired him to start the company, and talks about the challenges that the current political environment brings.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Books–Podcasts–Science 58 mins – “Episode 35 of Books and Ideas is an interview with best-selling author Scott Sigler. Scott is known for his unique blend of horror and hard science fiction. In this interview Dr. Ginger Campbell talks to him about his career with a focus on the challenges of trying to incorporate accurate science into fiction. They also talk about his most recent hard cover book “The Rookie” and how it is encouraging young adults to become readers.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar to download the audio file.

Bored and Brilliant 29 mins – “When was the last time you found yourself truly bored? Have you forfeit those nooks and crannies in the day when you used to let your mind wander aimlessly in a daydream? On today’s episode of Team Human, Douglas is joined by Manoush Zomorodi, host of the popular WNYC Studios podcast, Note to Self. On Note to Self, Manoush initiated a series of listener experiments aimed at breaking the influence of our digital devices and networks on our lives. Those social experiments led her to uncover the creative power of boredom, detailed in her brand new book Bored and Brilliant: How Spacing Out Can Unlock Your Most Productive and Creative Self.” At the link find the title, “Ep. 54 Manoush Zomorodi “Blissfully Bored,” right-click “Media files 59b8c64eed01d6b16d563ffa.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Implants 46 mins – “It’s not quite as crazy as it sounds.” That’s how Brett Wingeier describes his work as the Principal Biomedical Engineer with NeuroPace, the company where he spent over a decade designing and ultimately winning FDA approval for an implantable medical device that sits inside the skull of epilepsy patients, patiently waiting for the warning signs of an “electrical storm in the brain” — the neurological underpinnings of an epileptic seizure — and the countering the signal. Dr. Wingeier describes his invention as “like a defibrillator for the brain,” with the significant difference that his is a small wafer of platinum resting on the inside of a living human skull.  Technically, it’s not on the inside of the skull itself, but an artificial trapdoor cut into the skull by surgeons specifically to gain entry for the NeuroPace device.  When all goes as planned, the NeuroPace defuses seizures without the patient even knowing anything has happened. Wingeier talks about his work with realism of someone who knows he’ll have to back up claims with working prototypes, but also the enthusiasm of a sci-fi fanboy who truly sees ‘human potential as unlimited.’” At the link find the title, “#194: Brain Implants – Medical and Beyond with Dr. Brett Wingeier, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files SDS194.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

C-ion Cell Batteries 6 mins – “Many appliances used around homes and gardens run off rechargeable batteries. Typically, these cordless drills, hedge cutters, vacuum cleaners and sanders take up to 4 hours to charge then deliver their charge in 20 minutes. A new battery technology would see an end to this. The battery uses carbon nano materials and graphene, with energy stored within an electrolyte. The cells are known a C-ion cells. As well as domestic appliances, the technology has application for stabilizing electricity grids which may be fed by intermittent sources such as wind.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Calendar History 20 mins – “A month is hardly a unit of measurement. It can start on any day of the week and last anywhere from 28 to 31 days. Sometimes a month is four weeks long, sometimes five, sometimes six. You have to buy a new calendar with new dates every single year. It’s a strange design. Avery Trufelman explores the weirdness and alternate designs for the calendar.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Research 30 mins – “This week we discuss precision medicine and genetic testing with Dr. Jill Hagenkord, Chief Medical Officer at Color Genomics, which provides genetic testing for hereditary cancer and high cholesterol risks as well as preventative health services, including genetic counseling. We spoke to her about recent breakthroughs in cancer research and precision medicine, the benefits of testing for cancer-causing gene mutations, and what it means for patients, families, and medical providers.” At the link find the title, “Episode 27: Dr. Jill Hagenkord on Precision Medicine and Genetic Testing, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SBHAG0915.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cavitation Science 60 mins – – “This week, we’re discussing an effect called cavitation: low pressure causes bubbles of vapour to form in a liquid, which can cause a lot of damage when those bubbles collapse. First up is Paul Brandner, Associate Professor and Research Leader of the Cavitation Research Laboratory at the Australian Maritime College, to discuss how these bubbles form and why they can be so destructive. And we talk with Suzanne Cox, artist, scientist, and engineer, to discuss her work with crustaceans who have evolved ways of controlling the effect when they strike snail shells.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chicken Industry 48 mins – “Chicken is such a mainstay of the contemporary American dinner table that it seems hard to imagine that, just a century ago, it was rare and expensive. But over the course of the 20th century, both chickens and the chicken industry exploded in size. Much of that growth can be attributed to the miraculous properties of antibiotics, which were developed to fight human diseases but quickly began to be fed to farm animals in vast quantities. Journalist and author Maryn McKenna weaves these two intertwined tales together in her new book, Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats. In this episode of Gastropod, she describes the consequences of decades spent feeding chicken antibiotics, in terms of chicken flavor, poultry well-being, and, most significantly, human health.” At the link right-click “Download: and select Save Link As” from the up-up menu.

Climate Analysis 26 mins – “Dr. Armin Shwartzman, an associate professor at University of California San Diego, received a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University and since then has used statistics for image analysis. On this week’s science studio, we begin a new season with Dr. Shwartzman as he shares with us his expertise in statistics and how he has advanced his studies.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Disinformation 30 mins – “Disinformation. It sometimes manifests in theatrical shows of ignorance, like Senior Republican Senator James Inhoffe bringing a snowball to the Senate floor as “evidence” that global warming is a hoax, or the persistent denial coming out of the ill-informed head of the current president that Harvey and Irma are unrelated to climate change. But where does the disinformation start? Sometimes the seeds of willfully inaccurate right-wing talking points are planted by more mainstream conservative thinkers like George Will, Rich Lowry, Peggy Noonan, or the latest star of the right wing elite, NY Times opinion columnist, Bret Stephens. Under cloak of sophisticated language, these opinion columnists bury grains in the fertile right-wing psyche that grow into dangerously thorny vines of falsehood. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with DC-based science communicator, Aaron Huertas, to discuss what disinformation Bret Stephens has sown lately regarding the climate. We talk about Stephens’s disregard for solutions that could fight climate change, examine the weaknesses in his research, and ponder what motivates him to reach his simplistic and misleading conclusions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Hogs 23 mins – “…As a new miner in a dangerous industry, Ronnie had to go through an intensive orientation process before this first trip underground. He sat through 40 hours of training and safety classes before going down into the mines. He was also issued a yellow hardhat that identified him as a rookie, and given his first reflective coal mining stickers. He put one on his new hardhat and saved one in a box, later putting it into an album.Today, after 34 years as a miner in Alabama, Ronnie has filled several photo albums with thousands of stickers. Some are inside jokes. Others commemorate big events or accomplishments at work. Some come from unions or manufacturers connected to the industry….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Commercial Law 20 mins – “The federal government can’t pass any law it wants to. It’s limited by Article 1 Section 8 of the Constitution, but the executive branch can choose how to enforce those laws. Under Trump, there are indications that drug laws, which are based on the Commerce Clause, are about to be enforced very differently.” At the link find the title, “9- Commerce Clause,” right-click “Media files TCL_ep_9_Commerce_part 1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Common Carriage Law 30 mins – “The modern fight over network neutrality isn’t a few years old. It is well over 1,000 years old across a variety of infrastructures and is totally wrapped up in a legal concept known as common carriage that has governed many kinds of “carriers” over the years. Few, if any, are as conversant in this subject as Barbara Cherry – a lawyer and PH.D in communications. She has worked in industry for 15 years, at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for five years, and is currently a professor in the Media School at Indiana University. One of the key points of our conversation is regarding the problems with media shortening the Network Neutrality policy fights as turning the Internet into a “public utility.”  Barbara helps us to understand how common carriage is distinct from public utility regulation and why common carriage regulation is necessary even in markets that may have adequate competition and choices.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from here.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Complex Global Law 67 mins – “Law professor Gillian Hadfield of the University of Southern California and author of Rules for a Flat World talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in her book for regulating the digital future. Hadfield suggests the competitive provision of regulation with government oversight as a way to improve the flexibility and effectiveness of regulation in the dynamic digital world we are living in.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Security 27 mins – “With the coming of the World Wide Web in the 1990s internet access opened up to everybody, it was no longer the preserve of academics and computer hobbyists. Already prior to the Web, the burgeoning internet user groups and chat rooms had tested what was acceptable behaviour online, but access was still limited. Aleks Krotoski asks whether the Web through enabling much wider use of the internet is the villain of the piece in facilitating not just entertainment and commerce, but all aspects of the darker side, from malicious computer hacking attacks, worms and viruses, to new channels for criminality, online extortion and identity theft.” At the link find the title, “Dark Side of the World Wide Web,” right-click “Media files p05fh819.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness 56 mins – “In the second year of what’s becoming a tradition here on Think Again, this is a mixtape of some of Jason’s favorite moments from the past year’s shows. Things that stuck with him because they were funny, or especially wise, or because of something extraordinary about the conversation that he can’t quite put his finger on. This episode — 2017 Mixtape #1 — features philosopher of mind Daniel Dennett, architecture critic Sarah Goldhagen, novelist Ian McEwan, child psychologist Alison Gopnik, neuroscientist Erik Kandel, and actor Alan Alda. Among the many ideas that come up: minds, buildings, Hamlet, A.I., the nature of evil, communication.” At the link find the title, “113. 2017 Mixtape #1 – Mind, Body, Authenticity, Artifice,” right-click “Media files PP5241072106.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness 60 mins – “In his latest book Consciousness and the Social Brain  Princeton neuroscientist Michael Graziano proposes a unique and compelling theory of consciousness. He proposes that the same circuits that the human brain uses to attribute awareness to others are used to model self-awareness. He emphasizes that his attention schema theory is only tentative, but it is testable and it does fit our current knowledge of brain function. In a recent interview for the Brain Science Podcast (BSP 108), Graziano used the following clinical example to clarify his approach. A colleague had a patient who was convinced that he had a squirrel in his head. When confronted with the illogic of his claim the patient replied “Not everything can be explained by science.” In this example it is clear that the squirrel doesn’t really exist, so the question to be answered is HOW did his brain reach the conclusion that it does. While imagining one has a squirrel in one’s head is thankfully rare, we also know that our subjective experiences of the world are not necessarily accurate. Our perception of the world is shaped by how our brain processes the sensory inputs it receives. For example, we perceive white light as an absence of color even though in reality it consists of all wavelengths.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Convicted Innocents 12 mins – “Harvard Law professor Ronald Sullivan fights to free wrongfully convicted people from jail — in fact, he has freed some 6,000 innocent people over the course of his career. He shares heartbreaking stories of how (and why) people end up being put in jail for something they didn’t do, and the consequences in their lives and the lives of others. Watch this essential talk about the duty we all have to make the world a bit more fair every day, however we can.” At the link find the title, “How I help free innocent people from prison | Ronald Sullivan, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files RonaldSullivan_2016X.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cosmic Questions 53 mins – “Who better to answer fan-submitted questions about science fiction on TV and in the movies than Bill Nye? Bill and Chuck Nice flip channels between “Star Trek,” “Star Wars,” “Lost in Space,” “Gilligan’s Island,” “Back to the Future,” and more. (Adult Language.)” At the link click the square with three dots and double-click “Download” to get the audio file.

Cosmic Questions 55 mins – “Black holes, neutron stars, the multiverse, and much more. Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Leighann Lord delve into the dark mysteries of the universe – now extended with a cosmic conversation between Neil and Matt O’Dowd, host of PBS Space Time.” At the link click the square with three dots and double-click “Download” to get the audio file.

CT and MRI 58 mins – “We talk with Dr. Scott Klioze, a board certified radiologist from Saint Augustine, Florida who is using social media and YouTube to inform the public about the theory and practical applications of MRI and CT scanning, about his views on 3D in Medicine and the role radiology has played in bringing 3D visualization and fabrication to forefront of the media’s attention on the 3D. Dr. Klioze’s YouTube videos can be found on his channel “Doctor Klioze” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SUHgtREWQc&list=UUp0iQ6CVp6qPcJetHP5-nEA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djAxjtN_7VE&index=7&list=UUp0iQ6CVp6qPcJetHP5-nEA This episode was recorded on the 2nd of September, 2014. And if you want to see some of the cool 3D animations that Dr. Klioze is talking about, head out to our YouTube channel ‘All Things 3D’.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Detroit Revitalization 87 mins – “On May 17, the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings held an event that aimed to unpack the updated findings from the Detroit Reinvestment Index, a comprehensive report created and issued by The Kresge Foundation that measures Detroit’s comeback from its history-making bankruptcy in 2014.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow and to get the audio file.

Diagnosis Uncertainty 22 mins – “This week we’re at the Preventing Overdiagnosis conference in Quebec Canada, The conference is a forum to discuss the harms associated with using uncertain methods to look for disease in apparently healthy people – and is part of the BMJ’s too much medicine campaign. The literature on overdiagnosis has mostly been published since 2013 – partly…” At the link find the title, “Preventing Overdiagnosis 2017 – Rita Redberg, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files 338474985-bmjgroup-preventing-overdiagnosis-2017-rita-redberg.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dilbert Creator 44 mins – “Recorded on July 12, 2017 The Dilbert comic strip artist and political philosopher Scott Adams sits down with Peter Robinson to discuss his book How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big. He discusses with Peter his theory of “talent stacking,” the idea that rather than being an expert in one particular skill (i.e., Tiger Woods and golf), one can become successful by stacking a variety of complementary nonexpert skills. …Adams argues that President Trump is one of the best branders, influencers, and persuaders he has ever seen, in that the president uses persuasive techniques in debates and on social media as a way to get people to do what he wants. Adams contends that President Trump’s persuasive techniques will help solve the problem of North Korea because he has already set up China to get involved by intimating that it tried and failed. …They also briefly discuss his new book, Win Bigly, about the persuasive strategies of Donald Trump. Scott Adams is releasing his new book, Win Bigly, in October 2017.” At the link find the title, “How to Fail at Almost Everything with Scott Adams, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170914-adams.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dog Domestication 58 mins – “According to Dr. Clive Wynne, most of the differences we see in dogs versus their wolfish cousins derive from the fact that dogs — in Peter Pan fashion — maintain the features and mentality of juvenile wolves all through their lives. A dog is wolf whose genes refuse to let it grow up. Dr. Monique Udell, an Animal Behaviorist at Oregon State University, studies the differences (and the similarities) between dogs and wolves, including the approaches that each take to problem solving, social learning, and submission to human authority.  She paints a picture of dogs as a pretty laid-back species, un-self-consciously waiting on humans to solve their problems for them.  Kind of like a canine Marie Antoinette. In Episode #195, both Wynne and Udell combine to provide a tag-team interview on almost everything you might have wondered about your dog’s innermost mind.  (The kind of questions you just can’t ask your dog without getting a cock-headed stare and a confused bark in reply.)” At the link find the title, “195: Dognition,”right-click “Media files SDS195.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dog Rescues 57 mins – “Episode 33 of Books and Ideas is an interview with Kyla Duffy from Happy Tails Books. Duffy publishes inspiring stories about how adopting rescued dogs enriches peoples lives. Proceeds go to various rescue organizations.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Flying Careers 37 mins – “Is a career flying, fixing, or supporting drones in your career future? Today I am joined by Ryan Wallace from Polk State College to discuss the career opportunities in the world of Commercial Drones. Ryan is a professor of Aeronautical Science and is actively involved in the local Unmanned Aircraft System Community.” At the link right-click “Downloads” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eclipse Experience 53 mins – “Neil deGrasse Tyson, Chuck Nice, and broadcast meteorologist Joe Rao are here with everything you need to know about the August 21st total solar eclipse, called “the Great American Eclipse.” Keep looking up – but only with eclipse-safe glasses!” At the link click the square with three dots and double-click “Download” to get the audio file.

Eclipse History 27 mins – “Eclipses have inspired dread and awe since antiquity. The earliest Chinese mythology saw solar eclipses as dragons eating the sun. We speak to native American astronomer Nancy Maryboy who tells us about the Navajo and Cherokee beliefs, many of which are still held today. We visit Stonehenge to examine theories that the ancient Aubrey holes, burial pits on the outer edge of the monument, were used to predict eclipses. And, psychologist Dr Kate Russo looks at her own and others obsession with eclipses to examine the reactions so many people report.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eclipse Research 27 mins – “Eclipses have inspired dread and awe since antiquity. The earliest Chinese mythology saw solar eclipses as dragons eating the sun. We speak to native American astronomer Nancy Maryboy who tells us about the Navajo and Cherokee beliefs, many of which are still held today. We visit Stonehenge to examine theories that the ancient Aubrey holes, burial pits on the outer edge of the monument, were used to predict eclipses. And, psychologist Dr Kate Russo looks at her own and others obsession with eclipses to examine the reactions so many people report.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ecuadorian Oil Problem 30 mins – “Yasuni National Park in Ecuador is widely recognised as the most biodiverse place on earth. Around 10% of all known life forms can be found within a few hundred acres of this part of the Amazon rainforest. Yet the forest sits on top of thousands of barrels of crude oil and the Ecuadorian government has now given the go-ahead for drilling. Tom Heap finds out what is at stake and asks why the Ecuadorian government which has one of the greenest constitutions in the world has decided to exploit the reserves.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Election Security 59 mins – “On September 8, the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence and the Governance Studiesprogram at Brookings hosted an event focused on the national security concerns surrounding election security in the United States.At the link double click the down-pointing arrow to get the audio file.

Emotional Cognition 69 mins– “In The Cognitive-Emotional Brain: From Interactions to Integration neuroscientist Luiz Pessoa argues that emotion and cognition are deeply intertwined throughout many levels of the brain. In a recent interview (BSP 106) Pessoa and I focused on recent discoveries about the amygdala and Thalamus that challenge traditional assumptions about what these structures do. The amygdala processes more than fear (and other negative stimuli) and the Thalamus is more than  a mere relay station. This a fairly technical discussion but Pessoa did a good job of making the material accessible to all listeners. The reason I think these concepts matter is that not only do they challenge overly simplistic notions of how the brain works, but they also challenge our tendency to see emotion and cognition as separate and often opposing processes.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equifax Fiasco 119 mins – “[Starts at 80 min mark.] This week we discuss last Friday’s passing of our dear friend and colleague Jerry Pournelle, when AI is turned to evil purpose, whether and when Google’s Chrome browser will warn of man in the middle attacks, why Google is apparently attempting to patent pieces of a compression technology they did not invent, another horrifying router vulnerability disclosure — including ten 0-day vulnerabilities, an update on the sunsetting of Symantec’s CA business unit, another worrying failure at Comodo, a few quick bits, an update on my one commercial product SpinRite, answering a closing the loop question from a listener, and a look at the Equifax fiasco.” At the link right-click “Download options,” right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equifax Mess 96 mins – “[Intro covers Equifax.] Leo Laporte and Jason Howell take an in-depth look at the new Essential Phone PH-1. It finally arrived and Jason has spent a lot of time with it the last few days and will have a review. Also, Kelsea Weber from iFixit.com (a sponsor of TWiT) joins us to talk about what’s inside the Essential Phone. They had a hard time getting inside and had to freeze it! (plus they broke two screens!) Leo has the new Mavic Pro drone from DJI. We’ll take it for a spin and see if it’s worth the high price tag. Megan Morrone has a full review of the Tovala smart oven. Father Robert Ballecer, SJ has some ideas to bring new life to your old remote controls. In Call For Help, we’ll talk about whether or not you should install Oreo on your Android phone. Equifax gets hacked and leaked personal info of 143 million consumers.” At the link click “Download options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evangelical Movement 29 mins – “Between impending nuclear annihilation and the President of the United States seeming to endorse white supremacists, you may have missed the dismantling of the Environmental Protection Agency. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with Brendan O’Connor, a reporter for Gizmodo Media who has recently written an extensive piece chronicling the evangelical community and the elements behind the movement’s embrace of climate change denialism – and the politicians, oil companies and think tanks connected to it all. We look at the history of the movement, its leaders and discuss the unlikely alliance between the evangelical right and Donald Trump.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exercise and Learning 44 mins – “…One of the world’s foremost researchers on the subject of exercise and the brain is Dr. John Ratey, who is a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He’s also my guest on the show today. In this episode, Dr. Ratey goes into detail about how exercise makes your brain stronger and more capable. My hope is that, after listening to this episode, you’ll be equipped with a more technical understanding of exercise’s pivotal role in brain health – which, in turn, should give you more ammunition for fighting your brain’s lazy excuses and getting your daily exercise in”” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Falklands 27 mins – “Britain and Argentina’s competing claims over a small group of islands in the South Atlantic go back almost 250 years. In English they’re known as the Falkland Islands, after the 17th-century British lord Falkland. Matthew Teller explores the enduring connections of history, culture and identity that link the Falkland islands and the continent of South America.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Food Addiction 27 mins – “Is being addicted to food the same as being addicted to crack?” At the link find the title, “Can you be addicted to food?, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files whitecoat_20170909_77999.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Crop Quality 68 mins – “Author and farmer Ben Hartman talks about his farm and his book, The Lean Farm. View the show notes for this episode and all previous Farm Small, Farm Smart episodes.Keep learning with these two great audiobooks: The Market Gardener by JM Fortier and The Urban Farmer by Curtis Stone – Increase farm efficiency with the Paperpot Transplanter.” At the link find the title, “FSFS112: The Lean Farm with Ben Hartman, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files FSFS_112_2017 BenHartman.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foundations and Philanthropy 64 mins – “Is private charity always a good thing? Do large foundations have too much power? Political Scientist Rob Reich of Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the power and effectiveness of foundations–large collections of wealth typically created and funded by a wealthy donor. Is such a plutocratic institution consistent with democracy? Reich discusses the history of foundations in the United States and the costs and benefits of foundation expenditures in the present.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freedom of Religion 93 mins – “On September 13, 2017, Brookings hosted a discussion with the American Charter Project on the vital role that religious pluralism and freedom of religion and conscience play in fostering civility and unity in our democratic republic.At the link double click the down-pointing arrow and to get the audio file.  

Georgetown University Slaves 50 mins – “By the time the Jesuit priests of Maryland founded Georgetown College in 1789, they were among the biggest slave owners in the colony. With several tobacco plantations scattered across Maryland, the Catholic order owned at least 200 slaves. It used the income from their labor to create Georgetown, part of an educational mission to spread and maintain Catholicism in the U.S. “The idea was that the Jesuit plantations manned by enslaved people would essentially subsidize the Jesuit educational mission,” says Adam Rothman, a historian at Georgetown University, explaining the purpose and economics of free tuition. Georgetown also directly employed slave labor, says Rothman, citing the school’s early ledgers showing rented or hired enslaved people. By the 1810s, the Jesuits’ tobacco plantations failed, and Georgetown was in debt. For some 20 years, the priests debated whether to free their slaves, keep them as part of their religious stewardship or sell them. The Maryland Jesuits decided to sell 272 men, women and children — virtually their entire slave community — to two planters in Louisiana. They were paid $115,000, roughly $3 million in current dollars. The money helped pay off Georgetown’s debts. In 1838, the enslaved people were divided and sent by ship to Louisiana. Nearly two centuries later, Georgetown President Jack DeGioia formed the Working Group on Slavery, Memory, and Reconciliation to investigate that history and recommend ways to atone.” At the link find the title, “Shadow Class: College Dreamers in Trump’s America, Sept 2017,” right-click “Media files shadowclassed_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gerrymandering 39 mins – “When the Supreme Court term opens next month, perhaps no issue will be more urgent – and more complicated – than voting rights. One of the first cases the justices will hear is Gill v. Whitford, a challenge to the 2011 redrawing of district lines in Wisconsin. While the Court has struck down racially-motivated gerrymanders in the past, no election map has ever been rejected as a purely partisan gerrymander. And recent developments have some court watchers concerned that Justice Anthony Kennedy may still not be ready to do that. Our guest this episode is Richard Hasen, Chancellor’s Professor of Law and Political Science at the University of California, Irvine, and curator of the must-read Election Law Blog.” At the link find the title, “Gerrymandering Goes Back to Court, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY9994512039.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guts Research 60 mins – “This hour, we dive into the messy mystery in the middle of us. What’s going on down there? And what can the rumblings deep in our bellies tell us about ourselves? We stick our hand in a cow stomach, get a window into our core (thanks to a hunter who became a walking science experiment in the 1800s), and listen in on the surprising back-and-forth between our gut and our brain. And we talk to a man who kind of went out of his mind when a medical procedure left him (for a little while) gutless. Correction: An earlier version of this piece implied that subjects in the human probiotics study were given a larger dose of probiotics than they actually were. We also compared the results of the study to the effect of giving people anti-anxiety medication. The subjects did experience a significant positive mood change, but the researchers did not compare that result to the effect of anti-anxiety medication. The audio has been adjusted to reflect these facts.At the link right-click “Download: and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Happiness Expert 30 mins – “On The Gist, Gretchen Rubin explains why her system of sorting people into four personality types (Rebel, Obliger, Questioner, and Upholder) will make your life easier. Rubin is the author of The Four Tendencies and host of the podcast Happier. In the Spiel, what happens when politics seeps into sports.” At the link find the title, “Which Type Are You? Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM7778843674.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Happiness Expert 36 mins – “This episode we have Gretchen Rubin back on the podcast. Gretchen is the author of several books, including the blockbuster New York Times bestsellers, Better Than Before, The Happiness Project and Happier at Home. In Better Than Before: Mastering the Habits of Our Everyday Lives, she provides surprising insights and practical advice drawn from cutting-edge research, ancient wisdom, and her own observations, about how we can make our lives better than before. Listen in as we talk about her new book The Four Tendencies, what it means to be an Upholder, a Questioner, an Obliger, or a Rebel, and how to use that to better your own life and motivation.” At the link right-click “Download episode hereMP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hashtag Octothorpe 16 mins – “If you want to follow conversation threads relating to this show on social media—whether Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram, Tumblr—you know to look for the hashtag: #99pi. In our current digital age, the hashtag identifies movements, events, happenings, brands—topics of all kinds. The “#” didn’t always have this meaning, though. It’s had a few different lives and a few different names.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Speech 48 mins – “In the wake of the white nationalist rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia, we dig into the nuances of how businesses handle the First Amendment and their own ethics policies. Plus, a discussion of the case for diversity in business, the question of whether you can bring your kids into the office and the ongoing debate over the North American Free Trade Agreement.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Hate Speech 57 mins – “After the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, people in this region are looking more closely at local racist and anti-Semitic groups: their statements, their plans, and what may happen next.  We’ll talk about those issues and gauge the overall New Hampshire reaction to what happened this weekend.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Hip Hop Geeks 54 mins – “Drop That Track! Neil deGrasse Tyson discusses the fusion of hip-hop and science, the legacy of violence in hip-hop, the culture of music, and much more with rapper Logic, co-host Chuck Nice, and rapper/educator/DJ Steve Tyson, a.k.a The Intellect.” At the link click the square with three dots and double-click “Download” to get the audio file.

Homeless Drunk 7 mins – “Earlier this year, Keith Howard stepped down as executive director of Liberty House, a transitional living facility for formerly homeless veterans.  And he started something new. Howard now lives at a converted hunting camp in northern New Hampshire, on the grounds of Warriors at 45 North, where he’s going to run writing retreats for veterans.  Howard himself lives in what he calls the Tiny White Box. I went to visit him there….” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hospital Discharge Concerns 44 mins – “In this presentation, Dr. Mitchell discusses discharge-related risks, appropriateness for discharge, and elements of the discharge process.  Dr. Mitchell emphasizes that dangerous events happen commonly, involving medications, test results, and poor communication and/or follow-ups. However, with a clear understanding for the process, these are mostly preventable.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Forecasting 28 mins – “In the last few weeks, Hurricanes Harvey and Irma have been breaking records as they caused devastating damage in the Atlantic. Is there a link between global warming and these mega hurricanes? Looking at data collected over the last decade, the number of hurricanes each season may not change, but it is possible that strong storms will get even stronger.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hydrogel Retinas 4 mins – “Until now, replacement retinas have consisted of hard materials, which can lead to inflammation or scarring. A PhD candidate at Oxford University, Vanessa Restrepo-Schild has led a team producing a new synthetic, double-layered retina which closely mimics the natural human retinal process. The replica retina consists of soft hydrogels and biological cell membrane proteins.  The cells act as pixels, detecting and reacting to light to create a grey scale image.  Currently Vanessa is trying to incorporate the photoreactive cells with cultured cells, which might be able to stimulate the neurons at the back of the eye as does a working retina.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hygiene Hypothesis 30 mins – “Do germaphobic parents doom their kids to a lifetime of allergies and irritable bowels? This sounds like a question for our favorite game, “Is That Bullshit?” Returning champion Maria Konnikova helps us sort good bacteria from bad. Konnikova writes for the New Yorker and is the author of The Confidence Game.” At the link find the title, “The Hygiene Hypothesis, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM9560599236.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impact Investing 62 mins – “Felix Salmon of Fusion, senior strategy officer at a political risk startup Anna Szymanski, Slate Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann, and VP and Managing Director of Impact Investing at Enterprise Community Partners Julia Shin discuss: The disbanding of Trump’s CEO council; Companies’ responsibilities to their shareholders; Impact investing” At the link find the title, “The Only Way Is Ethics Edition, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM5858333871.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Partition P1 26 mins – “On its 70th anniversary, Kavita Puri hears the untold stories of those who witnessed India’s partition in 1947. The years leading up to partition was a time in which many Muslims, Sikhs and Hindus recalled living together harmoniously. We hear about the calls for independence; the rising clamour for an independent Pakistan; the dread as communal rioting gripped ever more of the sub-continent; how the movement of people began prior to independence; and how independence day was marked on both sides of the border.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Partition P2 25 mins – “On the 70th anniversary of the partition of India, Kavita Puri hears remarkable testimonies from people who witnessed the drama first hand – and even took part in it. They speak with remarkable clarity about the tumultuous events, whose legacy endures to this day. Witnesses describe the immediate aftermath of partition itself. As the former British territories were divided into two new dominions of India and Pakistan, millions on both sides of the new border found themselves in the wrong place – and fled. Intercommunal violence spread rapidly among Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs, and news of the atrocities sparked revenge attacks. Yet even as this brutality shocked the world, some of those who bore witness to it recall many individual acts of courage and humanity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing Philosophy 42 mins – “Paul addresses the 4 most common questions he receives from readers and listeners: Will indexing work as well in the future as in the past? Will small cap and value asset classes produce higher than S&P 500 returns in the future? How often should I rebalance? How do I best put my money into the market at these historically high prices? He also discusses an important lesson learned from a meeting with Dr. Hendrick Bessembinder.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran Elections 83 mins – “On May 16, the Brookings Center for Middle East Policy and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace co-hosted a discussion on the election’s candidates, its stakes, and its potential impact on the policies of the Trump administration and CongressAt the link double click the down-pointing arrow and to get the audio file.At the link double click the down-pointing arrow to get the audio file.    

Jackson Hole Economic Policy Symposium 48 mins – “What if the way our infrastructure is designed could keep us safe from earthquakes, accidents and from terrorism? Lizzie O’Leary looks at the design of U.S. cities with counterterrorism expert Brian Michael Jenkins. Also, ex-Fed economist Bill Nelson talks about the people who are thinking of our financial well-being: the monetary policy leaders meeting at the Jackson Hole Economic Policy Symposium. Plus, a visit to places that inspire us — public libraries! — and how they’re changing to meet the needs of the millennial generation that visits them the most. Marketplace Weekend also gets a sneak peak at Marketplace’s Trade Off series on globalization with reporter Scott Tong.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jazz Artists 52 mins – “Neil deGrasse Tyson gets his improv on with legendary jazz musicians Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock. Featuring Chuck Nice, Sean Ono Lennon, Stephen Tyson, Mona Chalabi, Charles Limb, and the Columbia University Jazz House.” At the link click the square with three dots and double-click “Download” to get the audio file.

Justice in U.S. 52 mins – “The United States has the world’s largest prison population. In 2012, there were 2.3 million people in American prisons or jails – and even more under some kind of “correctional supervision.” In fact, if you added up all the people in America in prison, on probation, or on parole, it’d total about 6 million – just a little smaller than the population of New York City. The system is vast, but how well is it working? In this episode, we explore how a few communities across the country have responded creatively to problems with police, courts, and prisons.” At the link find the link, “American Justice, Oct, 2014,” right-click “Media files Justice_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Karachi Pakistan 30 mins – “Razia wants to win Pakistan’s first Olympic gold medal for women’s boxing; student teacher Iqra is a guide on Karachi’s first tourist bus tour; top boy scout Rizwaan started Pakistan’s Youth Parliament and young lawyer Faiza has created Asia’s first female troupe of improvisational comedians. They are just some of the young people determined to put their home city on the map for good reasons rather than bad. In 2013 Karachi was described as the most dangerous mega-city in the world where political gang warfare, terrorist bomb blasts, targeted killings, kidnapping and extortion were everyday occurrences. But in the past two years the security situation has been brought under control and citizen-led activities to reclaim Karachi’s public spaces are blossoming again, particularly by young people under 30 who make up two thirds of Pakistan’s population. Walls that were once covered with political slogans and hate speech are now painted over with murals celebrating the city’s history and diversity. Nightlife is once again booming with arts and culture back on the stage. This spring’s annual all-night Aalmi Mushaira, held in the Karachi Expo Centre, attracted thousands of Urdu poetry lovers of all ages and backgrounds. And the comedy scene is thriving, drawing new audiences and challenging stereotypes with internationally successful acts such as Saad Haroon. Join Karachi radio journalist Noreen Shams Khan to discover a Pakistan that you do not usually hear about.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Katy Tur Correspondent 46 mins – “Katy Tur, NBC News Correspondent and author of a new book about “Unbelievable,” joins Chuck on stage at the 92nd Street Y in Manhattan to talk Donald Trump and the 2016 election. This podcast was part of the 92Y Talks program and has been edited for pacing.” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar to get the podcast.

Larry King Interview 96 mins – “Larry King (@kingsthings) has been dubbed “The most remarkable talk show host on TV, ever” by TV Guide and “Master of the mic” by Time Magazine. Larry’s been described as the Muhammad Ali of the broadcast interview, and he’s been inducted into five of the nation’s leading broadcasting halls of fame. He’s the recipient of the Allen H. Neuharth Award for Excellence in Journalism, an Emmy, the George Foster Peabody Award for Excellence in Broadcasting, ten CableACE awards — the list goes on.” At the link find the title, “#259: Lessons from 50,000 Interviews: Larry King and Cal Fussman,” right-click “Media files The Tim Ferriss Show-Larry King and Cal Fussman.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Latin American Trends 105 mins – “On May 16, the Brookings Global-CERES Economic and Social Policy in Latin America Initiative hosted a panel discussion on the implications of new global and regional trends for the political and macroeconomic outlook in Latin America, including whether these new trends could reverse the institutional, economic, and social progress of the last 20 years.At the link double click the down-pointing arrow and to get the audio file.

Lexicographers 56 mins – “Kory Stamper is a lexicographer at Merriam-Webster, often seen on their “Ask the Editor” video series. Her funny and fascinating book Word By Word: The Secret Life of Dictionaries is about the how the sausage of dictionaries is made, and about the slipperiness of words themselves. This is not a “prescriptivist” manifesto, fussily criticizing people’s misuse of apostrophes or words like “irregardless.” On the contrary, like any lexicographer worth her salt (and salt, as Kory will tell you, was once so valuable it was used as money, which is where we get the word “salary” from…) Kory’s a professional “descriptivist”, painstakingly trying to pin down how words are actually used even as they try to wriggle away from her.” At the link find the title, “95. Kory Stamper (Lexicographer) – Lair of the Level 10 Word Mage, Apr, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP8415028636.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liberal Democracy 86 mins – “On September 13, as governments gather in Washington for the 9th ministerial conference of the Community of Democracies, Foreign Policy at Brookings hosted Secretary Albright and Prime Minister Jomaa to launch the Democracy and Security Dialogue’s final report.At the link double click the down-pointing arrow and to get the audio file.  

Life Extension Factors 16 mins – “The Italian island of Sardinia has more than six times as many centenarians as the mainland and ten times as many as North America. Why? According to psychologist Susan Pinker, it’s not a sunny disposition or a low-fat, gluten-free diet that keeps the islanders healthy — it’s their emphasis on close personal relationships and face-to-face interactions. Learn more about super longevity as Pinker explains what it takes to live to 100 and beyond.” At the link find the title, “The secret to living longer may be your social life | Susan Pinker, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files SusanPinker_2017.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linux Intro 19 mins – “There are literally hundreds of versions of Linux to choose from. Each has its own look and feel. Each is designed with a specific purpose in mind. Each comes pre-packaged with a selection of software applications, and each is the same Linux at the core. Having said that, if you ask 10 people which version of Linux is best, you will get at least 12 different answers. 🙂 The recommendations we give in this episode are based on our experience and knowledge. (Larry has been using Linux as his exclusive personal computer operating system for about 10 years.)” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Literacy Lawsuit 51 mins – “The show this week is education themed, and we’re looking at stories from all over the country. We consider a landmark case weighing the right to literacy and its value, tax breaks for school supplies, the cost of college and the best gifts to give a new freshman. Parents, students and teachers all share their views in this episode about the value of education in the U.S.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Madisonian Law 66 mins -”In commemoration of Constitution Day 2017, we will explore what James Madison would think of today’s presidency, Congress, courts, and media and how we can resurrect Madisonian values today.” At the link find the title, “What would Madison think today?, Sept, 2017,” right click “Media files PP6836023159.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marine Venoms 46 mins – “Coral, sea urchins, venomous fish, and stingrays can all inject venom into their targets causing pain and wounds that must be treated. Dr. Dan Repplinger explains how to recognize and treat these injuries. Recorded on 05/10/2017. (#32457)” At the link right-click “audio mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martin Luther Anniversary 50 mins – “Chris Bowlby visits Wittenberg, where Martin Luther started it all in 1517. He discovers how the Reformation transformed life in many different ways, and helped make Germany a nation of singers and book-lovers. But amidst all the culture and kitsch Germany’s also grappling with a darker legacy – Luther’s anti-Semitism and exploitation by dictators and populists.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Million Dollar Question 28 mins – What is the best way to spend $100 million to fix one huge problem in the world today? That is the challenge laid down by the MacArthur Foundation in Chicago, distributors of the “genius grant”. They created the 100&Change competition to inspire solutions for some of the looming disasters facing people, places or the planet. The prize is one colossal grant of $100 million for the project which can make the most lasting difference to people’s lives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Model Helicopters 87 mins – “This week we talk with Robert Rodriquez, the founder of the Society of Aerial Cinematography (AKA SOAC), for a discussion about the use of Multirotors and helicopters in the motion picture industry. Also discussed in this show are some cool new multirotor products and upcoming flying events.On this show Raja joins us to answer your questions about helicopters. Why are there different swashplate geometries? How do mechanical mixing and CCPM compare? And everyone’s favorite, flybar or flybarless?” At the link find the title, “ATTF #253 – Helicopter Tech Questions,” right-click “Media files ATTF_253-Helicopter Tech Questions.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Snippets Creator 21 mins – “Behind almost all popular music, there is this hidden economy of music producers buying and selling sonic snippets, texting each other half-finished beats, and angling for back-end royalties.” At the link find the title, “#794: How To Make It In The Music Business,” right-click “Media files 20170915_pmoney_pmpod794.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nation of Islam 30 mins – “Abdurrahim Rashada has seen a lot in his life. He served in the Navy during World War II. He survived and escaped the Jim Crow South. He worked in the GM factories of Michigan and saw their rise and fall. And then, he joined the Nation of Islam, attracted by their message of freedom, justice, and equality for black folks. And later, when the community moved towards Sunnism, he learned to adapt to a broader community of immigrant Muslims. In 1988, he met Ahmed when he had his first aqiqah (first haircut) at the mosque in Saginaw. In this episode, Ahmed takes a step back and Khalila Rashada interviews her grandfather in the Saginaw house she grew up in.” At the link find the title, “Episode 33: A 91-Year-Old Imam Still Finds Joy In The Podcast Studio, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY8830390577.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Netflix Gigs 21 mins – “Patty McCord helped create a workplace at Netflix that runs more like a professional sports team than a family. If you’re not up to scratch, you’re off the team. Is this the future of work?” At the link find the title, “#647: Hard Work Is Irrelevant, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170913_pmoney_pmpod647rerun.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neural Discovery 29 mins – “Our guest this week is Greg Gage. Greg is the co-founder and CEO of Backyard Brains, a company started with Tim Marzullo as neuroscience graduate students at the University of Michigan. Greg is a published neuroscientist and engineer, and has helped develop tools, curriculum and experiments that allowed the general public to participate in neural discovery. Greg is a senior fellow at TED and the recipient of the White House Champion of Change from Barack Obama award for his commitment to citizen science.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-clcik “Download” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Niger High Birth Rate 27 mins – “Women in Niger have more children, on average, than anywhere else in the world. The government of Niger can’t support such a fast growing population and wants traditions to change” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nigerian Author 27 mins – “The author of Stay With Me, Ayobami Adebayo, sits down with Isaac Chotiner to discuss what she learned from Margaret Atwood, the pain of writing about Nigeria’s turbulent recent past, and using fiction to challenge the idea that women must have children.” At the link find the title, “Ayobami Adebayo, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY2169299463.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea History 31 mins – “Episode 25: Jean H. Lee on the Rise and Rule of North Korea’s Kim Dynasty As tensions with North Korea rise, this week we examine the history of that country’s ruling Kim family. We spoke to Jean H Lee, author of “Kings of Communism: Inside Kim Jong Un’s Bloody Scramble to Kill of His Family” in the September edition of Esquire Magazine. She also led the Associated Press’s coverage of the Korean Peninsula as bureau chief from 2008 to 2013 and opened the AP’s Pyongyang bureau in January 2012. We spoke with Ms. Lee about the Kim family’s rise to power, the idea of North Korea as an absolute monarchy, and the message Kim Jong Un sent with the assassination of his brother in February.

NSA Security Counsel 57 mins – “We have a special treat in this off-cycle episode!  NSA GC Glenn Gerstell is in Austin to speak to our students here at UT, and (no doubt against his better judgment) he agreed to sit for an interview with Professors Chesney and Vladeck.  The conversation focuses in particular on the nature, operation, and criticisms of Section 702 collection authority.  As you probably know, Section 702 is scheduled to expire at the end of December, and there is certain to be a fascinating, high-stakes Congressional fight over its renewal in the months ahead.   Tune in for our discussion of targeting, minimization, “backdoor” searches, database queries, masking, unmasking, and many other key elements in the debate!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

One-legged Wrestler 33 mins – “On the next Snap Judgment,”On The Mat.” Amazing people wrestling with tough opponents and big decisions. Featuring Anthony Robles, the grappler that could take you down with one leg, and the Von Erich wrestling family whose glitz and fame was riddled with pain and sacrifice.” At the link click the circle with three dots and right-click “Download this audio” to get the podcast.

Orphan Prevention 13 mins – “Could it be wrong to help children in need by starting an orphanage? In this eye-opening talk about the bad consequences of good intentions, Tara Winkler speaks out against the spread of orphanages in developing countries, caused in part by foreign donors, and details the harm done to children when they are separated from their families and left to grow up in institutions.” At the link find the title, “Why we need to end the era of orphanages | Tara Winkler, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files TaraWinkler_2016X.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Panhandling Solution 12 mins – “When Richard J. Berry, the mayor of Albuquerque, saw a man on a street corner holding a cardboard sign that read “Want a job,” he decided to take him (and others in his situation) up on it. He and his staff started a citywide initiative to help the homeless by giving them day jobs and a place to sleep — and the results were incredible. Find out how your city can replicate Albuquerque’s model with this frank and optimistic talk.” At the link find the title, “A practical way to help the homeless find work and safety | Richard J. Berry, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files RichardJBerry_2017X.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pink Slime Lawsuit 55 mins – “Felix Salmon of Fusion, senior strategy officer at a political risk startup Anna Szymanski, and Slate Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann discuss: Pink slime and food libel; Disney and Netflix; Office open seating plans” At the link find the title, “The Disney World Edition, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM7938092209.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poker Pro Interview 69 mins – “Phil Hellmuth (@phil_hellmuth) is an American professional poker player who has won a record fourteen World Series of Poker bracelets. He is the winner of the Main Event of the 1989 World Series of Poker (WSOP) and the Main Event of the 2012 World Series of Poker Europe (WSOPE), and he is a 2007 inductee of the WSOP’s Poker Hall of Fame. Hellmuth is also known for his temperamental “poker brat” personality — reflected in his new book, Poker Brat: Phil Hellmuth’s Autobiography. We recorded three hours of material and only one hour was used for the TV show. This podcast episode is almost entirely new content that didn’t appear on TV. In this conversation, we examine Phil’s morning routine, the importance of goals and blessings, how he became the youngest person to win the World Series of Poker, his prep for high-stakes games, what it takes to compete at the highest level, and much, much more.” At the link find the title, “#260: Setting Goals, Making Money, and Overcoming Tough Times — Phil Hellmuth,” right-click “Media files The Tim Ferriss Show-Phil Hellmuth.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prisons and Trump 44 mins – “How we got from the events in Ferguson to the election of you-know-who: Chris Hayes talks about race, incarceration, and politics in his new book  A Colony in a Nation—Salon called it “a dark book for a dark time.” Start Making Sense is hosted by Jon Wiener and co-produced by the Los Angeles Review of Books. Plus: Although Trump was the least Christian of all the Republican candidates, white evangelicals voted for him overwhelmingly, despite the work of some prominent evangelical leaders.  Sarah Posner of the Nation Institute analyzes the political deal that evangelicals made—she wrote about the issue last month for The New Republic. And Gary Younge explains what it’s been like talking about kids killed by guns—on call-in shows on talk radio.  His book Another Day in the Death of America: A Chronicle of Ten Short Lives recently won the Anthony J. Lukas Prize.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Privacy Data 55 mins – “More and more our lives are online. Wherever we go, whatever we do, we leave a digital trail. Cameras follow us as we walk through the city. Financial transactions are recorded be it banking or buying groceries, buying anything. And some people choose to document their lives on social media. Our data is valuable.  Profiles are assembled. What about privacy? Does it exist anymore? A human right or an outdated custom?  When political messages are unregulated and targeted, is democracy under threat? This discussion was held as part of Brisbane’s World Science Festival 2017.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race-Class-Culture 108 mins – “On September 5, the Brookings Institution hosted a conversation with William Julius Wilson, America’s leading voice on the sociology of race and poverty and author of “The Truly Disadvantaged,” and J.D. Vance, the author of the acclaimed “Hillbilly Elegy,” a personal and moving account of white underclass struggle in Appalachia.At the link double click the down-pointing arrow and to get the audio file.  

Read Between the Trump Lines 26 mins – “Jacob Weisberg talks to Lawfare’s Benjamin Wittes about who’s saying what in the Trump-Russia investigation and why it’s important to know the difference.” At the link find the title, “How to Read L’Affaire Russe, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY7229385510.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Renewable Energy in Texas 27 mins – “Why has a heavily Republican city in Texas, chock full of climate change sceptics, become the first city in the South to be powered entirely by renewable energy? And why, just a few miles away, has a small town consisting of a lone truck stop and a deserted dirt road they call Main Street, become the richest area in the entire United States? As Donald Trump pulls the US out of the Paris Climate Accords, and talks up the use of fossil fuels, we explore the unexpected reality of the energy industry in the ‘oil state’.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Ethics 28 mins – “Alan Winfield is the only Professor of Robot Ethics in the world. He is a voice of reason amid the growing sense of unease at the pace of progress in the field of artificial intelligence. He believes that robots aren’t going to take over the world – at least not any time soon. But that doesn’t mean we should be complacent. Alan Winfield talks to Jim al-Khalili about how, at a young age, he delighted in taking things apart. After his degree in microelectronics and a PhD in digital communication at Hull University, he set up a software company in the mid-80s, which he ran for the best part of a decade before returning to academia. In 1993, he co-founded the Bristol Robotics Laboratory at the University of the West of England, by far the largest centre of robotics in the UK. Today, he is a leading authority, not only on robot ethics, but on the idea of swarm robotics and biologically-inspired robotics. Alan explains to Jim that what drives many of his enquiries is the deeply profound question: how can ‘stuff’ become intelligent.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Safecracker 82 mins – “Leo Laporte and Iain Thomson talk with Nathan Seidle, the founder of SparkFun Electronics about the safe-cracking robot he created and how it works[20 min mark]. It was one of the most popular exhibits at DEF CON. Is your digital life a mess? Megan Morrone is here to help as she kicks off our #DigitalCleanse series. Today, learn how to tame your notifications. Is there a good ‘trust no one’ cloud storage solution? Why is Verizon so late on Android updates? Find out in our ‘Calls for Help.’ Then, Jason Howell loves great audio and has a review of IK Multimedia’s small iLoud Micro Monitor speakers.” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Romanian Internet Porn 29 mins – “Inside Romania’s live, web-camming world – the engine of the online sex industry… Assignment explores the fastest growing sector of so-called, ‘adult’ entertainment.” At the link right-click “Download: and select Save Link As” from the up-up menu.

Roundabouts 7 mins – “…Rotaries were introduced in the U.S. in the early 20th century — but there was no real design criteria. They have pretty high entry speeds, over 30 miles an hour, and they don’t process traffic very well. Another name for those? Traffic circles. But take that traffic circle, shrink it down, and add a few rules, maybe an extra lane, and you’ve got something special: the roundabout. Traffic circle being converted to a roundabout in Kingston, NY. The roundabout is the smaller circle in the middle. Oldenburg says you actually have less traffic in a roundabout than in a traffic circle, and that a lot of the roundabout construction in New Hampshire is actually a retrofitting of existing traffic circles. The engineers see a better flow of traffic and think, success! But the people driving through these things often have a different opinion….”  At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salman Rushdie 58 mins – “Since 2008, Big Think has been sharing big ideas from creative and curious minds. Since 2015, the Think Again podcast has been taking us out of our comfort zone, surprising our guests and Jason Gots, your host, with unexpected conversation starters from Big Think’s interview archives. Today’s guest is Salman Rushdie. He’s the author of twelve previous novels and four books of nonfiction, including Joseph Anton, Midnight’s Children (for which he won the Booker Prize and the Best of the Booker), Shame, The Satanic Verses, and Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights which we discussed two years ago on this show.  He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and a Distinguished Writer in Residence at New York University. His kaleidoscopic, funny, philosophical new novel The Golden House has been called a “return to realism” but maybe only because the present-day American realities it draws upon and reimagines are so indistinguishable from fantasy. In this episode, the first one with a repeat guest since the show was launched (Henry Rollins was one taping split into two episodes) Rushdie and Jason discuss New York City, the surrealism of everyday life, comic books, and much, much, more.” At the link find the title, “115. Salman Rushdie (writer) – A Permeable Frontier, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP1671544126.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

School Lunches 54 mins – “Across the United States, school lunch is being transformed, as counties and cities partner with local farms to access fresh vegetables, as well as hire chefs to introduce tastier and more adventurous meals. This is a much-needed correction after decades of processed meals that contained little in the way of nutrition and flavor. But how did we get to trays of spongy pizza and freezer-burned tater tots in the first place? While it seems as if such culinary delights were always part of a child’s day, the school lunch is barely a century old—and there are plenty of countries in the world, like Canada and Norway, where school lunch doesn’t even exist. This episode, we dive into the history of how we got to today’s school lunch situation, as well as what it tells us about our economic and gender priorities. Listen in now for all that, plus the science on whether school lunch even matters.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharps’ War 52 mins – “In January 1939, Unitarian minister Waitstill Sharp and his wife Martha received a call: would they travel to Europe to help Jewish dissidents and refugees under threat of Nazi persecution? While few Americans were paying attention to Hitler’s growing power, the Sharps agreed to the dangerous mission. A new PBS film explores their incredible work, and Wednesday, filmmaker Artemis Joukowsky joins us to talk about how the Sharp’s actions saved hundreds and altered the course of their own lives.”  At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Sixties Big Switch 53 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Department of Classical Studies, and is titled “Personal Agency and the Big Switch 1962-64: Thucydides, Bob Dylan and Stanley Kubrick.”  Our speaker is Professor Thomas Palaima from the University of Texas at Austin.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep and Memory 71 mins – “In The Secret World of Sleep: The Surprising Science of the Mind at Rest Dr. Penelope A. Lewis provides a highly readable account of the fascinating world of sleep research. Fascinating research is being carried out with animals as varied as fruit flies and rats, as well as with humans. I was surprised to learn that most people actually find it fairly easy to fall asleep in an fMRI scanner. I have just posted an interview with Dr. Lewis (BSP 107) that includes a discussion of the role of sleep in memory as well as interesting findings about how synapses in the brain actually change during sleep. We still don’t know exactly what sleep (and dreaming) are essential, but research in this field is growing. Dr. Lewis is excited about emerging research that suggests improving slow wave sleep may significantly improve learning and memory.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep Deprivation 33 mins – “If you could compare the person you were before you became sleep deprived to the person after, you’d find you’ve definitely become…lesser than. When it comes to sleep deprivation, you can’t trust yourself to know just how much it is affecting you. You feel fine, maybe a bit drowsy, but your body is stressed in ways that diminish your health and slow your mind. In this episode, we sit down with two researchers whose latest work suggests sleep deprivation also affects how you see other people. In tests of implicit bias, negative associations with certain religious and cultural categories emerged after people started falling behind on rest.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 110-Sleep_and_Bias.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Space Walk Stories 20 mins – “200 miles above Earth’s surface, astronaut Dave Wolf — rocketing through the blackness of Earth’s shadow at 5 miles a second — floated out of the Mir Space Station on his very first spacewalk. In this short, he describes the extremes of light and dark in space, relives a heart-pounding close call, and shares one of the most tranquil moments of his life. When we were putting together our live show In the Dark, Jad and Robert called up Dave Wolf to ask him if he had any stories about darkness. And boy, did he. Dave told us two stories that  became the finale of our show….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Special Forces Wound Care 19 mins – “This Clinical Practice Guideline was written by a fellow 18D with input from around the surgical community.  It reconciles the differences between wound care done in a role 2 or 3 facility, such as serial debridements, with what is taught in the 18D Special Forces Medical Sergeant Course with regards to delayed primary closure.  One way is not “right” while the other wrong, it has more to do with the amount of time and resources available to the medic or other provider.  The remainder of the blog post and podcast is meant to be a refresher for those who have already been taught these procedures.  It is also meant to be informational for those medical directors who may not be exactly certain of what has been taught as far as wound care and surgery. If you haven’t been trained to do these procedures before going ahead with them, it is very likely that you may do more harm to the patient than good.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Wound_Care.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startup Mentor 33 mins – “Jasen Yang gave up the security of a high-paying Wall Street job to launch his company, Polly Portfolio. It’s been three years since then, and Jasen still isn’t taking a salary. It’s put a lot of strain on his family, and made it difficult for Jasen and his wife, Lynn, to make important decisions about their future. So we brought in executive coach Jerry Colonna, who helped Jasen find the unlikely source of his anxiety.” At the link find the title, “Sell the Apartment, Keep the Startup (Season 6, Episode 3), Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT8589225555.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Sterile Earth 27 mins – “This month’s episode is about what it would take to sterilize the Earth, and why you might want to figure that out in the first place. First we talk to the authors of a paper that tries to figure out this exact question. David Sloan and Rafael Alves Batista are the authors of a paper called “The Resilience of Life to Astrophysical Events” (along with Avi Loeb). No, they’re not evil scientists, just interested in what it might take to find life on other planets. They explain their calculations, and how we mostly don’t have anything to worry about. Plus, cool facts about tardigrades! Then we talk to science-fiction author N.K. Jemisin who is the author of The Broken Earth trilogy. Which is very good! She explains her thinking behind the books, why the Earth is out to get her characters, and how humans banding together to survive is more interesting to her than the lone ranger making it on his own.” At the link find the title, “After Life, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicide History 52 mins – “Questions surrounding suicide have been with us for at least as long as we’ve had written record, and the answers are as varied as the times and places where they were discussed. Tuesday, Doug’s guest is the philosophy scholar Margaret Battin. She’s spent her career collecting the works of religious and secular thinkers regarding suicide. It has been considered noble, immoral, heroic and cowardly, and we’ll talk about what all of those views teach us about end-of-life issues today. Margaret Battin is a Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and an Adjunct Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Utah. Her books include Ending Life: Ethics and the Way We Die and The Ethics of Suicide: Historical Sources ”  At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Supernatural Beliefs 34 mins – “Episode 34 of Books and Ideas is an interview with Bruce Hood, author of “SuperSense: Why We Believe in the Unbelievable.” Dr. Hood is a developmental psychologist with a long-standing interest in why people believe weird things. In “Supersense” he argues that innate cognitive structures (how we think without being taught) give people a natural tendency toward belief in the supernatural. Our intuitive sense of how the world works is often at odds with the findings of modern science. In this interview we discuss the evidence for these conclusions and their implications. Please go to http://booksandideas.com for show notes and episode transcripts.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugee Story 28 mins – “In the summer of 2015 tens of thousands of Syrians left their war torn homeland and put their lives in the hands of the smugglers who would help them navigate the hazardous route to Europe. Among the new arrivals were Mohammed Dallal, a man in his late 40s and his 16-year-old daughter Noor. Amy Zayed and Laura Graen have accompanied Mohamed and Noor for nearly two years through the emotional and bureaucratic vagaries of the refugee life. In this programme, we hear whether the family is, at last, together again.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tennis Pro Interview 133 mins – “Maria Sharapova (@MariaSharapova) is one of the best tennis players in the world. She is the winner of five Grand Slam titles (two at the French Open and one each at the Australian Open, Wimbledon, and US Open) and an Olympic silver medalist. Forbes named Maria the highest-paid female athlete of all-time in 2005 — a title she’s held for 12 years. Off the court, she’s an ambassador for many of the world’s top luxury brands and a number of Fortune 500 companies including Porsche, Nike, Evian, and Head. In 2007, she became a goodwill ambassador for the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and has made significant contributions to Chernobyl-related projects. Her first book, Unstoppable: My Life So Far, comes out this year. In this conversation, we went deep into tactics of training, mental performance, mental toughness, and much more. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did!” At the link find the title, “#261: Mental Performance, Work-Life Balance, and the Rise to the Top – Maria Sharapova,” right-click “Media files The Tim Ferriss Show-Maria Sharapova.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanksgiving Day 50 mins– “If a Pilgrim were to attend a contemporary Thanksgiving celebration, he or she would probably be stunned by our “traditional” foods. In this episode of BackStory, The Guys discuss Puritan foods with historian James McWilliams, and religion scholar Anne Blue Wills reveals the surprising, 19th century origins of our national holiday. We’ll also hear from legendary NFL quarterback Roger Staubach about what it was like to spend every turkey day on the football field.” At the link find the title, “American As Pumpkin Pie: A History Of Thanksgiving, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files BKS6372346025.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and the Press 31 mins – “Josh King talks to Chief Media Writer at the Poynter Institute for Media Studies, Jim Warren, about the competition between the Washington Post and The New York Times. Plus, how are those two organizations handling the attacks coming from Donald Trump and his administration and what might the future hold for both papers?” At the link find the title, “The Last Newspaper War (Pt. 1), Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM8799356700.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Controversies 26 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to Matt Miller, formerly of the DoJ and currently an MSNBC Justice and Security Analyst, about the latest surrounding the Trump-Russia investigations.” At the link find the title, “If You’re Concerned and You Know It, Just Impeach, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM9038421348.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Trump Russia Affair 26 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to Andrew Rice, a contributing editor at New York Magazine, about Felix Sater, Trump’s original Russia connection, and why his name may come up more and more as Mueller’s investigation unravels. Read Andrew’s story The Original Russia Connection over at New York Magazine.” At the link find the title, “The Key to a Thousand Doors, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM7212731565.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Special Investigation 45 mins – “In the past 24 hours, the Financial Times reported that Russian lobbyist Rinat Akhmetshin testified before Robert Mueller’s grand jury; Politico carried that the Mueller team is cooperating with the New York Attorney General to investigate Paul Manafort; and the Wall Street Journal broke that the President’s lawyers have provided memos to the Special Counsel arguing that the president cannot commit obstruction of justice and questioning Jim Comey’s credibility. Shane Harris and Paul Rosenzweig joined Susan Hennessey and Benjamin Wittes to discuss the recent developments.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Shane and Paul on WSJ1.mp3” and select “Save LinkAs” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Standards 45 mins – “Josh King talks to Philippe Reines, longtime spokesman and adviser to Hillary Clinton, about playing Donald Trump in debate prep and his former boss’ book What Happened.” At the link find the title, “Becoming the Opposition, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY6495119894.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Truth and Accuracy 54 mins – “Yascha Mounk and Matthew d’Ancona discuss why lies have taken over our politics; what kinds of policies might be able to move us past the post-truth age; and how Democrats can win in 2020.” At the link find the title, “Matthew d’Ancona,” click the three dots near the title, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Undocumented Students 51 mins – “President Trump is ending DACA, which allowed some 800,000 undocumented young people to stay and work in the United States. For some, that may mean the end of a dream of going to college. This program profiles DACA students and their opponents and examines a key court case and political forces that led to this moment.” At the link find the title, “Shadow Class: College Dreamers in Trump’s America” right-click “Media files shadowclassed_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Utopias 52 mins – “In his recent book “Utopia for Realists,” Rutger Bregman advocates a 15-hour workweek, universal basic income, and open borders. Sounds like paradise to us! From the Oneida Community’s dream of open, or “complex marriage” to the rise and spectacular fall of Pullman’s model company town, the Guys look at why the idea of “utopianism” has such strong appeal to Americans.” At the link find the title, “A Whole New World: A History of Utopias, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files BKS2337485428.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela Overview 27 mins – “Episode 24: Francisco Toro on the Crisis in Venezuela Earlier this month, President Trump addressed the deepening political and economic crises in Venezuela stating that the U.S. may consider “military options” if the situation gets worse. This week we spoke to Francisco Toro, a Venezuelan journalist and the Executive Editor of English-language blog Caracas Chronicles, about the current state of affairs in Venezuela and the rapidly deteriorating quality of life for those who remain in the country.” At the link find the title, “Episode 24: Francisco Toro on the Crisis in Venezuela,” right-click “Media files SBTOR0818.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela Status 27 mins – “Venezuela has some of the largest oil reserves in the world but incredibly, around four in five Venezuelans live in poverty. The BBC’s South America correspondent, Katy Watson, went to cover the unfolding political and economic crisis in Venezuela and found a country divided.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela Violence 27 mins – “Venezuela has some of the largest oil reserves in the world but incredibly, around four in five Venezuelans live in poverty. The BBC’s South America correspondent, Katy Watson, went to cover the unfolding political and economic crisis in Venezuela and found a country divided.” At the link right-click “Download: and select Save Link As” from the up-up menu.

Volt Solar Energy 29 mins – “Our guest this week on Sea Change Radio, Gilbert Campbell III, the Co-Founder of Volt Energy, is here to remind us that sustainable energy is good, not only for the earth, but also for business. Campbell’s company, based in Washington, D.C., builds and operates solar projects, electric-vehicle charging stations, and offers energy storage solutions. We discuss how Volt Energy’s business model works, why there are not nearly enough minority-owned businesses in the renewable energy space, and the challenges of interacting with a new Administration that is openly hostile to science and minorities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Walt Mossberg Columnist 75 mins – “Walt Mossberg has been reporting on tech since 1991. He talks to Leo Laporte about his recent retirement, how he got his start, and his history as a ‘tech kingmaker.’” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Useage 29 mins – “Brad Udall has an extensive background in water and climate policy issues, including as Director of the Western Water Assessment (University of Colorado), as the first Director of the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment (University of Colorado), and currently as the first senior water and climate research scientist/scholar at the Colorado Water Institute (Colorado State University). This week, he joins us in the studio for an enlightening conversation on water.” At the link right the title, “SCIENCE STUDIO: Brad Udall, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files sci_stud-082717-_orig._052216_0.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Weed Control 88 mins – “Sam Hitchcock Tilton studies weed control at Michigan State University, where he went to study after two years of pushing a wheel through clay soil on his own farm, and more years of working for other farmers. His graduate-student work on in-row weed control in vegetable crops has led him to explore the various elements that go into setting up for weed control success. Sam draws on his experience on farms, a visit to Europe to learn about and evaluate precision weed-control tools, and his work in his experimental plots to provide insight into more than just the cool tools that make weed control work. We look at the foundations of mechanical weed control, starting with soil preparation and seeding the crop through blind cultivation, flame weeding, tool carriers, and selecting the right tools for between-row and in-row weed control.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Future 51 mins – “Nature writer Gary Ferguson says we are facing a “perfect storm” when it comes to wildfires. Climate change has led to less snow, longer droughts, and more wind and there’s a lot of fuel on the forest floors. The result is ten more weeks of fire season than we saw in the early ’70s, and those fires are hotter and often beyond control. Ferguson joins us to talk about the role fire should play in a healthy ecosystem and the new reality of wildfire in the West. Gary Ferguson has written many books on nature and science, including Hawks Restand The Carry Home. His new book is called Land on Fire: The New Reality of Wildfire in the West.”  At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Womens Prison 53 mins – “A lot of people wouldn’t guess that the first women’s prison in the nation was built in Indiana in 1873. Though it has moved locations and changed names, it is still open and imprisoning women. Its current name is the Indiana Women’s Prison. We talked to two researchers who uncovered stories about the early history of this prison, stories that call the official textbook account into question. But this isn’t just the story of the first women’s prison in the nation, it’s also the tale of the journey of the two researchers who exposed the prison’s dark beginnings.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Wordstar Impact 26 mins – “The unlikely rise of Lee O’Denat, the founder of Worldstar Hip Hop. Also, we reopen a cold case. Further Listening -Q’s interview on Shots Fired – [WorldStarHipHop.com gets around 4-6 million hits a day. Q is the man behind this juggernaut of a website and joins MC Nocando & Jeff Weiss to talk about his early beginnings selling mixtapes online with DJ Whoo Kid, where he got his inspiration to make WorldStar a central hub for entertainment, when WorldStar started getting huge, which is the highest trafficked video, how rappers can get on WorldStar, criticisms the site has received from the fight videos, and the future ventures of WorldStarHipHop. Be sure to get a copy of Jeff’s new book “2pac vs. Biggie: An Illustrated History of Rap’s Greatest Battle,” check out Nocando’s mixtape “Tits ‘N Explosions” at http://hellfyreclub.bandcamp.com/, and fire shots of your own by calling us at (424) 216-6230! Also, come to a live taping of Shots Fired, next Thursday, May 30 at Lot 1 in Echo Park. 8 p.m. 1533 W. Sunset Blvd. Featuring guests Evan McGarvey, co-author of 2Pac Vs. Biggie: Rap’s Greatest Battle, and 2Pac’s mentor and first manager, Leila Steinberg.]…” At the link find the title, “#89 Worldstar, Feb, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT9889756837.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Bank – Global Financing 13 mins – “The world bank was set up in 1944. In the aftermath of the second world war, the institution was there to give loans to countries rebuilding after the conflict. Their first loan went to France – but with stipulations about repayment that set a tone for future funds. A new series, authored by Devi Sridhar, and her team from the University of Edinburgh, and published on bmj.com, looks at where the World Bank has come. In this fourth interview, Genevie Fernandes a PhD student at the University of Edinburgh discusses a new model of combing grants and loans in the Global Financing Facility. Read the full analysis: http://www.bmj.com/content/358/bmj.j3395” At the link find the title, “The World Bank – the Global Financing Facility, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 340430843-bmjgroup-the-world-bank-the-global-financing-facility.mp3” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Bank – Global Health 22 mins – “The world bank was set up in 1944. In the aftermath of the second world war, the institution was there to give loans to countries rebuilding after the conflict. Their first loan went to France – but with stipulations about repayment that set a tone for future funds. In this first interview, Devi Sridhar, professor of global health at the University of Edinburgh explains why the bank matters for global health. Read the full analysis: http://www.bmj.com/content/358/bmj.j3339” At the link find the title, “The World Bank – why it matters for global health, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 340430541-bmjgroup-the-world-bank-why-it-matters-for-global-health.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Bank – Pandemic Risk 22 mins – “The world bank was set up in 1944. In the aftermath of the second world war, the institution was there to give loans to countries rebuilding after the conflict. Their first loan went to France – but with stipulations about repayment that set a tone for future funds. In this final interview, Felix Stein a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Edinburgh describes the bank’s move to create a market for pandemic insurance. Read the full analysis: http://www.bmj.com/content/358/bmj.j3394” At the link find the title, “The World Bank – creating a market in pandemic risk, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 340430948-bmjgroup-the-world-bank-creating-a-market-in-pandemic-risk.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Bank – Trust Funds 19 mins – The world bank was set up in 1944. In the aftermath of the second world war, the institution was there to give loans to countries rebuilding after the conflict. Their first loan went to France – but with stipulations about repayment that set a tone for future funds. In this third interview, Janelle Winters a PhD student at the University of Edinburgh explains what the bank’s trust funds are, and why it can be hard to tell what they’re funding. Read the full analysis: http://www.bmj.com/content/358/bmj.j3394” At the link find the title, “The World Bank – trust funds, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 340430773-bmjgroup-the-world-bank-trust-funds.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Bank – Universal Health Care 17 mins – “The world bank was set up in 1944. In the aftermath of the second world war, the institution was there to give loans to countries rebuilding after the conflict. Their first loan went to France – but with stipulations about repayment that set a tone for future funds. In this second interview, Marlee Tichenor, postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Edinburgh explains why the bank has embraced universal healthcare. Read the full analysis: http://www.bmj.com/content/358/bmj.j3347” At the link find the title, “The World Bank – Universal Healthcare, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 340430656-bmjgroup-the-world-bank-universal-healthcare.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WW II Shanghai Battle P1 26 mins – “Chiang Kai-Shek decides that the time has come to openly fight back against Japan. His chosen site is the port city of Shanghai. Both sides build up their forces there, but the Chinese Nationalists will attempt to deliver a surprise attack. As the war enlarges, Stalin decides to assist the Chinese. Tokyo will widen the battle of Shanghai, as their first attempt is blunted.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode 201-9917_4.15_PM.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWII Shanghai Battle P2 33 mins – “The Japanese bring reinforcements to Shanghai as their marines are bogged down by Chiang Kai-Shek’s best troops. Meanwhile, retired US Army Air Force Captain Claire Lee Chennault, finds the Chinese pilots woefully inadequate in deflecting the building assault. The Japanese invaders come ashore and now the fate of Shanghai is in the balance, as British and American civilians flee the International Settlement.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode 202- 91517_11.10_PM.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Update 108 mins – “Sharon and Scott return to TWiV for a Zika virus update, including their work on viral evolution and spread, and whether pre-existing immunity to dengue virus enhances pathogenesis. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson DespommierAlan Dove, and Kathy Spindler Guests: Sharon Isern and Scott MichaelAt the link right-click “Download TWIV 454” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 306 – Sept 22, 2017: African Northwest Countries, Aging Wisely, Agriculture Technology, Antifa, Australian Health Care Plan, Back Pain Solutions, Black Ad Man, Black Teachers Decline, Boredom Value, Breast Milk Business, Budgeting, Carbon Disulfide Hysteria, Charlottesville Analysis, Chokehold-Policing Black Men, Civic Participation, Climate Change Adaptation, Coal Mining Film, Cohabitation Nation, Confederate Statues, Conservatism, Contaminated Water in Texas, CRISPR, DACA Prospects, Democracy Trends, Digital Disruption, DNA Test for Racial Purity, Economic Causes, Education Costs, Education Mentors, Election Security, Emotional Support Animals, Equal Rights Amendment, First Amendment and Twitter, Football Concussions, Forest Regrowth, Gender Bias at Google, Glenn Greenwald, GMO Food Rejection, Gobi the Dog, Indigenous Canadian History, Insider Training, Jerry Lewis, John Le Carre, Kitty Genovese and Lockerbee Bombing, Medical Problems, Medical Uncertainties, Military Contaminated Water, Mo Willems Books, Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Net-Square in India, Obesity Treatment, Overdiagnosis in Medicine, Overdiagnosis Prevention, Patient Education, Physics History, Plastics Impact on Environment, Prejudicial Speech, Prostate Cancer, Racist Ideas, Radical Candor, Ransom Policy, Refugees from Africa, Republicans in California, Richard Dawkins, Ricky Skaggs, Rikers Island Teacher, Robbery-Murder Story, Saudi Arabia Future, Senator Feinstein, Sepsis Treatment, Sinclair Broadcasting, Stuxnet Virus, Taliban in Afghanistan, Teen Depression, Terrorism Prevention, Tree Whisperer, Trump Corruption, Turkey Democracy Survival, Vice Magazine Founder, White Supremacists, Wildfires in Canada

Exercise your ears: the 149 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 631 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 17,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 86GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 400 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Addictive Technology 49 mins – “Adam Alter is the author of the New York Times bestseller, Drunk Tank Pink: And Other Unexpected Forces That Shape How We Think, Feel, and Behave, and has written for the New York Times, New Yorker, Atlantic, WIRED, Slate, Washington Post, and Popular Science, among other publications. He’s an associate professor of marketing at New York University and also teaches in the psychology department. His fascinating and chilling new book, Irresistible: the Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping us Hooked has, among other things, convinced Jason to stop charging his cellphone in his bedroom.” At the link find the title, “93. Adam Alter (Social Psychologist) – Ping!” right-click “Media files PP5765678848.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African Northwest Countries 21 mins – “The countries of northwest Africa – Morocco, Tunisia, and Algeria – may look like islands of stability in a sea of Middle East turmoil. But perhaps better to see them as low coral atolls – and the sea around them is rising fast. Soref Fellow Sarah Feuer, coauthor of a presidential transition study of American challenges and policy options in northwest Africa talks about why these countries matter to the United States, what Washington can do to help preserve reform and democracy there, and what the stakes are should these islands of regional stability sink below the waves of chaos lapping at their shores. Near East PolicyCast: Conversations on Middle East issues from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.” At the link click the square with three dots, then right-click “Download” to download the audio file.

Aging Wisely 49 mins – “America is a nation of “death ostriches.” By denying mortality, death ostriches reduce the odds of living as well and as long as possible. Winning the Endgame will help you optimize the rest of your life. With author Ray Brown’s help, the audience will learn how to make wise decisions based on their staying power, how to evaluate the pros and cons of selling the house, and how to manage risk. Death ostriches suffer needlessly and die badly. Exiting gracefully requires long-term planning. Winning the Endgame can help you control when, where and how well you die.” At the link find the title, “Winning the Endgame: A Guide to Aging Wisely and Dying Well, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170907_Winning_the_Endgame Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Technology 6 mins – “Tomatoes: from your garden, they are full of flavor. They even smell good. Tomatoes from the grocery store, however, might lack that same intense taste. Depending on what variety you buy, the tomato may have been engineered or sprayed to be heavy, not flavorful. Tomatoes are sold by the pound, after all. A new bit of technology may help some farmers create a tastier tomato. Granite Geek David Brooks has been writing about this tech for The Concord Monitor and spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello about it.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.  

Airplane Design 3 mins – “Episode: 1395 The World’s Worst Aircraft: learning what constitutes bad. Today, the worst airplanes ever built!” At the link find the title, “Engines of Our Ingenuity 1395: Worst Airplanes, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files KUHF_20170906.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alan Alda on Communicating 39 mins – “Today’s guest is actor, writer, director, and science-curious artist Alan Alda. Jason says: “I grew up watching him in reruns of MASH, where his character Hawkeye Pierce was so specific and relatable that he feels in my memory like a not-too-distant relative. And in Horace and Pete, Louis CK’s 2016 brilliant web-tv dramedy, Alan underwent a miraculous metamorphosis into a bitter, racist barman who is also a fully-fleshed human being. But wait – there’s more! For decades, Alan has been helping to heal the ancient rift between highly technical science and ordinary curiosity. Alan’s new book If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face? Shares what he (and science) have learned about how we can communicate better. It’s no exaggeration to say that this is a matter of life or death.” At the link find the title, “106. Alan Alda (Actor) – The Spirit of the Staircase,” right-click “Media files PP5550286131.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antifa 20 mins – “Historian and former Occupy Wall Street organizer Mark Bray explores the contemporary anti-fascist movement, known as Antifa.” At the link find the title, “Aug 24: Anti-fascist handbook explores long history of opposition movement, 2107” right-click “Download Aug 24: Anti-fascist handbook explores long history of opposition movement” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antifa 21 mins – “Virginia Heffernan chats with Mark Bray, the author of Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook to figure just who the antifa are and where they come from.” At the link find the title, “The Anti-Fascists AKA The Antifa, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM7463145721.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronomy History 64 mins – “On April 26th of 1920, Harlow Shapley and Heber Curtis presented talks on the idea of island universes to the National Academy of Sciences.  Held at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, the Great Debate, as it would come to be known, would showcase two differing views of the scale and structure of the universe.  In this episode we look at the scientific developments made at the Lick Observatory at Mt. Hamilton by James Keeler and Curtis, the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, AZ by Vesto Slipher and at Mt. Wilson near Pasadena that attempted to resolve the island universes question prior to the event itself.” At the link right-click “Direct Download Link” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Health Care Plan 62 mins – “Australian Medical Association president Michael Gannon addresses the National Press Club on Medicare.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Michael Gannon, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files NPCc_Gannon_2308_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Back Pain Solutions 24 mins – “Back pain affects most Canadians. Investigative journalist and back pain sufferer Cathryn Jakobson Ramin says it’s time to rethink treatment.” [The exercises recommended by Stuart McGill (http://www.backfitpro.com) at the podcast end can be seen at this link: https://www.nytimes.com/video/magazine/1194841000095/core-values.html] At the link find the stitle, “Aug 29 ENCORE | Chronic back pain? Journalist investigates what works and what doesn’t 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170829_75257.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bannon and Trump 20 mins – “U.S. President Donald Trump’s adviser Steve Bannon has been criticized for his right-wing influence on the presidency and many want to see him go. But will Trump let his right-hand guru go?” At the link find the title, “Aug 17: Are Steve Bannon’s days in the White House numbered? 2017,” right-click “Download Aug 17: Are Steve Bannon’s days in the White House numbered? 2017” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Ad Man 26 mins – “Tom Burrell was the first black man in Chicago advertising. He went on to change the way we think about ads, and the way advertisers think about us.” At the link find the title, “#628: This Ad’s For You, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170906_pmoney_pmpod628rerun.mp3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Colleges 58 mins – “Historically black colleges and universities serve an important purpose in creating equal opportunity – and the majority of students on HBCU campuses identify as women. E&B unpack why this matters – especially for women of color.” At the link find the title, “What are HBCUs and why do they matter? Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-08-18-smnty-hbcu-final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Black Teachers Decline 55 mins – “There may be nothing more important in the educational life of a child than having effective teachers. But the United States is struggling to attract and keep teachers.” At the link find the title, “Keeping Teachers, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files keepingteachers_full_128.mp3” and select ‘save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boredom Value 17 mins – “Today, the first book to be born out of a crowdsourced podcasting movement – our movement, dear listeners – is here. In 2015, tens of thousands of you joined me in an experiment. Could we separate from our devices just a bit, and turn them from taskmaster to tool? Could we make space for boredom, and let the brilliance in? Together, we found the answer. YES. Enter Bored and Brilliant: How Spacing Out Can Unlock Your Most Productive and Creative Self. Today, we connect with Liam and Vanessa, who took part of the original challenge, to hear the surprising places the last two years have taken them.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Tells Times 48 mins – “Dean Buonomano is a professor of neurobiology and psychology at UCLA and a leading theorist on (and researcher into) the neuroscience of time. His latest book, Your Brain is a Time Machine, the Neuroscience and Physics of Time convinced Jason that time is far weirder than he knew it to be (and he already knew it was mind-bogglingly weird). In this episode: Does time exist at all, or is it an illusion of consciousness? If the latter, what’s the evolutionary advantage of seeing time as linear and one-directional? Which is right: the Einsteinian view that the universe is a four dimensional box in which all time is already present, or the “common-sense” view that time is uni-directional? How does comic timing work? What’s the evolutionary advantage of comedy? And oh so much more.” At the link find thte title, “97. Dean Buonomano (Neuroscientist) – This is Your Brain on Time,” right-click “Media files PP5537594954.mp3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Breast Milk Business 34 mins – “Life as a budding entrepreneur isn’t exactly glamorous, and making a business come to life involves a lot of confusing, complicated, and exhausting realities. But when you have the passion to fulfill your dream, that passion can sustain you through all the hard work and long hours. And when you succeed, the results can be both incredible, and incredibly rewarding. In this episode of The Drawing Board, we talk with three passionate women who started their businesses as passion projects: Phuong Mai of P.MAI (2:00), Kate Torgersen of Milk Stork (6:20), and Kim Malek of Salt & Straw (19:00). We discover the paths they took to success, and explore the passions that fuel their work.” At the link find the title, “Episode 4: Passion Projects, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files 338836433-thedrawingboardbyudacity-episode-4-passion-projects.mp3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband and Public Safety 89 mins – “Panel at the 2011 NIJ Conference” At the link find the title, “The National Broadband (Communications) Plan: Issues for Public Safety, Nov, 2011,” right-click “Media files nijconf2011-national-broadband-plan.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Budgeting 87 mins – “Money may be the root of all evil, but it’s certainly much easier to do good if you’ve got it. Along with wisdom and health, it’s an essential ingredient for personal freedom, and yet a discouragingly large amount of us are living paycheck to paycheck, one setback away from financial ruin. We’re talking a bit about money management today, in the hopes that we can all get financially stable or die tryin’.” At the link right-click “download” and select ‘save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Built Environment 47 mins – “Sarah W. Goldhagen taught for ten years at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design and spent many years as the Architecture Critic for the New Republic. She’s written about buildings, cities, and landscapes for publications all over the world. Sarah’s new book Welcome To Your World: How the Built Environment Shapes Our Lives is a thoroughly entertaining, eye-opening manifesto arguing that the buildings we live and work in deeply affect us, physically and psychologically, and that we can’t afford the soul-crushing architecture we mostly subject ourselves to. In this episode: why we tolerate design that’s bad for us, startling parallels between a passage from a Chekhov short story and Sarah’s book, the many ways concrete can be beautiful, and why schools shouldn’t look like prisons (maybe prisons shouldn’t, either?).” At the link find the title, “96. Sarah W. Goldhagen (Architecture Critic) – Souls & Spaces,” right-click “Media files PP5771900591.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Butter History 26 mins – “You can make it with a cow, a yak, an ox, a sheep, or even a reindeer. Food writer Elaine Khosrova pays tribute to the rich history of butter.” At the link find the title, “Aug 23: ENCORE | Where in the world is the best tasting butter? 2017,” right-click Download Aug 23: ENCORE | Where in the world is the best tasting butter?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Disulfide Hysteria 56 mins – “In a comprehensive and disturbing history of viscose rayon, or “fake silk,” Paul Blanc sheds light on the environmental and public health hazards of producing this ubiquitous textile. In Fake Silk: The Lethal History of Viscose Rayon, Blanc asks a fundamental question: When a new technology makes people ill, how high does the body count have to be before protective steps are taken? This is a dark story of hazardous manufacturing, poisonous materials, environmental abuses, political machinations and economics trumping safety concerns. Blanc explores the century-long history of fake silk, which is used to produce products such as rayon textiles and tires, cellophane, and everyday kitchen sponges. He uncovers the grim history of a product that crippled and even served a death sentence to many industry workers while at the same time environmentally releasing carbon disulfide, the critical toxic component of viscose.” At the link find the title, “Fake Silk: The Hidden Story of a Workplace Tragedy, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170830_Fake Silk Podcast.mp3“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charlottesville Analysis 22 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to Jamelle Bouie about the tragic events of this weekend in Charlottesville, VA and how this can no longer allow Americans to put their heads in the sand about what really got Trump elected.” At the link find the title, ““There’s Nothing New Under the Sun…” Aug, 2017, right-click “Media files PPY4313217238.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charlottesville Incident 20 mins – “This violent speech has to be put back where it belongs, which is in the shadows,” says author Nathan Englander. At the lind find the title, “ Aug 18: Anti-semitism in Charlottesville exposes an ‘assault on empathy,’ says Jewish author, 2017,” right-click “Download Aug 18: Anti-semitism in Charlottesville exposes an ‘assault on empathy,’ says Jewish author” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charlottesville Incident 22 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to Jamelle Bouie about the tragic events of this weekend in Charlottesville, VA and how this can no longer allow Americans to put their heads in the sand about what really got Trump elected.” At the link find the title, ““There’s Nothing New Under the Sun…” Aug, 2017, right-click “Media files PPY4313217238.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charlottesville Incident 57 mins – “Emily Bazelon and John Dickerson are joined by Jeffrey Goldberg, editor-in-chief of The Atlantic, to discuss President Trump’s response to Charlottesville, the impact of Charlottesville on the nation, and the upcoming Alabama Senate Race.” At the link find the title, “The “Very Fine People” Edition, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM2576518448.mp3 pp489” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charlottesville Incident Background 19 mins – “”Trump is a racist … and what Stephen Bannon and Steven Miller do are to give the policy ideas behind that racism.” At the link find the title, “Aug 14: Trump has emboldened white nationalists with racist policies, says author, 2017,” right-click “Download Aug 14: Trump has emboldened white nationalists with racist policies, says author” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chokehold: Policing Black Men 60 mins – “Georgetown University Law School professor Paul Butler discusses his book, [Chokehold: Policing Black Men].” At the link find the title, “Paul Butler Discusses [Chokehold], Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.482868.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civic Participation 72 mins – “Do you want to use your power as an individual to change your community and your country? Then civic expert Eric Liu has all the tools you’ll need. Increased turbulence and grassroots movements are shaping today’s political and civic landscape, and citizen power is their driving force. But what exactly is civic power? Who has it? How can you use yours effectively? Join Liu as he shares case studies from across our historical and political spectrums that demonstrate key laws of citizen power. These laws aren’t just theoretical—Liu’s new book offers step-by-step guidance on how to make true, lasting change both as an individual and through grassroots political movements.” At the link find the title, “A Citizen’s Guide to Making Change Happen with Eric Liu, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170822_Inforum Eric Liu Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Adaptation 47 mins – “We know climate change is a factor in the intensity of the recent Texas storm, but did you know that flooding and fires are the most common identifiers of climate change in Canada?” At the link find the title, “Sept 5: Is Canada prepared for climate change? Adaptation is key, say experts, 2017,” right-click “Download Sept 5: Is Canada prepared for climate change? Adaptation is key, say experts” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Impact – “The evidence is everywhere: forests retreating, glaciers melting, sea levels rising. And we’re only just beginning to feel the strain of climate change. Despite all of these dire events and projections, the attacks continue — on climate scientists.” At the link find the title, “Are We F–ked? Decoding the resistance to climate change, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170907_37544.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Mining Film 55 mins – “From National Geographic Documentary Films, From the Ashes captures Americans in communities across the country as they wrestle with the legacy of the coal industry and what its future should be under the Trump Administration. From Appalachia to the West’s Powder River Basin, the film goes beyond the rhetoric of the “war on coal” to present compelling and often heartbreaking stories about what’s at stake for our economy, health, and climate. The film invites audiences to learn more about an industry on the edge and what it means for their lives.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cohabitation Nation 47 mins – “Cohabitation nation. More unwed Americans are living together than ever before. We’ll ask who and why. We used to call it shacking up. But a couple living together before they marry is the new normal. Two out of three couples who’ve married since 2000 started out by living together. For some, it was a good first step. For many, it was just a matter of economic necessity. This hour On Point: Cohabitation Nation. How the living-together trend is remaking relationships and highlighting gender and class divisions” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Servers 99 mins – “Rick Altherr is a firmware and software designer who works on server technologies; his work on the Open Compute project has produced open source designs for hyper-scale server installations. Rick works on the platform team at Google, designing firmware and software for the servers that go into hyperscale datacenters. He does not discuss specific Google stuff. Chris was surprised when Rick walked into a meetup carrying the Zaius server under his arm….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the up-up menu.

Confederate Statutes 12 mins – “”[Confederate statues] were put up mostly to be part of the legitimacy of white supremacy, of the Jim Crow system in the South, long after slavery,” says Civil War expert Eric Foner.” At the lin find teht itle “Aug 18: Confederate statues represent ‘image of America as a white society,’ says historian Deck, 2017,” right-click “Download Aug 18: Confederate statues represent ‘image of America as a white society,’ says historian Deck” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu”

Consciousness Evolution 48 mins – “Daniel Dennett is one of the foremost philosophers of mind working today to unravel the puzzle of what minds are and what they’re for, and Co-Director of the Center for Cognitive Studies at Tufts University. His latest book of many is called From Bacteria to Bach and Back: The Evolution of Minds, and it’s a sweeping (but detailed) attempt to demystify how we get from inanimate matter to cathedrals, symphonies, and of course, podcasts. Andrew Keen on the Internet and social isolation and Ben Goertzel on Artificial General Intelligence.” At the link find the title, “91. Daniel Dennett (Philosopher) – Thinking About Thinking About Thinking, Mar 25, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP7121030594.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conservatism 39 mins – “Senator Jeff Flake (R-AZ) talks about his book [Conscience of a Conservative], in which he calls for a return to core conservative principles. He is interviewed by S.E. Cupp.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Senator Jeff Flake, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.483816.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Contaminated Water in Texas 29 mins – “Contaminated drinking water is coming into the homes of tens of millions of Americans, especially in smaller, lower income communities, from aging, under-funded water treatment plant and distribution systems, poorly maintained private wells, and groundwater sources polluted by industrial dumping and agricultural waste. Experts and the GAO say it will require billions of dollars of infrastructure improvements to maintain safe water throughout the U. S. Customers of antiquated, poorly maintained, under-funded systems in rural areas, smaller communities and neglected older urban areas – who are disproportionately lower income, African-American and Latino – are most at risk. Today we’re going to Sand Branch, Texas, where 100 residents haven’t had access to clean water for decades. What’s it like to not have access to clean drinking water, and just how far do residents have to go to get it? Jimmy speaks with Brandon Kitchin, a reporter with News21’s Troubled Waters investigative team, about their deep dive into clean water access across the country.” At the link find the title, “208: The military’s toxic water,” right-click “Media files 8ca0dbe-d152-4ed9-b76f-60a01801ceb0.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CRISPR 24 mins – “A gene editing technology called CRISPR could allow us to change DNA, not just in individuals, but in all their future children and grandchildren.” At the link find the title, “Aug 16: ENCORE | How gene editing technology could change the course of evolution, 2017,” right-click “Download Aug 16: ENCORE | How gene editing technology could change the course of evolution” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CRISPR 52 mins – “Jennifer Doudna is a Professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology at the UC Berkeley, and until around 2012 she was quietly and contentedly studying the three dimensional structure of RNA molecules. Then she and her colleagues started looking into a thing called CRISPR-Cas9. It’s a kind of bacterial immune system, and it led to an invention that will change everything for all of humanity, forever. In this episode Jennifer and Jason discuss the implications of the gene editing tool her lab created, and how humanity should (and likely will) yield the power to rewrite our own evolutionary destiny.” At the link find the title, “105. Jennifer Doudna (Geneticist) – Intelligent Redesign?, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP1538606393.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CRISPR Impact 53 mins – “Jennifer Doudna is a Professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology at the UC Berkeley, and until around 2012 she was quietly and contentedly studying the three dimensional structure of RNA molecules. Then she and her colleagues started looking into a thing called CRISPR-Cas9. It’s a kind of bacterial immune system, and it led to an invention that will change everything for all of humanity, forever.In this episode Jennifer and Jason discuss the implications of the gene editing tool her lab created, and how humanity should (and likely will) yield the power to rewrite our own evolutionary destiny.” At the link find the title, 105. Jennifer Doudna (Geneticist) – Intelligent Redesign?” right-click “Media files PP1538606393.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DACA Fate 50 mins – “The Trump administration has announced the end of the DACA program. We examine the rhetoric used to justify the decision. Plus: the Southern Poverty Law Center faces questions from across the political spectrum about its messaging and fundraising; and the surprising history of FEMA’s Cold War origins and what it means for emergency response today.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.  

DACA Politics 34 mins – “What does Trump hope will happen in Congress? With white house reporter David Nakamura, we talk to John Sandweg, former Immigration and Customs Enforcement acting director about policy. Plus, a dreamer in the DACA program shares her story.” At the link find the title, “What does Trump really want for the ‘dreamers’? Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 59b1d8b4e4b0dc4794590f98_1351620000001-300030_t_1504827577075_44100_160_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DACA Prospects 20 mins – “The so-called “Dreamers” who came into the U.S. illegally as children have been allowed to live and work under an Obama era program. Now in a Trump era, the program has been rescinded.” At the link find the title, “Sept 5: Immigration protection for ‘Dreamers’ rescinded by Trump , 2017” right-click “Download Sept 5: Immigration protection for ‘Dreamers’ rescinded by Trump” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia Play 17 mins – “Frank Langella’s career has been full of complex characters with very dark sides. In the 1970s, he starred in a production of “Dracula” that went from Broadway to the movies. This story is based on a radio interview. Three decades later, he went from the stage to the screen again: He originated the role of Richard Nixon in the play “Frost/Nixon,” won a Tony Award, then got an Oscar nomination for the movie version. His roles have continued to grapple with morality and mortality, from an aging jewel thief in “Robot & Frank” to a KGB spy on “The Americans.” In 2016, he starred in “The Father” on Broadway. He played a man being undone by dementia, a role that earned him another Tony award.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Trends 56 mins – “The CBC Massey Lectures inspire a lot of provocative questions — and thoughtful answers — in each city on the tour. In this episode, you’ll hear the best of those audience questions with a bonus: questions posed by our radio and online audiences.” At the link find the title, “The Return of History- Your Questions, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170829_63490.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Disruption 72 mins – “How do we present and disseminate news to ever-changing consumers, hungry for fast and smart information in the digital age? It’s a question that gnaws at every news organization today, from legacy newspapers like the New York Times to online startups like BuzzFeed. What’s the best way to reach and engage people when there’s an avalanche of information coming their way? To get at this question, our host Tom Ashbrook hosted a panel discussion with a few journalists turned technologists — Washington Post’s director of strategic initiatives Jeremy Gilbert, Vox.com director of programming Allison Rockey, and Gannett SVP & chief transformation officer Maribel Perez Wadsworth — at the Public Radio Content Conference in Washington. They dove into their strategies for engaging digital audiences with information they crave.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Tests for Racial Purity 26 mins – “White nationalists are using DNA tests to legitimize their “purity,” says sociology researcher Joan Donavan. It’s not how the test was intended to be used.” At the link find the title, “Sept 4: White nationalists are using DNA ancestry tests to prove ‘purity’2017,” right-click “Download Sept 4: White nationalists are using DNA ancestry tests to prove ‘purity’” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Epidemic 50 mins – “Attorney General Jeff Sessions has signaled that he’d like to revamp the war on drugs. We take a look at the history of the battle, and how sensational media depictions of crack, heroin, and meth have helped fuel it. Plus: our Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook: Drugs Edition. Then, a look at how America’s first drug czar used racist propaganda to outlaw marijuana. And why the debate between treatment and law enforcement is blurrier than you might think.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Drugs Podcast 53 mins – “Cocaine, heroin, marijuana, and opiates. Learn how these drugs can affect our lives, with guest host Geoff Turner. Feat: Love + Radio, On Drugs, Stoner, Note to Self, Embedded, The Mortified Podcast” At the link find the title, “Podcast Playlist is on Drugs,” right-click “Download Podcast Playlist is on Drugs” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Causes 27 mins – “We’re living in a time of economic babble, where politicians and economists throw out words like “reform,” “privatize,” and “austerity” to prop up corrupt capitalist opportunists. So says our guest this week, economist Michael Hudson, author of J is for Junk Economics. Plus, a report from Diverse Filmmaker’s Alliance on the Yemeni bodega workers who went on strike in New York to protest the Muslim Ban.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Costs 140 mins – “On September 5, the Center for Universal Education (CUE) at Brookings launched a report on the standardized ECD costing tool (SECT), a tool developed in collaboration with the World Bank Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund.” At the link find the title, “Encouraging better financing of early childhood development programs, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170905_SAUL CUE Costing Tool_Event.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Mentors 55 mins – “It’s hard being a young person today: 1 in 6 teenagers have seriously considered suicide, 1 in 5 binge drink, and 1 in 10 experience violence in a relationship. It’s harder still for young people from marginalized backgrounds to know how to make healthy decisions, especially as many attend schools that either lack or offer limited health education. The situation has serious implications for students’ academic achievement, dropout rates and life opportunities. Though this may sound like yet another intractable socioeconomic problem, Peer Health Exchange (PHE) has made measurable progress in addressing it. This innovative nonprofit organization strives to ensure that all young people have the knowledge, skills and resources needed to make healthy decisions. PHE provides skills-based health education in urban high schools in the Bay Area and elsewhere using volunteer college students as peer instructors. And it works: PHE aggressively assesses the impact of its programs, reports its results and reinvests in its most successful efforts. Join Louise Langheier, along with several current and former PHE participants and host teachers, to hear about the value of providing these health resources to young adults through this inspirational and practical approach.” At the link find the title, “Helping Marginalized Youth Make Healthy Decisions: A Model That Works, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Mddia files cc_20170906_Helping Marginalized Youth Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Election Security 93 mins – “On September 8, the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence and the Governance Studiesprogram at Brookings hosted an event focused on the national security concerns surrounding election security in the United States.” At the link find the title, “National security imperative of addressing foreign cyber interference in U.S. elections, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170908_Saul_Election_Security.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emotional Support Animals 48 mins – “It’s hard not to sympathize with the comfort given by an emotional support dog. You may have seen them nestled next to a passenger on a plane. Maybe nestled next to you. But the definition of an emotional support animal is so loose it’s also being fudged. People bringing pets along – to hotels, restaurants, grocery stores – just for fun, or to save a buck. And it’s not just dogs. Think pigs, ducks, snakes, turkeys. This hour On Point, we’re sniffing out the facts on emotional support animals.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equal Rights Amendment 34 mins – “Women’s Equality is one of those bittersweet holidays. It marks the incredible effort that led to US women gaining the right to vote, while reminding us of another critical constitutional amendment that would have established true equality – but failed.” At the link find the title, “The Untold History of Women’s Equality Day, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-08-25-smnty-equality-day-final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Erdogan’s Rise to Power 27 mins – “Why is the most successful and powerful leader in modern Turkey’s history driven by insecurity and grievances? Author and Turkey expert Soner Cagaptay unpacks the ways in which Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s biography shapes his politics and the fate of his nation. Near East PolicyCast: Conversations on Middle East issues from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.” At the link click the square with three dots, then right-click “Download” to download the audio file.

Fentanyl Crisis 20 mins – “Even with Narcan kits, first responders worry fentanyl is getting so powerful the antidote won’t be enough. The CBC’s Natalie Clancy looks at the raw reality of what is now considered to be Canada’s opioid crisis.” At the link find the title, “Aug 25: ENCORE | Vancouver’s opioid overdose crisis: ‘I was dead for 10 minutes’ 2017,” right-click “Download Aug 25: ENCORE | Vancouver’s opioid overdose crisis: ‘I was dead for 10 minutes’” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial and Digital Inclusion Project 84 mins – “On August 31, the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings held a forum to launch the 2017 Brookings Financial and Digital Inclusion Project (FDIP) report and discuss key research findings and recommendations with a diverse group of financial inclusion experts.” At th elink find the title, “Building a secure and inclusive global financial ecosystem, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170831_FALK_FDIP.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Amendment 68 mins – “What makes America great? According to Floyd Abrams, it’s our exceptional protection of free speech under the First Amendment. From college campuses to cable news, the First Amendment has been at the center of many conflicts on both sides of the political spectrum. First Amendment rights, and the controversy surrounding these seemingly dry issues, have even captured the attention of President Trump on Twitter. The United States is unique in its protection of free speech, even for those we vehemently disagree with—at least for now. Though things have certainly been worse, Abrams warns we should not fall into the complacency and irresponsibility that can threaten the most valuable rights we are entitled to. Abrams is an attorney and expert on constitutional law as it relates to the First Amendment….” At the link find the title, “Floyd Abrams: The Soul of the First Amendment, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170828_Floyd_Abrams_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Amendment and Twitter 53 mins – “Can President Trump block citizens from following his own Twitter feed? The Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University has filed suit on behalf of several Twitter users who were denied the ability to follow the President’s Twitter feed after they made comments critical of him. The Institute claims that the ban is a violation of a First Amendment right to free speech and free assembly, and that a public official’s social media page is a designated public forum. The Justice Department, defending President Trump, says the courts are powerless to tell President Trump how he can manage his private Twitter handle and the Institute’s requests would “send the First Amendment deep into uncharted waters.” Joining our We The People podcast to discuss these arguments are Alex Abdo, a senior staff attorney at the Knight First Amendment Institute and Eugene Volokh, the Gary T. Schwartz Professor of Law at UCLA School of Law. “ At the link find the title, “Trump, Twitter and the First Amendment, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP5929473406.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flood Insurance 48 mins – “Felix Salmon of Fusion, political risk consultant Anna Szymanski, Slate Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann discuss: Hurricane Harvey and flood insurance; Construction productivity; Tax reform.” At the link find the title, “The Rebuilding Edition, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM3576723334.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Hazards 60 mins – “What if you could get healthy by simply changing your home environment? Every day, we’re exposed to hundreds of untested chemicals: additives in food, endocrine disruptors in soap and shampoo, fumes in household cleaners. These chemicals comprise your “body burden” and can exacerbate allergies, asthma, fatigue, cough, headache and more serious health conditions.” Beth Greer had been living what she considered a healthy lifestyle when a medical crisis prompted her to reevaluate everything—from the food she ate to the personal-care products she used and the environment she lived in. She eliminated a sizable tumor in her chest without drugs or surgery by making small but powerful lifestyle shifts…In addition to experiencing firsthand the powerful benefits of holistic, toxin-free living, Greer found powerful holistic approaches that helped her teenage daughter overcome ADHD and addiction to drugs and alcohol. Greer is the host of “Kids in Crisis” radio show, where she interviews leading medical experts and treatment professionals. …Learn more at BethGreer.com.” At the link find the title, “Good Health Starts in Your Home, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170817_Good Health Starts in Your Home Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Football Concussions 47 mins – “John Urschel was the only player in the N.F.L. simultaneously getting a math Ph.D. at M.I.T. But after a new study came out linking football to brain damage, he abruptly retired. Here’s the inside story — and a look at how we make decisions in the face of risk versus uncertainty.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forest Regrowth 4 mins – “Episode: 1389 The supply of wood: trouble along the Equator, good news to the North. Today, some good news and some bad.” At the link find the title, “Engines of Our Ingenuity 1389: Regrowing Our Forests, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files KUHF_20170825.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Bias at Google 20 mins – “Feminist critics argue James Damore’s Google “manifesto” debating a woman’s biological abilities is just another example of the enduring discrimination women face in the workplace.” At the link find the title, “Aug 16: Why the anti-diversity Google ‘manifesto’ misses the point, 2017,” right-click “Download Aug 16: Why the anti-diversity Google ‘manifesto’ misses the point” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

George Orwell P1 56 mins – “His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us ‘big brother’, ‘thoughtcrime’, ‘doublethink’? Steve Wadhams delves into recordings he made with the people who knew Orwell from his earliest days to his final moments.” At the link find the title, “The Orwell Tapes – Part One, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170816_56959.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

George Orwell P2 56 mins – ““Asleep or awake, working or eating, indoors or out of doors, in the bath or in bed — no escape, ‘Big Brother is watching you.'” George Orwell, 1984 Who was the man who gave us ‘big brother’, ‘thoughtcrime’, ‘doublethink’?” At the link find the title, “The Orwell Tapes- Part Two, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170823_50385.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pp-up menu.

George Orwell P3 56 mins – “His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us ‘big brother’, ‘thoughtcrime’, ‘doublethink’, whose name looms so large in this era of mass surveillance?” At the link find the title, “The Orwell Tapes- Part Three, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20170830_22109.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Glenn Greenwald 53 mins – “Glenn Greenwald is one of the co-founding editors of The Intercept. He sits down with Isaac Chotiner to discuss whether America is risking a new cold war with Putin’s Russia, Julian Assange’s complicated personality, and why Trump is less unprecedented in American history than we’d like to believe.” At the link find the title “Glenn Greenwald, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY9053170886.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GM Salmon 22 mins – “Genetically modified fish is now being sold in Canada — but without any labels, who knows if you are buying it?” At the link in the title, “Aug 14: Would you eat genetically modified fish? Chances are you already have, 2017,” right-click “Download Aug 14: Would you eat genetically modified fish? Chances are you already have” and select ‘save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Food Rejection 87 mins – “Though it’s routinely claimed that producing new foods through genetic engineering is no riskier than traditional breeding—and that questioning the safety is tantamount to denying the reality of climate change—many experts assert that the facts do not support such claims; and according to the analysis in Steven Druker’s book, the claims rely on multiple misrepresentations. The Royal Society of Canada and several other scientific institutions have stated that bioengineering entails higher health risks, and several studies in peer-reviewed journals have detected harm to animals that consumed GMOs. The hazards are especially striking in light of the lessons from computer science about the unavoidable risks of altering human-engineered information systems that are much simpler and far better comprehended than bioinformation systems. Come discuss this topic with author and attorney Steven Druker.  Steven M. Druker is a public interest attorney who initiated a lawsuit against the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that revealed the agency had covered up its own scientists’ warnings about the risks of genetically engineered foods and then misrepresented the facts….” At the link find the title, “How the Health Risks of GMOs Have Been Underestimated and Misrepresented, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170815_How the Health Risks of GMOs Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gobi the Dog 24 mins – “Dion Leonard was racing across the Chinese and Mongolian desert when a scruffy dog started running alongside him.” At the link find the title, “June 22: How a little dog named Gobi changed an ultramarathoner’s liferight-click “Download June 22: How a little dog named Gobi changed an ultramarathoner’s life” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gross Ecosystem Product 53 mins – “It is possible to protect profits and the planet. Despite claims that a win for the environment is a loss for the economy, corporations are finding innovative ways to have it both ways. These corporations are quickly realizing that protecting watersheds and ecosystems can also protect their business. Companies in many sectors are realizing the changing climate means they need to pay closer attention to the relationship between natural and financial capital. Investors are making money by investing in habitat restoration; this is done to offset the environmental impacts of mining and other industrial activity. Gretchen Daily argues that markets and nature can live in harmony if the incentives are aligned properly. For her work demonstrating we don’t have to trash the planet to live a better life, she recently won the $450,000 Blue Planet Prize, which is considered the Nobel Prize for environmental solutions. Join us for a conversation about how business and nature can learn to play nice.” At the link find the title, “Aligning Profits with the Planet, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170903_cl1_AligningProfts.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guy Debord Book 56 mins – “On the 1967 neo-Marxist, Situtationist book. What is culture? In modern capitalism, Debord thinks that it’s all about the economy. It’s not just our jobs that keep us trapped, but our life outside of working hours is also demanded by “the system” via our activity as consumers, and this commoditization infiltrates every corner of our lives. Debord wants us to WAKE UP, break our chains, and live lives of immediacy, vitality, and authenticity. This means wrenching ourselves from “the spectacle,” which is not just the media created to distract us (per our ep. #136 on Adorno), but our whole shallow culture where technology, efficiency, and loss of aesthetic quality in favor of economic quantity all isolate us from each other so that we can’t effectively engage in political opposition. Is this all a bit exaggerated? Is the type of shallowness Debord refers to really restricted to the modern age, or to capitalism? Haven’t we always had spectacles foisted upon us to keep us in line? Mark, Seth, Wes, and Dylan delve into this prescient critique and come up firing on all four cylinders.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Health 21 mins – “Heart disease is the leading death for Americans today. In this special edition of the Science Physician-in-Chief of the Mount Sinai Medical Center, director of the Wiener Cardiovascular Institute at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and scientific organizer of the Academy’s upcoming conference on cardiovascular health in Barcelona, Spain has to say about heart healthy behavior in children, youth, and adults.” At the link click the square with three dots and double-click “Download” to get the audio file.

Heirloom Avalanche 20 mins – “It’s a demographic certainty that as baby boomers age, the volume of unwanted family heirlooms will skyrocket — and families navigating this inheritance are finding it stressful.” At the link find the title, “Aug 25: How unwanted family heirlooms create a divide with aging parents, 2017” right-click “Download Aug 25: How unwanted family heirlooms create a divide with aging parents” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.