Media Mining Digest 269 – Jan 6, 2017: A Christmas Carol, Addictive Processed Foods, Albert Race-Hoss Sample, Algae Fuel, Bolshoi Ballet History, Broadband and FCC, Broadband Trends, Chess Master, Climate Change, Computer Repair Woman, Constitutional Law, Cyber Security, Cyborgs, Eloquence, Energy in Cities, Engineer School, Farming Technology, Forever War, Fred Rogers, HiddenFigures, Hieronymus Bosch, Homeless In Britain, Human Transplants, Hygga Event, Immigrants in California, Infrastructure Needs, JK Rowling, Kepler, Lab Girl, Lead Poisoning, Loon Preservation, Marijuana Impact, Maurice Sendak, Midlife, Military Science, Opioid Sammy, Orca Whales, Parenting after Divorce, Philippine Politics, Premature Baby Story, Productivity, Repair or Replace, Shooting Aftermaths, Sick Kids Hospital, Springsteen, Story Teller, Sweatshops or Not, Syrian Refugee Music, Toxic Chemicals, Triangulations Best 2016, White Supremacists

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 51 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 254 for the week to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 13,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 12,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 350 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

A Christmas Carol 51 mins – “In the fall of 1843, Charles Dickens was in something of a mid-life crisis. His marriage was troubled, his career tottering, his finances on the verge of collapse. He even considered giving up writing. He didn’t, of course. Instead, he wrote his most famous work, A Christmas Carol, in just six weeks, and then self-published it. As the historian and writer Les Standiford notes, Dickens’ famous Christmas tale didn’t just change his life, it reinvented the way we celebrate the holiday. We’ll talk with Standiford about A Christmas Carol on Friday….Les Standiford is the director of the creative writing program at Florida International University. He’s the author of many books, including The Man Who Invented Christmas: How Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol Rescued His Career and Revived Our Holiday Spirits.At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Addictive Processed Foods 58 mins – “We need food to survive. Can we really be “addicted” to something required for survival?” At the link find the title, “All About Food Addiction, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files SDS160.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Albert “Race Hoss” Sample 44 mins – “In this rebroadcast, we hear one of Diane’s all-time favorite interviews. And judging from the response we got, it was one of yours as well. In 1986, Diane spoke with Albert “Race Hoss” Sample. He grew up under very difficult circumstances and wound up in a Texas prison, where he spent 17 years until he won his release. He spoke of the cruelty and brutality he experienced there, which he relived in an autobiography, “Race Hoss: Big Emma’s Boy.” He died in 2005. Diane said talking with Mr. Sample, hearing his story, moved her greatly. She hopes it will move you, too.” (He died in2005) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Algae Fuel 30 mins – “Who doesn’t need a miracle? As the lyricist for many timeless Grateful Dead classics, as a privacy rights activist, or as the founder of the biofuel company, Algae Systems, John Perry Barlow has used creativity and sheer will to advance a wide array of “miracles.” That is until a devastating illness left him hospitalized for most of 2015. Sea Change Radio host Alex Wise sat down recently with Barlow, who’s still on the mend, along with the CEO of Algae Systems, Matthew Atwood. They discuss the company’s technology which turns waste water into fuel, and the current Indiegogo campaign to raise new capital for Algae Systems. They also delve into Barlow’s relationship with Edward Snowden, his recovery from this illness, and the unfortunate tale of how he missed out on the Grateful Dead’s Fare Thee Well mini-tour.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bolshoi History 48 mins – “From murder, fire and on-stage suicides, to a jewel of national culture – on this special Boxing Day edition of The Current, the dramatic history of the Russian Bolshoi Ballet.” At the link find the title, “Full Episode for December 26, 2016 – The Current,” right-click “Media files current 20161226_38385.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband and FCC 30 mins – “Mignon Clyburn, the longest-serving commissioner on the Federal Communications Commission, discusses how the incoming Trump administration could affect the FCC’s work, including the future of internet regulation and broadband expansion needs.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Mignon Clyburn, December 24, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.463643.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Trends 2016 35 mins – “It’s that time of year – for reflection of the past and thinking about the future. Lisa, Nick, Hannah, and I discuss the previous year and then make some predictions for next year. Along the way, we have some banter and occasionally an insightful comment if you listen hard enough.” At the link right-click “… download this mp3 file directly.…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chess Master 58 mins – “We talk to American chess Grandmaster Patrick Wolff.” At the link find the title, “161 Patrick Wolff – How to Become a Grandmaster Chess Champion,” right-click “Media files ab4af996-a6c8-4eda-9028-e9d6d41d3fbd.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change 58 mins – “David Suzuki says we are the first species in the history of life on Earth to have created the conditions for our own demise. He says the list of environmental problems grows and worsens. The human population continues to increase and finite resources are being depleted. We have the knowledge and power to address the problems, but sadly, political and financial greed is stymying any real progress. This is David Suzuki’s address at the WOMADelaide Planet Talks in 2016.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Repair Woman 62 mins – “How I made it in the Field: By accident (my parents bought a computer a did not want and ITT not having multimedia at the time had no choice but networking)… My first job was really not in tech but in customer service which allowed me to open up to people, got a feel of how to handle customer interactions… The Computer Repair Life: This was my better year which is giving that motivation to keep it pushing….” At the link right-click beside “Direct MP3 Download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constitutional Law 60 mins – “’[N]o person holding any office of profit or trust under them, shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept of any present, emolument, office, or title, of any kind whatever, from any king, prince, or foreign state.’ These words, from Article I of the U.S. Constitution, make it unambiguously clear to many legal scholars that Donald Trump will be committing an impeachable offense by not relinquishing an ownership stake in his multiple companies before Jan 20. Zephyr Teachout is among those scholars, and joins us to explain why corruption in the presidency was such anathema to the nation’s founders. In the remainder of today’s episode, we share a few highlights from a recent symposium about the current state of free speech on campus. The event was organized by the Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression. You can watch videos of the entire two-day event….” At the link find the title, “Corruption in the White House, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM3041126757.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Security 25 mins – “With the rise of legal technology came a heightened awareness amongst lawyers and law firms of the importance of cyber security to ensure that one’s own, and the clients’, assets are protected. In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek sit down with former law enforcement officer and High-Technology Crime Unit detective Keith Lowry to discuss governmental cyber security policy under President Obama and how those policies might change during the administration of President-elect Trump.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyborgs 27 mins – “Virtual reality offers the myth of presence; technology can only reward with vicarious pleasure. If your identity is tied up with memory, what happens to that idea when memories disappear, and can tech that enables life-logging at least arrest if not reverse this loss? The idea of being able to store your voice, to bank it, for people with degenerative voice conditions, has informed researchers into the latest voice synthesisers, but if you lost your voice what impact would a restored synthesised version have on your sense of your identity? Click is joined by an expert panel in the Media Café at Broadcasting House in London, to discuss how technology is increasingly shaping our identities: Neil Harbisson, a composer who was born colour-blind and who has an electronic eye implanted in his brain that allows him to hear colours; Cathal Gurrin has been wearing a life-logging camera for the last 10 years recording his every action; Phillipa Rewaj and Rupal Patel are research Speech and Language experts who have looked into collecting people’s voices for regeneration via synthesisers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eloquence 52 mins – “We all know eloquence when we hear it. The skillful delivery of language delights us, captivates us, persuades and moves us. Most importantly, says the linguist David Crystal, speakers and listeners alike enjoy eloquent speech. Crystal has dissected the qualities and practice of eloquence. Partly, he wants to better understand how it’s achieved. He also wants to show that eloquence is a talent everyone who uses words can possess. Crystal joins us to examine how the gift of gab works…. David Crystal is an independent scholar with lifelong experience as a lecturer, public speaker, and broadcaster. He is the author of more than one hundred books on phonetics, Shakespeare’s language, child language, and related topics. His latest book is called The Gift of the Gab: How Eloquence Works” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy in Cities 54 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Institute for Sustainable Energy and the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future, and is titled “District Energy in Cities: Unlocking Efficiency, Sustainability and Resiliency through Infrastructure Investment.”  Our speaker is Rob Thornton, President and CEO of the International District Energy Association.” At the linkr ight-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Engineer School 61 mins – “In this episode of The Engineering Commons, we answer questions from listener Jared about coping as an engineering student.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Technology 58 mins – “Johns Hopkins professor Ellen Silbergeld looks at new farming methods and technology and their impact on consumers, the environment, and workers. Professor Silbergeld is interviewed by Dan Glickman.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Ellen Silbergeld, December 24, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.459289.MP3-STD.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forever War 60 mins – “Journalist Mark Danner, who lectures at the University of California, Berkeley, talks about his latest book, [Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War], which looks at the 15-year U.S. war on terrorism.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Mark Danner, December 25, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.458897.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fred Rogers 54 mins – “Fred Rogers dedicated his life to serving children. He was a pioneer in educational television and a PBS icon. His show “Misters Rogers’ Neighborhood” ran for decades. In December 2002, Diane Rehm spoke with Rogers about his new parenting book, his career and the importance of fostering self-esteem at an early age. A year after this interview, Fred Rogers passed away. This remains one of Diane’s favorite on-air conversations and she wanted to share it with you during this last week of the show as one of our “farewell favorites.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Hidden Figures 13 mins – “In this episode of The Remix we talk to Margot Lee Shetterly about the real life heroines behind the new film, Hidden Figures. Author Margot Lee Shetterly grew up knowing that black women were behind the success of the early space program, that eventually became NASA. Shetterly grew up knowing their children and grandchildren in her Hampton, Virginia, community. Her recent book “Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race” tells the story of these “human computers” who helped launch America’s space program, broke racial and gender barriers and supported the next generation of African American engineers and aerospace professionals.” At the link find the title, “The true story behind ‘Hidden Figures’ Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files hidfigweb1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hieronymus Bosch 52 mins – “If you’ve ever seen paintings by the Dutch artist Hieronymus Bosch, such as The Garden of Earthly Delights, you’ve probably wondered what they mean and what kind of person could have imagined such fanciful scenes. Problem is, we know very little about Bosch’s personal story. That leaves the paintings, which present their own puzzles. This year marks the 500th anniversary of Bosch’s death, and Tuesday, art historian Gary Schwartz joins us to discuss the fearless artist’s life and his inventive art….Gary Schwartz is an art historian of Dutch painters of the 17th century and the author of two books about Hieronymus Bosch, one for young readers, First Impressions: Hieronymus Bosch, and Jheronimus Bosch: The Road to Heaven and Hell” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless in Britain 27 mins -”There’s a crisis of homelessness for families in Britain” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Transplants 50 mins – “Human transplants. Hand, face, uterus, even head transplants in the news now. We’ll look at the widening frontier of transplant surgeries.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hygga Events 21 mins – “Hygge, a centuries-old Danish practice, is now trendy, with social media sites teeming with images of woolly socks and intimate gatherings around the fireplace. What does hygge really mean and how can it serve us?” At the link find the title, “Dec 27: In troubled times, Danish art of ‘coziness’ sparks international trend,“ right-click “Media files current_20161227_76268.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrants in California 92 mins – “Looking back on the state of race relations in LA and exploring how we can move forward, LA’s busy immigration court system, 2016 tech roundup.” At the link find the title, “Race relations in LA, exploring the immigration court system, the year in technology, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files SHOW_122716-d98b3653.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infrastructure Needs 25 mins – “More than a few scientists on Radio Ecoshock tell us our present economy threatens to kill us, and take out many other species in the Sixth Great Mass Extinction. Surely, we all have an interest in a new climate economy. That’s a huge global task. I’ve come across a report that seems written in a bland code for top government and corporate planners. But there are gems buried in this work, titled “The Sustainable Infrastructure Imperative.” It’s the 2016 report from something called “the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate”.The Global Commission on the Economy and Climate was commissioned by seven countries – Colombia, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Norway, South Korea, Sweden and the United Kingdom – as an independent initiative to report to the international community. To help us sort out who that is, and what this report can tell us, as citizens of this planet, I’ve called on Ipek Gencsu. She’s the Research and Engagement Manager at the New Climate Economy. Ipek has degrees in politics and economy from the London School of Economics. You may also have heard about her as a campaigner for the charity Oxfam, and for climate and food justice.” At the link right-click “CD Quality” near the sound bar for Dr Blanc and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

JK Rowling 47 mins – “In October of 1999 J.K. Rowling, author of the best-selling Harry Potter books was on a book tour in the U.S. Diane had a chance to talk with her while she was in Washington. J.K. Rowling’s books and the movies based on her books have become international sensations with fans of all ages. In this hour Rowling talks about how the Harry Potter story began in her imagination and how she hoped it would become “a little book a few people might like.” Please enjoy this conversation with writer J.K. Rowling, the creator of the Harry Potter series.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Kepler 43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the German astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571 – 1630). Although he is overshadowed today by Isaac Newton and Galileo, he is considered by many to be one of the greatest scientists in history. The three laws of planetary motion Kepler developed transformed people’s understanding of the Solar System and laid the foundations for the revolutionary ideas Isaac Newton produced later. Kepler is also thought to have written one of the first works of science fiction. However, he faced a number of challenges. He had to defend his mother from charges of witchcraft, he had few financial resources and his career suffered as a result of his Lutheran faith.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lab Girl 48 mins – ““Lab Girl”, the powerful new memoir of a female scientist — geobiologist Hope Jahren — on life and love.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lead Poisoning 46 mins – “Today on Slate Money, hosts Felix Salmon of Fusion, Cathy O’Neil, author of, Weapons of Math Destruction, and Slate Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann discuss: America’s growing lead poisoning problem; The actual effectiveness of China’s educational system; How some of the Pulse nightclub victim’s families are suing Facebook, Twitter, and Google for their roles in spreading ISIS propaganda” At the link find the title, “The Doomed Youth Edition, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM7781512504.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Loon Preservation 56 mins – “Warm evenings on the lakes of New Hampshire might mean the call of a loon and, perhaps, bats swooping overhead. While loon populations are on the increase, they still face rising threats in the region, while bats have been decimated by a debilitating disease. We find out what’s being done to maintain the local populations as we celebrate summer in New Hampshire..” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Impact 47 mins – “Pot in the family. With marijuana now legal in more states, the conversation between parents and teens is more complicated. We’ll listen.” At the link find the title, “Navigating The New Pot Talk In A Time Of Legal Weed, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_506473671.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maurice Sendak 58 mins – “Diane had the pleasure of speaking with famed author and illustrator Maurice Sendak in September of 1993. He wrote a number of children’s books, but “Where the Wild Things Are” which was first published in 1963 remains one of a best-selling children’s book, a book that’s been described as thrilling to children and controversial to adults. In this hour Maurice Sendak talks about the importance of being honest with children and why it was important for him to be honest about the difficulties he experienced in his own childhood. Please enjoy this rebroadcast of Maurice Sendak talking about his life and his work.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Midlife 56 mins – “Even with all the angst about mid-life crises, and birthday cards calling you over the hill, the author says the middle years are most often about renewal. Today we’re talking with former NPR correspondent Barbara Bradley Hagerty on what she discovered about middle age in America.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Science 52 mins – “When you think about military science, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Bombs and guns, right? Well, that’s not what interests the writer Mary Roach, who has a habit of seeking out eccentric scientific corners. She’s not so much curious about the killing as she is about the keeping alive. That curiosity led her to research into the battlefield’s more obscure threats: exhaustion, shock, bacteria, panic, even turkey vultures. Roach joins us to explore the curious science of humans at war… Mary Roach is the author of the books StiffSpook, BonkPacking for Mars, and Gulp. Her new book is called Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Sammy 64 mins – “Jeff and Greg attempt to chew through an opioid sammy[sandwich] and Greg ponders the collective childhood of test question writers” At the link find the title, “JMT 2.0 September 2016 – Opioid Sammy,” right-click “Media files 300061338-acmt-jmt-20-september-2016-opioid-sammy.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Orca Whales 26 mins – “At one time the orca — or killer whale — was seen as a terrifying monster. But then a wounded orca named Moby Doll ended up in Vancouver and in no time at all once-frightened Vancouverites fell in love. Meet the disruptor who paved the way for Shamu.” At the link find the title, “Dec 27: ENCORE: How Moby Doll changed the worldview of ‘monster’ orca whales,” right-click “Media files current_20161227_94491.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parenting after Divorce 49 mins – “Taking care of your kids’ needs after a divorce. Psychologist, divorce expert Robert Emery on his new book “Two Homes, One Childhood.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Philippine Politics 48 mins – “Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte brags about a lot of things, including committing murder. We look at the Philippines under Duterte’s rule.” At the link find the title, “The Philippines’ Controversial President, Rodrigo Duterte, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_506327967.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Premature Baby Story 26 mins – “Born in the grey zone. Micro-preemies are babies born so premature, they’re on the edge of viability. Modern medicine means these babies can increasingly be saved. But with the advances, come thorny new questions about where life truly begins.” At the link find the title, “Dec 29: ENCORE: Parents explore medical frontier of micro-preemies,” right-click “Media files current_20161229_17569.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productivity 39 mins – “In this busy time of year, we could all use some tips on how to get more done in less time. First, however, a warning: there’s a big difference between being busy and being productive.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Repair or Replace 24 mins – “Fix your clothes, appliances or whatever you’re tempted to take to the curb. It’s part of a burgeoning “fixer movement” that not only is good for the environment and pocket, in Sweden repairing what’s broken can actually give you a tax break.” At the link find the title, “Dec 30: ENCORE: Sweden offers tax breaks to repair — not replace — broken objects,” right-click “Media files current_20161230_81185.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shooting Aftermaths 68 mins – “Massad Ayoob has been handgun editor of GUNS magazine and law enforcement editor of AMERICAN HANDGUNNER since the 1970s, and has published thousands of articles in gun magazines, martial arts publications, and law enforcement journals. He is the author of more than a dozen books on firearms, self-defense, and related topics, including “In the Gravest Extreme,” widely considered to be the authoritative text on the topic of the use of lethal force….Massad joins us today to discuss protecting yourself as an armed citizen from the threat we seldom consider, our own legal system.  How to make sure you are not in violation of the law, what constitutes justification for the use of deadly force and having a “prep kit” for after a deadly force incident.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sick Kids Hospital 24 mins – “Historian David Wright chronicles how The Hospital of Sick Children became one of leading pediatric health facilities in the world.” At the link find the title, “Dec 27: History of SickKids hospital marked by achievements and scandal,” Media files current_20161227_65455.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Springsteen 48 mins – “Recorded at his home studio, Springsteen speaks to Terry Gross about growing up in Jersey, songwriting, and wishing to be his stage persona. His new memoir is ‘Born to Run.’…” At the link find the title, “December 26, 2016 Bruce Springsteen,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Story Teller 26 mins – “A journey of 8,000 kilometres begins with a single step. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Paul Salopek is walking the modern-day Silk Road, talking to people in the pursuit of what he calls ‘slow journalism.’” At the link find the title, “Dec 28: Why Paul Salopek is walking the modern-day Silk Road to pursue ‘slow journalism,” right-click “Media files current_20161228_75689.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sweatshops or Not 78 mins – “If you were a poor person in a poor country, would you prefer steady work in a factory or to be your own boss, buying and selling in the local market? Economist Chris Blattman of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about experimental evidence on how poor people choose in the labor market and the consequences for their income, health, and satisfaction.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugee Music 48 mins – “Since war broke out in Syria over a million people have sought refuge in Lebanon – a small country of just over 4 million people. The reporter Lina Sinjab left her home in Damascus in 2013 to live in Beirut, and for her, as for so many Syrians, the poignant music of home has become a crucial source of comfort and resilience. As the war drags on, music and songs provide a strong link to the past and hope for the future. Lina joins refugee musicians across Lebanon and hears how their music is one of the few things they were able to bring with them. In the Bekaa Valley, close to the border with Syria, she meets an oud player, a percussionist and a piper who arrived with nothing but the clothes on their backs and their precious instruments. And she visits a refugee youth choir who have found new joy and hope by singing with others who have been uprooted from their homes. In Beirut, the Oumi ensemble use music as a counter to religious extremism, taking their inspiration from the peace-loving Sufi poet Mansur Al-Hallaj. The arrival of Syrian musicians has also had a big impact on the cultural scene in Lebanon, and Lina discovers how this has inspired bands and artists in the capital.” At the link find the title, “A Song for Syria, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04m6tky.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Toxic Chemicals 20 mins – “Now and then, just one dedicated person can put the spotlight on a dangerous chemical. Every day, some of us wear or use the products made with this toxic process. Few people know fabrics like Rayon are made from forests boiled down by dangerous chemicals. So are cellophane and dish sponges. That person could be Dr. Paul David Blanc. He’s a real doctor and a professor of medicine at the University of California, in San Francisco. The story and the warning come in Paul’s new book “Fake Silk, The Lethal History of Viscose Rayon.” At the link right-click “CD Quality” near the sound bar for Dr Blanc and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Triangulations Best 2016 85 mins – “The best interviews of Triangulation in 2016! From Wiki inventor Ward Cunningham and Java creator James Gosling to Macintosh veteran Bill Atkinson and IARPA director Jason Matheny, this collection of 2016’s best interviews recollects Leo Laporte’s fascinating meetings of the minds.” At the link click “downloads,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White Supremacists 75 mins – “The so-called alt-right leader Richard Spencer has railed against Jews and said the U.S. belongs to white men. Now Neo-Nazi groups are calling for white supremacists to march through his hometown of Whitefish, Mont. — a site of protest as residents react.” At the link find the title, “Dec 28: Whitefish, Mont. residents rally against ‘alt-right’ targeting Jewish community,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 268 – Dec 30, 2016: Addiction Experts on Opioid Crisis, Addiction Medicine, Advertising History, Aging Cognition, Airline Travel, Aleppo, Andrew Weil MD, Asbestos Ban in Canada, Asian Americans, Astronomical Women, Bad Kids at Black Rock High, Beer Brewing, Biohacking, Blind People Jobs, Bollywood Book, Borneo Deforestation, Brain Cooling, Broadband in Boseman, California Climate One, California Water Plan, CIA and Elections, Cyber Attacks on Democracy, Cyberattacks, Desktop Fabrication, Disruptive Thinking, Dog Domestication, Ebola Review, Election Disruption in US, Election Hacks by Russia, Electoral College Dispute, Electronics Engineers Discussion, Encryption, Fake News, Fake Zombie Bands, Feds versus Locals, Female Negotiators, Genocide Survivors, Guatemala Social Media Use, Hidden Figures, Holiday Cards History, Icy Walkways, Indian Cash Chaos, Infrastructure Projects, Intellectuals and Race, Intelligence and Propaganda, Judaism in America, Katrina Disaster Response, Kid Logic, Korean Sea Women, Language Evolution, Linux Support, Malaysian Protests, Med Students Life, Medicine Defined, Micro Greens, Moral Decisions, Native Americans, Neil de Grasse Tyson, Opiate Epidemic, Pain Control Pills, Parasitism Case, Physics Tools, Political Activism, Political Unions, Prison Violence in Canada, Refugees in New Hampshire, Reindeer Racing, Religious Trends, Research Pitfalls, Robot Dangers, Roy Cohn Lawyer, Russian Nuclear Testing, Sanctuary Cities, Science of Motivation, Science Outreach to Kids, Seed Banks, Spices in US, Syrian Refugee Children, Syrian Refugees in Canada, Thomas Sowell on Economics, Tillerson as Secretary of State, Toy Inventors, Transgender Story, Trump Election Analysis, US Foreign Policy, Verizon, War Aftermaths, Warfare, Waste to Water, Wealth Poverty Politics, Wood Woodpecker, Word Use and Trends

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 104 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 308 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 12,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 12,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 350 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

Addiction Experts on Opioid Crisis 23 mins – “B.C’s epidemic of opioid overdoses is in need of a solution. But how to tackle a seemingly intractable problem is complicated. The Current looks at a proposal to end the prohibition of heroin to the call for more government money to treat addiction.” At the link find the title,Dec 20: Addiction experts discuss solutions to opioid overdose crisis, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161220_50978.mp3”and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Addiction Medicine 49 mins – “Psychiatrist Anna Lembke says the medical establishment and drugmakers began telling doctors in the 1980s that opioids were effective treatment for long-term chronic pain. “That was patently false,” she says. Her book is ‘Drug Dealer, MD.’ Critic Ken Tucker shares his top 10 favorite albums of 2016.” At the link find the title, “Dec, 2016, Inside The Prescription Drug Epidemic,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Advertising History 60 mins – “Tim Wu is the Author of The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Brains. Tim and Leo talk about the history of mass media advertising, from its beginnings in the 1830s with newspaper broadsheets to its current state on the internet. Tim argues that what you pay attention to defines your life, and you should think hard about how you want to spend your precious attention.” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Cognition 56 mins – “There are many normal physiological changes that come with aging. Dr. Anne Fabiny helps distinguish those from the pathological changes of disease or illness. Then, Craig Wingate of the Alzheimer’s Association, provides clues to differentiate typical aging with Alzhemier’s. When we can make that distinction we can focus on being resilient, sustaining a sense of purpose and vitality, even while coping with stressful experiences. Recorded on 11/01/2016. (#31555)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Prognosis 86 mins – “Dr. Alex Smith is a clinician-researcher at the University of California San Francisco who is at the forefront of efforts to integrate geriatrics and palliative care. Recorded on 11/08/2016. (#31556)” Reference is made to ePrognosis site and process. At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Airline Travel 47 – “A heads-up for all travelers. In-flight phone use is back on the table, and a new bare-bones economy class is moving in. We catch up with air travel.” At the link find the title, “Are You On Board With Cellphones On Airplanes? Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_505579657.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aleppo Evacuation 19 mins – “It was supposed to be over with a ceasefire and withdrawal. But over the last 24 hours, there have been claims of executions by government troops and stories of bombardment. The Current speaks with those still inside — trapped.” At the link find the title, “Dec 14: ‘They are dying in the streets’: Aleppo ceasefire fails, civilians trapped,” right-click “Download Dec 14: ‘They are dying in the streets’: Aleppo ceasefire fails, civilians trapped” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aleppo Power Dynamics 19 mins – “Eastern Aleppo’s fall signals changed power dynamics in and around Syria with potentially world-changing geopolitical implications. The Current looks at the new dynamic between Russian and U.S. influence. “ At the link find the title, “Dec 15: How will Aleppo’s fall factor into Assad’s end game?” right-click “Download Dec 15: How will Aleppo’s fall factor into Assad’s end game?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Andrew Weil, MD 59 mins– “Dr. Andrew Weil, the country’s leading expert in integrative medicine, believes that good health begins in the kitchen. It’s hardly revolutionary to propose that diet matters when it comes to our health, but so many people feel that eating delicious, healthy home-cooked meals isn’t possible for them. They don’t have time, they say, or they can’t afford good food. Dr. Weil shows us that tasty, healthful food can be prepared quickly and easily, and it isn’t especially pricey. His new cookbook, Fast Food Good Food tells us all how we can enjoy good food fast….” At the link right-click “Download the mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asbestos Ban in Canada 22 mins – “Today the federal government announces a comprehensive ban on asbestos which may come as a surprise to people who think asbestos is already banned in Canada. The CBC’s Julie Ireton explains the long road ahead for getting rid of asbestos.” At the link find the title, “Dec 15: Thought asbestos was fully banned in Canada? Not until 2018,” right-click “Download Dec 15: Thought asbestos was fully banned in Canada? Not until 2018” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asian Americans 28 mins – “California newspapers once wrote that Chinese immigrants had “most of the vices and few of the virtues of the African”. Until 1940, Asian Americans earned less than whites…and less than black Americans too. All that changed just a few generations. Today, how Asian Americans became a “model minority.” Then, from unidentified noises to a story of heartbreaking loss, we scour the audio landscape for sound we can’t help but share. Morning Edition host Rick Ganley joins us for the latest installment of Overheard.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronomical Women 62 mins – “Dava Sobel argues that in the 19th century, it was women and not male astronomers who actually made some of the great discoveries of the universe. …At the outset, this group included the wives, sisters and daughters of the resident astronomers, but by the 1880s the female corps included graduates of the new women’s colleges—Vassar, Wellesley and Smith. …Anna Draper, whose late husband pioneered the technique of stellar photography—enabled the women to make extraordinary discoveries that attracted worldwide acclaim. Hear this captivating, little-known true story of a group of women whose remarkable contributions to the burgeoning field of astronomy forever changed our understanding of the stars and our place in the universe. Sobel is a noted author, and in addition to her work for The New York Times she has been a longtime science contributor to Harvard Magazine, Audubon, Discover, Life, Omni, and The New Yorker.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bad Kids at Black Rock High 12 mins – “Many of the kids at Black Rock High School have been labeled “bad kids.” Their principal and teachers are determined to help them succeed.” At the link find the title, “’The Bad Kids’ offers lessons in empathy and second chances, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files BadKidsDoc BROOD PODCAST-2cfedf87.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beer Brewing 16 mins – “What gives beer its taste? Why do some ales taste of berries, bananas or chocolate? A big part of the answer is the type of yeast used to ferment it. There are hundreds of different strains that brewers can use to make beer, and many of them can be found at the National Collection of Yeast Cultures in Norwich. We went for a pint with scientists from the NCYC to find out how different yeasts affect the taste of ales, and learn about their research to find strains that can produce new and better beers.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biohacking 55 mins – “How fake news spreads. Making ears from apples. Texting with household cleaners. The impact of tech on families. Transgender on Tinder.” At the link find the title, “339: Fake news, synthetic ears and more, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files spark_20161218_30659.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Blind People Jobs 20 mins – “US report on employment for visually impaired people, Charles Bonnet in pictures”At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bollywood Book 53 mins – “Author, Columnist Gautam Chintamani talks all things Bollywood in this awesome interview. We talk about his interest in movies, the documentaries made by him, his book on Bollywood Star Rajesh Khanna. We also talk about his most recent book titled Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak, which is based on the film by the same title.” At the link find the title, “Biography of Bollywood Film Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak: Author Gautam Chintamani ep81,” right-click “Media files 5423070-biography-of-bollywood-film-qayamat-se-qayamat-tak-author-gautam-chintamani-ep81.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Borneo Deforestation 8 mins – “…Over the past 10 years, roughly half of the deforestation on Borneo, an island Indonesia shares with Malaysia and Brunei, has been done to clear the way for industrial plantations. Most of that deforested land, an area just slightly smaller than Taiwan, has been converted into oil palm plantations in the Indonesian portion of Borneo. The vegetable oil those palms produce is used in a huge variety of products sold in the US, from ice cream to lipstick…. “Communities that live near forests depend on these forests for a number of natural resources that they use every day,” Chatellier says. When conservation groups move in to claim a piece of land to preserve it, “that can create conflict,” Chatellier says. As billions of dollars are poised to flow from developed to developing countries to protect their forests, countries like Indonesia are scrambling to figure out how to resolve that kind of conflict: how to balance the lives and livelihoods of local people with the need to protect the global climate and fragile species, like Borneo’s endangered orangutans. Note: This is the first story in a series on PRI.org and The World examining social entrepreneurs using innovative methods to protect Indonesian forests.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Borneo Deforestation Control 6 mins – “The sun is just starting to dip toward the horizon in Indonesian Borneo, and Dharsono Hartono is standing on a fire tower, looking out over a peat forest falling into shadow. …“Unlike the typical mineral soil,” Hartono says, “peat soil is actually dead wood, leaves and logs that become part of the soil.” The layers of wood and decomposing leaves create a forest floor so thick it bounces when Hartono steps on it. All those decomposing plants contain lots of carbon, which means peat forests store more greenhouse gases than a regular tropical rainforest. If the forest in front of Hartono were converted to plantations like much of Borneo already has been, tons of carbon would be freed from the soil and released into the atmosphere, where it would contribute to global warming. “It would emit about 6 million tons of carbon dioxide-equivalent,” Hartono says. “Which is in this case close to about 5 million cars a year.” Hartono’s job is to prevent that from happening. And to make sure his company turns a profit along the way. …Getting the right government permits has been a bureaucratic nightmare. Then there’s the science: Measuring the carbon stored in the company’s 600 square miles of peat forest took two years, and then the methodology had to be verified by an independent carbon credit certification body called the VCS. … I’m still very optimistic that we will make it.” Hartono hopes to finally start selling carbon credits next year….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Borneo Deforestation Medicine 3 mins – “ In a village on the western edge of Borneo, there’s a small hospital where people come from miles around to get treatment for everything from a broken arm to a heart attack. Good health care in a remote town like Sukadana, in the Indonesian province of West Kalimantan, is hard to come by. But there’s another thing that sets this one-story, metal-roofed clinic apart: how patients pay for their health care. “You can pay with non-cash means,” says Dr. Kinari Webb, founder of the ASRI clinic, known by the acronym for its Indonesian name, Alam Sehat Lestari. “So that people don’t have to log in order to pay for health care.” Patients can pay with manure, seedlings, handicrafts including hand-woven baskets, or their labor. In ASRI’s courtyard, seedlings that patients have used to pay for healthcare are a sign of what’s different about this clinic. And no matter the currency they use, patients get a 70 percent discount if they live in an area where illegal logging activity has stopped. …According to ASRI data, when the clinic opened, there were an estimated 1,350 logging households around the national park. That dropped to 450 after the clinic had been in operation for five years, and today, Webb says fewer than 200 people (that’s individuals, not households) in villages bordering the national park are loggers. ” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Cooling 27 mins – “Victims of traumatic brain injuries – caused by car accidents or falls – have a better chance of survival if their body temperature is deliberately cooled for a few days. But the technique does not help children with similar injuries – according to the British researchers behind the largest ever review of “brain cooling” studies. Pankaj Sharma, Professor of Neurology at Royal Holloway, University of London led the research and says the body should be cooled quickly to get the best results. Is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder actually a problem of excessive mind-wandering? Children who find it hard to sit still and concentrate may be diagnosed with ADHD. Health Check hears from two teenage girls with ADHD, talking about how difficult they find it to concentrate at school. Philip Asherson is Professor of Clinical and Molecular Psychiatry at Kings College London – and he says the idea that mind-wandering might play a big part in ADHD is now being taken seriously….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Sve Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Bozeman 29 mins – “This week, we return to Bozeman’s unique model in Montana to get an update now that the network is up and running. President of Bozeman Fiber Anthony Cochenour and city of Bozeman Economic Development Director Brit Fontenot join us again to discuss their unique approach. We last spoke with them on episode 142. We discuss how they are doing two months after launching the network. With five ISPs already using it to deliver services a several more in the process of signing up, they are on target for where they hoped to be….” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Climate One 59 mins – “Cassandra Sweet, Energy Reporter, The Wall Street Journal Katie Fehrenbacher, Former Senior Writer, Fortune David Baker, Energy Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle Top energy stories this year range from speedy ratification of the Paris climate deal to the large number of reservations for Tesla’s mid-priced sedan. Recent headlines also include PG&E’s surprise announcement that it will close the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant and the surprise bankruptcy of SunEdison, once a darling of the solar industry. We’ll take stock of a year in which oil prices stayed low, autonomous cars sped ahead, and the first offshore wind farm in the United States was poised to come online. On the policy front, California extended its main climate law with the passage of SB 32, but clean energy is playing defense in many states around the country. Would you fly in a battery-powered helicopter or a solar-powered plane? Brave souls did just that this year. Join us for a look back at an active year in technology, innovation, policy and the battle over how to power our future.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Water Plan 58 mins – “California’s primary clean water supply, upon which 25 million people depend, is out of date, unreliable and inefficient. California’s largest supply of clean water is dependent on 50-year-old levees. Earthquakes, floods and rising sea levels could cause these levees to fail, putting the fresh water supply at risk from saltwater contamination. The current system is inefficient and cannot adequately capture and store water when it is available. The state is losing fresh water that could be used by farms, businesses and communities. Without an update to the water infrastructure, the environment and the state’s economy are at risk. Tune in today as we talk with Jeffrey Kightlinger, the General Manager of Metropolitan Water District, and Erin Mellon, Communications and Outreach Advisor at the California Natural Resources Agency.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA and Elections 14 mins – “As the CIA cries foul over Russian election interference, more than a few observers find it a little bit rich given the CIA’s past meddling in elections abroad. The Current speaks to a history professor who says, “History is replete with ironies.” At the link find the title, “Dec 16: Whatever Russia did, CIA has its own history of meddling in elections,” right-click “Download Dec 16: Whatever Russia did, CIA has its own history of meddling in elections” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Attacks on Democracy 5 mins – “Germany finds itself in the center of the cyberstorm – … “What we’re seeing now is only the beginning,” Klingbeil says. In addition to the hacking, “there’s the problem of fake news, fake quotes and even fake videos floating around, and people believe this stuff, because they’re losing faith in traditional institutions.” Klingbeil says Germany needs new regulations for social media companies like Facebook and Twitter. He supports new legislation that would impose hefty fines on social media sites if they fail to remove fake news posts quickly… Klingbeil says, “We are irritated about Russia influencing the US election campaign. … But it’s also true that the Americans are engaging in cyber-espionage.” “They were listening to our chancellor’s mobile phone. And it’s not just Russia and America,” Klingbeil adds. Klingbeil says other national governments are capable of carrying out large-scale cyberattacks….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyberattacks 136 mins – “This week, Leo and Steve discuss Russia’s hacking involvement in the US Election; that, incredibly, it gets even worse for Yahoo!, misguided anti-porn legislation in South Carolina, troubling legislation from Australia, legal confusion from the Florida appellate court, some good news from the U.S. Supreme Court, Linux security stumbling, why Mac OS X got an important fix last week, the Steganography malvertising attack that targets home routers, news of a forthcoming inter-vehicle communications mandate, professional cameras being called upon to provide built-in encryption, LetsEncrypt gets a worrisome extension, additional news, errata, miscellany… and how exactly DOES that “I really really promise I’m not a robot (really!)” non-CAPTCHA checkbox CAPTCHA work?” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Desktop Fabrication 8 mins – “In this installment of On the Lookout, we explore another device in the world of desktop fabrication.  Recently, we were able to test out Carvey – a tabletop 3D carving machine from Inventables. Right out of the box, we discovered Carvey to be a remarkably easy to use tool appropriate for younger learners. Solidly built, Carvey’s small footprint can easily sit on a tabletop, and features an enclosed frame that keeps the workspace relatively clean and safe. Of course, Carvey’s reach extends well beyond the science classroom, and will function as a savvy tool that any STEAM program or Makerspace could rely upon for hands-on student learning. Listen to (and watch our unbox video) to see how this new digital manufacturing tool can allow students to transform their digital creations into physical, everyday objects.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disruptive Thinking 92 mins – “A.J. Jacobs (@ajjacobs) is a kindred guinea pig of self-experimentation who chronicles his shenanigans in books that seem to keep winding up as New York Times best sellers. The Know-It-All was about his quest to learn everything in the world. In The Year of Living Biblically, he tried to follow all the rules of the Bible as literally as possible. Drop Dead Healthy followed his well- (and ill-) advised experiments to become the healthiest person alive. My Life as an Experiment is about exactly what it sounds like, and It’s All Relative — which will be out in 2017 — will aim to connect all of humanity in one family tree. A.J. is also the host of the new podcast Twice Removed, which takes a celebrity guest and introduces them to a surprise cousin they didn’t know they had. It could be one of their heroes, an old friend, a teacher, etc.” At the link find the title, “#211: A.J. Jacobs: Self-Experimenter Extraordinaire,” right-click “Media files The_Tim_Ferriss_Show-AJ_Jacobs.mp3” and select “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Dog Domestication 37 mins – Experts agree that dogs have evolved from the gray wolf, but after that there are many questions and debates about how and why they became our prized companions.  Prof. Greger Larson applies the lessons of evolution, archaeology and genomics to describe the canine lineage and describe this progression.  There are many inferences and surprises along the way, and DNA from dog fossils is shedding light on this interesting question. Follow Prof. Larson at @Greger_Larson or www.palaeobarn.com  Also, Chelsea Boonstra and The Boonstra Report.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Review 20 mins – “Marie-Paule Kieny outlines encouraging final results of the rVSV-ZEBOV Ebola vaccine trial from Guinea.” At the link find the title, “Ebola vaccine: The Lancet: Dec 22, 2016,” right-click “Media files 22dec-ebola.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Election Disruption in US 47 mins – “Russia and the American vote. Aleppo horror. Exxon Mobil chief to State. The Fed hikes rates. Our weekly news round table goes behind the headlines.” At the link find the title, “Week In The News: Russia Hack, Aleppo Burning, Exxon Mobil And Trump Appointees, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_505876656.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Election Hacks by Russia 48 mins – “Late last week, a CIA report suggested Russia intervened in U.S. elections to boost Donald Trump’s chances of winning. On Tuesday, a New York Times investigation supported that conclusion – and revealed new evidence that Russian hackers also targeted nearly a dozen congressional races. The investigation details a series of missed signals, slow responses and a mis-estimation of Russia’s ability to influence U.S. politics—by political leaders, the FBI and The White House. It also traces two decades worth of Russia’s attempts to tamper with America’s most sensitive computer networks. Diane and a panel discuss new details about Russia’s role in the 2016 race and its efforts to destabilize democracies around the world.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Electoral College Dispute 47 mins – “Calls grow to abolish the Electoral College and for electors to vote their conscience. We’ll take on the Electoral College question.” At the link find the title, “As Vote Looms, Controversy Over The Electoral College, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_505732717.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electronics Engineers Discussion 66 mins – “Jeff Keyzer returns for a special Christmas episode! We talk about travel, prototyping, Bell Labs, high volume manufacturing, radio astronomy and much more!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Encryption 30 mins – “How encryption hides all around us, how it was used in 18th century Paris to separate merchants from their money and the difference between your brain and your fingertip. Listen, decode, and decide: Can encryption save us?” At the link find the title,”S02-6: Encryption, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files codebreaker 20161221_e6_671_20161114_128.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. “Why women doctors might be better for your health, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20161223_58213.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 47 mins – “Buzzfeed News’ media editor, Craig Silverman, dissects how false stories during the presidential campaign were spread on Facebook and monetized by Google Ad Sense. Also, critic at-large John Powers shares six things he loved this year that he didn’t get around to reviewing.” At the link find the title, “Dec, 2016, How Fake News Spreads & Why People Believe It,”click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake Zombie Bands 20 mins – “When “Time of the Season” became a hit song in 1969, the Zombies had already disbanded. Yet for some reason, there was a band touring around America calling itself the Zombies. Listen as Daniel Ralston, author of the article “The True Story Of The Fake Zombies,” talks about unearthing this forgotten piece of music history.” At the link find the title, “16: The Fake Zombie Invasion, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 585614ac88d80d2d4a1f77a8.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feds versus Locals 92 mins – “The latest on former Sheriff Lee Baca’s mistrial, an up close look at the fears facing LGBT youth during the holidays, a shift in attitudes towards holiday classics.” At the link find the title, “Former Sheriff Baca’s mistrial, LGBT youth in crisis, a shift in pop culture, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files SHOW_122316-b800a92b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Negotiators P1 74 mins – “In many countries, women are well-positioned to detect early signs of radicalization because their rights and physical integrity are often the first targets of extremists. In addition, they are well-placed to challenge extremist narratives in homes, schools, and communities. This session will address strategies to counter  violent extremism by capitalizing on the contributions of women.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Negotiators P2 62 mins – “In many countries, women are well-positioned to detect early signs of radicalization because their rights and physical integrity are often the first targets of extremists. In addition, they are well-placed to challenge extremist narratives in homes, schools, and communities. This session will address strategies to counter  violent extremism by capitalizing on the contributions of women.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Negotiators P3 72 mins – “State fragility poses a significant threat to international security, contributing to conflict onset and relapse, the global refugee crisis, the expansion of extremist groups, and public health emergencies like the Ebola epidemic. In fragile states, women are often marginalized, despite their potential contributions to the security and prosperity of their societies. The speakers on this panel will review lessons from conflict situations and provide recommendations to the next U.S. administration on addressing state fragility by promoting women’s participation in conflict prevention and peacebuilding” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genocide Survivors 26 mins – “After Rwanda, Bosnia, WWII — the world has vowed never to let such atrocities happen again. Yet, the killing in Syria continues. Two survivors of Srebrenica, and Rwanda, share their perspectives on the failure to respond, once more.” At the link right-click “Dec 22: ‘United Nations didn’t do anything’: Genocide survivors relate to Aleppo, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161222_86307.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guatemala Social Media Impact 39 mins – “Everybody has that one Facebook friend who just won’t stop posting their political opinions. This week, we talk to one of those Facebook friends, someone whose opinions got her into an enormous mess.” At the link find the title, “#47 Quit Already (REBROADCAST) Dec 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT6508571625.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hidden Figures 12 mins – “The movie “Hidden Figures” comes to theaters this month. The film looks at the lives of a group of African American women who worked for NASA as “human computers” – the brains behind the calculations necessary for human space flight. In this Short Take, Brian talked to Margot Lee Shetterly (the author of the book the movie is based on) about the work the women did on projects Mercury and Apollo and the impact they had on the 20th century.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the en of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Holiday Cards History 47 mins – “ Holiday cards were the first social media. We’ll look at the rich history and hot trends for sharing “Seasons Greetings.” At the link find the title, “From Snail Mail To Social Media: The History Of Holiday Cards, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_505429006.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Icy Walkways 20 mins – “It’s that time of year again when sidewalks get treacherous and thousands of Canadians end up in the ER after a spill. From better boots, to deluxe heated sidewalks, The Current looks at ways to cut down on the ice-induced injuries.” At the link find the title, “Dec 16: Think big treads on winter boots can stop you from slipping on ice? Nope,” right-click “Download Dec 16: Think big treads on winter boots can stop you from slipping on ice? Nope” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India Cash Chaos 24 mins – “The Indian government’s move was designed to help combat the underground economy. But whether it was a bad idea or just bad execution, the country’s been sent into a state of cash chaos.” At the link find the title, “Dec 16: Cash crunch grips India one month after move to demonetization,” right-click “Download Dec 16: Cash crunch grips India one month after move to demonetization” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infrastructure Projects 15 mins – “Forecasts of the costs and benefits of infrastructure projects are important for making informed investment decisions. However, there have been many instances of major cost overruns and unexpected low utilization of new facilities. To explore the nature and pattern of such prediction errors and what we can do to make more accurate predictions, we talk with, Dr. Martin Wachs, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Urban Planning at UCLA, formerly with the RAND Corporation and before that professor at UC Berkeley.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intellectuals and Race 38 mins – “Thomas Sowell discusses is newest book, Intellectuals and Race, which argues that the impact of intellectuals’ ideas and crusades on the larger society, both past and present, is the ultimate concern.” At the link find the title, “Thomas Sowell, May, 2013,” right-click “Media files 20130516.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intellectuals and Society 53 mins – “On the occasion of the publication of a new edition of his book Intellectuals and Society, Thomas Sowell returns to Uncommon Knowledge for a wide-ranging interview.” At the link find the title, “Thomas Sowell, May, 2012,” right-click “Media files 20120507.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence and Propaganda Operations 47 mins – “The saga over Russian interference in the election has been marked by secrecy, rumor, and contradictory evidence. We try to bring some clarity to a cloudy narrative. Also, the CIA says Russian hackers deliberately helped Donald Trump win the election but the FBI wasn’t initially convinced. We consider the long and tumultuous rivalry between the two agencies, and how spies and G-men have been depicted in popular culture. Plus, how the US propaganda agency “Voice of America” might function under President Trump.” At the link find the title, “Spy vs. Spy, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files otm121616pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Judaism in America 59 mins – “On Dec. 24th, Jewish communities across the country begin celebrating Hanukkah. The annual holiday celebrates the victory of the Jews over the Greeks, and marks the rededication of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem in the 2nd century BC. Roughly 2% of the U.S. population is Jewish, but the influence of American Jews far outweighs their relatively small numbers. In this episode of BackStory, the Guys (along with guest host Joanne Freeman of Yale University) explore the history of Judaism in America.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Katrina Disaster Response 35 mins – “On this episode of the Disaster Podcast, we have a special guest on the show to talk about managing triage in disaster situations. Hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are joined by Dr. Jullette Saussy. Dr. Saussy was the medical director for New Orleans Fire and EMS Department during the Hurricane Katrina response and aftermath. She was an EMT and paramedic before she went on to become an ER doctor in New Orleans. She talks about the importance of building relationships with the people connected with your mutual aid partners at the state and federal level ahead of the day of the disaster.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kid Logic 58 mins – “Stories of kids using perfectly logical arguments, and arriving at perfectly wrong conclusions. An updated version of an episode from 2001, with one story swapped.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Korean Sea Women 54 mins – “South Korea’s “sea women” have been harvesting commercial treasures from the ocean floor since the 4th century. With only a few tools and fishing baskets slung over their shoulders, these sunburnt and wrinkled grandmothers can dive up to 20 metres on a single breath. Their dives mix dexterity, desire and death. Vancouver writer and broadcaster Gloria Chang returns to the country of her birth for an intimate portrayal of these cultural icons and to unravel a matriarchal mystery: Why do only women take to the waters? ” At the link find the title, “The Sea Women (Encore Oct 18, 2007),” Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161214_90639.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language Evolution 52 mins – “If you’re worried that the word “literally” now means “figuratively,” or if you fret that acronyms are replacing actual words, today’s show will do one of two things: make you pull out your hair, or it’ll change your mind. The linguist John McWhorter says that changes to the English language are nothing new. Language, he says, isn’t some static thing that just is, “it’s actually something always becoming.” McWhorter will join us to discuss how languages evolve and why we should embrace the changes.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linux Support 26 mins – “You can get help for your Linux computer in many ways. In this episode we provide some details about each kind of support. Many of the answers to your questions are available on your distribution’s website. Often, the fastest and easiest way to get answers to your questions about how to use Linux and its applications is to ask in the distribution’s community forum.” AT the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malaysian Protests 27 mins – “Street artist Reza captured public dissatisfaction when he caricatured the PM as a clown” At the link find the title, “Punk Art and Protest in Malaysia, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04m5c2t.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Med Students Life 51 mins – “Dave and the crew–Mark Moubarek, Levi Endelman, Julie Gudenkauf, and Erin Pazaski–look back on things they experienced as the semester draws to a close.  As first years, Levi and Erin share their thoughts on entering medical school.  Mark is getting ready for his clerkships to begin.  And Julie has finished up her primary-care clerkships and is moving into exploring some of the more specialized areas of medicine.  We also discuss the not surprising fact that baby-boomers are more into cannabis than their children and grandchildren are.  A scientist has decided that he can find people who are overly susceptible to the placebo effect and screen them out so drug companies can save millions on clinical trials and drugs can get to patients faster.  Meanwhile, some other podcasters who couldn’t join us this week send in their Short Thoughts on American consumerism, a woman that was truly a pioneer in medicine, and cats.” At the link find right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medicine Defined 17 mins – “Science is a learning process that involves experimentation, failure and revision — and the science of medicine is no exception. Cancer researcher Kevin B. Jones faces the deep unknowns about surgery and medical care with a simple answer: honesty. In a thoughtful talk about the nature of knowledge, Jones shows how science is at its best when scientists humbly admit what they do not yet understand.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Micro Greens 3 mins – “Red cabbage microgreens: A potent bad cholesterol fighter.” At the link find the title, “Episode 723 – December 21, 2016,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements_Dec21_2016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Moral Decisions 54 mins – “We all have a moral code — a clear sense of what is right and what is wrong. But the reasons why we make certain decisions can quickly get fuzzy. Producer John Chipman explores why some people stick to their moral codes more stringently than others, and delves into the latest neuroimaging research to find out what it can tell us about what guides our moral decisions.” At the link find the title, “Cracking the Moral Code,” right-click “Download Cracking the Moral Code” and select “Media files ideas 20161212_62698.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Native Americans 67 mins – “What do you imagine when you think about a Native American reservation? Do you see sweeping vistas of the desert or plains? Glittering casinos? Or substandard housing, stray dogs, and young men milling about? In this week’s episode, host Russ Roberts welcomes back Terry Anderson of the Property and Environment Research Center (PERC), who describes most reservations today as “islands of poverty in a sea of wealth.” The conversation covers what life was like for Native Americans pre-Europeans through today, raising lots of interesting questions about the changing nature of Indian institutions and the effects of current policy on reservation life today. What did you learn from this week’s episode, and what questions linger in your mind? Let us know, or have a crack at one of those posed below. As always, we love to hear from you.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neil de Grasse Tyson 28 mins – “The US science superstar, Neil de Grasse Tyson grew up in the Bronx, and studied astrophysics at Harvard, Columbia and Princeton Universities before becoming director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York City. But he’s best known for his TV and movie appearances, his books, podcasts and his tweets or ‘scientific droppings’ as he likes to call them. He has over 6 million followers on Twitter and is often credited with turning millennials around the world on to science. Neil tells Jim al-Khalili why he’s so committed to making science feel exciting, why we are all stardust and why Pluto isn’t a planet.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opiate Epidemic Control 11 mins – “On August 24, 2016, I mailed a letter and pocket card …to 2.3 million doctors, nurses, dentists, and other clinicians asking them to help address America’s escalating opioid epidemic. It was the first time in the 145-year history of the Office of the Surgeon General that such a letter was issued specifically to medical professionals calling them to action….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Epidemic 36 mins – “Since 2011, authorities have attempted to curb the growing opioid epidemic by monitoring prescribers, limiting doses, and cracking down on so-called pill mills. The goal is to limit access to addicts. But what do those restrictions mean for the estimated 25 million Americans who suffer from chronic pain? Plus, The Seventh Fire – a documentary follows two men through the cycle of poverty, addiction, and crime on a northern Minnesota Indian reservation.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Pain Control Pills 48 mins – “By some estimates, medical error is the third-leading cause of death in the U.S. How can that be? And what’s to be done? Our third and final episode in this series offers some encouraging answers.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parasitism Case 122 mins – “Hosts: Vincent RacanielloDickson Despommier, and Daniel Griffin The TWiPanorama solve the case of the Dutch Woman with Wormy Objects in Her Stool, dissect a study on cytoadhesion of malaria infected red blood cells, and introduce Parasitology Superheroes.” At the link right-click “Download TWIP #123” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physics Tools 36 mins – “We talk to physicist and oceanographer Helen Czerski about her new book Storm in a Teacup: The Physics of Everyday Life.” At the link find the title, “160 Helen Czerski – The Little Bits of Physics in Everyday Life,” right-click “Media files 1e413130-0ea9-4355-a7d8-0a44fbe0aa8c.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Activism P1 30 mins – All over the world people who care about the environment are watching the US President-Elect sketch out a blueprint for disaster. To head the EPA he has tapped a man who demonstrates open disdain for the very agency he would be running, and for Department of Energy Chief his choice is a guy who announced …” At the link find the title, “How We Fight Back: Part I, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files SC-2016-12-13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Activism P2 30 mins – “This week on Sea Change Radio, in the second half of our discussion with former senior advisers to the Bernie Sanders campaign, Becky Bond and Zack Exley, host Alex Wise struggles with the harsh reality of an incoming President completely unqualified and unprepared to lead the planet’s only superpower. We recap the 2016 presidential election …” At the link find the title, “How We Fight Back: Part II, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files SC-2016-12-20.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Unions 18 mins – “Today on the show, two unions separated by 200 years, an ocean and an exit clause. The United States has no exit clause. It led to civil war. Europe, on the other hand, has Article 50.” At the link find the title, “#743: 50 Ways to Leave Your Union,” right-click “Media files 20161221 pmoney podcast122116.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Violence in Canada 12 mins – “Prison violence is on the rise across Canada. And a recent prison riot in Saskatchewan that left one man dead is proof of that. The Current speaks to a former inmate for insights on how to fix a broken system.” At the link find the title “Dec 16: Prison violence won’t stop until overcrowding addressed, says former inmate,” right-click “Download Dec 16: Prison violence won’t stop until overcrowding addressed, says former inmate” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in Canada 27 mins – “The San’yas Indigenous Cultural Safety Training program uses blunt talk to confront racial bias in Canadian health care, with the goal of making healthcare safer and more accessible for Indigenous patients.” At the link find the title, “I’m a white settler: Why that matters in healthcare,” right-click “Download I’m a white settler: Why that matters in healthcare” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in Canada 24 mins – “Syrian refugees were welcomed by the government and Canadians but adjusting to life here, reconciling with what they’ve left behind has its challenges. One year on, The Current brings you the stories of families who now call Canada home.” At the link find the title, “Dec 14: ‘It’s a girl!’: Snapshots of Syrian refugees in Canada one year later,” right-click “Download Dec 14: ‘It’s a girl!’: Snapshots of Syrian refugees in Canada one year later” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in New Hampshire 56 mins – “About a dozen Syrians were resettled in New Hampshire last year, and more than 7000 refugees from many countries have come here since the 1980s. We look at the resettlement process, the challenges both newcomers and their host communities face, and what changes might be in store under a Trump administration.” At the linkr ight-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reindeer Racing 27 mins – “Competitive reindeer-racing is a popular sport across the Arctic Circle. In Finland, the season runs from November to April and good jockeys are local celebrities. They need strong biceps and serious guts: strapped onto cross-country skis they’re hauled behind reindeer at up to 60km/hour….” At the link find the title, “Burn Slush! The Reindeer Grand Prix, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04lxn22.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Religious Trends 16 mins – “At a moment when the world seems to be spinning out of control, religion might feel irrelevant — or like part of the problem. But Rabbi Sharon Brous believes we can reinvent religion to meet the needs of modern life. In this impassioned talk, Brous shares four principles of a revitalized religious practice and offers faith of all kinds as a hopeful counter-narrative to the numbing realities of violence, extremism and pessimism.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Research Pitfalls 28 mins – “There is a replication “crisis” in psychology: many findings simply do not replicate. Some critics take this as an indictment of the entire field — perhaps the best journals are only interested in publishing the “sexiest” findings, or universities are pressuring their faculty to publish more. But this week on Hidden Brain, we take a closer look at the so-called crisis. While there certainly have been cases of bad science, and even fraudulent data, there are also lots of other reasons why perfectly good studies might not replicate. We’ll look at a seminal study about stereotypes, Asian women, and math tests.” At the link find the link, “Encore of Episode 32: The Scientific Process,” right-click “Media files 20161216_hiddenbrain_hb32.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Dangers 19 mins – “Gordon Briggs, a postdoc at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, talks about the article he and Matthias Scheutz, director of the Human Robot Interaction Laboratory at Tufts University, wrote in the January issue of Scientific American titled the Case for Robot Disobedience.” At the link find the title, “Getting Robots To Say No, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Roy Cohn Lawyer 26 mins – “If president-elect Donald Trump learned anything from his mentor Roy Cohn, it was this: punch first and never apologize. Cohn was notorious for going on the attack—as counsel for Senator Joseph McCarthy during the communist witch-hunts of the fifties, and later as a pugnacious attorney for whom the only bad publicity was no publicity. With hooded eyes and a scar running along his nose, Cohn relished playing the intimidating outlaw in a black hat. He was fearless and bullying yet always considered himself as a victim. Despite this loathsome reputation, Cohn was resolutely loyal and counted among his friends Democrats and Republicans alike. More than partisanship, what mattered most to Cohn was power, as we learn in Ken Auletta’s searing 1978 profile, “Don’t Mess with Roy Cohn.” Auletta joins host David Brancaccio on the Esquire Podcast this week to discuss Cohn’s unrelenting cruelty and drive, and how it helped shape the man who will now lead the country.” At the link find the title,“Don’t Mess With Roy Cohn, by Ken Auletta, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files Dont-Mess-With-Roy-Cohn-by-Ken-Auletta.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Nuclear Testing 48 mins – “Between 1949 and 1989 the Soviet Union tested 456 nuclear bombs in Semipalatinsk in Kazakhstan. The area the size of Belgium became known as the Polygon and when Kazakhstan became independent – 25 years ago this week – it inherited the world’s fourth biggest nuclear arsenal. The BBC’s Rustam Qobil visits the Polygon to piece together its remarkable story.” At the link find the title, “The Polygon People, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04lpdhn.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sanctuary Cities 26 mins – “U.S. president-elect Donald Trump has set up a showdown with the dozens of American cities actively sheltering undocumented immigrants. But a lot of those cities have vowed not to back down.” At the link find the title, “Dec 22: Santa Fe mayor defies Trump’s crackdown on immigrant ‘sanctuary cities’, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20161222_78184.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science of Motivation 60 mins – “It happens to all of us every day. You get rejected. Your customer doesn’t buy. Your boss doesn’t agree. Your crush doesn’t say yes. In this provocative and entertaining talk, exclusive to Intelligence Squared, American author Daniel H. Pink harvested a rich trove of social science to explain the theory and practice of bouncing back. He showed why questioning your abilities is often more effective than affirming them; why being positive (but not too positive) can improve your performance; and how to explain failure in ways that prepare you for your next encounter… Pink lectures on economic transformation and the new workplace at corporations, associations and universities around the world. His latest book is To Sell is Human: The Surprising Truth About Persuading, Convincing and Influencing Others.” At the link find the title, “Dan Pink on the Science of Buoyancy, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up men.

Science Outreach to Kids 26 mins – “So many of our misconceptions about science come from where we first encountered them—the classroom. How can we do a better job of teaching science, both so we make sure we have a new generation of STEM professionals, but also a STEM-literate public? The second of the three-part series.” At the link find the title, “The Face of Science: Teaching Teachers, y, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 161004_faceofscience_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seed Banks 54 mins – “In the face of climate change and declining biodiversity, one of humanity’s oldest cultural practices – seed saving – has a new urgency. Maria Zytaruk explores how preserving seeds reflects the deepest of human fears and hopes, whether it’s done in a high-tech seed bank in Britain, or a simple storage closet lined with jars at a convent in Kingston. ” At the link find the title, “Seed Banks: Re-sowing paradise, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161216_50145.mp3” ad select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Serengeti Rules 60 mins – “This week we’re exploring how life is regulated at very small scales — down to the molecular level — and how those rules and regulations also seem to apply when we zoom back out to look at environments and ecosystems across the planet. We spend the hour with author and Professor of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the University of Wisconsin Sean Carroll talking about his new book “The Serengeti Rules: The Quest to Discover How Life Works and Why It Matters”.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spices in US 46 mins – “Vanilla, chili, garlic, soy. We’ll taste the “Eight Flavors” that writer Sarah Lohman says now define American cuisine and culture.” At the link find the title, “Uncovering The ‘Eight Flavors’ Of Modern American Culture, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_505734977.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugee Children 24 mins – “More than 20,000 Syrian refugees who have come to Canada over the last year are under the age of 18. In schools across the country, teachers share challenges and triumphs with their students. But how do you teach a kid to be a kid again?” At the link find the title, “Dec 21: Syrian refugee children learn to be kids again, one year in Canada, 2016” right-click “Media files and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugees in Canada 20 mins – “This is the story of a new life, in a new country with a successful new business. It starts in the kitchen where three Syrian refugees created a catering company to bring the taste of home to Canada.” At the link find the title, “Dec 22: New life, new business: Syrian refugees bring taste of home to Canada, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20161222_89510.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thomas Sowell on Economics 50 mins -”In this episode of Uncommon Knowledge, Peter Robinson interviews Hoover fellow and author Thomas Sowell, on his 5th edition of Basic Economics: A Common Sense Guide to the Economy. In this interview, Sowell brings the world into clearer focus through a basic understanding of the fundamental economic principles and how they explain our lives. Sowell draws on lively examples from around the world and from centuries of history.” At the link find the title, “Thomas Sowell Brings the World into Focus through an Economics Lens, Dec, 2014,” right-click “Media files 20141219.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thomas Sowell Reader 29 mins – “Thomas Sowell has studied and taught economics, intellectual history, and social policy at institutions that include Cornell, UCLA, and Amherst. Now a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Sowell has published more than a dozen books. His most recent book is The Thomas Sowell Reader.” At the li” right-click “Media files 20111031.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tillerson as Secretary of State 47 mins – “Donald Trump’s transition team says the president elect is choosing ExxonMobil chief Rex Tillerson as his Secretary of State. Tillerson is a controversial pick. Like Trump he has no government experience and is likely to face many questions about his business ties with Russian leader Vladimir Putin. Meanwhile Donald Trump is holding another victory rally today, gatherings his supporters greet with great enthusiasm. But some of his sharpest critics are concerned that his political appeal and agenda bear some similarity to last century’s fascist leaders in Europe. Join us to talk about reactions to Rex Tillerson plus the history of Fascism and what resonance, if any, it has in U.S. politics today.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Toy Inventors 37 mins – “Melissa and Doug Bernstein’s first success was a wooden ‘fuzzy puzzle’ of farm animals. Today, Melissa & Doug makes over 2,000 kinds of toys and serves as an antidote to the rise of digital toys.” At the link find the title, “Melissa & Doug: Melissa And Doug Bernstein, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161216_hibt_melissadoug.mp3” and Select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender Story 50 mins – “Nicole Maines was born an identical twin, but unlike her twin brother, never identified as male. She became prominent in the trans community after winning a discrimination lawsuit. Also, contributor Sarah Hepola talks about the stress of the holiday season when you don’t drink. And producer Sam Briger speaks to author Maria Semple about her comic novel ‘Today Will Be Different,’ about a stressed-out wife and mother who starts every day with a mantra.” At the link click find the title, “Dec 2016, Best Of: Transgender Activist Nicole Maines / Writer Maria Semple,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Election Analysis 39 mins – “After a surprising presidential election, Americans and foreign leaders have closely watched the executive transition for clues to American priorities and policy under the Trump administration. What does Donald J. Trump’s victory tell us about American politics – and how will our allies and adversaries respond?” At the link find the title, “A New President and the Middle East with Norman Ornstein and Dennis Ross, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files PolicyCast_13_Ornstein_Ross.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Foreign Policy 47 mins – “What role the U.S. should play in Syria has been one of the most vexing foreign policy challenges for the Obama administration. The enormity of the crisis is playing out right now in Aleppo as the Syrian government, backed by Russia and Iran, take back the city from rebel forces. It’s a problem President-elect Donald Trump now inherits, and it’s one of many complex foreign policy challenges he’ll face. High on the list is Russia, following reports that the country interfered in U.S. elections in support of Trump, as well as the future of the U.S.’s “One China” policy. Diane sits down with former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and former national security adviser Stephen Hadley to discuss U.S. foreign policy and risks for the new administration.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Verizon 30 mins – “Verizon General Counsel Craig Silliman discusses issues facing his company, including the so-called “internet of things,” Verizon’s purchase of AOL and proposed purchase of Yahoo, and its work on new phone technology, mobile services, and broadband.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Craig Silliman, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.462750.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Aftermaths 59 mins – “Entrepreneur and travel writer Brian Gruber discusses his book, [War: The Afterparty – A Global Walkabout Through a Half-Century of U.S. Military Interventions].” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Brian Gruber, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.457868.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Warfare 27 mins – “In this year’s Christmas BMJ 2016 podcasts, we’ve been discussing morality, compassion, truth. In this final one, it’s time for war. After the second world war, there was an attempt to bring a moral sense to conflict – and Julian Sheather, specialist adviser on ethics and human rights to the BMA, and author of the christmas editorial “medicine under fire” is worried about the retrenchment of those ideals.” At the link find the title, “Christmas 2016 – War, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 299298723-bmjgroup-christmas-2016-war.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Waste to Water 6 mins – “On the outskirts of Windhoek, the capital of Namibia, there’s a huge, churning vat of nasty brown liquid. It’s so stinky that my guide, the man who runs Windhoek’s water department, tells me I might want to stay in the car. But this is what I came to see — raw sewage, on its way to being turned back into drinking water. The Goreangab waste treatment plant is where most of the wastewater from Windhoek’s 300,000 residents ends up. But it’s not your run-of-the-mill sewage plant. It’s the first stop in the city’s pioneering water recycling system. Cities around the world are wrestling with whether they should build facilities like this. But here, in the middle of a desert in a remote corner of southern Africa, they’ve been recycling wastewater for almost 50 years. It’s cutting-edge technology, but it’s based on the humblest of creatures — bacteria….”At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wealth, Poverty, Politics 44 mins – “Hoover Institution fellow Thomas Sowell discusses poverty around the world and in the United States. Poverty in America, he says, compared to the rest of the world, is not severe. Many poor people in poverty in the United States have one or two cars, central heating, and cell phones. The real problem for the poor is the destruction of the family, which Sowell argues dramatically increased once welfare policies were introduced in the 1960s.” At the link find the title, “Wealth, Poverty, and Politics, Sept, 2015,” right-click “Media files 20151208.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Woody Woodpecker 10 mins – “Who knew cartoon characters could be so litigious?” At the linkr ight-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Word Use and Trends 36 mins – “It’s finally over, kids. This monstrosity of a year is coming to a close! And to celebrate, Amy + Rebecca sit down with Kory Stamper, lexicographer for Merriam-Webster, to discuss the dictionary’s 2016 Word Of The Year: Surreal. We also learn fabulous new swears, consider Beowulf, and say eff you to the academy.” At the link right-click “Download” below “Listen Now” and select and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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Media Mining Digest 267 – Dec 23, 2016: Advertising Work, Aged Medication, AI Operations, Aleppo Rebels Fail, Alzheimers LED Light Treatment, American Military, Analog vs Digital, Bernie Campaign, Biofilm Research, Black Holes, Black Lives Matter, Boko Haram, Broadband, Carbonation, Cemetary Space Limits, Charles Johnson Writer, Chemical Weapons, Chemotherapy, Christmas Tree Giveaways, Climate Change, DDT, Diazepam, Domestic Abuse, Environmental Triage, Failure to Adjust, Fake News, FEMA Trailers, Fingerprint Comparisons, Gender and Labor, Genetic Engineering, Gin Craze of 1700’s, Indian Religious Intolerance, Industrial Espionage, Informal Economy Women, Investing Basics, Invisible Influences, Islam People and Power, Islamists, Israel Country History, Knights Templar Bank, Law and Technology, Lynching Veterans, Maker Movement, Malaysia Air 370 Crash, Male Contraception, McFaddin Murders, Megyn Kelly Interview, Mind Over Genes, NSAID and Heartburn Pill Problems, NY Times on Trump, Opioid Overdose Vaccine, Organ Transplants, Password Sharing Crime, Patagonia Founder, Permaculture, Pigments and Painters, Pizzagate Discussion, Presidential Transition, Prosthetics and Bullying, Psychology of Power, Refugee Tech Help, Refugees in Canada, Science Literacy, SECDEF Mattis, Senior Care Plans, Sex and Gender, Shi’ism, Soul Sound, Space Junk Problem, Students of Color, Sunnis, Time Management, Toxicology History, Triage Process, Trump, UN Secretary General, Urban Agriculture, US Refugee Program, US-Israel Relations, Wahhabism, Waste Disposal, Women Peacekeepers

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 89 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 318 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 12,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 350 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

Advertising Work 44 mins – “Debbie talks to Cindy Gallop about her career in advertising and about the trouble people have communicating about sex. “People therefore find it bizarrely difficult to talk about sex with the people they’re having it with while they are actually having it.“ Cindy Gallop has said about herself “I like to blow shit up. I’m the Michael Bay of business”. That may be true, but it doesn’t describe all the things she has built in her career. She used to work in advertising, and now she runs her own brand and business innovation consultancy. She started Make Love not Porn a site that shows how real people have sex to counter the cliches of hardcore porn. She also started If We Ran the World, a site designed to turn good intentions into action. She’s a fierce feminist warrior and talks to Debbie about her incredible career.” At the link find the title, “Cindy Gallop, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files Cindy-Gallup.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aged Medication 86 mins – “Powerful medicines save lives but also carry risks. Find out how to avoid excessive or unnecessary use of medications while achieving the desired benefits. Dr. John Newman and Pharmacist Kirby Lee look at the principles of medication in older adults and caution that too much of anything, including medicine, can cause harm Recorded on 10/25/2016. (#31554)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Operations 17 mins – “In this wide-ranging, thought-provoking talk, Kevin Kelly muses on what technology means in our lives — from its impact at the personal level to its place in the cosmos.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aleppo Rebels Fail 47 mins – “Aleppo looks set to fall to Assad, a turning point in Syria’s awful war. We’ll ask if Assad now looks set to win, and what that means for Syria and the region.The suffering in Syria has been deep and long. Rebels and civilians dug in in Aleppo have captured the horrified attention of the world. But Bashar al-Assad, the ruler whose excesses sparked the rebellion, appears to be on the verge of retaking Aleppo and maybe on his way to winning – if you can say that – the civil war.  This was not Washington’s plan. Or the rebels’. It is Russia’s. And Iran’s. This hour On Point, if Assad wins. We’re looking at Syria, the region, the big powers, the people.” At the link right-click the arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimers LED Light Treatment 26 mins – “Today, a startling new discovery: prodding the brain with light, a group of scientists got an unexpected surprise — they were able to turn back on a part of the brain that had been shut down by Alzheimer’s disease. This new science is not a cure, and is far from a treatment, but it’s a finding so … simple, you won’t be able to shake it. Come join us for a lab visit, where we’ll meet some mice, stare at some light, and come face-to-face with the mystery of memory. We can promise you: by the end, you’ll never think the same way about Christmas lights again. This piece was reported by Molly Webster. It was produced by Annie McEwen, Matt Kielty, and Molly Webster, with help from Simon Adler.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Military 43 mins – “Recorded on September 21, 2016 Although Americans have great respect for the military, most civilians have lost touch with it. This means that US citizens are not attuned to what the military needs because so few American volunteer to serve; this lack of understanding reduces not only battlefield effectiveness but the military’s role in American life. Schake talks about the effect of high levels of public support for the military combined with low levels of trust in elected political leaders. She also reflects on whether American society is becoming so divorced from the requirements for success on the battlefield that not only do we fail to comprehend the enormous responsibilities of our military but we also would be unwilling to endure a military constituted to protect us.” Kori Schake on Civil-Military Relations, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160921-schake.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Analog vs Digital 46 mins – “In 1992, a New York Times headline declared “The End of Books.” The future of literature, it said, was digital. Similar predictions were made for vinyl records, film, even paper. Yet the digital revolution has yet to strike a mortal blow against these older technologies. In fact, even as our computers have gotten faster, our devices smarter, and our lives more connected, a peculiar thing has happened –analog objects have made a comeback. Print books remain twice as popular as e-readers, vinyl record sales hit a near 30-year high, and online retailers are opening brick and mortar stores. An exploration of the re-emergence of analog in the digital age.” (2 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Bernie Campaign 29 mins – “This week on Sea Change Radio, in the second half of our discussion with former senior advisers to the Bernie Sanders campaign, Becky Bond and Zack Exley, host Alex Wise struggles with the harsh reality of an incoming President completely unqualified and unprepared to lead the planet’s only superpower. We recap the 2016 presidential election and draw parallels between the fight to improve this country’s healthcare system and the battle to cut carbon emissions. Then we revisit part of Alex’s discussion with Ralph Steadman, the British artist best known for his work with the godfather of gonzo journalism himself, the legendary Hunter S. Thompson.” At the link right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biofilm Research 66 mins – “Hosts: Vincent RacanielloElio Schaechter, and Michael Schmidt Guest: Jennifer Bomberger Jennifer joins Vincent, Elio, and Michael to talk about the work of her laboratory on how a respiratory virus enhances bacterial growth by dysregulating nutritional immunity.” At the link right-click “TWiM#141” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Holes 74 mins – “Today our guest is a person I’ve wanted to meet for years: The founder of the Skepchick website, Rebecca Watson. Our physicists are Dr. Katie Mack and Hannalore Gerling-Dunsmore. TODAY’S TOPIC: Supermassive Black Holes!!” At the link right-click “Direct download: Ep 69 Super Hyper Fire Hose Bucket Challenge.mp3” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Black Lives Matter 19 mins – “After a mistrial this week in the case of Michael Slager, the police officer caught on camera shooting Walter Scott in the back as he ran away, we revisit two interviews we did this summer. Patrice Cullors is the co-founder of Black Lives Matter and Eugene O’Donnell is a former police officer, we spoke to them after two deadly shooting incidents involving young black men targeting police officers.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio”and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.  

Boko Haram 65 mins – “Drawing on her recent trip to Nigeria and Chad, Undersecretary Sewall assesses the ongoing fight against Boko Haram and violent extremism more broadly. She evaluates related humanitarian and stabilization challenges and discusses the need to reintegrate women and girls previously captured by Boko Haram back into society.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Chattanooga 70 mins – “In a break from our traditional format of 20-30 minutes (or so), we have a special in-depth interview this week with Harold Depriest, the former CEO and President of Chattanooga’s Electric Power Board. He recently retired after 20 incredibly transformative years for both Chattanooga and its municipal electric utility. We talk about the longer history behind Chattanooga’s nation-leading fiber network and how the culture of the electric utility had to be changed long before it began offering services to the public. We also talk about the role of public power in building fiber networks….” At the link right-click “download this mp3 file directly from here…” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Osage 34 mins – “…Osage Municipal Utilites General Manager Josh Byrnes joins us for Community Broadband Bits podcast 232. He is also in the midst of retiring after 3 terms in the Iowa Legislature. Osage built a hybrid fiber coaxial cable network many years ago that they are considering upgrading to being fully fiber-optic following a lot of community support for next-generation connectivity and most importantly, greater reliability….” At the link right-click “download this mp3 file directly from here…” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in San Francisco 18 mins – “Cities across America are implementing policies that create friendly environments for Internet Service Providers in order to encourage competition. In San Francisco, the Board of Supervisors is now considering legislation that will create choice for residents or businesses in multi-welling units, or MDUs. In episode 231, Mark Farrell, a member of the Board of Supervisors, joins us to discuss the proposal.” At the link right-click “download this mp3 file directly from here…” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbonation 44 mins – “’Tis the season for a glass of bubbly—but this episode we’re not talking champagne, we’re talking seltzer. America is in the throes of a serious seltzer craze, with consumption of the bubbly stuff doubling in only a decade, from 2004 to 2014. But where does seltzer come from, and why is it called “seltzer,” rather than simply “sparkling water”? Is there any truth to the rumors that seltzer can combat indigestion—or that it will rot our teeth? Why are all the hipsters crushing cans of LaCroix, and what’s the story behind Polar’s ephemeral sensation, Unicorn Kisses?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cemetary Space Limits 19 mins – “Countries around the world are running out of burial grounds. From a black market in grave sites in Istanbul to Jerusalem building underground chambers dozens of storeys deep, The Current looks at accommodating the dead among the living.” At the link find the title, “Dec 12: What happens when cemetery space runs out?” right-click “Download Dec 12: What happens when cemetery space runs out?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charles Johnson Writer 47 mins -”Best-selling author and philosopher Charles Johnson has been writing and teaching for more than three decades. His novel, “Middle Passage,” about a freed slave who unknowingly boards an American slave ship, won the National Book Award in 1990. Johnson’s work spans multiple genres, including dozens of screen and teleplays as well as several short-story collections like his 2011 work, “Doctor King’s Refrigerator.” In a new memoir, Johnson writes about his childhood growing up in Evanston, Illinois, his early career as an illustrator and his years teaching writing at the University of Washington.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Chemical Weapons 44 mins – “Chemical weapons have played a chilling role in human history ever since they were first used in World War I.  As reports of more recent use continue to cycle through the news, we decided to take a deeper look. The story begins in Belgium, where reporter Helena de Groot visits a farm in Flanders Fields—the frontline during World War I—and discovers that for some people the war isn’t yet over. Then we talk to Jeffrey Johnson, a historian of science and technology at Villanova University with a special interest in the origins of chemical warfare, and Amy E. Smithson, a senior fellow at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, who specializes in modern-day chemical and biological weapons and their proliferation. Our guests discuss the past and present of chemical weapons, and share their thoughts about the future of warfare.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chemotherapy 18 mins – “Ancient Greek doctors knew about it, but could do nothing about the scourge we know as cancer. Producer Ed Prosser interviews historian Viviane Quirke about the development of chemotherapy drugs in the 20th century, drugs that for the first time offered hope to cancer patients. Next up producer Christine Laskowski goes on a very personal journey. Last year her father was among the more than 1 million Americans diagnosed with cancer. Along with radiation, his treatment included a drug called cisplatin. Cisplatin has nasty side effects, so why is a drug first used to treat cancer in the 1970s still used for many cancers?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Christmas Tree Giveaways 14 mins -”A Christmas tree is a holiday tradition so many take for granted. One single mother’s joy and gratitude upon receiving a donated tree inspired a group to play Santa and spread cheer by delivering trees to those who would otherwise go without.” At the link find the title, “S01 Episode 10: Christmas Tree Santas,” right-click “Media files CGT EP10 Christmas_Tree_Santa HLS_mix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change 64 mins – “For the first time in Earth’s history, our planet is experiencing rapidly accelerating changes prompted by one species: humans. Climate change is the most visible, and our current behavior threatens not only our own future but that of countless other creatures. As we stand at this pivotal juncture, Dr. Grinspoon calls upon all of us to be planetary engineers, conscious shapers of our environment and caretakers of the Earth’s biosphere. With our future at stake, Dr. Grinspoon shares his 10,000-year perspective by not only asking what kind of future we want to avoid, but what do we ultimately seek to build?” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DDT 16 mins – “Americans have had a long, complicated relationship with the pesticide DDT, or dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane, if you want to get fancy. First we loved it, then we hated it, then we realized it might not be as bad as we thought. But we’ll never restore it to its former glory. And couldn’t you say the same about America’s once-favorite pop star? We had a hunch that the usual narrative about DDT’s rise and fall left a few things out, so we talked to historian and CHF fellow Elena Conis. She has been discovering little-known pieces of this story one dusty letter at a time. But first our associate producer Rigoberto Hernandez checks out some of CHF’s own DDT cans—that’s right, we have a DDT collection—and talks to the retired exterminator who donated them.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diazepam 5 mins – “Jamie Durrani introduces one of the biggest selling pharmaceuticals in history, the ‘mother’s little helper’: Diazepam” At the link find the title, “Diazepam: Chemistry in its element, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files Ciie_Diazepam.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Domestic Abuse 27 mins – “She was a mother, a friend, and a doctor. The shocking murder of Elana Fric in Toronto has re-ignited calls for medical professionals to screen patients for signs of domestic abuse.” At the link find the title, “Dec 12: Doctor calls for screening of potential domestic abuse ,” right-click “Download Dec 12: Doctor calls for screening of potential domestic abuse” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Triage 60 mins – “50 scientists warn official predictions don’t include a feed-back as large as all U.S. emissions: the warming soil. From the Netherlands, Dr. Thomas Crowther. From Maine, paleobiologist Dr. Jacquelyn Gill says abrupt climate change hit species before us. We’re next. Radio Ecoshock 161214” At the link find the title, “Radio Ecoshock: Welcome to the Dark New Climate, Dec 14, 2016,” right-click “Media files ES_161214_LoFi.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Failure to Adjust 56 mins – “Edward Alden, CFR’s Bernard L. Schwartz senior fellow and director of the Renewing America publication series, discusses how the past four decades of U.S. trade and economic policy left many Americans behind in the global economy, and what the next administration might do to address this trend, as part of CFR’s Academic Conference Call series.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.  

Fake News 48 mins – “Fake news has always been around. Think UFO stories at the supermarket checkout counter. But this year, in the cauldron of social media and bare-knuckled politics, fake news has exploded. It’s all over, on Facebook feeds and smartphones. It polluted our election season. It’s getting people riled up over bunk. It got a Trump transition team member fired yesterday. He was spreading it. It’s poison to democracy. This hour On Point: the problem of fake news, and what to do about it.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

FEMA Trailers 28 mins- “Ten years ago Hurricanes Katrina and Rita tore into the Gulf Coast and displaced more than one million residents. For many of these people, trailers provided by th Federal Emergency Management Agency became their homes. But many of the new occupants soon found it hard to breathe, suffering flulike symptoms, stinging eyes, and nosebleeds. The culprit was formaldehyde, which emanated from the hastily assembled, substandard materials used to make the trailers. A decade after the storms Distillations follows CHF researcher and medical anthropologist Nick Shapiro as he searches for the remaining FEMA trailers. His search takes him to the oil fields of North Dakota, where a different kind of housing crisis is taking place.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fingerprint Comparisons 4 mins – “Episode: 2529 Comparing Fingerprints: What’s Involved and What can go Wrong.  Today, who dunnit?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender and Labor 64 mins – “Women’s economic advancement is a primary driver of economic growth and development. In this roundtable, Shauna Olney addresses gender inequalities across a variety of labor market indicators, including quantity and quality of jobs. She also discusses the policies that are necessary to improve women’s labor market participation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Engineering 35 mins – “Celebrities, politicians, and scientists have fiercely debated the safety of using genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, in food. It remains to be seen whether GMO labeling becomes mandatory in the United States, but there’s no doubt that the “GMO-free” sticker is garnering the prestige and premium prices already reaped by the labels “organic” and “gluten-free.” But what’s the big fuss? And how did this great GMO debate begin? To find out Distillations goes to the soy and corn fields of Iowa where reporter Amy Mayer hears the perspectives of a few Midwesterners, including two farmers who have found a lucrative niche for the GMO-free crops they’re growing. Then, we’ll talk with plant geneticist Pamela C. Ronald and organic farmer Raoul Adamchak. Together they wrote Tomorrow’s Table: Organic Farming, Genetics, and the Future of Food. And they’re married—to each other.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gin Craze of 1700’s 56 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the craze for gin in Britain in the mid 18th Century and the attempts to control it. With the arrival of William of Orange, it became an act of loyalty to drink Protestant, Dutch gin rather than Catholic brandy, and changes in tariffs made everyday beer less affordable. Within a short time, production increased and large sections of the population that had rarely or never drunk spirits before were consuming two pints of gin a week. As Hogarth indicated in his print ‘Beer Street and Gin Lane’ (1751) in support of the Gin Act, the damage was severe, and addiction to gin was blamed for much of the crime in cities such as London.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Religious Intolerance 27 mins – “Protecting cows has now become the focus of armed Hindu vigilante groups intent on asserting Hindu radicalism under India’s Hindu nationalist government.” At the link find the title, “India’s Silent Terror, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04lgd5s.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Industrial Espionage 26 mins – “Hackers. Spies. Secrets. This is the menacing language of industrial espionage. But how easy is it to plunder a company for its ideas? Not very, says our guest, Douglas O’Reagan, a historian of science and technology. Throughout history, O’Reagan argues, stealing trade secrets has proven more complicated than lifting a blueprint or section of computer code. What makes a company prosperous is usually much harder to grasp. But first we look at how one company is trying to pass on the skills and secrets responsible for its success. Reporter Susanne Gietl visits the small Bavarian town of Ingolstadt, headquarters of German automaker Audi. There she finds hundreds of Mexican workers learning skills, secrets, and the “German way” to build cars so they can bring that knowledge back to Mexico.” Join us for a trip to the murky world of technology transfer.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Informal Economy Women 60 mins – “Martha Chen addressed the overrepresentation of women in the informal economy and the challenges they face – including low earnings and lack of social protections, which reinforce the cycle of poverty. She also discussed the resources women need to overcome these challenges and the strategic imperative for more inclusive and equitable policy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Investing Basics 43 mins – “Fellow Retirementor Ken Roberts always has a long list of questions for me on his Ken’s Bull and Bears Report.  In this interview Ken asks questions about stock performance in a growing economy, how to beat the market, the need for professional advisors, lessons learned from the Trump election, my favorite Bogle quotes and  how to be sure an advisor has your best interest in mind.  During the interview  I surprised myself by noting that Bogle, Buffet and Trump are all losers——as well as myself!” At the link right-click “Download’ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Invisible Influences 27 mins – “Look down at what you’re wearing. You picked out that blue shirt, right? And those boots — you decided on those because they’re warm, didn’t you? Well, maybe not. Researcher Jonah Berger says, we tend to be pretty good at recognizing how influences like product placement and peer pressure affect other people’s choices… but we’re not so good at recognizing those forces in our own decision-making.” At the link find the title, “Episode 55: Snooki and the Handbag, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161212_hiddenbrain_55.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islam People and Power 27 mins – “Presenter Safa al Ahmad is joined by a panel of experts to reflect on the issues raised in her documentary series ‘Islam People and Power’. Guests in the studio are: Dr Maha Azzam, former Associate Fellow of Chatham House, now Head of the Egyptian Revolutionary Council Dr Hazem Kandil, Fellow of St Catharine’s College, Cambridge and author of Inside The Brotherhood Hassan Hassan, Fellow of The Tahrir Institute for Middle East Policy and author of ISIS: Inside the Army of Terror” At the link find the title, “Reflections: Islam, People and Power Boxset, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04lnc52.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islamists 27 mins – “What should the relationship be between Islam and the state? This is the question which dominates political debate in the Arab world. Many traditional Islamic scholars believe in the separation of religion and politics. For the Muslim Brotherhood though – the Arab world’s foremost social and political movement – the goal is to create an Islamic state. In Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood was elected to power after the Arab uprisings. But its plans quickly ended in failure. After just a year in office, the Brotherhood government faced mass protests before it was deposed by a military coup. As presenter Safa Al Ahmad discovers, these events have caused an unprecedented level of debate between members past and present. She talks to a Brotherhood veteran who believes the Brotherhood should have remained a social movement rather than entering politics and to young members who believe it should be more revolutionary.” At the link find the title, “The Islamists: Islam, People and Power Boxset, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04ln8lr.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Israel Country History 66 mins – “Dr. Gordis, a former Conservative rabbi, award-winning author of several books on Jewish thought and Israeli currents, and columnist for the Jerusalem Post, will discuss the topic of his latest book, which has been described as a luminous history shedding light on Israel’s culture, politics and economy, so people can understand her future. Gordis was the founding dean of the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies in Los Angeles before moving to Jerusalem, where he helped to found Israel’s first liberal arts college. Presently, he is senior vice president and Koret Distinguished Fellow at Shalem College in Jerusalem.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Knights Templar Bank 12 mins – “On today’s show, how a band of medieval warrior monks sworn to poverty got into the banking business and changed the way we think about money forever.” At the link find the title, “#742: Making Bank, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161216 pmoney_pmpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Law and Technology 29 mins – Georgetown University law professor Paul Ohm discusses the need for lawyers, prosecutors, and judges who understand the internet and coding. He is a former computer programmer and has been a Department of Justice prosecutor of computer crime.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Paul Ohm, “right-click “Media files program.461985.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lynching Veterans 41 mins – “Forty-thousand African Americans died fighting during the Civil War – more than a million enlisted in World War II.  Military service is often seen as emblematic of America’s best qualities – but the record shows that, instead of being honored, African American veterans were disproportionately targeted, beaten and lynched throughout American history. Today on the show: America’s history of targeting black veterans. Plus, the city that put a bird on it decides to put a tax on it – wage gaps that is. We’ll hear how about Portland, Oregon’s move to penalize companies that pay executives 100 times more than average workers. At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maker Movement 61 mins – “…Dale Dougherty has been on the front lines of a worldwide renaissance of creating, designing, modifying, inventing and personalizing that is affecting all aspects of how we do business. In his new book, Free to Make: How the Maker Movement Is Changing Our Schools, Our Jobs, Our Minds, Dougherty acts as a tour guide to the spectacular, hope-filled global phenomenon that we now call the maker movement. In conversation with Robert Stephens, the founder of the Geek Squad, they will explore how the do-it-yourself movement approaches arts, crafts, science and engineering, changing us as a result.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malaysia Air 370 Crash 27 mins – “The question is astonishingly simple: In the year 2015, with GPS and satellites and global surveillance everywhere all the time, how does a massive airplane simply go missing? To find the answer, writer Bucky McMahon boarded one of the vessels searching for Malaysia Air 370 in one of the most isolated and treacherous stretches of ocean on the planet. In telling the story of the search crew and the massive amounts of technology, money, and human capital being spent trying to find this airplane, McMahon tells a story of our time—of a world completely dependent on nets of redundant technology, yet completely lost and broken when those nets suddenly break. McMahon joins host David Brancaccio to discuss his October 2015 story, “The Plane at the Bottom of the Ocean.” At the link find the title, “The Plane at the Bottom of the Ocean, by Bucky McMahon, Dec, 2016,”Media files The Plane on the Bottom of the Ocean by-Bucky McMahon-1.mp3

Male Contraception 28 mins – “ At the link right-click “download this mp3 file directly from here…” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

McFaddin Murders 59 mins – “Samantha Broun talks to cops, politicians, inmates, and family closest to the crime that changed policy 20 years ago for inmates serving life sentences in Pennsylvania. It’s a crime Samantha knows well, because it happened to her mom. This story was produced by Samantha Broun and Jay Allison for Transom, and won the Silver Award in the 2016 Third Coast / Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Competition. There are descriptions of violence and sexual violence, so there is a content advisory, including a warning to parents that the episode is not for children. The internet version of this episode contains un-beeped curse words. If you prefer, here is a beeped version.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Megyn Kelly Interview 46 mins – “Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly talks about “PC culture,”coming forward about CEO Roger Ailes sexually harassing her, and how Trump’s election has empowered white nationalists. Her new memoir is ‘Settle For More.’” At the link find the title, “Dec, 2016, Megyn Kelly Of Fox News,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mind Over Genes 75 mins – “A renaissance in science is creating a revolution in thought and understanding—and in our physical bodies—that is changing the world and our health. Epigenetics reveals that we are not victims of our genes. Cancer, depression and diseases were once believed to be preprogrammed in our genes. In fact, the nervous system can send different signals to cells, reprogramming their genetic activity and behavior. Dr. Lipton says that this provides for miraculous spontaneous remissions from cancer or other diseases. Cell biologist and bestselling author Bruce H. Lipton will take you on a fast-paced journey from the microcosm of the cell to the macrocosm of the mind. This informative and self-empowering presentation on the mechanics of the mind-body interaction explores his views of how our thoughts, attitudes and beliefs create the conditions of our body and our place in the world. He has designed this presentation to inspire your spirit, engage your mind and empower you to become the master of your fate rather than the “victim” of your heredity.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

NSAID and Heartburn Pill Problems 58 mins – “Are there medicines you take for granted that might do you unexpected harm? We talk about the latest findings on pain relievers and heartburn pills. Occasionally a medication that has been on the market for some time is found to do unexpected harm. That happened with Vioxx, and led researchers to take a closer look at all NSAIDS. A large trial showed that the NSAID pain reliever celecoxib (Celebrex) is no worse than naproxen in raising the risk of heart attacks. Or does that mean that naproxen is no better than celecoxib? We talk about the evidence that NSAIDs can increase your chance of a heart attack. What other approaches could you take to alleviate chronic arthritis pain without causing unexpected harm?” At the link right-click “Download the MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

NY Times on Trump 46 mins – “Dean Baquet talks about covering tweets as news, his decision to use the word “lie” in a headline about Trump and why he’s not worried about libel suits from the president-elect. Book critic Maureen Corrigan shares her top 10 books of 2016.” At the link find the title, “Dec, 2016, NYT Exec. Editor On The New Terrain Of Covering Trump,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Overdose Vaccine 3 mins – “Vaccines could one day reduce fatal opioid overdoses.” At the link find the title, “Episode 720 – December 14, 2016,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements Dec14_2016.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Organ Transplants 21 mins – “Scientists experimented with skin and organ transplants for a long time before they finally met with success in the mid-20th century. Now surgeons are expert at performing transplants. The only problem? There aren’t enough organs to go around, which creates some serious ethical dilemmas. First, reporter Dalia Mortada takes us to Tel Aviv, Israel, where a dialysis patient waiting for a new kidney is running out of patience. Conflicting religious interpretations have prevented many Israelis from signing up to become organ donors. This has created a serious supply-and-demand problem, leading many desperate patients to the black market. Mortada tells us how this trend is slowly changing and talks to the doctors, rabbis, and bioethicists behind the shift. Then we talk to American bioethicists Art Caplan and Robert Baker about the pitfalls of the U.S. donation system. “You sign up when you go to Motor Vehicles,” Caplan says, “which may not be the ultimately wonderful place to make [these] decisions, other than the fact that you may wait there long enough to die there, in which case they can probably get your organs.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Password Sharing Crime 18 mins – “The story of a court case. On one side, the best lawyers money can buy. On the other, a night school lawyer who had never argued a case before. The outcome could affect everyone on the internet.” At the link find the title, “#741: Amy and Steve vs. Facebook, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161209_pmoney_podcast120916.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patagonia Founder 27 mins – “In 1973, Yvon Chouinard started Patagonia to make climbing gear he couldn’t find elsewhere. Over decades of growth, he has implemented a unique philosophy about business, leadership and profit.” At the link find the title, “Patagonia: Yvon Chouinard, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161209_hibt_patagonia.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Permaculture 26 mins – “Jono Neiger is a conservation biologist, a permaculture educator, and a designer, and he joins us to talk about how the practice of permaculture lends itself to a sustainable environment.  Permaculture isn’t just an agricultural practice, but a way to sustainably design buildings, improve food production, and design smarter technology.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pigments and Painters 31 mins – ““Alchemy’s Rainbow: Pigment Science and the Art of Conservation” features art conservator Mark F. Bockrath and art historian and CHF fellow Elisabeth Berry Drago. Our guests discuss and show the messy and occasionally dangerous process of making paints from pigments and the transition to using paints from tubes. They explain how conservators preserve paintings and why alchemists were so important to painters in early modern times.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pizzagate Discussion 57 mins – “Fake news stories circulating on social media about a pizza restaurant in Washington, D.C., have led to a disturbing chain of events. The stories claimed the restaurant – Comet Ping Pong – operated a child sex-trafficking ring run by Hillary Clinton. On Sunday a man from North Carolina who read about the rumors fired an assault-style rifle inside the restaurant. No one was injured. But the incident highlights the sometimes serious consequences of sharing false information on social media. A member of Donald Trump’s transition team resigned after it was learned he too was spreading conspiracy theories about the restaurant. Diane and her guests discuss the rise in fake news and what can be done about it.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Presidential Transition 60 mins – “The peaceful transition of power has been a hallmark of our democracy, but new presidents consistently fail to get their new administrations up and running quickly and effectively. Max Stier has been leading a comprehensive initiative to reform the system and advise both the outgoing administration and the incoming transition teams. He will give a candid, insider’s perspective on the most complex takeover in the world and a case study on changing how Washington works. Under Max Stier’s leadership, the Partnership for Public Service has been widely praised as a first-class nonprofit organization and thought leader on federal government management issues. In 2015, the Partnership launched the Center for Presidential Transition, a first-of-its-kind effort to ensure the smoothest transition of power yet by working with campaign teams, federal agencies and the outgoing administration….” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidents and Wars 75 mins – “There is a fascinating and depressing positive correlation between the reputation of an American president and the number of people dying in wars while that president is in office. Political scientist Bruce Bueno de Mesquita of NYU and co-author of The Spoils of War talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how presidents go to war. Bueno de Mesquita argues that the decision of how and when to go to war is made in self-interested ways rather than in consideration of what is best for the nation. The discussion includes a revisionist perspective on the presidencies of George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and others as Bueno de Mesquita tries to make the case that the reputations of these men are over-inflated.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Programmer Spolsky 66 mins – “Joel Spolsky is the CEO and founder of Stack Overflow, the premiere question and answer site about computer programming. He also founded Fog Creek Software, created Trello, and is the author of Joel on Software, one of the first (and best) computer programming blogs. Joel and Leo talk about Joel’s history with Microsoft, Juno, and Fog Creek, as well as why Stack Overflow works so well, and Fog Creek’s newest programming environment, Gomix.” At the link click “Download Options” right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prosthetics and Bullying 56 mins – “In this hour, double-amputee Aimee Mullins chronicles her adventures with prosthetic legs as an athlete, actress and artist; the mother of a bullied teen tells the story of his suicide; Ex-NYC Mayor Ed Koch stands up to his anti-Semitic platoon leader while in training for WWII; and three teenagers from Grace King High School….” At the link find the title, “The Moth Radio Hour: Prosthetics, Boot Camp and Heartache, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files moth_1102_mp_465_12_13_16.mp3” and select “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Psychology of Power 127 mins – “On this episode of the Dangerous History Podcast, CJ talks with Dr. Jim Cunagin, a practicing psychiatrist, about the psychology of power and obedience and some of the experiments that can help us understand these phenomena.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from te pop-up menu.

Refugee Tech Help 27 mins – “How might technology be harnessed to help refugees? Click talks to Tom Hayton from Techfugees about the hackathon challenge that flagged up the tech benefits from ideas that arose from a new competition.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” fromteh pop-up menu.

Refugees in Canada 24 mins – “Experts from around the world working with refugees are meeting in Ottawa this week to consider if Canada’s private sponsorship system could work as a model in their country, hoping to address the worldwide refugee crisis.” At the link find the title, “Dec 12: World refugee experts meet to consider Canada’s private sponsorship model,“ right-click “Download Dec 12: World refugee experts meet to consider Canada’s private sponsorship model” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Literacy 64 mins – “Physician and astronaut Dr. Mae C. Jemison is a science literacy advocate and the lead ambassador of the Bayer Making Science Make Sense program. The goal of the initiative is to provide 1 million hands-on science experiences to children by 2020. Dr. Jemison is particularly devoted to getting more girls, young women and minorities into careers in science, tech, engineering and math (STEM). Join Dr. Jemison for an inspiring call-to-action on how to get Americans psyched about science!” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

SECDEF Mattis 46 mins – “President-elect Donald Trump has chosen General James Mattis as the new Secretary of Defense. Mattis is described as both a tough and thoughtful leader – and one who may challenge Trump, differing from the President-elect on Russia, Iran, and NATO. Much of the initial reaction to the appointment of “Mad Dog Mattis” has been positive, even from Democrats. But one concern looms large for some: Mattis’ recent military service. It would require a special congressional waiver for him to take the post, and some feel strongly that to allow it would be going against an important tenet of U.S. government. We take a close look at General James Mattis.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Senior Care Plans 27 mins – “Most Canadians will, at some point, care for an elderly family member. It can be a stressful and difficult experience.” At the link find the title, “Parenting your parents,” right-click “Download Parenting your parents” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up men

Sex and Gender 24 mins – “Several years ago historian of medicine Alice Dreger found herself in a room full of intersexed people, individuals with reproductive or sexual anatomy that is neither typically female nor male. Dreger noticed something strange: many of them had teeth that were in bad shape. She soon learned that many of them had endured such traumatic experiences with doctors that they wouldn’t go near anyone in a white coat, including dentists. We were astonished by this story, so we asked Dreger to tell us more. She joined us for our December podcast alongside Eric Vilain, a medical geneticist and director of the Center for Gender-based Biology at UCLA. While intersex, transgender, and transsexual issues have recently entered the mainstream, our guests explain that there have always been those whose anatomy or identity prevents them from fitting neatly into the categories of male or female. And even with this newfound exposure, tensions continue to exist for them all. But first we’ll hear about the experiences of a transgender couple desperate to conceive a child, but who struggled to find a willing doctor. Mariel Carr visits them at home in Philadelphia, where they’re adapting to life with an infant.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shi’ism 27 mins – “Within Shi’ism there is a high level disagreement about the role of Islam in government. Shia-dominated Iran is an Islamic republic, led by Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, a senior Islamic cleric. But the Iranian model of government – a theocratic state – is not supported by Shi’ism’s most senior Islamic cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani who is based in the Iraqi city of Najaf. “Khamenei is the head of Iranian army. Sistani is not the head of Iraqi army,” explains Iraqi politician Walid al-Hilli. But, as presenter Safa al-Ahmad discovers on a visit to Iraq, Grand Ayatollah Sistani has significant influence on the way Iraq is governed.” At the link find the title, “The Shia: Islam, People and Power Boxset, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04ln9pq.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soul Sound 11 mins – “There’s an angry divisive tension in the air that threatens to make modern politics impossible. Elizabeth Lesser explores the two sides of human nature within us (call them “the mystic” and “the warrior”) that can be harnessed to elevate the way we treat each other. She shares a simple way to begin real dialogue — by going to lunch with someone who doesn’t agree with you, and asking them three questions to find out what’s really in their hearts.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Space Junk Problem 10 mins – “Our lives depend on a world we can’t see: the satellite infrastructure we use every day for information, entertainment, communication and so much more. But Earth orbit isn’t a limitless resource, and the problem of space debris will get worse without a significant change to our behavior. Natalie Panek challenges us to consider the environmental impact of the satellites we rely on. Our orbital environment is breathtakingly beautiful and our gateway to exploration, she says. It’s up to us to keep it that way.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Students of Color 10 mins – “As a black woman from a tough part of the Bronx who grew up to attain all the markers of academic prestige, Dena Simmons knows that for students of color, success in school sometimes comes at the cost of living authentically. Now an educator herself, Simmons discusses how we might create a classroom that makes all students feel proud of who they are. “Every child deserves an education that guarantees the safety to learn in the comfort of one’s own skin,” she says.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sunnis 27 mins – “The anti-government protests that began in the Arab world in 2010 triggered division between the religious scholars of Islam’s largest branch – the traditional Sunnis. Some of the most senior Sunni scholars in the world held fast to the idea that revolution, and even simple protest, was forbidden in Islam. Others decided to back armed groups in Syria, though not the global jihadists of al-Qaeda and ISIS. Presenter Safa Al Ahmad travels to Egypt to meet Dr Abbas Shouman, one of the most senior scholars at Islam’s most famous seat of learning, Al Azhar University. She also tells the story of Sheikh Ramadan al-Bouti, a famous Syrian Islamic scholar whose stance on the uprisings cost him his life.” At the link find the title,”The Sunni Traditionalists: Islam, People and Power Boxset, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04ln683.mp3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Time Management 12 mins – “There are 168 hours in each week. How do we find time for what matters most? Time management expert Laura Vanderkam studies how busy people spend their lives, and she’s discovered that many of us drastically overestimate our commitments each week, while underestimating the time we have to ourselves. She offers a few practical strategies to help find more time for what matters to us, so we can “build the lives we want in the time we’ve got.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Toxicology History 39 mins – “In this episode we are excited to talk to Barry Rumack about his life in toxicology, the eponymous nomogram, and future directions in toxicology and acetaminophen.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Triage Process 40 mins – “On this episode of the Disaster Podcast, we have special guests on the show to talk about managing triage in disaster situations. Hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are joined by Jeff Lengyel – Product Manager at Disaster Management Systems, Inc. (DMS) and David Crowl – Hospital Specialist Product Manager at DMS.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and Immigrants 46 mins – “President-elect Donald Trump says once he is in office he will deport two to three million immigrants who have committed crimes. In response, mayors of cities nationwide – from New York to Los Angeles – pledged to not to cooperate with immigration agents. Some universities are considering similar policies. But municipal officials risk losing millions of dollars in federal aid if they don’t cooperate with federal authorities. Trump says that if cities fail to cooperate with Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents, he will block all federal funding for these municipalities. Diane and a panel of guests discuss so-called “sanctuary cities” under a Trump presidency.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Trump and the Media 50 mins – “We devote this hour to a question put to us pretty much daily since election day: How to cover President Trump? First, we ask the AP, Univision, NPR, USA Today, and other news outlets about how they are defining a relationship with a president-elect who flouts traditional rules, spreads misinformation, and criticizes the press. Then we turn to language. Listeners help us highlight moments in media coverage that obscure the truth, and journalist Masha Gessen warns of the “impulse to normalize.” Plus, linguist John McWhorter describes the phenomenon of partisan words, and cognitive scientist George Lakoff argues that the principles of journalism need to be redefined… because of how our brains work.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio”and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Election Questions 9 mins – “After news broke Friday that the CIA had assessed Russia intervened in the presidential election to favor Donald Trump, top-ranking senators from both parties called for an investigation. “Congress has an extremely important role to play using its investigative powers to get to the bottom of what happened,” said Jack Lerner, professor of law at the University of California, Irvine and director of the Intellectual Property, Arts, and Technology Clinic….” At the link click “Listen to this story” by the play button, then find the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump on Abortions 46 mins – “During his campaign, President-elect Donald trump pledged to defund Planned Parenthood and nominate Supreme Court justices opposed to abortion. Now, he’s preparing to take office in January with a Republican-controlled Congress and abortion opponents in his cabinet. Among them: incoming Health Secretary Tom Price, who also wants to dismantle the Affordable Care Act. This is likely to reopen emotional debates over issues like abortion and the role of government in health care – at the federal level and within state legislatures. What Trump’s presidency could mean for reproductive rights and women’s health.”(4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Trump on Global Warming 46 mins – “Donald Trump has called climate change “a hoax”. But this week he met with Al Gore, a leader in the fight against global warming — raising questions about Trump’s position on the issue. For this month’s Environmental Outlook: a look at Trump’s priorities on energy and the environment.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Trump Shock 42 mins – “Matthew Continetti and Andrew Ferguson discuss Donald Trump’s nomination and what it means for conservatives in America. They argue that they are encouraged by whom Trump is nominating to different cabinet positions and the Supreme Court but that Trump’s unpredictability and lack of core values are a concern. They discuss the role the media will play with the Trump administration and their relationship with the president-elect.” At the link find the title, “Donald Trump and Conservative Intellectuals, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161214-Continetti-Ferguson.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

UN Secretary General 57 mins – “Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon discusses the role of the United Nations in a changing global landscape.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.  

Urban Agriculture 19 mins – “City dwellers across the country are picking up shovels and burying seeds, part of a burgeoning movement to bring fresh, local produce back to urban areas. But before you join their ranks, stop and check your soil. It might be flecked with dangerous lead. On todays episode of Distillations we look at the challenges of urban agriculture and the innovative ways to solve them. First producer Charlie Mintz visits West Oakland to reveal how an EPA-funded program is leeching lead out of backyard gardens using hundreds of tons of discarded fishbones. Then we sit down with Graceful Gardens Alice Edgerton and Fair Food Philadelphia’s Alex Jones to learn about how to best make an urban garden grow.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

US Refugee Program 76 mins – “Experts discuss the role faith-based organizations have taken during the refugee crisis and the challenges of aiding and resettling refugees in the United States and abroad.” (4 panelists) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.  

US–Israel Relations 45 mins – “Robert D. Blackwill, CFR’s Henry A. Kissinger senior fellow for U.S. foreign policy, and CFR Senior Fellow Philip H. Gordon discuss their recently released Council Special Report, Repairing the U.S.-Israel Relationship, and what the U.S. and Israeli governments can do to reframe and revive the countries’ relationship, as part of CFR’s Religion and Foreign Policy Conference Call series.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.  

Wahhabism 27 mins – “Wahhabism is the most misunderstood brand of Islam. It is more correctly called Salafism and is a fundamentalist interpretation of the faith, often associated with Saudi Arabia. The Salafis have long been split between jihadists who justify violently overthrowing their rulers and quietists who believe that even oppressive governments should be obeyed. Since the Arab uprisings, two new groups – Salafi democrats and Salafi revolutionaries – have come to the fore too. Presenter Safa Al Ahmad talks to representatives of all positions in the current debate within Salafi Islam about the relationship between religion and politics.” At the link find the title, “The Salafis: Islam, People and Power Boxset, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04ln7g2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Waste Disposal 40 mins – “In case you hadn’t noticed, during our short time on Earth we humans have created a lot of stuff. Some of it is life-altering, like the device you’re looking at right now, and some of it is pretty silly, like those plastic, banana-shaped containers made for holding bananas. Regardless of their value, these objects all have one thing in common: one day they will become trash. For all the time we spend creating these wonders, we don’t devote much energy to thinking about what happens when their intended life-cycles run out. This episode of Distillations traces the history of trash, consumerism, and municipal garbage collection in the United States, and explores what the future holds. First, reporter Daniel Gross tells us the origin story of kitty litter, an ingenious consumer product that transformed a natural resource straight into trash.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women Peacekeepers 60 mins – “In this roundtable discussion, Admiral Tidd shares his insights on the role of women in building peace, preventing conflict, and countering violent extremism. His remarks address the growing body of research establishing that peace and security efforts are more successful and sustainable if women participate, as highlighted in our new report, “How Women’s Participation in Conflict Prevention and Resolution Advances U.S. Interests.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.  

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Media Mining Digest 266 – Dec 16, 2016: Adoption Trends, Agriculture Greenhouse Gases, AIDs Stories, Alt Right Movement, Atlanta BeltLine, Ballot Recount Issue, Black Hole Physics, Black Lives Matter, Bob Woodward on Presidents, Brain Waste, Burnouts, California Gold Rush, Canadian Pipeline, China Jails Canadian Couple, Cleve Jones Activist, Climate Change Politics, Colonial American Health, Concepts and Patterns, Conflict Resolution, Corruption in South Korea, Culture and Technology, Cybersecurity, Dakota Pipeline Protest, Death Penalty Argument, Deep Work, Democratic Party Decline, Drug Interactions, Ebola Epidemic Response, Economic Modeling, Emergency Power, End of Life Issues, Facebook Designer, First Nations Missing Women, Fish Industry Decline, Gaming Women Online, Garth Brooks, Genocide Prosecutor, George Washington, Geriatric Isolation, Guano Mania, Harriet Martineau, History and Historians, Homeless Help in Las Vegas, IARPA, Involuntary Commitment, ISIS Organization, James Burke Knowledge Web, Language Gap in Medicine, Limelight, Map Size by Topic, Mark Cuban, MDMA and PTSD, Medical Coaching, Medical History, Memory Formation, Near Death Experiences, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Oklahoma School Decline, Older Workers, Oprah Show, Pandora Website, Philippine Drug Problem, Pizzagate, Placebos, Politics and Religion, Progressive Movement, Public Discourse, Public Health History, Reality Definition, Rejection Training, Social Credit Program, Surveillance Camera Use, Thalidomide Impact, Thomas Friedman, Tim Ferriss Interview, Trevor Noah, Trump, Tuberculosis from Animals, Uganda Refugee Story, White Supremacist Groups History

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 92 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 305 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 12,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 350 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

Adoption Trends 56 mins – “International adoption peaked in 2004: That year, Americans brought 23,000 children from foreign countries into their families. But in the decade since, there’s been a remarkable decline. Last year, 5000 kids from other nations were adopted, which is a slide of 70 percent. Theories abound on why this sudden, dramatic drop-off occurred, but researchers say one thing is clear: Many Americans still want to adopt internationally, and they’re frustrated that it’s become far more difficult.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agricultural Greenhouse Gases 25 mins – “From quitting social media in favour of “deep work,” to why journalist Chang Ping has been banned in China, to mental health advocates urging the government to commit more money for mental illness treatment … This is The Current with Nam Kiwanuka.” At the link find the title, “Full Episode for December 9, 2016 – The Current,” right-click “Media files current_20161209_51818.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AIDs Stories 22 mins – “In this episode, we head to South Africa for the first ever Johannesburg Mainstage show. A woman confronts her fears by sharing a personal truth, and a career-woman takes a leap of faith.” At the link find the title, “Hail Mary & Gethwana Mahlase, Dec, 2016, right-click “Media files moth 464, 12_6_16.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alt Right Movement 47 mins– “We look at the dreams, some now coming true, of the White supremacist “alt-right” movement.” At the link find the title, “What The Alt-Right White Supremacist Movement Wants, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_503627559.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atlanta BeltLine 11 mins – “Urban planner Ryan Gravel shares the story of how his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia, rallied to build a massive urban park that will transform an abandoned railroad track into 22 miles of public green space called the Atlanta BeltLine. The places we live aren’t inevitable, he says — and if we want something different, we need to speak up.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ballot Recount Issue 47 mins – “It’s been nearly three weeks since Donald Trump was declared the winner of the presidential election. But the results are being disputed by Green Party candidate Jill Stein, who has petitioned for a recount in the battleground states of Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Michigan. Election officials in Wisconsin confirm a statewide recount will begin on Thursday. And Hillary Clinton’s campaign has joined the Wisconsin recount effort. President-elect Donald Trump calls the recounts “ridiculous” and “a scam.” And he says he would’ve won the popular vote were it not for “millions” of illegal voters. Diane and guests discuss recounts, allegations of voter fraud and the 2016 presidential election.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Black Hole Physics 84 mins – “Are physicists on a path to upend some of the time-tested fundamental theories of physics? This podcast explores the interplay between quantum theory and general relativity, and how these phenomena may be exploited, from black holes to quantum computing.” At the link find the title, “A Quantum State of Mind, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 161208_poe6.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Lives Matter 16 mins – “Born out of a social media post, the Black Lives Matter movement has sparked discussion about race and inequality across the world. In this spirited conversation with Mia Birdsong, the movement’s three founders share what they’ve learned about leadership and what provides them with hope and inspiration in the face of painful realities. Their advice on how to participate in ensuring freedom for everybody: join something, start something and “sharpen each other, so that we all can rise.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bob Woodward on Presidents 9 mins- “As a reporter, Bob Woodward has written the first draft of history on some of this country’s most important events. In 1973, his coverage of the Watergate Scandal with Carl Bernstein for The Washington Post was instrumental in uncovering corruption that led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon.  Woodward was also The Washington Post’s lead reporter for the 9/11 terrorist attacks. These days, Woodward is still an associate editor with the paper. Few reporters are as knowledgeable about presidents and the presidency as Woodward, who spoke Tuesday at University of New Hampshire about “the age of the American presidency from Nixon to now.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Waste 95 mins – “The United States has long attracted some of the world’s best and brightest, drawn by the strong U.S. economy, renowned universities, and reputation for entrepreneurship and innovation. But because of language, credential-recognition, and other barriers many of these highly skilled, college-educated immigrants cannot fully contribute their academic and professional training and skills once in the United States. As a result they work in low-skilled jobs or cannot find a job—a phenomenon known as brain waste. On this podcast, MPI experts give a presentation of the first-ever U.S. estimates on the economic costs of this skill underutilization for immigrants, their families, and the U.S. economy, along with estimates on forgone earnings and tax payments for: California, Florida, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Texas, and Washington. The panel discusses the factors linked to immigrant skill underutilization; highlight the potential for current city, state, and U.S. labor policy (including implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act) to reduce this brain waste; and offer an employer-based view of skill underutilization and how it can be addressed.” At the link right-click “Download(Loading)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burnouts 19 mins – “All types of companies are struggling with burnout. Many try to fix it. Most of them fail. One exception: A 26-year-old call center manager, with stress balls and costumes in her arsenal.” At the link find the title, “#740: Burnout, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161207 pmoney podcast120716.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Gold Rush 48 mins – “Emory University professor Patrick Allitt teaches a class about the California Gold Rush of the mid-1800s. He describes how people got there, the physical geography of the area, and the evolving technology used to mine gold.” At the link find the title, “California Gold Rush, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.454557.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Pipeline 21 mins – “There’s anger and elation over Justin Trudeau’s approval of two major new oil pipelines — Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline and Enbridge’s Line 3 pipeline. Environmentalists are seeing red. The Current looks at all sides of the debate.” At the link find the title, “Nov 30: Kinder Morgan decision a black day for Canada, say West Coast environmentalists, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161130_94364.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Pipeline Issue 24 mins – “The Current heads on a road trip along the route of Kinder Morgan’s newly-approved pipeline expansion to gauge support for it in communities along the way.” At the link find the title, “Dec 6: Meet the people living along Kinder Morgan pipeline route, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161206_61335.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Pipeline Support 25 mins – “Some First Nations groups welcome pipeline developments as a source of wealth and jobs for their people. The Current speaks with two First Nations leaders who say working with the pipeline giant is better than working against it.” At the link find the title, “Dec 13: Why some Indigenous leaders see benefits to Kinder Morgan pipeline, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161213_90678.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Pipelines 9 mins – “With declining global demand for oil, author Jeff Rubin says the pipeline expansion will not be the economic salvation for Alberta.” At the link find the title, “Economist warns insufficient oil demand hinders Trans Mountain pipeline, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20161202_94894.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China Jails Canadian Couple 45 mins – “Kevin and Julia Garratt called China home for 30 years. But two years ago, the Canadian couple were arrested, thrown in jail, and accused of spying. Now back in Canada, Kevin and Julia Garratt are ready to share their story.” At the link find the title, “Dec 8: ‘We only came to help’: Canadian couple imprisoned in China, accused of spying, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161208_19326.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cleve Jones Activist 47 mins – “Jones became an activist after Harvey Milk’s assassination, and he lost countless friends to the AIDS epidemic. He says, “There are some days when it is so painful that I really can barely function.” He conceived the AIDS Memorial Quilt in 1985. His memoir is ‘When We Rise.’” At the link find the title, “LGBTQ Activist Cleve Jones, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_503768709.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Politics 47 mins – “Exxon Mobil’s climate policy is under attack from its founding family, the Rockefellers. They’re with us. So is Exxon.” At the link find the title, “Exxon Mobil Vs. The Rockefellers, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_504010603.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Colonial America Health 78 mins – “Yale University professor emeritus John Demos leads a seminar for high school teachers on the Americas in the Colonial era. This class is hosted by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.” At the link find the tite, ”People, Germs, and Food in the Colonial Americas, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.455845.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concepts and Patterns 16 mins – “Neuroscientist Kate Jeffery discusses how the brain represents the world. This episode is is part of a short series Mind Bites made in association with Nicholas Shea’s AHRC-funded Meaning for the Brain and Meaning for the Person project. That website is open for comments and discussion of the topic of this podcast.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Kate Jeffery on Concepts and Representation.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conflict Resolution 198 mins (3 parts) – Session 1 – “State fragility poses a significant threat to international security, contributing to conflict onset and relapse, the global refugee crisis, the expansion of extremist groups, and public health emergencies like the Ebola epidemic. In fragile states, women are often marginalized, despite their potential contributions to the security and prosperity of their societies. The speakers on this panel will review lessons from conflict situations and provide recommendations to the next U.S. administration on addressing state fragility by promoting women’s participation in conflict prevention and peacebuilding “ Session 2 – “This session will examine the devastating use of sexual violence against civilians by armed factions and extremist groups. Research shows that postconflict societies more effectively recover and rebuild when women participate in reconstruction efforts and their experiences in conflictincluding wartime sexual violence—are addressed. Responding to conflict-related sexual violence includes promoting justice and accountability, training security forces in protection measures, investing in services for survivors, and including women in developing solutions to the factors that place them at risk.” Session 3 – “In many countries, women are well-positioned to detect early signs of radicalization because their rights and physical integrity are often the first targets of extremists. In addition, they are well-placed to challenge extremist narratives in homes, schools, and communities. This session will address strategies to counter  violent extremism by capitalizing on the contributions of women.” At the links right-click the down-point arrow on the sound bar, and right-click “Save Page As” from the pop-up menus.

Corruption in South Korea 21 mins – “For weeks, protesters have been in the streets demanding the disgraced president to step down. But the political scandal has also become a flash point for broad public discontent.” At the link find the title, “Dec 1: South Koreans call for president’s impeachment amid corruption scandal, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161201_31547.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Culture and Technology 136 mins – “Breaking the Internet, empathy gap in Silicon Valley, encryption on the road, Snapchat Spectacles, and more.” Leo Laporte with guests, Om Malik and Stacey Higginbotham At the link click “Download options,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cybersecurity 42 mins – “Entrepreneur Jay Kaplan, co-founder and CEO of Synack, describes how the idea of creating a cybersecurity service for enterprise businesses by crowdsourcing hackers went from sounding like a long shot to launching as a venture capital-backed startup. Kaplan, previously a senior analyst at the National Security Administration, talks about the virtues of government work and the nuances of “white hat” hacking.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dakota Pipeline Protest 14 mins – “On Sunday, the Army Corps of Engineers refused to issue a permit for the Dakota Access Pipeline. The water protectors, which includes members of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and other tribes (as well as climate activists), celebrated the decision. But the celebration was brief as the opposition realized that this might be just another battle won in an ongoing war that has spanned centuries. In this Short Take, Brian talks to Robert T. Anderson, a Professor of Law and Director of the Native American Law Center at the University of Washington, about the history of colonization and treaties between the government and indigenous people.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dakota Pipeline Protest 22 mins – “Protesters at Standing Rock are celebrating a fragile victory. But a woman protesting for three months says the fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline isn’t over until it’s over.” At the link find the title, “Dec 6: ‘Still a lot of work to do’: Despite Standing Rock victory, protesters stay put, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20161206_18195.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dakota Pipeline Protest 47 mins – “The Governor of North Dakota has ordered the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and other Native American Dakota Access Pipeline protestors to evacuate from the federal land where many have been camped out since last summer. The protestors face blizzard conditions but have, so far, refused to move. At issue is a nearly completed 1,100 mile pipeline designed to carry oil from northwestern North Dakota to Illinois. It’s slated to tunnel under a lake less than a mile from the Standing Rock Sioux reservation which, protestors contend, poses a threat to their water supply. An update on the protest and its political implications. (5 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Death Penalty Argument 25 mins – “Psychological evaluations that determine whether Texas inmates get sent to death row are based on the 1937 book, Of Mice and Men. Critics say it’s high time that changed.” At the link find the title, “Dec 1: How Lennie in Of Mice and Men influences Texas death row cases, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161201_33003.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deep Work 26 mins – “How can you get the highest quality results from your work? According to Cal Newport, author of Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World, the answer is to prioritize work that requires your full concentration and skill, a.k.a. Deep Work. When you engage in Deep Work, you don’t just get things done, you get them done well. Find out his two steps to remove distractions and make Deep Work possible, and learn a better way to market your product in our busy, noisy world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democratic Party Decline 47 mins – “Democrats facing big leadership issues and struggling with defeat. We’ll look at who will lead the Democratic Party.” At the tlink find the title,”Leadership Struggles In A Shaken Democratic Party, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_503756142.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Interactions 23 mins – “In this episode, we discuss more of the most important drug interactions, including grapefruit juice with statins and calcium channel blockers, QT prolonging medications, levothyroxine with cations and PPIs, and PDE-5 inhibitors with nitrates.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 053-Drug Interactions II.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Epidemic Response 26 mins – “It sounds like the plot of a movie: police discover the body of a young man who’s been murdered. The body tests positive for a deadly infectious disease. Authorities trace the killing to a gang. They race to find gang members linked to the murder… who may also be incubating the virus. This week on Hidden Brain… disease, panic, and how a public health team used psychology to confront an epidemic.” At the link find the title, “Episode 54: Panic in the Streets, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161205 hiddenbrain panic.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Modeling 56 mins – “Interest rates. Unemployment. GDP. Markets. Austerity measures. Economists tell us what we, as societies, can and can’t afford. But how do they decide? What values are at play?” At the link find the title, “It’s the Economists, Stupid (Encore Sept 9, 2015), Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161128_35377.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emergency Power 79 mins – “Author and Consultant Jeff Yago – Jeff Yago is a well known writer for Backwoods Home Magazine, Mother Earth News, Self-Reliance Magazine, Homepower Magazine, and others. His articles cover all areas of solar power, emergency backup power, battery power, and energy conservation. I have asked Jeff back today to discuss his new book titled: Lights On, which was just released on Nov 1 and is now available from all bookstores, Amazon, and World Net Daily bookstore. Jeff believes most preppers are limiting their backup power preparations to only generators, and power outages are becoming more often and lasting longer, which will easily exceed your stored fuel supplies, then what?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

End of Life Issues 47 mins – “Earlier this month, voters in Colorado overwhelmingly approved a so-called Death with Dignity ballot measure. It allows doctors to prescribe life-ending medication for terminally ill patients. Colorado joins four other states and the District of Columbia that have similar options. Advocates are pushing more states to consider aid-in-dying measures. The laws are controversial, to be sure. But as medical advances have done much to prolong life, more people are demanding greater choice in how and when they die. This hour offers an update on the debate over whether doctors should be permitted to give patients the means to take control of their own death.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Facebook Designer 38 mins – “Julie Zhuo, vice president of product design at Facebook, describes how the development of new features starts with three questions: What people problem are we solving? How do we know it’s a real problem? And how will we know if we’ve solved it? Zhuo explains how answering those fundamental questions at the outset reveals the most urgent problems to tackle — and yields features that truly enhance user satisfaction.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Nations Missing Women 75 mins – “A special edition of The Current comes to you from Winnipeg with a public forum in front of a live audience focusing on the relationship between families of murdered, missing and Indigenous women, the police and justice system.” At the link find the title, “Full Episode for December 7, 2016 – A special edition of The Current,” right-click “Media files current 20161207_11885.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fish Industry Decline 42 mins – “We talk to investigative journalist Lee van der Voo about her new book The Fish Market: Inside the Big-Money Battle for the Ocean and Your Dinner Plate.” At the link find the title, “158 Lee van der Voo – The Fish Market: Inside the Big-Money Battle for the Ocean and Your Dinner Plate,” right-click “Media files 8572010a-daff-412b-9321-7f61fdd080ea.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gaming Women Online 56 mins – “As a teen and then in her 20s, Emma Vosen loved gaming. Now as a PhD candidate, she looks to gamer culture as a microcosm of how sexism is seeded and replicated within broader society.” At the link find the title, “Ideas From The Trenches – The Dangerous Game, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161130_94968.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Garth Brooks 46 mins – “Country music legend Garth Brooks joins us. Don’t miss it.” At the link find the title, “Garth Brooks On ‘Gunslinger,’ Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files, npr_503759219.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genocide Prosecutor 52 mins – “Salt Lake City resident Pierre-Richard Prosper is the son of Haitian immigrants, a former district attorney in Los Angeles at the height of the gang violence there, and he was the lead prosecutor in the first trial for genocide and rape as war crimes. Those are just a few of his stories, but in many ways they’ve shaped his view of the world. Prosper believes deeply in the law’s ability to right wrongs that we could have prevented in the first place. He joins us Thursday to talk about his fascinating life.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

George Washington 58 mins – “This week on Q&A, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and Pepperdine University professor Edward J. Larson discusses his book, [George Washington, Nationalist].” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Edward Larson, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.455843.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geriatric Isolation 57 mins – “The complexities of aging and health can result in loneliness and social isolation. Dr. Carla Perissinotto, UCSF Division of Geriatrics, looks at the health effects of being lonely, who is at risk and what you can do. Then take a look at programs that provide services older adults and their caregivers. Recorded on 10/18/2016. (#31553)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guano Mania 21 mins – “…Guano was a great fertilizer and many believed it would revolutionize farming, which traditionally involved cycling crops or simply depleting soil nutrients and moving to new land. While novel to Americans and Europeans, using bird poop as fertilizer was nothing new to the Quechua people of Peru who had long mined it from the Chincha Islands off the southwest coast of Peru. For centuries, seabirds nesting on the islands had piled up guano, sometimes close to a 100 feet deep, making it a rich and ready source of the stuff….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Harriet Martineau 43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Harriet Martineau who, from a non-conformist background in Norwich, became one of the best known writers in the C19th. She had a wide range of interests and used a new, sociological method to observe the world around her, from religion in Egypt to slavery in America and the rights of women everywhere. She popularised writing about economics for those outside the elite and, for her own popularity, was invited to the coronation of Queen Victoria, one of her readers.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

History and Historians 56 mins – “It’s tempting to think that in order to comprehend the future, we need to know the past, that there are always lessons in history. But is that true anymore? Sailing in the 21st century, perhaps we are in uncharted waters.” At the link find the title, “Rear View Mirror: Has the future ever looked like the past? Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas 20161202_78244.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless Help in Las Vegas 21 mins – “The glittering neon and bustle of the Vegas strip hide a vast maze of underground flood channels that hundreds of men and women call home. Hear how journalist turned activist Matt O’Brien discovered this homeless community and what he’s doing to help.” At the link find the title, “S01 Episode 9: Shine A Light,”Media files CGT_EP” 9,Shine a Light HLS mix2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IARPA 68 mins – “Jason Matheny is the Director of the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). IARPA is the US intelligence community’s “moon shot” department, similar to DARPA, but focused in intelligence. Jason discusses IARPA’s research in data analysis, quantum computing, meme proliferation, and more.” At the link click “Download Options,”right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Involuntary Commitment 48 mins – “Many mental health experts say forcing someone into psychiatric care against their will can be necessary to protect people dangerous to themselves and others. But in some certain cases it is illegal, and some see involuntary commitment as a civil rights violation. A look at how patients can be both helped and traumatized by involuntary psychiatric care, and what the data indicates about its role in preventing violence, suicide and mass murder.” (5 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

ISIS Organization 48 mins – “ISIS started capturing America’s attention in 2014. At the time it felt to many like the group had popped up suddenly, as a result of the Syrian civil war. But counterterrorism expert Brian Fishman says that’s not the right picture. While it may feel new to us, the origins of the group known as the Islamic State go back at least a decade. Because it has overcome numerous obstacles since then, Fishman says, ISIS sees itself as highly resilient, and the U.S. has failed to recognize this in its strategy to combat the group. Fishman and ISIS expert William McCants take us inside the hidden past of the organization, and talk about what the new U.S. administration needs to know about ISIS moving forward.” (2 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

James Burke Knowledge Web 73 mins – “Dan has another visit with the always fascinating science historian and TV host James Burke. He also catches up a bit on early Trump cabinet picks and the Dakota pipeline protests.” At the link find the title, “Show 312 – Re-Connections with James Burke,” right-click “Media files cswdcd12.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language Gap in Medicine 27 mins – “Bridging the language gap in medicine. We visit the Crossroads Clinic, a first stop for many refugees arriving in Toronto. A medical interpreter tells us why you shouldn’t let kids interpret for parents. And, using Google Translate in the Dr.’s office.” At the link find the title, “The doctor speaks English. The patient doesn’t. Now what?,” right-click “Download The doctor speaks English. The patient doesn’t. Now what? “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Limelight 3 mins – “…Sir Humphry Davy gave a famous series of lectures on natural philosophy at the Royal Institution of London starting just after 1800. Davy was enormously influential, and he returned again and again to the theme of light. Light and seeing were scientific fixations in the first half of the 19th century. That age produced dioramas, magic lanterns, photography, the first electric lighting (long before Edison), and public gas lighting. Michael Faraday followed Davy in those lectures, and, in the early 1820s, a young member of the Royal Engineers, watched him do a demonstration. When Faraday turned an oxygen-hydrogen flame on a lump of quicklime, the heated lump emitted a brilliant light. Drummond saw a new use for that fluky behavior. Setting distant markers for surveyors could radically improve the accuracy of geographic surveys. In 1825, Drummond set a limelight marker on a mountaintop near Belfast. It was so bright it could be seen in Donegal county, sixty-six miles away….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Map Sizes by Topic 14 mins – “What does the world look like when you map it using data? Social geographer Danny Dorling invites us to see the world anew, with his captivating and insightful maps that show Earth as it truly is — a connected, ever-changing and fascinating place in which we all belong. You’ll never look at a map the same way again.” (Look at the video presentation, and visit Views of the World) At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mark Cuban 36 mins – “Mark Cuban made millions off of tech startups, then billions off of stocks — and later went on to buy and revive the Dallas Mavericks. He has come to define the persona of the serial entrepreneur.” At the link find the title, “Serial Entrepreneur: Mark Cuban, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161202_hibt_markcuban.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MDMA and PTSD 24 mins – “Researchers say pure MDMA — not the stuff on the street — has the potential to change the brain and create conditions that allow psychotherapy. Ed Thompson who suffers from PTSD says MDMA treatment saved his life.” At the link find the title, “Dec 5: ‘I have no doubt it saved my life’: MDMA drug helps former firefighter with PTSD, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161205_20064.mp3” and select “Save Link As”from the pop-up menu.

Medical Coaching 62 mins – “Coaching is an integral part of sports, it’s often used by corporate executives, and even helps people manage ADHD. But until recently coaching wasn’t something physicians used to achieve their goals. For this show, Mark Moubarek, Aline Sandouk, and Amy Young talk with Georgetown University faculty member Maggi Cary and Georgetown student Jack Penner. Dr. Cary is a certified coach specializing in leadership coaching for healthcare professionals. But a serendipitous acquaintance with Jack lead to him becoming a client. Recognizing its value for him as a student–in dealing with the so-called hidden curriculum and impostor syndrome, among other things–they have put together a pro-bono arrangement for twelve Georgetown student with area coaches. …” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medicine History 44 mins – “We tend to think of medicine as a science, but for most of human history it has been scientific-ish at best. In the first episode of a three-part series, we look at the grotesque mistakes produced by centuries of trial-and-error, and ask whether the new era of evidence-based medicine is the solution.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Memory Formation 27 mins – “How are memories made? Claudia Hammond joins an audience at London’s Royal Institution this week to hear from three prize-winning neuroscientists about their cutting-edge research on the brain. Earlier this year Tim Bliss, Graham Collingridge and Richard Morris won the one million Euro Lundbeck Foundation Brain Prize – the world’s biggest prize for neuroscience. They worked out how the brain remembers, how it strengthens connections between different brain cells and why it sometimes forgets. The brain has billions of nerve cells or neurons which are linked by trillions of connections or synapses. It is at these synapses where memories are formed – the memories which make us who we are. The trio’s research was on a mechanism known as Long-Term Potentiation, which works by permanently strengthening the connections between two neurons. It is a bit like beating a path through some long grass – the more you walk the path, the more defined it becomes. Similarly, the more times we have an experience, the stronger the memory gets. Understanding this process brings the exciting possibility of new treatments for conditions like Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and depression.” At the link right-click “Download’ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Near Death Experiences 52 mins – “The nature of “near death experiences”, or NDE’s has historically been the territory of religion and philosophy. But now science has staked its claim in the discussion. Ashley Walters explores the science and the meaning of near death experiences.” At the link find the title, “Decoding Death: The Science and Significance of Near Death Experiences, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161207_71952.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson 33 mins – “What first attracted one of the world’s foremost astrophysicists to the night sky? Are we alone in the universe? And how can scientific thinking benefit us all?…” At the link right-click Download MP3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oklahoma School Decline 46 mins- “Oklahoma public schools are on the ropes after years of budget cuts. Four-day school weeks and more. We’ll take it as a big case study and and look at Donald Trump’s new education secretary.” At the link find the title, “Public School Funding At A Loss, In Oklahoma And Beyond, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_503895602.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Older Workers 46 mins – “The number of older workers is on the rise. We’ll tackle the myths and realities of landing a job after fifty.” At the link find the title, “How To Find A New Job After 50, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_503895616.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oprah Show 52 mins – “Most producers want to keep you awake; we talk to a podcaster bent on putting listeners to sleep. Then, we interview Oprah! Just kidding. But we check out a podcast that did! Plus, Dan Savage’s vanilla tastes in podcasts.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pandora Website 30 mins – “Steve Bene, general counsel for Pandora discusses issues facing Pandora and the music industry, including copyright laws, ticket-price inflation, and what happens when humans compete with bots for concert tickets.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Steve Bene, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.455051.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Philippine Drug Problem 47 mins – “President Rodrigo Duterte was elected to power in the Philippines promising to tackle crime and to feed the corpses of drug dealers to the fish. In the months since he took office almost 5,000 people are believed to have been killed by police and vigilantes. The BBC Trending team investigates how Duterte’s ‘war on drugs’ is playing out in real life, and how a sophisticated social media strategy is ensuring support for the controversial policy.” At the link find the title, “Trolls, ‘the Devil’, and Death, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04k8n3h.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pizzagate 58 mins – “A conspiracy theory, a pizza related map, and a website fighting for its very soul.” Bryan Menegus’ great article, “Reddit is Tearing Itself Apart.” AT the link find the title, “#83 Voyage Into Pizzagate, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT9695520801.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Placebos 60 mins – “This week, we’re taking on the science of the sugar pill. We’re talking about the placebo effect, its potential benefits and its pitfalls. We speak with Erik Vance about his new book “Suggestible You: The Curious Science of your Brain’s Ability to Deceive, Transform and Heal”. And we’ll talk with Kathryn Hall, a genetic epidemiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, about why we experience the placebo effect, why some people are more open to suggestion than others, and why that might not be a weakness. “ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Politics and Religion 60 mins – “Shadi Hamid, senior fellow at the Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World at the Brookings Institution’s Center for Middle East Policy, discusses the outcome of the U.S. presidential election and the role of identity, morality, and religion in American politics, as part of CFR’s Religion and Foreign Policy Conference Call series….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Progressive Movement 68 mins – “Were the first professional economists racists? Thomas Leonard of Princeton University and author of Illiberal Reformers talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book–a portrait of the progressive movement and its early advocates at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th. The economists of that time were eager to champion the power of the state and its ability to regulate capitalism successfully. Leonard exposes the racist origins of these ideas and the role eugenics played in the early days of professional economics. Woodrow Wilson takes a beating as well.” At the link right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Discourse 67 mins – “James Hoggan contends that the most pressing environmental problem we face today is not climate change. It is pollution in the public square, where a smog of adversarial rhetoric and propaganda stifles discussion and creates resistance to change, thwarting our ability to solve our collective problems. In I’m Right and You’re an Idiot, Hoggan grapples with this critical issue, conducting interviews with such notables as Thich Nhat Hanh, Noam Chomsky and the Dalai Lama.” At the link find right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Health History 10 mins – “Author Steven Johnson takes us on a 10-minute tour of The Ghost Map, his book about a cholera outbreak in 1854 London and the impact it had on science, cities and modern society.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reality Definition 66 mins – “Have you ever questioned the nature of your reality? For our guest in this episode, cognitive psychologist Donald Hoffman, that’s his day job. Hoffman has developed a new theory of consciousness that, should it prove true, may rearrange our understanding of reality itself.Listen as Hoffman talks about the bicameral mind, the umwelt, and the hard problem of consciousness in this mindbending episode about how we make sense of our world, our existence, and ourselves.” At the link find the title, “090 Reality Donald Hoffman,” right-click “Direct download: 090 Reality Donald Hoffman.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rejection Training 16 mins – “Jia Jiang adventures boldly into a territory so many of us fear: rejection. By seeking out rejection for 100 days — from asking a stranger to borrow $100 to requesting a “burger refill” at a restaurant — Jiang desensitized himself to the pain and shame that rejection often brings and, in the process, discovered that simply asking for what you want can open up possibilities where you expect to find dead ends.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Credit Program 48 mins – “A Chinese project is tracking everything citizens do and ranking them based on their behavior – like a credit score. With impact. We’ll check it out.” At the link find the title, “China Explores Social Credit Scores, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_504015070.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Camera Use 37 mins – “A small city known for its Amish population and surveillance cameras, an old lady in Northern Ireland who watches video feeds in Brazil and getting footage from the fin of a shark. Listen, decode, and decide: Can watching save us?” At the link find the title, “S02-4: Watching, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files codebreaker 20161207_e4_240_20161114_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thalidomide Impact 45 mins – “How do so many ineffective and even dangerous drugs make it to market? One reason is that clinical trials are often run on “dream patients” who aren’t representative of a larger population. On the other hand, sometimes the only thing worse than being excluded from a drug trial is being included.” At the link click the circle with three dots right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thomas Friedman 78 mins – “In his most ambitious work to date, Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist’s Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations, Thomas L. Friedman shows that we have entered an age of dizzying acceleration—and explains how to live in it. Due to an exponential increase in computing power, climbers atop Mount Everest enjoy excellent cell-phone service, and self-driving cars are taking to the roads. A parallel explosion of economic interdependency has created new riches as well as spiraling debt burdens. Meanwhile, Mother Nature is also seeing dramatic changes as carbon levels rise and species go extinct, with compounding results. Today, it is easier than ever to be a maker (try 3-D printing) or a breaker (the Islamic State excels at using Twitter), but harder than ever to be a leader or merely “average.” Friedman concludes that nations and individuals must learn to be fast (innovative and quick to adapt), fair (prepared to help the casualties of change), and slow (adept at shutting out the noise and accessing their deepest values). Join Friedman for an engaging conversation on how we should think about and cope with all of these changes.” At the link find right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thomas Friedman on Trends 39 mins – “[New York Times] foreign affairs columnist Tom Friedman speaks to a forum of global business leaders and innovators about advancements in technology and how humans can adapt to such changes.” At the link find the title, “Thomas Friedman Discusses [Thank You For Being Late], Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.462153.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tim Ferriss Interview 69 mins – “Debbie talks to writer Tim Ferriss about the strategies he has used to change his life. “Any time that I take off on a plane, I ask myself ‘if I died right now, would I be happy with what I’ve been doing for the last 24 hours?'” According to Tim Ferriss, we can be great cooks, with fit bodies, and we shouldn’t have to spend so much time at work. That is, if we follow the counsel in his bestselling books: The 4-Hour Workweek, The 4-Hour Body, and The 4-Hour Chef. His central idea is that we can all be a lot more efficient in our lives if we’re willing to rethink and redesign our habits and routines. His latest book was born out of the interviews he’s conducted on his extraordinarily popular podcast “The Tim Ferris Show“. The new book is called Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers. Listen to hear more.” At the link find the title,”Tim Ferriss, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files Tim-Ferris.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trevor Noah 50 mins – “Writer Zadie Smith talks about nostalgia and why she likes talking to people with whom she disagrees. Her new novel is ‘Swing Time.’ Also, ‘Daily Show’ host Trevor Noah revisits his childhood in apartheid-era South Africa in his new memoir, ‘Born a Crime.’ Noah says writing the book helped him see that his mother was the real hero of his story.” At the link find the title, “Best Of: Zadie Smith / Trevor Noah, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_503377667.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trevor Noah 75 mins – The Daily Show host Trevor Noah’s book Born A Crime talks about growing up in apartheid South Africa when the relationship between his black mother and white father was illegal.” At the link find the title, “Dec 5: Trevor Noah on growing up mixed race in South Africa, ‘a product of my parents’ crime’, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161205_73345.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Businesses 46 mins – “A business empire, conflict of interest concerns and President-Elect Donald Trump. We’ll look at the challenge.” At the link find the title, “Unique Conflicts Of Interests For A Businessman President-Elect, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_503627545.mp3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Journalism 48 mins – “The U.S. media is accustomed to covering a White House that plays by certain rules. But President-elect Donald Trump tweets false information freely and frequently manipulates the media. How journalists are rethinking their role under a Trump presidency.” (5 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Trump Tragedy 61 mins – “It’s one month since we woke up to the shock news that the next president of the United States will be Donald Trump, and the whole world is trying to read the runes and work out what the next four years will hold for America and the rest of the world. Many are decrying Trump’s election as the end of democracy and the beginning of fascism. Others, observing that he is already watering down many of his more extreme threats, are willing to see a silver lining in at least some of his avowed policies. To weigh up these conflicting attitudes and gauge what a Trump presidency might actually look like, Intelligence Squared are bringing together a high-profile cast of Republicans, Democrats, historians and former political advisers. Given what we know of Trump’s character (he’s been described by clinical psychologists as a case-book narcissist), perhaps the most pressing question is how much power he will actually be able to wield in office. To what extent will he be able to take executive action to push through his plans, and how much will the constitutional checks and balances work to rein him in? At home, his supporters (and even some on the left) have welcomed his economic plan to revive America’s impoverished areas by building new infrastructure. His critics, however, see this as a con – nothing more than a tax-cut for the wealthy construction sector and its investors. And then there’s trade. While Trump’s promise to tear up international trade agreements won him millions of votes amongst blue-collar workers who feel left behind by globalisation, most experts believe such a move would cause a recession that hurts the rust belt more than free trade ever did. When it comes to Trump’s foreign policy, opinions are again divided. His negative stance towards NATO has sparked alarm, particularly in eastern Europe which sees the alliance as a bulwark against an increasingly aggressive Russia. To others, Trump’s apparent willingness to work with President Putin could mark the start of a new east-west détente that should be welcomed.” At the link find the title, “Trump: An American Tragedy? Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tuberculosis from Animals 6 mins – Dr Mark Crislip discusses how TB can pass from animal to man. At the link find the title, “A Gobbet o’ Pus 896: Going ape? Monkey business?” right-click “Media files gop896.mp3” and select “Save Link” from the pop-up menu.

Uganda Refugee Story 9 mins – “Meet Friday host Nam Kiwanuka. As someone who escaped Uganda and lived in a refugee camp as a child before coming to Canada, she tells The Current how she connects to today’s refugees.” At the link find the title, “Dec 8: Meet The Current’s Friday host Nam Kiwanuka, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161208_51580.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White Supremacist Groups History 46 mins – “Westfield State University criminal justice professor George Michael teaches a class on white supremacist groups in the mid to late-20th century.” At the link find the title, “Twentieth-Century White Supremacist Groups, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.455236.MP3-STD.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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Media Mining Digest 265 – Dec 9, 2016: Ageing, Aging and Mobility, AIDS Concerns, Albania’s Cannabis, Aleppo Overview, American Progressive Movement, Angies List Founder, Animal Work Rights, Arctic Ice Melt, Bacon Story, Behavioral Economics, Blind Parents, Bronze Age Collapse, California Trends, Canadian Startups, Canadian Shooting Hazards, Cancer Treatment, Cesar Chavez March, Chaos Value, Childhood Adversities, Climate Change, Cold War, Cuban Gay Scene, Dementia Decline, Digital Culture, Disabled in Wheelchairs, Dollar History, Election Rigging, Electoral College, End of Life Care, Energy Defined, Fake News, Female Hazards, Feminism, Fidel Castro, Hair Business, Hate Speech, Health Care in Britain, High Speed Cameras, Jury Selection, Justice System Concerns, Lighting History, Louisiana Justice, Mars Explorer, Mental Health Research, National Security, Navigating Nature, NBC Chimes, Oligarchy Defined, Palm Oil Impact, Pandemic Prediction, Parkinson’s Case, Particle Physics, Phantom Limb Pain, Photosynthesis Improvement, Placebos, Polymer Scientist, Salt History, Science Careers, Sea Rise Reaction, Seminole Wars, Social Enterprise Solutions, Survival Skills for Kids, Thyroid Problems, Trade Policy, Trump, Veteran Affairs Deficiencies, Vitamin D Supplements, Vitex, Voting Fraud in NH, Weapons of Math Destruction, Welfare Roadtrip, White House Renovation, Wilderness Art, Working Women, World War One

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 99 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 255 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 12,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 350 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

Aging  35 mins – “On 4th August 1997, Jeanne Louise Calment died in a French nursing home. Born 122 years and 164 days earlier, Jeanne currently holds the record for the greatest fully authenticated age to which any human has ever lived. And with the ever-growing average life expectancy for humans showing no sign of slowing down, how close are we to cracking the code of longevity? Helping Nicola Davis delve into the age-old problem of ageing this week, prominent biomedical gerontologist Dr Aubrey De Grey reveals his unique, seven-step approach to the problem of ageing. We ask Harvard University’s Dr Justin Werfel why programmed death might be a good thing. And we hear how the University of Kent’s Dr Jenny Tullet is using roundworms to reveal clues about the genetics of ageing.”  At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As”from the pop-up menu.

Aging and Mobility 84 mins – “Mobility is important for health. Learn about mobility, activity, function and falls and how these relate to health. Then explore ways to assess and improve your mobility with an activity plan. Recorded on 10/11/2016. (#31552)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AIDS Concerns 57 mins – “On the week of World Aids Day, a look at HIV and AIDS in New Hampshire. New preventative methods and ever-improving treatments mean that more patients are living longer, healthier lives. But many challenges remain, including testing and insurance discrimination.” (3 links) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AIDS Research 67 mins – “Find out all about the research being carried out at the MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research (CVR)into HIV, AIDS and related viruses in this episode of the Contagious Thinking podcast on #WorldAIDSday. Read more on our blog here: wp.me/p5DCA6-gP Listen and find out about the HIV/AIDS problem from the clinical, scientific and veterinarian perspective, all from researchers at the CVR. Here, we speak with Dr Emma Thomson [2 minutes 15], a local infectious diseases clinician and researcherAgeing within CVR, about the continued clinical challenged that HIV and AIDS poses; Dr Sam Wilson [24 minutes 06], an MRC research fellow whose work in fundamental HIV virology enables us to understand how our cells fight back are immune to infection; and Professor Margaret Hosie [45 minutes 42], whose research into FIV, the feline analogue of HIV, may be able to give us some insight into how we could develop a vaccine for HIV.” At the link click “More,” click “Download” and select “OK” As” from the pop-up menu.

Albanian Cannabis 27 mins – “Linda Pressly and Albana Kasapi investigate the ‘Green Gold’ rush in the Balkan nation” At the link find the title, “Albania’s Cannabis Boom, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04jn88k.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aleppo Overview 20 mins – “The Syrian military has announced it has taken control of two more districts in rebel-held Eastern Aleppo. The CBC’s Margaret Evans shares her observations on the many sides of a once-vibrant city ripped apart by an unending conflict.” At the link find the title, “Nov 28: CBC’s Margaret Evans shares ‘apocalyptic’ view of Aleppo, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20161128_96226.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.

American Progressive Movement 82 mins (2parts) – ”Here we’re going to dig into the beliefs of the original American Progressives (c. 1890s-1920), and we’ll see that they’re a bit different (and more troubling, if you happen to support things like self-ownership and property rights) from what you’ve probably been told about them.” In Part 2 “Those early American Progressives we talked about last time left the United States with a lot of physical and cultural artifacts that seem omnipresent through to today.  Many things that Americans take for granted as timeless examples of Americana are less than a century old and were Progressive innovations, sometimes ironically in light of how many modern-day “conservatives” love some of them.  Some of the details and origins of these artifacts are more troubling than you might think at first glance.” At the title right-click “Download” for Part 1 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same at and for Part 2.

Angie’s List Founder 32 mins – “In 1996, Angie Hicks spent hours reading contractor reviews to members over the phone. Today, the online review and referral service, Angie’s List, is publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange.” At the link find the title,”Angie’s List: Angie Hicks, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161121_hibt_hibtpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal Work Rights 27 mins – “They help us see, they calm us down and they can catch dangerous blood-sugar levels by scent alone. Service animals do life-changing work for humans every day. But who’s looking out for them?” At the link find the title, “Nov 30: Should Canadian unions take up the cause for working animals?, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20161130_60412.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arctic Ice Melt 4 mins – “…Scientists have expressed shock at the huge increases in temperature currently being recorded in the Arctic. Temperatures for November would normally be around -13 degrees Fahrenheit (-25 Celsius). Instead, this month they have been about 32 degrees Fahrenheit (0 degrees C). In addition, sea ice coverage is down 30 percent from levels 25 years ago, and is at the lowest levels ever recorded for this time of year….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bacon Story 16 mins – “Chemist Matt Hartings is excited — and a little frantic — when he receives an unexpected invitation to talk about the science of bacon on The Today Show. Matt Hartings is a chemist who works at American University. When he’s not being bossed around by chairs and deans and provosts, he’s more than happy to be bossed around by his wife and three kids. Matt’s research involves putting nanoparticles inside of polymers to make new stuff that does new kinds of things. He also loves food. And the science of food. He’s currently writing a book on kitchen chemistry and will be speaking about a little of that today.” At the link click “More,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Behavioral Economics 65 mins – “Every day we work hard to motivate coworkers, friends, family members and, most important, ourselves. Some people believe in positive reinforcement or financial incentives, others in tough love. But what works best? Ariely investigates what lies at the root of motivation—how it works, misconceptions and approaches to making better decisions in our own lives.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Parents 20 mins – “LOOK, the charity supporting parents of blind children is 25 years old. CEO Charlotte Carson talks to Peter White about the legacy left by her parents Jennifer and Gareth Bowen and her aims for the organisation’s future.
Denise Leigh and Joy Addo, also both blind mums, talk about the problem of carrying or transporting babies, if you are blind or visually-impaired.
Charlie also offers her experience as a partially-sighted mum to two young daughters.”
At the link right-click “Download’ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bronze Age Collapse P1 47 mins – “The Fall of the Western Roman Empire and its aftermath (discussed by me in Episodes 0004 and 0005) might be the most notorious civilization collapse, but it was by no means the first or even the worst example of that phenomenon. Over a thousand years before Christ, an even more dramatic collapse hit multiple Bronze Age civilizations […]” At the link find the title, “Ep. 0027: The Collapse of Bronze Age Civilizations, Part 1, Sep, 2014,” right-click “Media files PCJ_Ep_0027_Bronze_Age_Collapse_Part_1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bronze Age Collapse P2 55 mins – “Join Prof CJ as he discusses: Some possible explanations for the collapse, including: disease; seismic activity; climate change resulting in food shortages; mass migration (often violent), including the so-called “Sea Peoples,” who ravaged much of the Eastern Mediterranean before being stopped by the Egyptians; changes in weapons, armor, and tactics that might have allowed barbarians […]” At the link find the title, “Ep. 0028: The Collapse of Bronze Age Civilizations, Part 2, Sep, 2014,” right-click “Media files PCJ Ep_0028 Bronze_Age_Collapse Part_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bronze Age Lessons 47 mins – “Theses are just some thoughts on lessons for us Modern Day folks to be gleaned from the Bronze Age Collapse (c. 1200 – 1000 BC.) (Knock on wood, we think Prof CJ might have finally found a method for recording decent-quality podcasts from the car without spending huge amounts of his largely nonexistent fortune.) Join […]” At the link find the title, “Ep. 0030: Lessons from the Bronze Age Collapse, Sep, 2014,” right-click “Media files PCJ_Ep 0030_Lessons from Bronze Age Collapse.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Trends P1 30 mins – “Many believe Gavin Newsom will be the next Governor of the most populous state in the union. Today, in his first in-depth interview since the election, he is our guest here on Sea Change Radio. The former Mayor of San Francisco, and current Lieutenant Governor of California,  Newsom is a nationally recognized pioneer in gay rights, a champion for the environment, and a consistently progressive Democrat. This week, in Part 1 of a two-part series with the Lieutenant Governor, Newsom and host Alex Wise discuss what the result of the recent presidential election might mean for the country, for the Democratic Party, and for the environment. We also talk about California’s energy future, including the decision to shut down the state’s last nuclear power plant and its ambition to achieve a 55% renewable electric grid.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Trends P2 29 mins – “How does Gavin Newsom maintain his optimism in the face of all the destructive policies the president-elect might enact? That’s part of what we talk about today on Sea Change Radio in the second half of our discussion with California’s Lieutenant Governor. We also hear Newsom’s ideas on the future of public transportation, including self-driving vehicles, his thoughts on the ongoing drought, and why he is not particularly hopeful for the Delta Tunnels Project.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Shooting Hazards 15 mins – “Night hunting is supposed to end fatally for animals. But it’s not supposed to kill livestock — and especially not people. In Manitoba, there are concerns hunting at night is becoming too dangerous.” At the link find the title, “Nov 29: Manitoba wildlife group raises concerns over big game night hunting, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20161129_74182.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Startups 24 mins – “The Canadian startup scene is heating up. Meet three people whose startups are sending seismic signals into industries as diverse as construction, health care and financial services.” At the link find the title, “Nov 28: Canadian startup founders on disruptive innovation, 2016” right-click “Media files current_2016118_30184.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Treatment 22 mins – “Cancer is complicated and it’s personal, but a leading cancer researcher says those are also the keys to a cure. Dr. Pier Paolo Pandolfi shares insights from the forefront of a new approach to studying human cancers.” At the link find the title, “Nov 30: When will we cure cancer? Dr. Pier Paolo Pandolfi says ‘we are doing it every day’,” 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161130_74199.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cesar Chavez March 10 mins – Dramatized version of California grape boycott march by Cesar Chavez. At the link find the title, “Episode 100 (Peregrinar), Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files thememorypalace.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chaos Value 26 mins – “Many of us spend lots of time and energy trying to get organized. We KonMari our closets, we strive for inbox zero, we tell our kids to clean their rooms, and our politicians to clean up Washington. But Economist Tim Harford says, maybe we should embrace the chaos. His new book is Messy: The Power of Disorder to Transform Our Lives.” At the link find the title, “Episode 53: Embrace the Chaos, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161122 hiddenbrain_53.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childhood Adversities 66 mins – “Nadine Burke Harris, M.D., FAAP, Founder and CEO, Center for Youth Wellness Joyce Dorado, Ph.D. UCSF Healthy Environments and Response to Trauma in Schools Jane Stevens, Founder, Publisher, ACEs Connection James Redford, Director and Producer, Resilience—Moderator Resilience is an amazing story of research, understanding and hope for our children’s futures and for ourselves. People hope that every child lives in an safe and healthy environment. Most people know that neglect, abuse and unhealthy environments are damaging to children. The new documentary Resilience is about dedicated people discovering that adverse childhood experiences can lead to poor physical and mental outcomes in childhood and can carry over to life-threatening issues and health risks in adulthood. The film is about new discoveries and research about life, health and hope for people at all ages” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Climate Change and Food 58 mins – “Climate change is as much about what we eat as what we drive or where we live. Rising heat is hitting chocolate, wine, beer, bread and other foods we love, while our appetites for meat, fish, and dairy are responsible for a host of unsustainable farming practices. So what’s a climate-conscious eater to do? On today’s program we’ll look at how climate change affects us at the kitchen table. We’ll ask whether all those craft beers, fair-trade coffees, and single-batch chocolates are part of the solution, or whether going vegan is the key to a climate-friendly diet.” At the link right-click Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Issues 60 mins – “Climate scientist Paul Beckwith will tell us why sea ice around the world is in retreat, and what it means for our weather. Is it a planetary climate emergency? From the Center for Negative Carbon Emissions, Dr. Klaus Lackner explains capturing carbon from the atmosphere. It may be our best chance.  Radio Ecoshock 161130” At the link right-click “Download…Lo-Fi” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cold War 90 mins (2 parts) “In this episode and the next, we’re going to look at two instances in the early Cold War of American-sponsored and -instigated overthrows of democratically elected governments, and their replacement by unpopular, USA-backed dictatorships.  Of course, I’m talking about Iran and Guatemala in the early-1950s.  This episode will set the context and cover Iran.  Next time we’ll cover Guatemala and consequences of these sorts of operations.” In Part 2 “Encouraged by their success against Iran’s democratic government (covered in last episode), the Dulles Brothers’ next move was against the small central American country of Guatemala, where a left-of-center government appeared to be threatening the interests of the United Fruit Company.” At the title right-click “Download” for Part 1 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same at and for Part 2.

Cuban Gay Scene 9 mins – “As Cuba marks the death of Fidel Castro, journalist James Kirchick looks back on his record on gay rights, from the round-ups of the 60s to the laws that still haven’t changed.” At the link find the title, “Nov 29: Fidel Castro should not be celebrated, says journalist, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161129_38542.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia Decline 46 mins – “A new study shows that dementia rates among people over 65 have declined from 11.6 percent in 2000 to 8.8 percent in 2012—a 24 percent drop. This means one million fewer people than expected suffer from the condition. Researchers say the declines seem to be associated with healthier life styles and higher levels of education. The news is decidedly welcome, but the overall public health challenge remains daunting. Five million Americans are diagnosed with dementia today and that number is expected to triple by 2050. Please join us for an update on new efforts to prevent, diagnose, and treat Alzheimer’s and other kinds of dementia.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Digital Culture 47 mins – “It’s a familiar scene: parents or grandparents turning to their younger family members for help learning the latest technology or social media. (Diane’s own teenage grandson introduced her to emojis.) And teens are well-equipped for the job: Young people say they feel the pressure to be “always on” and connected more than ever. But digital communication can facilitate as well as complicate teen relationships, including those with older people. This hour, Diane talks with her grandson Benjamin and two experts about how young people use technology to communicate today and what it means for their relationships, especially with older generations.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Disabled in Wheelchairs 45 mins – “Co-founder of Motivation, David Constantine MBE, delivers the 48th Annual Designability Lecture at the University of Bath, talking about his experiences as a wheelchair user and creating a charity / social enterprise to give disabled people in the developing world access to wheelchairs.” At the link find click “More,” rclick “Download” and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Dollar History 210 Mins (4 parts) – “Why cover this topic?  First off, because the history of money is a lot more interesting than you might  think, and it’s absolutely crucial to understanding the world, past, present, and future. This will be part 1 of a multipart series (right now I estimate it will probably be around 4 parts) covering the history of the United States dollar.  The series will be non-contiguous — ie, interspersed with episodes on other, probably non-related topics.” In Part 2We continue with our non-consecutive mini-series on the history of the US dollar, which has changed repeatedly over the centuries.” In Part 3 “Here it is, another installment in our non-consecutive mini-series on the tumultuous history of the United States Dollar.” In Part 4 Bretton Woods and related matters are presented. At the title right-click “Download” for Part 1 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for the other parts.

Election Rigging 17 mins – “President-elect Donald Trump said the election was rigged because millions of non-citizens voted (although there is no evidence to support the claim), 2016 Green Party Presidential Candidate Jill Stein has requested audits in multiple swing states with Wisconsin being the first to begin a recount, and Hillary Clinton’s campaign is willing to go along with a recount despite that Clinton allies are, according to Politico, “irritated with Jill Stein.” Even with all of the talk of tampering, the actual chances of voter fraud are very slim now. The past, however, is a different story. In this BackStory short take, the Guys take a look at the history of rigged elections.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electoral College 46 mins – “For the second time in 16 years, a candidate has taken the presidency by winning the electoral vote, but not the popular vote. The Electoral College is enshrined in the U.S. Constitution. But critics have long said it’s an antiquated, even undemocratic system. At various points in history–including after the Gore-Bush election–there have been attempts to abolish the system. Bills to do that were introduced last week in the House and Senate. Few believe they will succeed. Defenders of the Electoral College say abolishing it would have a devastating effect on our constitutional form of government. Understanding the Electoral College-–and prospects for changing it.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

End of Life Care 64 mins – “Why do so many Americans die in ways they say they don’t want, suffering and tethered to machines? When Harvard physician Dr. Angelo Volandes had trouble explaining to his dying patient the possible consequences of her treatment options, he walked her down to the ICU. She immediately understood where her decision might lead, and it changed her outlook. Since then, Dr. Volandes has created dozens of powerful videos to support advance care planning and facilitate difficult conversations about end-of-life care. His ground-breaking work has attracted support from the NIH and private foundations, and his efforts have helped thousands of clinicians, patients and families have “the conversation.” Dr. Volandes’ efforts have demonstrated the power of stories and video in helping patients make decisions that reflect their preferences and values. He has applied his approach to large health-care systems and entire states, and his work has been translated into multiple languages. His presentation will include excerpts from several videos as well as from his recent book, The Conversation: A Revolutionary Plan for End-of-Life Care.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Defined 4 mins – “Episode: 1265 Science and the myth of the self-evident truth.  Today, a closer look at scientific knowledge.“ At the link right-click “Download’ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 20 mins – “British Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn was elected on a wave of social media enthusiasm.  Few imagined it, but Donald Trump is the US president-elect. Now it has been revealed fake news reports were shared hundreds of thousands of times in the lead up to the US presidential election. It has all become possible in the internet age. So what is the responsibility of internet giants Facebook and Google? Has the internet changed the nature of politics and even democracy?… At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 20 mins – “We track down a fake-news creator in the suburbs, uncover his empire of fake-news sites, and get him to tell us his secrets.” At the link find the title, “#739: Finding The Fake-News King, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161202_pmoney_pmpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Hazards 76 mins – “Join author Jessica Buchleitner and contributors Silvia Vasquez Lavado (Peru), Nwe Oo (Bangladesh/Burma border), Masha Maslova (Moldova), and Boona Cheema (India) as they offer advice for our new U.S. president to tackle the most prominent issues women face globally. Will the United States take a stand to ratify the CEDAW ordinance? What will be the fate of immigrant women with children and the programs they depend on? Each contributor offers her story and unique experiences serving communities through various means.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feminism 27 mins – “The BBC’s Katy Watson travels to Los Angeles and asks why feminism is still regarded by many as a word to avoid. Despite an ongoing gender pay gap, and a lack of female business-leaders, why does the word continue to raise an eyebrow?” At the link find the title, “The Taboo of Feminism, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04jdc98.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fidel Castro 27 mins – “Cuba’s iconic leader has died – we look back over his life” At the link find the title, “The Life of President Fidel Castro, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04j90lp.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hair Business 8 mins – “You’ve probably heard of a hair shirt — it’s rough, woven out of goats’ hair and worn as penance.  Now imagine a wedding garment fashioned from human hair. Kishore Kumar donned one to make his nuptial vows. The third generation Indian hair trader is just one of the eccentric characters profiled in anthropologist Emma Tarlo’s new book: “Entanglement: The Secret Lives of Human Hair.” Kumar “proudly showed me his wedding outfit and I have a photograph of him sitting in a gold throne wearing it,” Tarlo says. The hair “fabric” had been dyed blonde and decorated with tiny red and gold sequins. “He also had this idea that he was going to start manufacturing hair for all sorts of different uses, such as fertilizer for food, for skin products, and cloth,” she adds. Indeed, human hair has been put to all sorts of uses. In Korea and Japan, hair has been used for the lining of men’s suits. In south Indian Hindu temples, devotees have their heads shaved, and the shorn hair is carefully reclaimed. “It’s immediately put in these safes, locked safes and then it’s all transported up to the sorting workshops where it’s sorted into very precise lengths,” Tarlo explains. “Then about three times a year it’s auctioned off by e-auction to prevent hair cartels and fixing of prices.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Speech 54 mins – “Hate incidents on college campuses have been on the rise recently, raising these questions among college and high school students alike: What’s free speech?  And what’s hate speech? What’s dissent?  What’s a threat?” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care in Britain 22 mins – “Glasgow GP, writer, broadcaster, and The BMJ’s weekly columnist Margaret McCartney joins us to talk about her new book “The State of Medicine: Keeping the Promise of the NHS”. At the link find the title, “ Margaret McCartney wants to fix the NHS, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 295165548-bmjgroup-margaret-mccartney-wants-to-fix-the-nhs.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

High Speed Cameras 120 mins – “David Kronstein (tesla500) joins us to discuss the design of his high speed camera, the Chronos 1.4. Lots of technical detail about camera sensors, FPGAs and how to put the whole thing together.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jury Selection 52 mins – “At the trial of James Batson in 1982, the prosecution eliminated all the black jurors from the jury pool. Batson objected, setting off a complicated discussion about jury selection that would make its way all the way up to the Supreme Court. On this episode of More Perfect, the Supreme Court ruling that was supposed to prevent race-based jury selection, but may have only made the problem worse.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Justice Systems Concerns 58 mins – “On this episode of Slate Money, hosts Felix Salmon of Fusion, Cathy O’Neil, data scientist and author of Weapons of Math Destruction, Slate’s Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann and special guest, Laura Arnold the Co-Chair of the Laura and John Arnold Foundation discuss the economics of Philanthropy. Topics discussed on today’s show include: -Criminal-justice data and algorithms -The responsibility of philanthropy -Philanthropy in the age of Trump” The Eye in the Sky program is a major item of discussion. At the link find the title, “The Optimism Edition, Nov, 2016,”right-click “Media files SM1663377024.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lighting History 21 mins – “In this episode: How we got from candles made out of cow fat to as much light as we want. The history of light is the history of economic growth — of things getting faster, cheaper, and more efficient.” At the link find the title, “#534: The History Of Light, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161130_pmoney_podcast113016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Louisiana Justice 56 mins – “If you can’t afford a lawyer, one will be appointed to you – that’s how it’s supposed to work. But in New Orleans, the lawyer in charge of representing poor people accused of crimes is saying no. His office doesn’t have enough money or time to do a good job, he says, so he’s refusing some serious cases, which is jamming up the courts and leaving hundreds of people stuck in jail with no lawyer. His goal? To break the system in order to fix it.” At the link find the title, “If you can’t afford a lawyer, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files If-you-cant-afford-a-lawyer_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mars Explorer 53 mins – “What does it really take to survive on Mars? Neil Tyson interviews Andy Weir, author of “The Martian,” NASA/JPL engineer Adam Steltzner, NASA Planetary Science Director Dr. Jim Green, Sheyna Gifford, co-host Matt Kirshen, Chuck Nice, and Bill Nye.” At the link click the box with “More,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Health Research 27 mins – “Adolescence is a time when life-long mental health difficulties can first emerge. Researchers in Cambridge have scanned hundreds of teenage brains and combined the data with genetic information to try to work out why this happens. They hope that by identifying factors which increase the risk of developing conditions like schizophrenia, doctors will eventually be able to intervene early. 1 in 5 burn wounds can become infected as they start to heal. But even burns experts can’t tell which patients need antibiotics without removing dressings and swabbing the wound to culture it in the lab. British researchers have come up with a “smart” bandage – containing tiny nanocapsules of dye which “glows” when it comes into contact with enzymes released by infecting bacteria. It’s hoped if that trials prove successful then the dressings will be used to spot infections earlier. A new study has revealed that nearly all costly add-on treatments offered by UK fertility clinics to increase the chance of having a baby through IVF are not supported by high-quality evidence proving that they work.Australian novelist Julia Leigh’s book Avalanche describes her own personal IVF experience.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Security 59 mins – “Experts discuss how the United States can better prepare for and protect the homeland with the growing threat of ISIS inspired terrorist attacks on U.S. soil.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select ‘Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Navigating Nature 52 mins – “Nowadays, there are all kinds of devices to help us find our way through the world. But before all that stuff, before even cartography, humankind was navigating with nature as the guide. The adventurer Tristan Gooley is committed to recovering and teaching the lost arts natural navigation. Rocks, trees, grass, ducks, puddles, clouds, and the wind are all compass hands to him. Gooley joins us Wednesday to share what he’s learned about natural navigation and the joys of learning nature’s subtle signs. Tristan Gooley is the author of several books about natural navigation, including The Lost Art of Reading Nature’s Signs and his newest, How to Read Water. “ At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

NBC Chimes 18 mins – “The NBC chimes may be the most famous sound in broadcasting. Originating in the 1920s, the three key sequential notes are familiar to generations of radio listeners and television watchers. Many companies have tried to trademark sounds but only around 100 have ended up being accepted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office — and NBC’s iconic chimes were the first.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oligarchy Defined 48 mins – “Why do organizations, even ostensibly democratic ones, often seem to be less-than-democratic in practice?  The Iron Law of Oligarchy is the answer!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Palm Oil Impact 13 mins – “Palm oil is found in processed food products including peanut butter, ice cream, chocolate bars, drinks and even cosmetics. Much of it comes from vast plantations on former low lying peatlands in Malaysia and Indonesia. But the replacement of native forests by palm oil plantations brings with it a long list of serious environmental problems. The native peat is a concentrated store of carbon which when dried and burnt, releases large amounts of carbon dioxide. The land subsides and is more prone to flooding by salty seawater. The draining of the peat even affects nearby forests which Burn more often. Peter Hadfield travelled to Borneo and reports for The Science Show….At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pandemic Prediction 30 mins – “When pathogenic viruses pass from their animal reservoir into humans – known as ‘spillover events’ – the consequences can be severe. For example, it is thought that the West African Ebola outbreak began with an 18-month-old child in Guinea contracting the virus from a wild animal. To prevent future disease epidemics, we need a better understanding of the nature of spillover events, and the viruses involved in them. In this month’s podcast, we spoke to Professor Jonna Mazet, Director of the One Health Institute at the University of California, Davis. Jonna is also the Global Director of PREDICT, an ambitious project that is trying to identify any pathogens that might pose a threat to human health, and working to build capacity in areas of the world that are at risk of disease emergence.” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parkinsons Case 12 mins – “When Amanda Buch’s beloved father is diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, it sparks a passion in her for neuroscience. Amanda Buch is a budding neuroscientist and visual artist who draws inspiration from the intersection of brain biology and creativity in art. She graduated from Columbia University with a degree in Biophysics and will be pursuing a PhD in Neuroscience. As a scientist, Amanda aims to better characterize and treat the dysfunctional brain circuitry involved in Parkinson’s disease. She has approached this goal over the past five years by studying it from the perspectives of stem cell therapy, molecular signaling, biomedical engineering, and neuroscience. Her most developed work has involved using sound as a therapy for the brain, a technology called focused ultrasound. She has been coauthored in top science journals including Nature. She enjoys applying her understanding of the brain and her artistic abilities to science communication and illustration.” At the link click “More,” right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Particle Physics 57 mins – “In this inaugural lecture, Dean of the Faculty of Science, Professor Nick Brook, discusses some of the latest results from an experiment that uses the Large Hadron Collider. The Large Hadron Collider beauty (LCHb) experiment studies the decay and properties of particles containing heavy (charm and beauty) quarks, produced in the forward region from proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It uses the LHC as an intensity frontier machine and has recorded the world’s largest data sample of beauty and charm particles. This enables precise studies, including discoveries of new states and measurements of their properties.” At the link find the title, “The beauty and hidden charm of the Large Hadron Collider, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 295852932 uniofbath the beauty and hidden charm of the large hadron collider.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phantom Limb Pain 15 mins – “Max Ortiz-Catalan discusses his trial of using augmented reality, motor execution technology to help treat patients with phantom limb pain.” At the link find the title, “Phantom motor execution: The Lancet: December 1, 2016,” right-click “Media files 01december-phantomlimb.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Photosynthesis Improvement 33 mins – “Increasing efficiency in photosynthesis has been one of the desired goals of plant biology.  A recent paper in the journal Science presents work by a team led by Dr. Stephen Long from the University of Illinois/University of Lancaster.  By overexpressing three genes in tobacco, the plants were able to increase carbon assimilation, showing that there are mechanisms to improve the process.  We discuss the paper, but also its extensions into food security, climate change and future fuels.  Dr. Long’s website is here and his Gate’s foundation project is here.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Placebos 34 mins – “We talk to science writer Erik Vance about his new book Suggestible You: The Curious Science of Your Brain’s Ability to Deceive, Transform, and Heal.” At the link find the title, “157 Erik Vance – The Curious Science of Your Brain’s Ability to Deceive, Transform, and Heal, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 1124efa8-71cc-46c8-a972-0b97cdcc3d8b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.

Polymer Scientist 28 mins – “Plastic Bags and the DNA in our cells are both polymers, very long molecules ubiquitous in nature and in their synthetic form, in materials like polythene, perspex and polystyrene. Professor Dame Julia Higgins has spent a lifetime researching the structure and movement of polymeric material. Trained as a physicist, Dame Julia was one of the early researchers in polymer science and throughout her career worked alongside chemists and engineers. No surprise then that she was the first woman to become both a Fellow of the Royal Society and of the Royal Academy of Engineering. In the 1960s with other young researchers she worked at the Harwell Atomic Energy Research Centre in Oxfordshire, one of the first people to use neutron scattering as a technique to investigate how polymer molecules move. Emeritus Professor of Polymer Science and former Principal at the Faculty of Engineering at Imperial College, London, Professor Higgins tells Jim Al-Khalili how she used her influence as a leading academic to improve representation of women in top posts in science and medicine.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salt History 55 mins – “Neil Tyson and Eugene Mirman explore how salt has been a critical ingredient in history and the development of civilization. Now extended with 12 minutes of Neil and Bill Nye in the Cosmic Crib talking about evolution, Ivan the Gorilla and how bees fly.” At the link click the box with “More,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Careers 80 mins -”At the Hamilton, Montana Performing Arts Center, Vincent speaks with three local high school graduates and two high school teachers about how Rocky Mountain Laboratories influenced school science programs and opened up “ At the link career opportunities.” At the link right-click “…downloadTWIM#140” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sea Rise Reaction 5 mins – “… a new report was released with suggestions for how Seacoast communities should prepare for the effects of climate change. The document could influence town planning and development in the region for years. The report came from the Coastal Risk and Hazards Commission, which was created by the legislature back in 2013. It had 37-members representing Seacoast towns, state agencies, and private-sector interests. Their report identifies where the Seacoast is vulnerable to the effects of climate change and suggests a slew of recommendations for how towns and state and local agencies should respond.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As’ from the op-up menu….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” nd select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seminole Wars 107 mins (2 parts) – “This is the little-known story of how Florida became a part of Team America.  (Spoiler:  It wasn’t totally voluntary…)” In Part 2 “Last time, we covered the First Seminole War; this time, we get to the nastier sequel. The Second Seminole war was the US government’s longest and most expensive Indian War.  It also had many parallels to later campaigns in harsh environments against determined guerrilla fighters, and many lessons which, unfortunately, were not learned, as the nation did its best to consign the conflict to the ‘memory hole’ soon after its end.  Long before the Philippines War, and even longer before Vietnam, there was this brutal war…” At the title right-click “Download” for Part 1 and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu. Do the same for the other parts.

Social Enterprise Solutions 20 mins – “Social entrepreneur Shaun Loney believes you need to find the problem solvers, not the problems. He shares his practical vision to address issues communities face, transforming lives along the way.” At the link find the title, “Nov 29: How solving community problems with social enterprise is changing lives, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20161129_36661.mp3” and select “Save Link Ass” from the pop-up menu.

Survivor Skills for Kids 52 mins – “A few years ago, Paul Tough wrote a book about research showing that character traits like grit, self-control, and optimism are critical to a child’s success. Tough’s latest book builds on that research by explaining how to put it into practice. He argues that a child’s home and school environments are the principle barriers to his or her success. Improve the environment, Tough says, and you can improve the child. He joins us Monday to explain his theory of helping children succeed. Paul Tough is the author of the books How Children Succeed and Whatever It Takes: Geoffrey Canada’s Quest to Change Harlem and America. He is a contributing writer to the New York Times Magazine and a regular contributor to This American Life. His latest book is called Helping Children Succeed: What Works and Why.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thyroid Problems 58 mins – “On this episode of the podcast, we have guest Elle Russ. Elle Russ is a writer, actor, health/life coach, and host of The Primal Blueprint Podcast. As the author of The Paleo Thyroid Solution, she is becoming the leading voice of thyroid health in the burgeoning Evolutionary Health Movement (also referred to as paleo, primal, or ancestral health). Elle has a B.A in Philosophy from The University of California at Santa Cruz and is a certified Primal Health Coach. She sits on the advisory board of The Primal Health Coach Program created by Mark Sisson, bestselling author of The Primal Blueprint. Originally from downtown Chicago, she lives and plays in Malibu, CA. You can learn more about her at http://www.elleruss.com.” At the link right-click “Download Epsidoe Here (MP3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trade Policies 56 mins – “Opposition to global trade was a huge theme in the Presidential election, and President-elect Trump promises to renegotiate NAFTA and ditch the TPP on his first day in office.  We look at the implications of possible Trump administration trade policies for U.S. workers, for our international trading partners, and for the economy.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Trump and Climate Change 30 mins – “New President elect of the USA Donald Trump is a climate change denier, and so what does his rise to power mean for the environment? Among his early pledges he states: “The Trump Administration will make America energy independent. We will end the war on coal, and rescind the coal mining lease moratorium, the excessive Interior Department stream rule, and conduct a top-down review of all anti-coal regulations issued by the Obama Administration.” He promises to rip up climate deals and get the USA mining and burning fossil fuels again, giving jobs back to areas that need them. Costing The Earth will take each sector and try to predict what the next four years will hold for each energy generator. Is there any good news for the environment or will Trump’s election usher in a return to dirty, polluting, fossil fuel-burning days that we were pulling away from?”

Trump and Trade 47 mins – “Core supporters of President-elect Donald Trump and many who supported Senator Bernie Sanders for president agree on at least one issue. They both believe that globalization and free trade deals have undermined American workers. Now with Donald Trump heading to the White House, prospects for U.S. participation in the Trans-Pacific Partnership have all but evaporated. There are also many who believe he’ll make good on his promises to make substantial changes to the North American Free Trade Agreement and impose higher tariffs on other foreign-made goods. Join us to discuss what less free trade could mean for the American workers and the U.S. Economy” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Trump Businesses 47 mins – “Donald Trump touted his business successes on the campaign trail. Now, as President-elect, his far-flung corporate empire has raised red flags for ethics watchdogs. Trump tried to address this by handing management of his company over to his children – and vowed to keep them out of his political life. But critics say the move hardly addresses the conflicts of interest that could arise in office. And concerns deepened after his daughter Ivana Trump attended a meeting with the Japanese prime minister last Friday, which was Trump’s first face-to-face with a head of state. Diane and guests discuss questions about Donald Trump’s corporate empire as he prepares for the presidency.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Trump Campaign Boss 54 mins – “Kellyanne Conway discusses her life working on a New Jersey blueberry farm as an adolescent in the summers and being brought up by her mother, grandmother, and two unmarried aunts. She reflects on how she became conservative through the values her family placed in her and the inspiring reelection campaign of Ronald Reagan in 1984. Brought in by Donald Trump in August, Conway talks about how she told Trump that he was losing but there was a pathway to victory, which she helped the campaign realize and bring about Donald Trump’s victory. Finally, Conway discusses how she is able to balance being a wife and mother with running a presidential campaign and what the future holds for her.” At the link find the title,”Kellyanne Conway discusses the presidential election of 2016, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161130-conway.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Opposition 27 mins – “The concept of “allyship” has been making the rounds in progressive political circles for a few years. It seems easy, but doing the work of a real ally can be hard. Being an ally means you want to take part in activism even though you are not a member of the group being oppressed. If you are white, you want to support people of color protesting racism. If you are straight, you want to support the LGBTQ community’s fight for equality. How that support plays out is where things get complicated. Is it a Facebook post, ormarching with Black Lives Matter, or taking your racist aunt to task at Thanksgiving dinner? In the wake of Donald Trump’s election, wearing safety pins has emerged as a way to show support and solidarity to people who feel most threatened by Trump’s agenda. Writer and activist Lara Witt is not impressed by the safety pin movement. In her recent article on Medium.com, “Your Safety Pins Are Not Enough,” Witt challenges anyone who thinks that a safety pin equals effective activism. “The safety pin is a band-aid on a broken arm,” she says. “It’s not going to do very much.” This week on The Remix we talk to Witt about the reaction to her article, and how she thinks we can all be better allies.” At the link find the title, “Beyond safety pins: How to be a better ally, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files safetyweb.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Veteran Affairs Deficiencies 6 mins – “The Department of Veterans Affairs has policies in place to help ensure the privacy, safety, and dignity of women veterans when they receive care at its medical facilities. For example, exam rooms must have privacy curtains and exam tables must face away from doors. However, we found many instances of noncompliance with these policies. We also found that 27 percent of VA medical facilities lacked an onsite gynecologist. We recommended that VA improve its oversight of care for women veterans, including monitoring access to services such as gynecology and maternity care.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vitamin D Supplements 12 mins – “Despite high quality systematic reviews reporting ineffectiveness, many guideline groups continue to recommend vitamin D supplementation (with or without calcium) for fall or fracture prevention. Recently Public Health England recommended that everyone needs vitamin D equivalent to an average daily intake of 10 μg (400 IU) to protect bone and muscle health, In this podcast, Andrew Grey, associate professor of medicine at the University of Aukland joins us to discuss what the evidence says for who should, and who shouldn’t take vitamin D supplimentation. Read the full uncertainties article: http://www.bmj.com/content/355/bmj.i6201” At the link find the title, “Evidence for vitamin D supplimentation, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 294739789-bmjgroup-evidence-for-vitamin-d-supplimentation.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vitex 30 mins – “Vitex will boost your mood, give you more energy, and cure your man boobs.” At the link find the title, “Vitex with Matt Legge,” right-click “Media files SDS157.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Fraud in NH 4 mins – “New Hampshire polling places were under plenty of scrutiny on Election Day. The attorney general’s office dispatched 50 people to polling locations across the state to keep an eye out for problems. The U.S. Department of Justice had its own Election Day hotline set up to field questions and potential complaints. Officials in the Secretary of State’s office, meanwhile, also kept an eye out for issues. And, despite what President-Elect Donald Trump tweeted Sunday night, nowhere is there any evidence that large groups of people were voting illegally in New Hampshire….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Weapons of Math Destruction 62 mins – “Cathy O’Neil went from being a Wall Street quant to a member of Occupy Wall Street when she saw the ways that Big Data were being used to affect the lives of people every day. In Weapons of Math Destruction, she explores the algorithms that control us, from the way teachers are evaluated, to how loans are granted (or denied). She argues that rather than the impartial arbiters these algorithms are touted to be, they are dangerously opaque and flawed.” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Welfare Roadtrip 58 mins – “UPDATE, Nov. 26, 2016: With Republicans in full control of the federal government, there’s a good chance welfare reform will be an issue they may take on. In anticipation of that, it is worth taking another look at what’s worked and what hasn’t. An updated version of the original episode can be heard below. Twenty years ago, President Bill Clinton vowed to end welfare as we know it. And he did. One of the biggest changes to come out of the 1996 welfare reform law was that that the federal government handed over control of $16.5 billion to the states, in the form of block grants, to spend as they see fit. Today, only a quarter of welfare dollars actually goes toward basic assistance – housing, transportation or essential household items.” At the link find the title, “A welfare check” At the link find the title, “A Welfare Check, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files A-welfare-check_update_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White House Renovation 30 mins – “The Affordable Care Act, the Supreme Court, the Paris Agreement. The Trump administration is sure to bring lots of changes, among them: White House decor. On today’s show we’ll take a historic tour of how first families have put their stamp on the executive mansion, including President Teddy Roosevelt, who created the west wing. Plus, the latest installment of the Ten-Minute Writer’s Workshop with cartoonist and illustrator Tom Gauld.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wilderness Art 38 mins – “Yellowstone may be the first national park, but it was New Hampshire’s White Mountains that for decades prior captured the imagination of American tourists, scientists, and artists. Today, a portrait of Mount Washington’s artistic history. Plus, from Bob Dylan to Yoko Ono, audiences have long had a fascination with the off-beat or out of tune – so why do we love some bad singers and love to hate others? Then, America’s great repository of world knowledge faces an existential predicament. In a world where information is stored in servers and googled at will, can the Library of Congress really keep up? Listen to the full show.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working Women P2 27 mins – “Divya Arya meets the women from rural parts of India who are bucking the trend and working in jobs traditionally done by men. She meets the ‘Solar Mamas’ learning solar engineering, a widowed railway porter taking on the tough job her husband used to do, the women in rural Karnataka finding a voice in local radio, and those learning the male-dominated trades of boat building, masonry, carpentry and farm management.” At the link find the title, “Jobs for the Girls – Part Two, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04j8zq3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One 220 mins (4 parts) – “Since World War I officially began 100 years ago today (that is, July 28th 1914), I decided it would be an opportune time to kick off a multi-part series on this conflict.  (As of right now, I’m not 100% sure how many episodes this will encompass, but I think probably around 4.) “ In Part 2 “We continue our coverage of the unnecessary, freedom- and life-obliterating carnage-fest that was First World War.” In Part 3 “In this episode, I’m primarily going to cover the effects of entering the war on the United States.  Long story short, it was not a good time for civil liberties or the Bill of Rights…” In Part 4 “With this episode, we wrap up our overview of WWI and the incalculable damage it did to the world.  I’ll likely cover other topics related to this war in the future, but this four-part series is my basic overview of some of the war and its most conspicuous results, legacies, and byproducts.” At the title right-click “Download” for Part 1 and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu. Do the same for the other parts.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 264 – Dec 2, 2016: Addiction Problems, Advertising, Alan Greenspan Book, Alcoholic Mom Story, Alternate Reality Stories, Alzheimers Treatment, American Introspection, Ancient American, Bernie Sanders on Trump, Black Holes, Boredom, Breitbart Critique, Bridge Building, Broadband by Electrical Co-ops, Butter-Soup-Vegans, Cash and Charles, Catholic Priest Abusers, Cell Labeling, Charles Mingus, Chillwall.com, CO2 Production and Soil Carbon, Coal in Canada, Concentration Camp Music, Concussion Care, Corruption in Providence, Creativity, Cuban Women, Cyber Security, Dark Matter, De Tocqueville on Democracy, Disabled in Pennsylvania, Disco Music Death, Dollar Store Town, E-discovery, Elder Care, Electoral College, Engineering for Kids, FarmCrowdy in Nigeria, Fungi, Gender and Race, Genetic History, Global Changes, Glyphosate, Godfather Production, Good Samaritan, Haitian Coco Crop, Hal Linden, Hospital Noise, Immigrant Stories, Insomnia, Job Trends, Joe Hill Activist, Julia Child, Jupiter, Justice Clarence Thomas, Lead Poisoning, Leonard Cohen, Madness, Maker Revolution, Marijuana, Mathematics, Meat Eaters, Military Family Life, Millennials in Parents Homes, Mississippi Pioneer Woman, Mosul Battle, Multiple Sclerosis, Native American Myths, Nuclear Weapons Control, Oklahoma Earthquakes, Physics Story for Kids, Populism and Elites, Premed Gap Year, Refugee Rescues, Risk Management, Russian Cowboys, Russian Politics, Selective Attention, Skin Patch Monitor, Solar Research, Southwest Airlines Founder, StoryCorps Thanksgiving Stories, Sustainable Cities, Terminal Burrowing, Thomas Friedman Interview, Trade Policy by US, Trump, Tuberculosis, Turkish Politics, Veteran Flight Training, Women in Science, Working Women, World War One Stories, Zapruder Filmer

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 99 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 255 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 12,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 350 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

Addiction Problems 47 mins – “Addiction in the family. How to spot it, how to respond and help. The U.S. Surgeon General joins us.” At the link find the title, “How To Spot — And Treat — Addiction In Your Family, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_502907809.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Advertising 52 mins – “Wherever you turn these days, commercials, sponsored social media, and other advertising efforts await your attention. The influential thinker Tim Wu says we have the “attention merchants” to thank for that. In a new book, Wu argues that the concerted efforts of advertisers to attract our attention at every opportunity has made us more distracted and less focused than ever before. Wu joins us Monday to explore the rise of the attention merchants and the human costs of their efforts. Tim Wu is an author, policy advocate, and the Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. His writing has appeared in Slate, The New Yorker, Time, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and Forbes. His new book is called  The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alan Greenspan Book 58 mins – “Sebastian Mallaby discusses the life of Alan Greenspan in his book. He is interviewed by Alice Rivlin, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and former vice chair of the Federal Reserve.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Sebastian Mallaby, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.457480.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-upp menu.

Alcoholic Mom Story 58 mins – “Josh’s mother and younger brother were a mess. His mother drank too much. His brother got arrested a lot. Josh hadn’t lived with them since he was nine, and they didn’t play much of a role in his daily life—until duty called, and they took over his life.” At the link you can listen or pay for a download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Alternate Reality Stories 36 mins – “A therapist who creates virtual reality experiences for people with dangerous disorders, a grandmother who uses a headset to escape her surroundings and Ernest Cline on virtual reality in fact and fiction. Listen, decode, and decide: Can alternate realities save us?” At the link find the title, “S02-2: Alternate Reality, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files codebreaker 20161123_e2_322_20161114_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer’s Treatment 66 mins – “Dale E. Bredesen, M.D., Augustus Rose Professor of Neurology, Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA; Founding President, Buck Institute for Research on Aging Alzheimer’s disease is a major global problem and now one of the leading causes of death in the United States. We have recently seen the publication of the first examples of the reversal of cognitive decline in early Alzheimer’s disease and its precursors, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and subjective cognitive impairment (SCI). The successful protocol is a personalized, multi-modal approach that involves subtyping of Alzheimer’s and addressing dozens of factors that contribute to cognitive decline.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Introspection 50 mins – “This election season, the media frequently looked to history in an attempt to explain the rise of Donald Trump. We consider how historical parallels don’t always serve us well. Plus, revisiting a notorious murder that the press got wrong; the long reach of a WWII slogan; and attempts in Ukraine to whitewash the nation’s history. A special hour on memory, both historical and personal, and how what we remember shapes our world.” AT the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select ‘Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Ancient American 36 mins – “Today, we’re introducing you to a new Gimlet Media podcast about how big news stories that we thought were over were actually the beginning of something else. It’s called Undone. We spoke with the show’s host, Pat Walters, and give you a peek of their second episode, ‘The Ancient One’. It’s about some very old human remains that two teenagers stumbled on in 1996 — and the 20-year-long fight to identify them.” At th elink find the title, “Introducing Undone, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT7978621410.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bernie Sanders on Trump 56 mins – ”Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT), who is now the outreach chair for Senate Democrats, speaks to reporters at a [Christian Science Monitor] breakfast about the election results, Donald Trump’s presidency, and what’s next for Democrats.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, an audio file is included in the blog archive.

Black Holes 28 mins – “In a career of over fifty years Sir Roger Penrose has changed the way we see the Universe. He carried out seminal research on black holes and the big bang, and he’s questioned the current received wisdom on some of the most important ideas in science, such as quantum mechanics, artificial intelligence and where consciousness comes from. His ideas in geometry directly influenced the work of the Dutch artist M.C. Escher. Now Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford, Roger Penrose is one of the world’s most lauded mathematical physicists. He’s written a number of popular science books in which he certainly doesn’t shy away from the mathematics. Jim al-Khalili talks to Roger Penrose about his continuing fascination with the biggest questions in science.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boredom 56 mins – “Contributor Peter Mitton examines boredom and discovers a little-understood universal state of mind. From its obvious downsides and unexpected upsides, to its evolutionary origins and the way it’s shaping our future — boredom is anything but dull.” At the link find the title, “The Tedium is the Message, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161122_56442.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Breitbart Critique 31 mins – “Ben Shapiro is a pretty conservative guy. He’s written books like Bullies: How the Left’s Culture of Fear and Intimidation Silences Americans and The People vs. Barack Obama, and he’s a former contributor to Breitbart. But earlier this year, Shapiro quit the site over his editor’s unwillingness to defend reporter Michelle Fields, and he declared himself a never Trump-er. Now, he’s facing waves of anti-Semitic abuse by people on the self-declared alt-right. Shapiro is the editor-in-chief of the Daily Wire.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bridge Building 18 mins – “Cable stayed bridges have become increasingly common in the past few decade, and they seem to be the design of choice for modern bridges spanning 500 to as much as 2,000 feet. In this podcast we learn of the mechanics and the advantages of this architecturally appealing design from an expert in the field, Denny Pate, Senior Vice President and Principal Bridge Engineer with Figg Engineering in Tallahassee, Florida.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband by Electric Co-ops 36 mins – “Rural electric co-ops have started delivering high quality Internet access to their member-owners and our guest this week on Community Broadband Bits episode 229 is dedicated to helping these co-ops to build fiber-optic networks throughout their territories. Jon Chambers is a partner at Conexon and was previously the head of the FCC’s Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Analysis. Jon is a strong proponent for ensuring rural residents and businesses have at least the same quality Internet access as urban areas. We talk about his experience and frustration at the FCC, which was content to shovel money at telcos for the most basic infrastructure rather than setting higher expectations to ensure everyone had decent Internet access. We talk about how Co-Mo rolled out fiber to its members without federal assistance, inspiring electric cooperatives around the nation to follow suit. In our discussion, I reference Jon’s blog post “FCC to Rural America: Drop Dead.” In it, he cites some of the reactions in the FCC from his advocacy for real rural solutions rather than signing big checks to big telcos for delivering slow and unreliable Internet access. One of quotes from a Democrat: “Republicans like corporate welfare, so we’re going to give money to the telephone companies to keep the Republicans on the Hill happy.” Neither political party comes off looking very good when it comes to rural connectivity, which fits with our impression. But Jon confirms another of our experiences when he says that when he works with rural communities, politics doesn’t come up. They just focus on solutions.” You can listen at the link or right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download it.

Butter-Soup-Vegans 50 mins – “Now that the long, stressful, divisive election season is behind us, maybe it’s time to talk about something that unites us in pleasure: food. Now, a cultural history of one food that makes everything a little bit better: butter. Plus, the resurgence of rainbow sprinkles. Whether you call them jimmies, funfetti or unicorn food, those brightly colored sugary bits that top cupcakes, cookies & ice cream sundaes, are having a bit of a moment. We’ll talk to a food writer from the New York Times about the current funfetti explosion.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cash and Charles 48 mins – “For Thanksgiving, two archival interviews with American music icons: Cash spoke to Terry Gross in 1997, Charles in 1998.” At the link find the title, “Johnny Cash / Ray Charles, Nov 2016,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Catholic Priest Abusers 56 mins – “In this hour of Reveal, we’re going to revisit an Oscar-winning movie about The Boston Globe’s investigative team that exposed the Catholic Church sex abuse scandal: “Spotlight.” We’ll take you behind the scenes of that investigation, look at the legacy of the groundbreaking story and see how other journalists went on to expose more crimes by Catholic priests around the world.” At the link find the title, “Glare of the spotlight, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files Glare-of-the-Spotlight_update_podcast-master.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cell Labeling 5 mins – “Kat Arney illuminates the story of a molecular ‘highlighter pen’ for growing cells. Like the story of 5-FU or fluorouracil, which we brought you recently, this tale is all about a modified version of one of the chemical building blocks of DNA. But unlike fluorouracil, which is used all over the world as a cancer drug, bromodeoxyuridine caused a lab-based revolution, providing scientists with a vital tool to detect growing and multiplying cells.” At the link find the title, “Bromodeoxyuridine: Chemistry in its element, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files Ciie_Bromodeoxyuridine.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charles Mingus 49 mins – “Jazz great Charles Mingus played every kind of jazz and with almost everybody. Big band, hard bop, bebop, Third Stream, free jazz. With Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Kid Ory, Charlie Parker, on and on. He was a great bassist, composer, band leader – but above all, Mingus exploded the emotional language of jazz. This hour On Point, the singular life and sound of Charlie Mingus.” At the ink right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ChillWall.com 53 mins – “Chillwall is your social community for discovering, managing and sharing local events that matter to you.” This program discusses loneliness in our ultra-connected age and how Chillwall is one means of making local connections. At the link find the title, “335: The lonely generation and more, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files spark_20161120_15547.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CO2 Production and Soil Carbon 60 mins – “Scientist Tobias Friedrich says Earth could heat up 6 degrees C., almost 11 degrees F, in a single lifetime. Richard Heede finds 83 companies, plus 7 countries, are responsible for 65% of all greenhouse gases. He names names. Then restoring carbon to the soil, with Murielle Trouillet from the Government of France.” At the link “Download…Lo-Fi” by right-clicking “Lo-Fi” and selecting “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Coal in Canada 19 mins – “Canada’s coal reserves are the fifth largest in the world but within 14 years Ottawa says it wants none of it to be used to make electricity. Industry workers say the cost in jobs will be high but environmentalists say the cost in lives is already high.” At the link find the title, “Nov 22: Canada’s plan to phase-out coal-powered electricity by 2030 sparks concern,” right-click “Media files current_20161122_78819.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concentration Camp Music 39 mins – “Today, voices of Terezin, the Nazi concentration camp used to divert attention from the final solution. We’ll hear about how prisoners held under brutal conditions created art and music amid the horrors of the holocaust Plus, what happens when a protest movement professing all-or-nothing absolutism splits in two? We’ll find out how a splinter group of vegan activists toned down their goals and built a powerful machine for change.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concussion Care 18 mins – “Concussion is a clinical diagnosis made after a head injury with consequent associated signs, symptoms, and neurological or cognitive impairment (infographic – http://bmj.co/conrecG). In the absence of strong evidence, most recommendations on the management and recovery from concussion are based on international expert consensus. In this podcast John Brooks, academic clinical fellow in general practice, and Simon Kemp, chief medical officer for the Rugby Football Union take us through the process of guiding a patient through recovery and back into everyday life, including sport.” At the link find the title, “What to do after a concussion, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 293652172-bmjgroup-what-to-do-after-a-concussion.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concussion Effects 6 mins – “Four years ago, Carla Ciccone was out for dinner when a stack of plates smashed onto her head. Diagnosed with a concussion which led to a deep depression, she says the experience turned out to be a because of what she learned along the way to recovery.” At the link find the title,”Nov 18: How a concussion led Carla Ciccone to value life’s fragility,” right-click “Media files current_20161118_16789.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in Providence 39 mins – “On today’s episode of Reply All we are bringing you the first episode of Gimlet’s new show Crimetown. Crimetown is by the creators of HBO’s The Jinx. This season is about organized crime and corruption in Providence, Rhode Island.” At the link find the title, “Introducing Crimetown, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media filesGLT9662626976.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity 10 mins – “Traditional education classifies students as being either artistic or scientific. Some say this rigidity ignores what links science and arts, and that’s creativity. So how is creativity encouraged? In 2014, The University of Sydney opened the Charles Perkins Centre aimed at fostering collaboration by linking Sydney’s biggest hospital, Royal Prince Alfred with the Medical School, and biomedical research. Herbert Huppert considers creativity in physics and how teams in different countries work together.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Women 27 mins – “From a Bolero concert to a cancer ward, and from the apartment of a guy who helps Cubans get foreign visas to an Afro-Cuban Santeria ceremony, reporter Deepa Fernandes finds out how ordinary Cuban women have lived, loved and invented their way through dwindling resources and political isolation.” At the link find the title, “Candela: The Lives of Cuban Women, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Meddia files p04hd9tx.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Security 60 mins – “Minister assisting the prime minister for cyber security Dan Tehan addresses the National Press Club on the challenge of protecting Australian interests in the age of cyber warfare.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Dan Tehan, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_DanTehan_2311_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dark Matter 31 mins – “In 1933, Swiss astronomer Fritz Zwicky published a paper inferring the existence of what he called “dunkle Materie”, or dark matter. It was decades before this theory was taken seriously by the scientific community, but today the idea that the universe is filled with vast quantities of mysterious stuff that we can’t see and have never detected directly is considered mainstream science. But how has the world of science progressed in recent times? And does dark matter represent anything more than a proxy for our misinterpretation of the laws of gravity? To help reveal what we do know about dark matter, Hannah Devlin is joined in the studio by University College London astrophysicist Dr Andrew Pontzen. We also hear from Dr Peter Capak of the Nasa/JPL Spitzer Science Center at the California Institute of Technology, who is part of a consortium hoping to probe the nature of dark matter by mapping 30 billion galaxies in 2019. And finally, from Dr Sarah Malik of Imperial College London, who is a part of a team at the Large Hadron Collider hoping to detect the undetectable.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

De Tocqueville on Democracy 89 mins – “Democracy is in peril! So said Tocqueville in 1835 and 1840 when Democracy is America was published, and so would he likely say now. Democracy is always just one demagogue away from stripping us of our liberties, though certain structural and cultural features can make that more or less likely. Tocqueville liked our spirit of volunteerism, our civic activeness, our energy and inventiveness and competitiveness, and the pervasiveness of religion (at the time) in American culture. But he didn’t like our groupthink, our tendencies toward materialism and caring only about our own small circle (what he called “individualism”), our lack of philosophical curiosity, and was in favor of a strong separation between church and state. He thought that people in a democracy value equality over freedom, and that in the absence of a strong spiritual countervailing force, we’d spend more energy pursuing material comfort and so would be more likely to allow a tyrant who promises this to us to take control. He also feared the rise of a new aristocracy out of the business world, with bosses becoming the new de facto lords. Then again, he also feared a race war and thought for sure that if the South tried to secede, the federal government would be too weak to prevent this, so there’s that. This discussion was recorded live at Brown University 10/27/16 with Mark, Seth, Wes, and Dylan engaging the political moment and with an audience during the Q&A portion at the end.” At the link find the title, “Episode 152: Alexis de Tocqueville on Democracy in America (PEL Live!),” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled in Pennsylvania 58 mins – “Joyce welcomes Peri Jude Radecic, chief executive officer of the Disability Rights Network of Pennsylvania. During the show, Ms. Radecic will discuss the mission of the organization in depth, which is to advance, protect, and advocate for the human, civil, and legal rights of Pennsylvanians with disabilities.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disco Music Death 24 mins – “Hey Surprisingly Awesome listeners – we think you’ll love Undone, a new show from Gimlet Media. It’s about how the big stories we thought were over, were actually the beginning of something else. Hosted by Pat Walters and developed with help from the documentary series Retro Report, Undone challenges what you thought you knew about history.” At the link find the title, “Surprise Surprise! Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT7154500524.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dollar Store Town 18 mins – “Go into any dollar store in the United States and you’ll find the same kind of stuff. There are grocery items and cleaning products, some of them generic and others brand-named. But then there are other things for sale—toys and jewelry and knick-knacks that have a kind of generic cheapness to them. Dollar stores are not just a U.S. phenomenon. They can be found in Australia and the United Kingdom, the Middle East and Mexico. And a lot of the stuff—the generic cheap stuff for sale in these stores—comes from one place. A market in China, called the International Trade Market, or: the Futian market.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

E-discovery 24 mins – “The rapid embrace of emergent technologies has flooded the legal marketplace with new tools and processes to help make attorneys’ daily lives better in every way. In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek sit down with CloudNine Vice President of Professional Services Doug Austin to discuss the hottest changes and trends surrounding e-discovery.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elder Care 58 mins – “Speaking from her recent book, Tips for Helping Your Aging Parents (Without Losing Your Mind), elder care expert Kira Reginato shares her best tips for keeping your mind, temper and sense of humor as you care for a loved one. Kira’s upbeat approach outlines the basics of how to take care of anyone as they age without sacrificing taking care of yourself. Reginato, a gerontologist and elder care consultant, draws on her three decades of expertise helping older adults and their families, as well as from being the primary caregiver for her father. She knows the weight gain, the interrupted sleep, the worry, the resentment, along with the funny and tender moments. She’s on a mission to reduce the caregiving burden she sees every day with her clients. She provides practical methods for combating “caregiving overwhelm” and helps you manage expectations of your loved one and yourself.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electoral College 56 mins – “Last week’s presidential election marked the fifth time that there was a split on the popular and electoral college vote. Of course, it wasn’t the first time it’s happened in the early years of 21st century, and that’s got a lot of people are asking: why do we have an electoral college? How’d we end up with this obscure voting method? Defenders argue it’s a cornerstone of the American republic, while opponents counter that it doesn’t value each vote equally. Thursday, we’ll hear from both sides of the debate.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineering for Kids 7 mins -”TED Resident Fawn Qiu designs fun, low-cost projects that use familiar materials like paper and fabric to introduce engineering to kids. In this quick, clever talk, she shares how nontraditional workshops like hers can change the perception of technology and inspire students to participate in creating it.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FarmCrowdy in Nigeria 27 mins – “Segment 4: FarmCrowdy (7m) – Nigeria’s first online platform to unite investors with millions of small farmers in the country and to release the potential of millions of acres on unutilised arable land. Click talks to the CEO Onyeka Akumah.” Segment 1: Pakistan Online Piracy (8m); Segment 2: Airway-on-a-Chip (6m); Segment 3: Fusing Robotics With Textiles (7m) At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fungi 28 mins – “Fungi are responsible for rotting fruit, crumbling brickwork and athlete’s foot. They have a mouldy reputation; but it’s their ability to destroy things that enables new life to grow. 90% of all plants depend on fungi to extract vital nutrients from the soil. And it’s probably thanks to fungi that the first plants were able to colonize land 450 million years ago. Professor Lynne Boddy shares her passion for fungi with Jim Al-Khalili and describes some of the vicious strategies they use to defend their territory. Direct strangulation and chemical weapons; it’s all happening underground.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender and Race 19 mins – “Now more than ever, it’s important to look boldly at the reality of race and gender bias — and understand how the two can combine to create even more harm. Kimberlé Crenshaw uses the term “intersectionality” to describe this phenomenon; as she says, if you’re standing in the path of multiple forms of exclusion, you’re likely to get hit by both. In this moving talk, she calls on us to bear witness to this reality and speak up for victims of prejudice.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic History 52 mins -”Friday, the writer and oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee is our guest. He’s written a book that tells the epic tale of our quest to unravel the human genome. It’s the story of a long lineage of scientists—from Mendel, to Darwin, Watson, Crick, and countless others—and their efforts to understand the workings of the very threads of our existence. But how, Mukherjee wonders, can we best apply that knowledge? And what does it mean to be human when we can read and write our own genetic information? Siddhartha Mukherjee is the author of The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer, which won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in general nonfiction. He is an assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University and a cancer physician and researcher. He has published articles in NatureThe New England Journal of MedicineThe New York Times, and Cell. His latest book is called The Gene: An Intimate History” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Changes 28 mins – “The Vice-President of the Conservation Foundation in Washington, DC and renowned ecologist Sir Frank Fraser Darling explores the concept of Man’s responsibility for his natural environment in his Reith series entitled ‘Wilderness and Plenty’. In his fourth lecture entitled ‘Global Changes – Actual and Possible’, Sir Frank Fraser Darling explores the problem of overpopulation and its likely effect on the natural world. He considers the population problem in relation to other environmental factors such as increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, increased reliance on technology and the reduction in all natural environmental buffers. He ponders whether rises in prosperity and population might just signal the decline of the habitable world.” At the link right-click “Global Changes – Actual and Possible, Nov, 1969,” right-click “Media files p02qsl58.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Glyphosate 45 mins – “In the first part of this week’s podcast you’ll learn how to debunk a viral claim.  There are repeated claims that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the weed killer Roundup, is detected in a plethora of food, beverages and body fluids.  The reports are designed to scare people, especially targeting parents that are concerned about the food they feed to their families. This week a glossy brochure surfaced making claims that glyphosate was detected in Cheerios, Oreos, organic snack foods, and many other common groceries. However, this was not a legitimate report from a peer-reviewed journal and should not be given much weight.  Nonetheless, a well-meaning Snopes a response that gave the report undue credence.  Fortunately they corrected the record….” At the link right-click right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Godfather Production 53 mins – “Coppola was 29 when he signed on to direct a film based on Mario Puzo’s novel about an Italian-American crime family. “I was always just trying to bluff the studio to let me do it my way,” he says.” At the link find the title, “Francis Ford Coppola On ‘The Godfather’, Nov 2016,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Good Samaritan 9 mins – “Two decades ago, Camilla Gibb had set herself up for what she thought would be her dream job in academia — only to realize the realities of the ivory tower didn’t sit right with her. Then a man she barely knew gave her a gift that would change her life.” At the link find the title, “Nov 21: ‘Like a religious moment’: The gift that gave Camilla Gibb a new life,” right-click “Media files current_20161121_39224.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Haitian Coco Crop 4 mins – “If you’re into chocolate, and you’ve shopped at Whole Foods in the last couple of months, you might have seen Taza Chocolate’s stone ground Haiti bar. It hasn’t been easy, but cocoa production in Haiti has been on the rise in recent years, with more being exported. The Haitian cacao beans Taza buys come from that country’s northeast region, which was unharmed when Hurricane Matthew passed by last month. However, Haiti’s other big cacao-growing region was devastated. In the fall, in Haiti’s far southwest, carpets of cacao beans can be seen along roadsides, drying in the sun. This year is no exception. They lend a splash of normalcy to the wreckage left by Hurricane Matthew….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hal Linden 86 mins – “Emmy and Tony-winning actor and singer Hal Linden has done everything there is to do in show business, including sitcoms, movies, Broadway, nightclubs and even dubbing foreign language films. Hal joins Gilbert and Frank for a look back at his long and varied career and reveals why “Barney Miller” was considered the most authentic of all cop shows. Also, Hal covers Benny Goodman, backs up Perry Como, shares the screen with Harry Morgan and cuts the rug with Donald O’Connor. PLUS: Cab Calloway! Eddie “The Old Philosopher” Lawrence! “Godzilla vs. the Sea Monster”! The Chinese Bing Crosby! And Hal salutes the late, great Abe Vigoda!” At the link right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/4828820/bf6d6e32-5091-4e9c-9880-5e9252756bec.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hospital Noise 29 mins – “A noisy hospital makes it hard to sleep.Studies show it makes it hard to heal too, and when hospital staff experience ‘alarm fatigue’ it’s dangerous. Find out what alarm fatigue is, and meet an MD making a quieter, safer ICU, modelled on your iPhone.” At the link find the title, “Hospital noise is putting patients at risk. Here’s why. Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files whitecoat_20161111_90970.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Stories 27 mins – “This Thanksgiving, we remember that we stand on the shoulders of giants: Our immigrant parents, grandparents, and beyond. So how we live lives worthy of their sacrifices, while still being true to ourselves? Our Iranian-Jewish-American Mash-Up Roben Farzad, creator and host of Full Disclosure, has some surprising answers for us, and a whole lotta insight on how to create your own happiness while doing so.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Insomnia 27 mins – “Sleep disorders affect up to 40 per cent of Canadians. Find out how Dr. Brian Goldman won the battle against sleepless nights. And then: Why so many Canadians can’t get help for sleep apnea, and what one Canadian sleep expert is doing to change that.” At the link find the title, “Tired of waking up tired? Here’s help, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files whitecoat_20161118_94521.mp3 (MP3 – File)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Trends 71 mins – “Erik Hurst of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the state of the labor market in the United States. Hurst notes dramatic changes in employment rates for men and speculates about the causes. Two factors discussed in detail are declines in the manufacturing sector and the rise of high-end video games as a form of leisure.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Joe Hill Activist 52 mins – “…we’re talking about a new play that explores the trial and execution of labor activist Joe Hill. Playwright and legal scholar Debora Threedy says whether Hill was guilty or not, he didn’t get a fair trial. Her play looks at what went wrong, the efforts to save him, the complicated politics of his case, and how Hill’s words live on in music more than a century after his death. Threedy and researcher Jeremy Harmon join us to talk about the production. It’s called ONE BIG UNION.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Julia Child 29 mins – “Julia Child was the first television celebrity chef and one who broke all the rules. The Current looks back on the life of the American who mastered French cuisine and how the star in her 60s changed the way we eat and how we think about food.” At the link find the title, “Nov 21: ‘The revolutionary in pearls’: Julia Child’s recipe for success,” right-click “Media files current 20161121_51298.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jupiter 63 mins – “What are the conditions for planet formation and the emergence of life, and how does the Solar System work? These are the questions the European Space Agency’s latest JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) mission is seeking to address. In this William Herschel Society lecture, Dr Nigel Bannister, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leicester, talks about the engineering challenges of mounting a mission to the largest planet in the solar system which is scheduled to launch in 2022.” At the link click the “More” rectangle, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Justice Clarence Thomas 52 mins – “President-elect Donald Trump could potentially appoint enough Supreme Court justices to create a conservative majority unmatched in 80 years. Law professor RonNell Andersen Jones says that leaves Justice Clarence Thomas poised to be the “granddaddy of the conservative wing of the court.” So Wednesday, Jones joins us, along with scholar Amy Wildermuth, to talk about Thomas’ personality, his jurisprudence, and the contradictions Jones says make him one of the most interesting justices in generations.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lead Poisoning 46 mins – “[starts at 6 mins] The recent lead contamination crisis in Flint, Michigan has brought the dangers of lead exposure back to the forefront of national discussion.  But the really scary part is that almost everyone is regularly exposed to small amounts of lead — a silent pandemic.  And there is no safe level of lead exposure. Dr. David Bellinger, Professor of Neurology at Harvard University (you may remember him from Episode #58, covering neurotoxins in general) explains the dangers of lead, why lead removal is expensive but worth it, and how to treat lead exposure.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leonard Cohen 47 mins – “Before he died earlier this month, Cohen released a new album with songs that wrestled with mortality, transcendence and the question of God — themes he touched on in this 2006 interview with Terry Gross.” At the link find the title, “Remembering Leonard Cohen, Nov, 2016,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Madness P1 56 mins – “What’s it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit’s end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there’s stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.” At the link find the title, “Wit’s End, Part 1 (Encore June 20),” right-click “Media files ideas_20161116_52884.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Madness P2 56 mins – “What’s it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit’s end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there’s stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.” At the link find the title, “Wit’s End, Part 2 (June 27, 2016),” right-click “Media files ideas_20161117_85873.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maker Revolution 3 mins – “Episode: 3095 Making a Revolution.  Today, the Maker revolution.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Effects 27 mins – ”Legalized marijuana is on its way next year. And one of the big questions looming is what it will mean for Canadian teens. A CBC investigation looks into the potency of today’s pot.” At the link find the title, “Nov 25: How changes in today’s marijuana make it more addictive, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161125_39254.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana and Heart Attacks 3 mins – Researchers report that marijuana use can double user risks of heart attack. At the link find the title, “Interview, Nov 15, 2016,” right-click “Media files SoundsOfScience_Nov14_16.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mathematics 55 mins – “This week, Neil Tyson explores the language of the universe and the life of self-taught math genius Ramanujan. With Jeremy Irons and Matthew Brown from “The Man Who Knew Infinity,” co-host Eugene Mirman, mathematician Ken Ono, Mona Chalabi, and Bill Nye.” At the link click the rectangle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meat Eaters 58 mins – “Eating meat: some say we’ve evolved to do it. It’s in our DNA. It’s how we got our big brains. Now — perhaps more than ever — when it comes to the matter of meat, clear-cut answers can be hard to come by. Kevin Ball serves up the arguments.” At the link find the title, “The Matter of Meat: A history of pros and cons, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas 20161123_83641.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Family Life 9 mins – “Ginger Munson of Bedford has a rare perspective on being part of a military family. She is a veteran herself and her husband, George, serves in the N.H. Army National Guard. They met when they were both serving in Korea. She spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello about life in a military family.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Millennials in Parents Homes 47 mins – “The Great Recession is in the rearview mirror. But nearly a third of millennials are still living at home with their parents. And here’s the big change: more Americans aged 18 to 34 are now living with their parents than with romantic partners for the first time since 1880, the first time we kept records. Why are a third of millennials not leaving home? It’s about jobs, loans, rent, pay, late mating. And maybe a culture shift. This hour On Point, millennials, staying home.” (2 guest) At the ink right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mississippi Pioneer Woman 47 mins – “We know that settling the American frontier was not all “Westward Ho!” hat-waving and cowboys singing Oklahoma. But just how hard it could be can elude us. The long-unpublished memoir of Mary Mann Hamilton should set us straight. Her frontier was the untamed Mississippi Delta. Her life was a story of Biblical suffering, labor, loss, fire, flood, isolation, despair – and somehow she lived to 90 and told that story with spirited beauty. This hour On Point, a woman homesteads the Mississippi Delta.”(3 guests) At the ink right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mosul Battle 12 mins – “According to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Canadian special forces are in Iraq to train and “empower” against ISIS, but it’s not playing out that way. CBC’s Murray Brewster, embedded with the troops, says he saw them doing much more than that.” At the link find the title, “Nov 21: Embedded CBC journalist Murray Brewster on Canadian special forces mission in Iraq,” right-click “Media files current_20161121_72017.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Multiple Sclerosis 11 mins – “Jeff Cohen from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner School of Medicine discusses the Series—recent therapeutic progress, and remaining challenges.” At the link find the title, “Multiple sclerosis Series: The Lancet: November 23, 2016,” right-click “Media files 23november.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Native American Myths 39 mins – “From textbooks to westerns, Native American history and culture has often been reduced to stereotypes. Today, we’re breaking down the most pervasive myths about American Indians, including their role as welcoming host at Thanksgiving. Then, we’ll tackle an issue many of us will face when getting together with our families tomorrow:  passive aggression. Plus, the crew revisits the tense dinners of holidays passed.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Weapons Control 3 mins – “…President-elect Donald Trump will take control of America’s nuclear arsenal. In a time when nine countries have nuclear weapons, it’s a massive responsibility. But historically, it’s not a responsibility that presidents have borne alone. In the height of the Cold War, US leaders like Presidents Dwight Eisenhower and John Kennedy relied on experienced scientists who had witnessed the devastation caused by nuclear weapons. According to Audra J. Wolfe, a historian of Cold War science, nuclear scientists can help defuse tensions during diplomatic crises. “Scientists can remind the president of the very real damages that those kinds of weapons can do,” she said in an interview. “They can be a voice of reason. They can point to evidence. They can talk about radiation, they can talk about fallout.” In a recent article for The Washington Post, Wolfe looked to history for lessons about this kind of “science diplomacy.” In the 1960s, when the US and Soviet Union were locked in a nuclear arms race, scientists from the two superpowers met on a regular basis — and their work helped limit nuclear testing and prevent nuclear proliferation….In the end, though, nuclear weapons are the responsibility of the commander-in-chief. If a US president decides to order a nuclear strike, there’s little that scientists — or anyone else — can do to stop it.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oklahoma Earthquakes 35 mins – “Joining the gang this week on the Disaster Podcast is past guest from Oklahoma Chris Prutzman. We contacted Chris following an article we found on a recent spate of earthquakes in the Oklahoma region. Co-hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and paramedic Sam Bradley chat with Chris about how prepared the region is to handle these types of incidents. Check it out.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physics Story for Kids 14 mins – “Niraj Lal is a physicist working on improving the efficiency of solar cells. In 2016, he was part of the 5 Under 40 team of scientists who undertook a short residence with ABC RN Science. As well as producing radio and online pieces about his work and other areas of science, Nij has written children’s stories. One is about a flying emu. The short story gently introduces children to physical concepts around flight and the motion of satellites in orbit. Nij reads his story, Henry the emu that could fly.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save LinkAs” from the pop-up menu.

Populism and Elites 60 mins – “What is going on in the Western democracies? From Britain’s vote for Brexit, to Donald Trump’s election victory in America and the growth of populist movements across Europe, voters are expressing their dissatisfaction with the status quo. Economic anxieties go some way to explain the phenomenon, but as with the Brexit decision, people are voting in ways that seem – at least to their critics – likely to harm their own material interests just to give the establishment a bloody nose. In this special Intelligence Squared event, renowned American social psychologist Jonathan Haidt and politician Nick Clegg will examine the complex web of social, moral and political concerns that are driving the unrest. How can we explain the new illiberalism that is growing on both left and right, as authoritarian trends spread across campuses throughout the Anglosphere (the no-platforming of speakers being a typical example)? How should we understand the new ‘culture war’ emerging in Britain, America and elsewhere between the ‘globalists’ and ‘nationalists’? As deputy prime minister during the Coalition government, Clegg witnessed the upheaval in British politics from the inside. Haidt, author of the acclaimed bestseller ‘The Righteous Mind’, has long been studying the moral and cultural drives that divide people into different political camps.” At the lin find the title, “The Rise of Populism and the Backlash Against the Elites, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Premed Gap Year 27 mins – “In this episode, Ryan talks about taking gap years, the pros and cons, what to look at, and what to think about. He specifically mentioned similar questions from two students regarding their concern about taking gap years. Should you take it or not?….” At the link find the title, “PMY 209 : Taking a Gap Year Before Medical School? Should You Do It?,” right-click “Media files PMY209.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Rescues 16 mins – “When migrants making the perilous crossing of the Mediterranean radio for help, Commander Massimo Tozzi would answer the call. The former captain of an Italian military ship shares his experience rescuing desperate refugees wanting to start a new life.” At the link find the title, “Nov 21: Italian Navy Commander recalls ‘devastating’ memories of his year rescuing migrants,” right-click “Media files current_20161121_50464.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Risk Management 60 mins – “This week we’re talking about risks and resources. We speak with Dr. Lianne Lefsrud, Assistant Professor of Engineering Safety and Risk Management in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Alberta, about how engineers think about and evaluate risks, and her research into how language and conversations about resource development have changed over time. Then we’ll talk with Dr. David Sauchyn, Research Professor at the Prairie Adaptation Research Collaborative at the University of Regina about historical patterns of water resources, and how his research is being used for better planning. The Science for the People team are also pleased to welcome a new guest host into our midst! This episode is hosted by Marion Kilgour, a mechanical engineer and long-time friend and fan of the show.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Cowboys 18 mins – “Russia’s latest ambition: To build a steak empire. On today’s show, a fourth-generation American cowboy teaches Russian ranchers how to make American-style steaks. Some things get lost in translation.” At the link find the title, “#738: Russian Cowboys, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161125_pmoney_podcast112516.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Politics 64 mins – “David Satter, Former Moscow Correspondent, Financial Times; Fellow, Hudson Institute; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies; Author Satter was the first U.S. correspondent to be expelled from Russia since the Cold War. He will discuss the criminalization of Russia under Yeltsin and the role of the 1999 apartment bombings in saving the corrupt Yeltsin entourage and elevating Putin to power. He will describe what he says was Putin’s subsequent construction of an autocracy dominated by the security services, and Russia’s emergence as an aggressor state.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Selective Attention 5 mins – “Picture yourself in the grocery store. You’ve got an organized list in your hand and you’re looking for the things on that list. And as you go down the aisles you’re whizzing by dozens, maybe hundreds, of things on the shelves until your eye picks out that one jar of peanut butter that you have on your list. It’s an efficiency technique that helps you find what you’re looking for. So when you’re looking for that jar of peanut butter in the grocery store, you aren’t seeing all the other jars and boxes on the shelves. You’re subconsciously filtering out the items that don’t have anything to do with that peanut butter. This is called “selective attention,” a term you might recognize from psychology 101.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Skin Patch Monitor 27 mins – “A soft electronic skin plaster has been developed that can capture the detailed sound of valves opening and closing in the heart. It could help monitor heart murmurs in people with defective hearts. When the patch is placed on the throat however, it can help gamers give clear voice commands in a noisy room.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Research 27 mins – “Radiation from the sun relentlessly bombards the earth, and our atmosphere protects us from photons and solar wind.  How much does this solar radiation contribute to climate change?  On this program, we’ll visit with Judith Lean, researcher with the Naval Research Laboratory’s Space Science Division.  She’ll talk about solar radiation, solar cycles, and whether these cycles are reflected in the Earth’s ever-increasing surface temperature.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Southwest Airlines Founder 36 mins – “In 1968, competitors sued to keep Herb Kelleher’s new airline grounded. After a 3-year court fight, the first plane took off from Dallas. Today Southwest Airlines operates nearly 4,000 flights a day.” At the link find the title, “Southwest Airlines: Herb Kelleher, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161118_hibt_sw.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

StoryCorps Thanksgiving Stories 48 mins – “Last year, the interview-gathering group StoryCorps launched its Great Thanksgiving Listen. The idea was to get young Americans to sit down with a family elder at Thanksgiving and record family stories.  Some 50,000 recordings poured in. From all kinds of families. Stories and love and joy and hardship and loss and perseverance. Today, StoryCorps founder Dave Isay joins us to share some of that bounty.  This hour On Point, on the eve of Thanksgiving, we listen in on the Great Thanksgiving Listen.” At the ink right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainable Cities 52 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Institute for Sustainable Energy and the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future, and is titled “District Energy in Cities: Unlocking Efficiency, Sustainability and Resiliency through Infrastructure Investment.”  Our speaker is Rob Thornton, President and CEO of the International District Energy Association.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terminal Burrowing 54 mins – “’Tell Me Something I Don’t Know’ is a live game show hosted by Stephen J. Dubner of “Freakonomics Radio.” He has always had a mission: to tell you the things you thought you knew but didn’t, and things you never thought you wanted to know, but do. Now, with “TMSIDK,” he has a new way of doing just that. This new show is still journalism, still factual — but disguised in the most entertaining, unexpected, and occasionally ridiculous conversation you’re likely to hear. Audience contestants come on stage and try to wow a panel of experts with a fascinating fact, a historical wrinkle, a new line of research — anything, really, as long as it’s interesting, useful and true (or at least true-ish). The panel — an ever-changing mix of comedians, brainiacs, and other high achievers — poke and prod the contestants, and ultimately choose a winner. And there’s a real-time, human fact-checker on hand to filter out the bull. This debut episode features Barnard College president Debora Spar, New York Public Library president Tony Marx, and comedian Andy Zaltzman; Jody Avirgan from FiveThirtyEight handles the fact-checking.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thomas Friedman Interview 47 mins – “Three-time Pulitzer Prize winning columnist Tom Friedman told us the world was flat early on, as a metaphor for the globalization that has swept the planet. Now, from Washington to London and maybe beyond, walls seem to be going up. America, the great internationalist since World War II, has elected Donald Trump, who says no to globalism. Friedman says the hyper pace of change can save the world, or destroy it. Says he’s an optimist. This hour On Point, Thomas Friedman on the world now.Thomas L. Friedman, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times op-ed columnist and author. Author of the new book “Thank You For Being Late: An Optimist’s Guide To Thriving in the Age of Accelerations.” At the ink right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trade Policy by US 40 mins – “…hello, everyone, and thank you for joining this Council on Foreign Relations media call looking at the future of U.S. trade policy. I’m Robert McMahon, managing editor of CFR.org, and I’m going to be talking about the follow-on to the presidential elections, in which President-elect Donald Trump targeted U.S. trade policy as a top area of reform. His plan for the first one hundred days in office listed withdrawing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement, renegotiating NAFTA, and labeling China a currency manipulator as his top three priorities. So with us to help understand trade policy and what could be developing next, we are fortunate to have Edward Alden, CFR senior fellow, and author of the indispensable new book Failure to Adjust: How Americans Got Left Behind in the Global Economy, and Myron Brilliant, who is executive vice president and head of international affairs for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The three of us will be talking for about twenty minutes or so, and then opening up the call to you all.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and the FCC 46 mins – “Robert McDowell and Michael Copps, former commissioners at the Federal Communications Commission, discuss tech issues facing the FCC and the incoming Trump administration.” At the link find the title, “Communicators Roundtable on Technology Issues and the Trump Administration, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.460778.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and the Press 21 mins – “With the failure of hard-hitting investigative reporting to sway voters on election day, and continued hostility from the president-elect, do journalists need to revise their approach in covering Trump?” At the link find the title, “Rethinking how the mainstream media should cover Donald Trump, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161123_92597.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Autocracy 15 mins – “Russian journalist Masha Gessen has lived in Vladimir Putin’s Russia, chronicled his governing style, and profiled the man himself. When she looks at U.S. president-elect Trump, she sees a very similar, autocratic leader in the making.” At the link find the title, “Nov 24: America should not take Trump lightly, says Russian journalist, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161124_45230.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tuberculosis Vaccine 49 mins – “The world is facing a major challenge in producing and supplying enough safe and nutritious food for a growing global population. Vaccination plays a major role in combating this crisis by improving animal health and thereby food security. This podcast from Dr Jean van Den Elsen looks at how our research is improving vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). We’re developing a unique adjuvant protein with the potential to provide easier delivery, increased safety and more accessible vaccination programmes. The technology we have developed is applicable for vaccines against other infectious diseases and could help address needs in areas including autoimmune disease and cancer.” At the link click the rectangle with three dots, right-click “Download” and slect “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turkish Politics 66 mins – “A distinguished panel will discuss the unsettled situation in Turkey, one of the most important countries in the Middle East, after the unsuccessful coup attempt, a tightening of control by the regime of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and increased terrorism by Islamic State.” (4 guests) At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Veteran Flight Training 57 mins – “In episode 119 we answer listener mail. We have some great information on using VA benefits for aviation training and advice on accelerated versus non-accelerated training.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Science 54 mins – “New StarTalk All-Stars hosts, astrophysicists Summer Ash and Emily Rice, share their take on “Women Crushing It Wednesday” – reclaiming a sexist hashtag by celebrating women in STEM and examining the challenges women scientists face. Chuck Nice co-hosts.” At the link click the rectangle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working Women P1 27 mins – “Unemployment rates in India have shot up in recent years, and around twice as many women are out of work compared with their male counterparts. Divya Arya travels across India meeting some of the women who are challenging gender stereotypes and breaking down social taboos in order to find work in areas traditionally the preserve of men.” At the link find the title, “Jobs for the Girls – Part One, Nov, 2016” right-click “Media files p04h7rv6.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One Stories 52 mins – “At the center of author Richard Rubin’s latest book, The Last of the Doughboys, are several dozen extraordinary individuals, all more than a century old, all now passed away. They were the final survivors of the millions who made up the American forces that fought in World War I, 19th-century men and women living in the 21st century. Rubin’s book chronicles their remarkable stories and he joins us to to relate how the forgotten war and its forgotten veterans created the modern world. Richard Rubin has written for the New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, The Atlantic and Smithsonian. He’s the author of the book Confederacy of Silence. His latest book is called The Last of the Doughboys: The Forgotten Generation and Their Forgotten World War. At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zapruder Filmer 27 mins – “Whether you’re old enough to remember the assassination of JFK, the image that likely comes to mind is from an amateur film shot by Abraham Zapruder. His granddaughter shares the story of how the 486 frames of film still haunts America.” At the link find the title, “Nov 22: The personal history behind Zapruder’s JFK assassination film,” Media files current 20161122_35490.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 263 – Nov 25, 2016: African Nationalism, Ai Weiwei, Alt Right, Alt School, Anthropocene Epoch, Architectural Acoustics, Asteroid Impact, Attention Overload, Australian Aboriginal Music, Australian Indigenous Family Abuse, Bamboo Club Story, Black Holes, Blind Devices, Blind Kids and Smartphones, Blockchain Uses, Breech Births, British Rule in India, Broadband in Nebraska, Cancer Survivor Outcomes, Chicago Gun Violence, Child Raising, Climate and Health, Climate Talks, Connections, Corn History, Dakota Pipeline Protest and Facebook, Damages Calculations, Debt Collectors, Decision Making, Diarrhea, Digital Politics, Disabled Employment, Dog Training, Drone Strikes, Economics Noble Prize, Education in Inner Cities, Election Predictions, Emotional Intelligence, Employment Trends, European Union, Facebook Influence, Fake News, Food Waste, Francis Ford Coppola, Free Will, Gender Pay Gap, Hate Crimes, Health Care Innovation, Healthcare Under Trump, Hiring People, Holocaust Author, Honey, Hydroelectric Hazards, Immigration History, Industrial Science, International Criminal Court, Investment Q and A, Job Ends, Justinian Legal Code, Man’s Impact, Marijuana Legalization, Martin Luther King Death, Mathematics as Art, Meditation, Military Veterans in Workplace, Mindfulness, Narcan Warriors, Negative Emissions, Obama’s America, On the Media Goals, Patient Zero Myth, Pay Raises, Podcasting Styles, Police Abuses, Police Powers Online, Politics in Iceland, Pornography Status, Psychotherapy, RCMP Misconduct, Refugees in 1943, Rhythm Impact, Rumors for Profit, Science Education Problem, Self-driving Cars, South Africa Sanitation Problems, Statistics, Stephen Bannon, Surveillance Countermeasures, Texting for Health, Tidiness, Transgender Issues, Trump Trump Trump, Turkey Coup Backlash, Utopian Groups History, Video Games for Good, Virtual Engineering, Voting Concerns, Wine in California, Working Women, Workplace Diversity

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 108 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 304 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 12,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 350 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

African Nationalism 30 mins – “African affairs writer and lecturer Margery Perham discusses the effects of colonialism in tropical Africa. In 1939 she became the first female fellow of Nuffield College at Oxford University before being appointed as Director of the Oxford Institute of Colonial Studies in 1945. In her Reith series entitled ‘The Colonial Reckoning’, she highlights problems of colonial rule. In this lecture entitled ‘African Nationalism’, she explores the positive side of anti-colonialism, which is emancipation. She discusses how and why this force has started and tries to explain how it has led to African freedom from British and French rule. She analyses some of the converging events and influences which have turned the world into a hot-house for the forced and rapid growth of African nationalism.” At the link find the title, “African Nationalism, “ right-click Media files p02r6696.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ai Weiwei 56 mins – “Chinese artist Ai Weiwei in conversation with Eleanor Wachtel about his beautiful and subversive art and about his fight for freedom and democracy in China.” At the link find the title, “Wachtel on the Arts – Ai Weiwei, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161114_93544.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alt Right 50 mins – “In the months leading up to the election, some fake news stories generated more engagement on Facebook than real news stories. We consider the landscape of misinformation and how to separate truth from fiction. Plus: Steve Bannon, Trump’s chief strategist, hasn’t just influenced political discourse through the incendiary Breitbart News — he’s also sabotaged his chosen politicians through investigative journalism. And we interview a man who the Southern Poverty Law Center calls the “cultivated, cosmopolitan face of white supremacy” to find out what he wants wants from the Trump administration.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alt School 29 mins – “”We have an opportunity to do what we want – choose our path instead of the teachers making a choice for us.” Meet Piper, a blond, freckled 9-year-old from Brooklyn who talks like a seasoned grownup. She used to go to public school with Manoush’s son but now – with the help of financial aid – she’s enrolled in a new experimental school in her neighborhood: AltSchool. AltSchool is not your typical private school. Its founder is Max Ventilla, a former Google executive with a vision to reform education. Ventilla’s company, with over 100 million dollars from investors like Mark Zuckerberg and Marc Andreesen, uses tech to teach and track students’ social and academic skills. Ventilla’s idea is that over time, that data can build a more thorough picture of each student and determine how she is taught. This method of “personalized learning” (think Montessori 2.0) is being prototyped in eight “micro-schools” in Palo Alto, San Francisco, and New York City, with the goal of applying it to schools everywhere….” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” from the pop-up menu.

Anthropocene Epoch 27 mins – “Human impacts on the way our planet functions have now become so extreme many scientists are claiming the Earth has shifted out of the Holocene state and into a new geological epoch. They’re calling it ‘The Anthropocene’, the new age of humans, because millions of years after we are gone, the scar of our existence will be visible in the rocks of tomorrow. In this episode we look at how the last 60 years of socio economic growth has transformed the human race into a geological force to rival nature.” (Good video.) At the link right-click “download video mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Architectural Acoustics 21 mins – “There are two primary ways to control the sound of a space: active acoustics and passive acoustics. Passive acoustics are the materials in a space, like the padding in our studio or wooden floors or plaster walls. Materials like carpeting and drapery soak up sound, while materials like glass and porcelain make a room more echoey. Active acoustics are sound systems that use technology like speakers and microphones to boost or minimize certain sounds in a space…and the sonic control they offer can be dynamic and variable and quite dramatic.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asteroid Impact 27 mins – “The results from drilled geological samples of the Chicxulub crater have just been published. The crater off the coast of Mexico is thought to have been made by a meteor striking the Earth 66 million years ago. The strike and resultant ‘sterilisation effects’ on the planet are thought to play a major role in the demise of the dinosaurs. Core samples from the inner ring of the crater show that the impact was massive. Rocks from over 20 km down were brought up to the surface….” Also presented is oldest ice, insects and LED light, bees and light, and animal-free food. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Attention Overload 29 mins – “Think about where you go to find news. Podcasts? WNYC? The New York Times? Facebook? Twitter? Newsletters? Do you want us to stop asking questions? Welcome to the Attention Economy. There is fierce competition for your eyes and ears — (thank you for choosing correctly). Media companies know that a good way to find an audience is to write and speak like the people they’re trying to reach. It’s the reason Buzzfeed, Vice, Mashable and so many others are popular with Snake People. Identity Media is a big part of why theSkimm — a newsletter that targets Millennial women by rounding up the day’s news from Kanye West to Ban Ki-moon — has over 3.5 million subscribers. You might be one of them. This week we talked to theSkimm co-founders Carly Zakin and Danielle Weisberg about how they go about presenting the news. Identity Media is more than just a business model, it’s changing how we consume the news. To try and sort out why this “Skimm” approach to serious stories made her feel a little queasy, Manoush talked to John Herrman. He reports on the media for the New York Times. Together, Manoush and John embark on a mission to answer that age-old question: Do Justin Bieber and Hiroshima belong in the same sentence?….” At the link circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Aboriginal Music 27 mins – “Country music is commonly associated with downtrodden, lovelorn, white inhabitants of America’s rural south, but it has also long been a significant form of expression for Australia’s Aboriginal peoples. Country music became popular ‘down under’ during the first half of the 20th Century. Thanks to gramophone recordings, wind-up radios and touring bands, it even reached the bush where most Aboriginals lived, often more or less imprisoned on missions and government-controlled reserves. At a time when their own cultural heritage was being systematically erased, country music became a medium through which they could maintain their practice of sharing stories via the oral tradition. Its resonance was enhanced by melodies which tended towards the melancholic. As one musician put it “country music was all about loss, and we’d lost everything”. Through country music, Aboriginal people were able to give voice to their personal experiences and ongoing struggles for justice. Songs describe, for example, how babies and land were stolen, incidents of racism, poor living conditions, and high levels of incarceration. Country music, far from its origins, has thus become a deeply moving and powerful Aboriginal activism art form. With contributions from Auriel Andrew, Kev Carmody, Roger Knox, Sue Ray, Glenn Skuthorpe and Clinton Walker.” At the link find the title, “Country Down Under, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04gg5gt.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Indigenous Family Abuse 75 mins – “Three outspoken & fearless Aboriginal women: Professor Marcia Langton, Councillor Jacinta Price & lawyer/businesswomen Josephine Cashman speak on the topic Ending the Violence in Indigenous Communities.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Ending the Violence in Indigenous Communities, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_IndigViolence_1711_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bamboo Club Story 48 mins – “The Bamboo club was built for the people of St Pauls, in Bristol, England – the people who were victimised or not welcome elsewhere because of the colour of their skin. We hear from dozens of people who were members, musicians, or simply occasional visitors. They all share the same idea that there were two themes running through the club – community and music.” At the link find the title, “The Story of the Bamboo Club, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04gxg57.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Holes 55 mins – “If light can’t escape from black holes, how can we observe them at all? Find out from astrophysicist Janna Levin, co-host Matt Kirshen, and Shep Doeleman, the MIT astrophysicist leading the Event Horizon Telescope project to study black hole Sgr A* at the center of our galaxy.” At the link click “More” under the sound bar, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Devices 20 mins – “Peter White talks about guide dog waiting lists with BBC reporter and guide dog owner Ian Hamilton, who’s been waiting for a replacement dog for over six months. Ian Macrae and Hazel Dudley look at accessible watches. Ian reviews the smart watch from Apple and Hazel shows Peter two talking watches by Verbalise which she describes as ‘dressy’. Joy Addo presents her first column on being a blind Mum.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Kids and Smartphones 21 mins – “The Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired is stocked with all kinds of gadgets: singing calculators, talking typewriters, even video games that you navigate using only sound. Most are specialized and expensive — the school can afford them, but a lot of families can’t. There is one piece of tech, however, that almost every student has, and, absolutely every student wants. It’s a status symbol, it’s a social media machine, and it will read text out loud. Yes, it’s an iPhone. And ‘reading’ on a smartphone is gaining prominence as a reliable tool for the visually impaired. However this tool is the center of a larger question blind students and society at large are facing: Are iPads and iPhones rendering Braille obsolete? And if so, should advocates for the visually impaired be worried? At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Uses 15 mins – “Say hello to the decentralized economy — the blockchain is about to change everything. In this lucid explainer of the complex (and confusing) technology, Bettina Warburg describes how the blockchain will eliminate the need for centralized institutions like banks or governments to facilitate trade, evolving age-old models of commerce and finance into something far more interesting: a distributed, transparent, autonomous system for exchanging value.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Breech Births 27 mins – “Ottawa midwife Betty-Anne Daviss is a rare breed in health care. She does vaginal breech births.” At the link find the title, “Into the breech,” right-click “Download Into the breech” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British Rule In India 29 mins – “This year’s Reith Lecturer is British lawyer Lord Radcliffe. He was Director-General of the Ministry of Information during the Second World War, and is most famous for his role in Partition, the division of the British Indian Empire, His work led directly to the creation of Pakistan and India as independent nations. He examines the features of democratic society, and considers the problematic notions of power and authority in his series of seven Reith Lectures entitled ‘Power and the State’. In his fifth Reith lecture entitled ‘British Rule in India’, Lord Radcliffe examines the early years of British administration in India. He argues that period until the Indian Mutiny succeeded more as a result of the character of its institutions than their excellence. He suggests this offers a classic example of how men really respond to the stimulus of great authority.” At the link find the title, “British Rule in India,” right-click “Media files p02r7nzn.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Nebraska 30 mins – “When we last spoke to people from Lincoln, Nebraska, about their innovative conduit program to improve Internet access, we focused on how they had done it – Conduits Lead to Competition, podcast 182. For this week and episode 228 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast, we focus more on the community benefits their approach has led to. We are once again joined by David Young, Fiber Infrastructure and Right of Way Manager in the Public Works Department. We offer a shorter background about the history of the project before focusing on the franchise they developed with local ISP Allo. Allo is building citywide Fiber-to-the-Home and has agreed to provision 15 VLANs at every endpoint. We talk about what that means and implications for schools specifically.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Survivor Outcomes 9 mins – “Highlights of new articles published in Annals of Internal Medicine.” which focus on poor quality of outcomes for cancer survivors. At the link find the title, “Issue Summary November 15, 2016,” right-click “Media files annals_20161115.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chicago Gun Violence 47 mins – “We sit down in Chicago with former Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. He’s trying to tackle Chicago’s violence with jobs.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Raising 11 mins – “Now that the election is over, many families are now asking “What next?” A psychologist offers suggestions for productive ways to move forward. A weekly thought-provoking conversation about the top topics and thorny issues around children of all ages. From the cloth vs disposable diaper debate to how to afford your kid’s college tuition, we talk to people, parents and experts, hoping to rediscover the meaning of family in the modern age.” At the link right-click “Download’ near the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate and Health 12 mins – “Nick Watts discusses the Lancet Countdown paper about importance of climate change to health, and tracking alterations to create positive changes for human health.” At the link find the title, “The Lancet Countdown: The Lancet: November 13, 2016,” right-click “Media files13november-countdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Talks 28 mins – “While the world has held climate talks for 22 years (This is COP – Conference of the Parties — 22) and the Kyoto Protocol talks about climate change have been held for 12 years, this year’s October’s climate talks in Paris mark the first time that  “entry into force” has been achieved.  You might think of “entry into force” as the time when a critical number of nations are ready to develop global treaties regarding climate and pollution and its effects around the world.  The 1st world meeting ever to talk about “Entry into Force” on climate issues is taking place right now, in Marrakech, Morocco.  200 nations have gathered to discuss these issues.  The meetings began just before the US elections.  Now Donald Trump is President Elect, and he has signaled that he will pull back from many of the nation’s current plans to reduce pollution and combat climate change.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Connections 68 mins – “Legendary science historian James Burke returns to explain his newest project, a Connections app that will allow anyone to “think connectively” about the webs of knowledge available on Wikipedia. Burke predicted back in 1978 that we’d one day need better tools than just search alone if we were to avoid the pitfalls of siloed information and confirmation bias, and this month he launched a Kickstarter campaign to help create just such a tool – an app that searches connectivity and produces something Google and social media often don’t – surprises, anomalies, unexpected results, and connections, in the same style as his documentary series, books, and other projects. In the interview, Burke shares his latest insights on change, technology, the future, social media, models of reality, and more. To support the Kickstarter campaign for the Connections app, here are some links: jbconnectionsapp.com, knowledgediscoveries.com, kck.st/2eIg21RAt the link right-click “Direct download: 089-Connections-James Burke.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corn History 31 mins – “Corn. It ultimately has a role in so much of what we eat.  From a sweet corn cob on the 4th of July, to the calories that made the steak possible, to fuel in our gas tanks, to the sweetness in a soda, corn is a central player.  This week’s podcast is an interview with one of the world’s leading experts in corn genetics, Dr. John Doebley from the University of Wisconsin.  Dr. Doebley is the world’s leading authority on the genetic events that made modern corn, the individual steps in domestication thousands of years ago, that can be traced back to discrete changes in DNA.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dakota Pipeline Protest and Facebook 56 mins – “The months-long protest against the North Dakota Access Pipeline finally received mainstream attention this week after a misdirection campaign on Facebook, but to what end? Plus, making sense of what you’ve been told about Russia’s role in the election; Bob talks to Glenn Beck about his recent transformation; and the all-too-predictable fallout from hiring partisans as cable news pundits.” At the link find the title, “On Shaky Ground, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files otm110416pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Damages Calculations 39 mins – “People tell little white lies all day long, to be polite, avoid confrontation…or just because they seem so harmless. Today, how wearing down our truth telling muscles affects the brain. Then, a reporter looks at the established legal practice of using race, class and gender to to calculate damages in wrongful death and injury cases – the result? Women and minorities lives are worth less. Plus, New Hampshire author Jacquelyn Benson talks about feminism, Indiana Jones, and the unconventional romance in her debut novel, The Smoke Hunter.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Debt Collectors 26 mins – “The story of a guy who tried to make something of himself by getting into a rough business. And the story of a time when the world went wild for debt.” At the link find the title, “#574: The Buffalo Talk-Off, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161116_pmoney_podcast111616.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Decision Making 35 mins – “Some of our most important decisions are shaped by something as random as the order in which we make them. The gambler’s fallacy, as it’s known, affects loan officers, federal judges — and probably you too. How to avoid it? The first step is to admit just how fallible we all are.” At the linkclick the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diarrhea 60 mins – “This week we’re taking on maggots, wounds, and diarrhea in an episode about medical problems that plague the military, so make sure your last meal is a few hours behind you before you tuck in your ear buds. We speak with Captain Mark Riddle, the director of the United States Military Diarrheal Disease Vaccine Research Program at the US Army Medical Research and Material Command, about new ways to prevent and treat travelers’ diarrhea. And we talk with George Peck, a medical entomologist, about using maggots to help wounds heal.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at end of sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Politics 52 mins – “In Donald Trump’s Presidential victory speech, he struck a tone that some found hard to believe after the vitriolic race. He called on Republicans, Democrats, and independents to “come together as one united people.” But if you’ve been on social media recently, you know that’s a tall order. So Thursday, we’re looking at the state of polarization in the country and the internet’s effect on our political views. We’ll also talk to activists who are imagining a “Reunited” America. On Saturday, November 12, Salt Lake Civil Network, Village Square and other community organizations are hosting the 2016 Utah Citizen Summit. The event is a gathering of citizens and leaders interested in productive conversation across political and social divides.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Employment 56 mins – “Joyce welcomes disability leader, Christine Griffin, and executive director of the Disability Law Center of Massachusetts to the show. Also included will be Tony Coelho, author of the Americans with Disabilities Act. They will discuss the future for people with disabilities in 2017 and beyond.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dog Training 123 mins – “Susan Garrett (@susangarrett) is an incredible dog trainer. She has a B.Sc. in animal science, and for more than two decades has been one of the most consistently successful competitors in the sport of dog agility. Susan has been on the podium of the world and national championship events more than 50 times, winning those events a total of 38 times. She was of great help to me when I first adopted Molly, my own pup, and her book Shaping Success (The Education of an Unlikely Champion) was selected as the 2005 dog training and behavior book of the year. Susan is a champ not only for her competitive track record, but for her ability to convey concrete tips and recommendations for: The most critical exercises for your dog; The three types of reinforcement; How to use crates properly; What you should do in the first 24 hours of adopting a puppy; How training a dog is like training an Olympic athlete…” At the link find the title, “#200: Susan Garrett — Master Dog (and Human) Trainer,” right-click “Media files The Tim Ferriss Show-Susan Garrett.mp3”

Drone Strikes 21 mins – “The Obama White House created guidelines to control targeted killings and drone strikes but they are not enforceable and not open to judicial review. The Current looks at how Obama’s anti-terror track record feeds into Trump’s anti-terror Inheritance.” At the link find the title, “Nov. 15: U.S. drone warfare needs more oversight and controls, says lawyer, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161115_14060.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economics Nobel Prize 26 mins – “What happens when a creativity guru meets the winner of this year’s Nobel Memorial Prize in economics? You get life lessons in making art, and negotiating contracts.” At the link find the title, “#736: Messy Nobel, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161118_pmoney podcast111816.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education in Inner Cities 12 mins – “Define students by what they contribute, not what they lack — especially those with difficult upbringings, says educator Victor Rios. Interweaved with his personal tale of perseverance as an inner-city youth, Rios identifies three straightforward strategies to shift attitudes in education and calls for fellow educators to see “at-risk” students as “at-promise” individuals brimming with resilience, character and grit.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Election Predictions 28 mins – “On the morning after election day, pundits, pollsters, politicians, and citizens woke up feeling stunned. All signs, all year, had been pointing towards a victory for Democrat Hillary Clinton. So, what happened? We ask one of the few people who didn’t get it wrong: the historian Allan Lichtman.” At the link find the title, “Episode 51: What Happened? Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161114_hiddenbrain_51.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emotional Intelligence 30 mins – “Betty Liu, journalist, author, podcaster, and host of Bloomberg Television’s “In The Loop”, talks with us about her career and lessons she’s learned along the way. Betty shares her take on having a strong network, and the importance of emotional intelligence for success.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Employment Trends 56 mins – “New projections for the labor market what skills will be needed in the Granite State. Governor-elect Sununu’s business experience has grabbed the attention and hopes of business owners. Concern is rising about New Hampshire’s poorly funded public employee retirement plans.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

European Union 53 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Center for the Study of Europe, and the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies, and is titled “In The European Night: Will The Union Survive?”  Our speaker is media activist and philosopher, Franco Berardi.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook Influence 9 mins – “Those viral, fake news stories may have had a bigger impact on the U.S. presidential election then many people realize, according to MIT’s Sherry Turkle. She says internet and digital technology play a big role in political discourse and in real life.” At the link find the title,”Nov 17: Facebook, online culture, coarsened political discourse, says Sherry Turkle, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161117_56560.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 36 mins – “Last week’s election told us many things. Perhaps chief among them is how divided we are. We don’t agree on our most pressing problems, nor their solutions. Many say these divisions come from our increasingly segregated social media universes. We self-select of news and information to reinforce our respective worldviews, a development that’s particularly troubling given that much of what’s on Facebook and other social media isn’t news at all. It’s manufactured false information that brings in lucrative ad revenue but leaves us sorely misinformed. Join us to discuss how social media is shaping our world.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Food Waste 29 mins – “Five years ago, when we first started covering the food waste issue, America was throwing away enough food to fill the Rose Bowl every day. And, unfortunately, not much has happened to change that statistic. But this week on Sea Change Radio, we talk to someone who’s doing his best to change the status quo. First, we dig into the archives from 2011 as food waste expert, blogger and author of American Wasteland, Jonathan Bloom, gives us some perspective on the amount of food we waste from field to fridge in this country. Then, we hear from David Rodriguez, a Mexican immigrant turned Boston-based entrepreneur, who tells us about his startup company Food For All, a mobile app that allows diners a chance to purchase leftover food from restaurants at a steep discount.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Waste 56 mins – “In the U.S., about a third of all food produced is never eaten.  Yet, one in eight Americans struggle to put food on the table. And it’s not just the leftovers in the back of the refrigerator; it happens at every point along the supply chain. We’ll hear about a growing anti-waste movement and delve into the environmental consequences of food waste as well possible solutions that may help address issues of scarcity.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Francis Ford Coppola 76 mins – “Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather is universally praised as one of the greatest films ever made. The 1972 epic won best picture and best screenplay Oscars and was subsequently followed by two successful sequels. Join us for a rare conversation with Francis Coppola, who will take us behind the scenes of these legendary films, as spelled out in his just-published book, The Godfather Notebook. Here’s a chance to learn about Brando, Pacino, the casting and the filmmaking, along with the personal and professional qualities that turned director Francis Coppola into an American icon. An offer you truly can’t refuse.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Will 32 mins – “Free will has been debated by philosophers and theologians for centuries. Neuroscientists and psychologists have now entered the fray – but what new light can they shed? And just how free are we when it comes to “free” will? Arguably one of the oldest conundrums in the book, the paradox of free will has haunted scientists and philosophers alike for centuries. It would appear that we, as conscious agents, are able to make choices that change the world around us, despite many of the known laws of nature being deterministic. But is this freedom of choice all an illusion created by the conscious mind? And ultimately, is it even possible to act outside the bounds of our environment, our upbringing, and our genetic makeup? To delve into this and more, Ian Sample speaks to neurophilosopher and pragmatist Professor Patricia Churchland – who believes the key to studying free will lies in self-control and intention. We also hear from the University of Ghent’s Dr Marcel Brass how science is attempting to reveal more about the nature of free will through experimentation. Finally, Yale University’s Adam Bear explains how the conscious mind might play a role in the illusory nature of decision-making.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Pay Gap 33 mins – “Jean Chatzky is not just a personal finance expert, she’s an experienced journalist, best-selling author, entrepreneur, and much more. In this episode, she shares how she got to be the person she is now, and shares some useful personal finance tips.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Crimes 15 mins – “On February 10, 2015, Suzanne Barakat’s brother Deah, her sister-in-law Yusor and Yusor’s sister Razan were murdered by their neighbor in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The perpetrator’s story, that he killed them over a traffic dispute, went unquestioned by the media and police until Barakat spoke out at a press conference, calling the murders what they really were: hate crimes. As she reflects on how she and her family reclaimed control of their narrative, Barakat calls on us to speak up when we witness hateful bigotry and express our allyship with those who face discrimination.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Incidents 21 mins – “Amidst multiple reports of racist attacks and expressions of hate, there are concerns that the outcome of the U.S. presidential election there will enable and normalize hate crimes here in Canada — even when every day racism already exists.” At the link find the title, “Nov 16: Trump win gives ‘permission’ to racists, but hate crimes are nothing new in Canada, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161116_98383.mp3” and select ‘Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Innovation 58 mins – “Michael Ackermann, CEO of a med-tech startup that created a tear-stimulation device for those with dry-eye disease, explains how acquisition by a global pharmaceutical giant is helping him achieve his goal of reaching as many patients as possible. Ackermann, a graduate of the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign, also discusses why big tech companies have yet to disrupt healthcare and how that translates into big opportunities for entrepreneurs.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Healthcare Under Trump 46 mins – “Republicans in Congress have voted more than 50 times to repeal the Affordable Care Act without success. Now, they have an ally in President-elect Donald Trump, who promised on the campaign trail to “repeal and replace” the law. But over the weekend, Trump seemed to soften his stance. He told the Wall Street Journal he would consider leaving in place some provisions, including one that prohibits insurers from denying coverage for pre-existing conditions. Guest host Susan Page and guests discuss the future of President Obama’s signature legislation in a Trump administration and with a Republican congress.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Hiring People 26 mins – “You know that whole thing about hiring the best person for the job? Turns out, it’s not that easy. So how do applicants find out whether a job and workplace is right for them? And how do employers improve their strike-rate? The good news is there are plenty of ways we can improve the hiring process, as you’ll hear from the Dr Keri Spooner of the Wentworth Institute, Nova Franklin from Meld Studios and Laszlo Bock, responsible for recruitment at Google.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Holocaust Author 62 mins – “Saul Friedländer is widely regarded as one of the quintessential experts on the Holocaust. Forty years after his Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece, The Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945, Friedländer returns with When Memory Comes: The Later Years, bridging the gap between the ordeals of his childhood and his present-day towering reputation in the field of Holocaust studies. After abandoning his youthful conversion to Catholicism, he rediscovered his Jewish roots as a teenager and built a new life in Israeli politics and a lifelong fascination with Jewish life and history. Friedländer went on to spend his adulthood shuttling between Israel, Europe and the United States, armed with his talent for language and an expansive intellect. Join us for a rare conversation with this renowned historian, who will share his personal story and his insights on the relevance of the Holocaust to the world of 2016.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Honey 43 mins – “Honey seems like a simple, comforting food, slathered on toast, spooned down to soothe sore throats, and beloved of bears, both plush and real. In reality, this sticky combination of bee spit and evaporated nectar is a powerful and ancient ingredient. For much of history, honey was humanity’s main source of sweetness, as well as our first vehicle for getting drunk. Unlike table sugar, honey also comes in an infinite variety of textures and flavors, influenced by the two million blossoms from which each jar is made. And, from ancient Egypt to modern medicine, honey has been valued for its healing powers. Join us this episode as we get stuck in the sweet stuff.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hydroelectric Hazard 3 mins – “The hidden environmental costs of hydroelectric power revealed.” At the link find the title, “Episode 710 – November 14, 2016,”right-click “Media files ScienceElements_Nov14_2016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Immigration History 60 mins– “Economist George Borjas examines the impact of immigration on the U.S. economy throughout history. He is interviewed by Edward Alden, senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and author of [The Closing of the American Border].” At the link find the title, “After Words with George Borjas,, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.457662.MP3-STD.mp3After Words with George Borjas” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Industrial Science 15 mins – “This year’s Reith Lecturer is the Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh Sir Edward Appleton. From 1939 to 1949 he was Secretary of the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, and in 1947 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his contributions to the knowledge of the ionosphere, which led to the development of radar. In his Reith series entitled ‘Science and the Nation’, he considers the importance of science. In his fifth lecture entitled ‘Industrial Science’, Professor Appleton considers the functional uses of science. He explores the scientific research work carried out by industries in order to produce better products, and analyses how automation is expanding this kind of science.” At the link find the title, “Industrial Science,” right-click “Media files p02r79k9.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

International Criminal Court 26 mins – “From Brexit, to Trump, to some countries leaving the International Criminal Court. Are we entering a new, post co-operative world? The Current looks at the increased appetite for countries to “go it alone” and increased protectionism around the world.” At the link find the title, “Nov 17: From Brexit to Trump, are we entering a post co-operative world? Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161117_87281.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Q and A’s 54 mins – “What will market do under President Trump? And 12 other important investment Q&A’s. When Paul addressed members of the community in a seminar co-sponsored by the Bainbridge Community Foundation on Nov. 3, 2016, he was unable to answer all questions at the time but agreed to do so through this special podcast. Here are the questions addressed on this podcast: 1. What is the best source to determine the asset class of each mutual fund? 2. 8% seems like a high rate of return. Is it really a reasonable assumption for future growth? 3. Is it possible to get 8% with 20% or more in bonds? 4. What benchmark should I use to evaluate the performance of a portfolio? 5. Do you read the prospectuses that mutual fund companies send you? 6. How do you determine the total cost of owning funds like Vanguard? What about 401k fees? 7. Most U.S. companies are global. What percent of you have in international funds? 8. According to research only 15% of actively managed funds exceed the long term returns of the S&P 500. Why not invest most of your money in S&P 500 index funds or ETFs? 9. What is the difference between growth and value companies? Should you own both kinds? 10. What happens to the market when we have a cyber attack or the election ends undecided? (Note this was asked before the Presidential election) 11. My wife has followed your recommendations for years while I invest in individual stocks. Do think it is possible to compromise? And should we compromise? 12. There are so many index funds. Which are the most appealing? 13. How do you expect the market to do if Trump gets elected? (In my answer I address the reason I thought it was likely for Trump to win)” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Ends 26 mins – “’Your first loyalty is to your own career,’ says Patty McCord. “We need to all be more honest about that.” Patty McCord helped grow Netflix from their days of renting DVDs via the US postal service to being a global producer and provider of streaming videos. If you wanted to work and stay at Netflix, you had to impress Patty McCord. She has all kinds of wisdom to share about when your career’s best served by finding a new job and advice on firing someone if it’s time for them to go.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Justinian Legal Code 43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the ideas brought together under Justinian I, Byzantine emperor in the 6th century AD, which were rediscovered in Western Europe in the Middle Ages and became very influential in the development of laws in many European nations and elsewhere.” (3 guests) At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Man’s Impact 28 mins – “The Vice-President of the Conservation Foundation in Washington, DC and renowned ecologist Sir Frank Fraser Darling explores the concept of Man’s responsibility for his natural environment in his Reith series entitled ‘Wilderness and Plenty’. In his second lecture entitled ‘Impact of Man on His Environment’, Sir Fraser Darling explores the continuous affect of man on his natural habitat. Taking examples from prehistoric man, the industrial revolution and modern day technology, he considers whether man has taken all he can from the world to increase growth and development. He explores and criticises how politics and political policies have had a lasting affect on the contamination of the world and its ecology.” At the link find the title, “Impact of Man on His Environment,” right-click “Media files p02qslk7.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Legalization 56 mins – “Four out of five states with ballot measures this year to legalize recreational marijuana did so, including our neighbors Maine and Massachusetts. We find out what this might mean for similar efforts in New Hampshire, and the impact on federal laws.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martin Luther King Death 30 mins – “In 1968, just hours after Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, the future Pulitzer Prize–winning author Garry Wills—then a young writer for Esquire—rushed to Memphis, Tennessee, where he watched as King’s body was embalmed at the mortuary; later, Wills traveled twelve hours by bus with mourners to King’s funeral in Atlanta. Nearly fifty years after its publication, Wills’s “Martin Luther King Jr. Is Still on the Case!” remains one of the most revealing and lasting portraits of King and his turbulent era ever written. Writer and director John Ridley—who won an Oscar for his screenplay for 12 Years a Slave—joins host David Brancaccio to discuss why Wills’s wrenching profile of King continues to resonate today, what has changed in America since it was written, and, most important, what still needs to change.” At the link find the title, “Martin Luther King Jr Is Still on the Case! by Garry Wills, Nov, 2016,” right-click “ Media files Martin-Luther-King-is-Still-on-the-Case-by-Garry-Wills.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mathematics as Art 17 mins – “Unlock the mysteries and inner workings of the world through one of the most imaginative art forms ever — mathematics — with Roger Antonsen, as he explains how a slight change in perspective can reveal patterns, numbers and formulas as the gateways to empathy and understanding.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meditation 62 mins – “I’m excited to bring you a little taste test of a new show format that I’ve been working on — The Tim Ferriss Radio Hour. After 200 conversations with a variety of fascinating people, including Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jamie Foxx, Tony Robbins, Maria Popova, Peter Thiel, Marc Andreessen, Amanda Palmer, Malcolm Gladwell, Rick Rubin, Reid Hoffman, Chase Jarvis, Sam Harris, Rainn Wilson, and so many others, I started to spot patterns. This is the premise of my new book Tools of Titans, which is a compilation of all of my favorite habits, philosophies, and tools of world-class performers… In this episode, we’ll be exploring meditation and mindfulness. You’ll hear from Chase Jarvis as he explains his top priorities for feeling fulfilled. I talk transcendental meditation with Arnold Schwarzenegger. I cover a wide spectrum with Sam Harris, and ask him about everything from hallucinogens to meditation techniques. And then I wrap up with Rainn Wilson, discussing how to handle life when you feel overwhelmed.” At the link find the title, “#201: The Tim Ferriss Radio Hour: Meditation, Mindset, and Mastery,”right-click “Media files The Tim Ferriss Show Radio Hour Meditation.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Veterans in Workplace 21 mins – “Amanda Veinott is passionate about creating career opportunities for veterans when they return to civilian life. In this episode she shares why hiring veterans is good for business, why career transitions are so tough, why internships are important and what is her best piece of advise for people in the military.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mindfulness 26 mins – “Mindfulness is quite the buzzword these days. Especially within Silicon Valley, where many tech workers have been known to seek out guidance and spiritual direction in Eastern practices. HBO’s Silicon Valley parodied the trend with a tech company CEO who seems to be attached at the hip to his spiritual advisor. Putting fiction aside though, we’ve talked a lot about information overload and our addiction to our gadgets. We’re living in a world where it is challenging to be mindful. And, well, we all can’t afford to have a spiritual guru following us around non-stop. So, we brought in an actual spiritual advisor from the actual Silicon Valley to help bring us more kindness, compassion, and happiness (especially during this election season). His name is Chade-Meng Tan and he’s a former Google software engineer … In his quest, he recently wrote Joy on Demand: The Art of Discovering the Happiness Within. And he stopped by N2S to share some simple exercises for us all to find more joy and happiness. Step one: take one very long inhale in and then slowly exhale, listening to the sound of your breath as you do so. Then hit “play” above to find some serenity now. “ At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” from the pop-up menu.

Narcan Warriers 24 mins – “From long-time addicts to teens experimenting for the first time, fentanyl is not discriminating in who it kills. The Current looks into how an antidote drug that counters a fentanyl overdose is taking a toll on patients and front-line health workers.” At the link find the title, “’He was blue as a smurf ‘: Fentanyl overdoses take toll on front-line workers, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161114_31655.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Negative Emissions 60 mins – “Sometimes, my research for Radio Ecoshock gives me a sickening feeling, like I’m falling into a bad hole. We all are, when it comes to the developing climate shift. This time, it’s a new article published in October by Kevin Anderson. In the UK, he’s a Professor of Energy and Climate Change at the University of Manchester, and Deputy Director of the renowned Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research. His co-author is Glen Peters, a senior researcher for CICERO, the Center for International Climate and Environmental Research in Oslo, Norway. The title of the paper is deceptively simple: “The trouble with negative emissions.” It’s big trouble. We’ve had Dr. Anderson on Radio Ecoshock before, and I’ve run a speech or two by him. He’s a truth-teller who is somehow tolerated by the highest levels of established science, in the UK, and now in Sweden. Anderson has recently become the second person to hold the Zennström visiting professorship in Climate Change Leadership at Uppsala University.At the link right-click “Download…lo fi…” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obama’s America 27 mins – “In Mississippi in 2008, Chloe Hadjimatheou met a 15-year-old black boy with dreams of being a policeman. Eight years later, Chloe goes in search of him to find what became of him. Did he prosper in Obama’s America?” At the link find the title, “Searching for Tobias, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04gbgyw.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

OnTheMedia Goals 18 mins – “It’s the morning after in the offices of On the Media. Usually editorial meetings take place in Brooke’s office with Bob dialed in on the conference phone. This week we did it in the studio so you can hear the hosts talk about how they are feeling and how they envision the direction of the show in the Trump presidency.” At the link find the title, “Now What? Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files otm110916pod_extra.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patient Zero Myth 10 mins – “One of the most enduring myths of HIV/AIDS history has finally been laid to rest. The so-called “patient zero,” a Canadian flight attendant named Gaétan Dugas, was once blamed for igniting the entire AIDS epidemic in America. Media outlets fixated on his sexual promiscuity; the New York Post called him “The Man Who Gave Us Aids.” But new research published in the journal Nature reexamined the original blood samples taken from Dugas in 1983 and found that the strain of the virus he was infected with was already present in the country years before Dugas frequented the gay scene in New York and San Francisco. Bob talks with Michael Worobey, evolutionary biologist and lead author of the Nature paper, about how the patient zero story is an ongoing black comedy of mischaracterization.” At the link find the title, “Debunking the AIDS “Patient Zero” Myth, Nov, 2016” right-click “Media files otm110216podextra.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pay Raises 26 mins – “It’s one thing to want a pay rise; it’s another thing entirely to get one. First you have to ask the right questions of your boss, says psychiatrist and former FBI hostage-negotiation trainer Dr Mark Goulston. And if your boss won’t budge on pay, there are some other things you can negotiate apart from money too.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcasting Styles 56 mins – “Best-selling author Gretchen Rubin has a podcast. So does her teenage daughter, Eliza. They’re basically a mother-daughter podcasting duo.” At the link find the title,”Episode 7: The Family That Podcasts Together, Nov, 2016,”right-click “Media files 20161117_biglisten_epi7.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Abuses 47 mins – “Reporter Wesley Lowery on hate crimes, protest, race relations and Black Lives Matter in the age of Trump.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Powers Online 21 mins – “The police have opened their files to CBC News in an effort to show specific cases where they argue they need enhanced online surveillance and interception abilities. Canada’s top cop acknowledges its not an easy ask but says it’s necessary.” At the link find the title, “Nov 16: RCMP commissioner calls for greater police powers online, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161116_55713.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Politics in Iceland 19 mins – “With warmth and wit, Halla Tómasdóttir shares how she overcame media bias, changed the tone of the political debate and surprised her entire nation when she ran for president of Iceland — inspiring the next generation of leaders along the way. “What we see, we can be,” she says. “It matters that women run.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pornography Status 66 mins – “Less than 20 years ago, one of the most disruptive technologies in human history came to America—broadband Internet. Like most technical advances, it was immediately adapted for sexual purposes. When it brought free, high-quality pornography into 100 million American homes, the country was simply not prepared for it. Dr. Marty Klein says we still aren’t. He says that as a result, the United States is in the midst of what he calls a “porn panic,” marked by high levels of fear, outrage, misinformation, blame and demands for action. This is the background of the conflict many couples face about porn, of the anxieties of parents, and of the self-destructive uses of porn. In this talk, one of America’s experts on pornography discusses the context of our difficulties, with thought-provoking suggestions on how to respond. Using material from his new book His Porn, Her Pain, Dr. Klein will discuss building “porn literacy” in children, in couples and in porn consumers—while discussing the scientific evidence about how sexually explicit material actually affects consumers, their relationships and society. The subject of pornography sits at the intersection of politics, culture and our personal lives—and our audience last year found Dr. Klein so entertaining and provocative discussing “Sexual Intelligence” that we’ve invited him back again.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychotherapy 31 mins – “We have this idea of what therapy is supposed to look like. There’s a couch. An objective therapist sitting across the room scribbling notes. But of course it’s not that simple. What happens when your therapist is not really a therapist? Or the therapist is the one in tears? And of course, should you or should you not, try to have sex with your therapist? In this episode, six short stories, many from our listeners, looking at how the role of patient and therapist can get. complicated.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

RCMP Misconduct 18 mins – “In 2012, RCMP boss Bob Paulson was adamant his officers who broke the rules — or the law — would face serious consequences. Four years on, a CBC News investigation looking at RCMP officer infractions is raising questions about how punishment is doled out.” At the link find the title, “Nov 17: CBC obtains data on 700 disciplinary cases of RCMP members breaking rules or law, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161117_98353.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in 1943 24 mins – “Ana Maria Gordon watches the plight of Syrian refugee children with a deep understanding. She was four-years-old on the MS St. Louis ship that carried Jews across the Atlantic looking for refuge only to be turned away and forced into concentration camps.” At the link find the title, “Nov 16: Holocaust survivor shares lessons from ‘voyage of the damned’ on MS St. Louis, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161116_94988.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rhythm Impact 58 mins – “Acclaimed percussionist Dame Evelyn Glennie has a lifelong passion for understanding how we are impacted by rhythm. She explores the evolution of musical rhythm over several millennia through different cultures, demonstrating how migration has impacted many different styles of music across generations and regions, and how the resulting fusions gave rise to new rhythms in contemporary music.” At the link find the title, “The History of Rhythm, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04g0cl6.mp3” and select”Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rumors for Profit 4 mins – “…Voters in this election cycle were deliberately and cynically played by teenagers in a small town in Macedonia called Veles, home to at least 100 fake news sites dedicated to US politics. Most of them were pro-Trump. “There’s a fairly large group of young people in Macedonia, who, for a long time [have] been running dubious, on-the-edges websites about different topics, whether it’s health or other things,” says Craig Silverman, who co-reported the story for BuzzFeed News. Yes, health. You know, those sketchy health advice pages. They seek out clickbait, or come up with their own, to simply get clicks. Every click generates a tiny amount of advertising revenue — a fraction of a penny. But it can add up to a good living for creative kids in a poor town, in a poor country, like the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Their biggest hit was a story with a false quote from Hillary Clinton, saying a few years ago that Donald Trump should run for president. “She never said that,” says Silverman, “[but] it’s gotten over 480,000 shares, reactions and comments on Facebook.” That’s better than most scoops from leading news outlets like the New York Times or the Washington Post….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Education Problem 21 mins – “So many of our misconceptions about science come from where we first encountered them—the classroom. How can we do a better job of teaching science, both so we make sure we have a new generation of STEM professionals, but also a STEM-literate public? The second of the three-part series.” At the link find the title, “The Face of Science: Teaching Teachers, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 161004_faceofscience_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self-driving Cars 27 mins – “Audi of America President Scott Keogh discusses his company’s role in developing self-driving cars and his concerns about unrealistic consumer expectations due to industry hype.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Scott Keogh, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.456536.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Africa Sanitation Problems 20 mins – “In this country using a flush toilet in the privacy of our own home is something we take for granted. But in South Africa, people are fighting for safe, private toilets after a woman was murdered on her way to use a public bathroom.” At the link find the title, “Nov 15: ‘It’s not safe’: South Africans fear using public toilets after woman murdered, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161115_51559.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Statistics P2 25 mins – “We’ll revisit Statistics in this episode with Mindy McCann, Professor and Graduate Coordinator for the Department of Statistics at Oklahoma State University. She’ll discuss her early fascination with statistics, and familiarize us with the concepts of Multiple Comparisons, Confidence Intervals, and Error Rates.  McCann will also explain why one can never have a zero-percent error rate in statistical studies.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stephen Bannon 9 mins – “Now that Trump’s chief strategist Stephen Bannon has been appointed, critics are concerned the alt-right media mogul behind Breitbart News will promote populist ideals in the White House. Journalist Josh Green gives us a profile on Bannon.” At the link find the title, “Nov 15: Meet Trump’s chief strategist Stephen Bannon, the man behind alt-right Breitbart News, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161115_77419.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Countermeasures 20 mins – “Yes, all of the usual corporate and government entities know you’re here. Google remembers everything you’ve ever searched, BuzzFeed knows how you’ve scored on all their quizzes, and your cell phone provider knows who you talk to and who you sleep with. Terms of Service agreements are an exercise in futility, encrypted email often takes more trouble than it’s worth, and yeah, sure, go ahead and give Facebook a fake name, but don’t think you’re fooling anyone. Companies are collecting your data from just about everywhere, storing it through time unknown, and using it however they want. Oh, and that’s where the FBI-and-friends find it. But Bruce Schneier, author of the book, “Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World,” says the fact that you’ve taken the time to read this far means you’ve got the one reliable protection available to us in year 2016: awareness….” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Texting for Health 27 mins – “Researchers in Sydney are using all sorts of innovations to improve the health of Australians. Prevention is better – and cheaper – than a cure. But only half of patients who have had heart attacks and strokes actually take their medication which is prescribed to reduce their risk of further attacks. By sending four SMS/text messages a week to patients, public health experts have dramatically reduced their risk of dying. One patient Graeme Wilson now keeps a close eye on his diet, especially the salt content, thanks to the reminders he receives on his mobile phone. Preventing falls in the elderly is the goal of special exercise classes in Sydney. Researchers found that just 25 minutes of exercise a day to improve balance and stability, reduces the number of falls by nearly 40%. Aboriginal children used to have the best teeth – but sugary drinks are now causing decay. Researchers at the Poche Centre for Aboriginal Health at the University of Sydney found that they were reluctant to drink tap water instead because it was smelly and looked a strange colour. It is hoped that cool, clean water provided in schools and biodegradable toothbrushes will help to reduce decay.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tidiness 73 mins – “Tim Harford, journalist and author, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his latest book, Messy. Harford argues that we have a weakness for order and neat solutions causing us to miss opportunities to find happiness or success with messier, more disorderly processes and solutions. Hartford looks at a wide range of examples from business and personal life making the case that tidiness is overrated and that messy should get more love.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender Issues 27 mins – “Earlier this year, North Carolina passed HB2, the so-called “bathroom bill.” The law bans anyone from using a public restroom that doesn’t match up with his/her biological sex. HB2 put the state in the middle of a national fight about gender. But North Carolina is also home to one of the few gender clinics for kids in the South, at Duke University’s Children’s Hospital. This week, we spend a day in that gender clinic, the only one in North Carolina. We wanted to know how a clinic like this one operates in this political climate. And we wanted to find out how these patients are coping. Dr. Deanna Adkins, a pediatric endocrinologist, started the clinic a year ago. Over the course of our day, we met three of her very different patients. Drew Adams is a 15-year-old trans man who came with his mom, Erica, all the way from Jacksonville, Florida. On the drive up, Drew wore a T-shirt with “This is What Trans Looks Like” printed on it. He told us he decided to change out of it before he stopped for a bathroom break in North Carolina; he used the men’s room. When Dr. Adkins told Drew that not only would he get a prescription for testosterone, but that he could give himself his first shot that very day, Drew stood up and cheered.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Economics 47 mins – “The economy and Donald J. Trump. He ran on jobs and big growth. So, how will he do it? Can he do it?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Health Care 27 mins – “A joint podcast from Kaiser Health News and The Lancet – discussion of where US health policy might be heading when Donald Trump takes office early next year.” At the link find the title, “Where next for US health and health care? Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 11november-khn.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Promises 43 mins – “New Yorker writer Evan Osnos talks about the executive orders and other actions that Trump can use to undo existing agreements on climate change, immigration and foreign policy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Psychotherapy 31 mins – “We have this idea of what therapy is supposed to look like. There’s a couch. An objective therapist sitting across the room scribbling notes. But of course it’s not that simple. What happens when your therapist is not really a therapist? Or the therapist is the one in tears? And of course, should you or should you not, try to have sex with your therapist? In this episode, six short stories, many from our listeners, looking at how the role of patient and therapist can get… complicated.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Trade Policy 40 mins – “…thank you for joining this Council on Foreign Relations media call looking at the future of U.S. trade policy. I’m Robert McMahon, managing editor of CFR.org, and I’m going to be talking about the follow-on to the presidential elections, in which President-elect Donald Trump targeted U.S. trade policy as a top area of reform. His plan for the first one hundred days in office listed withdrawing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement, renegotiating NAFTA, and labeling China a currency manipulator as his top three priorities. So with us to help understand trade policy and what could be developing next, we are fortunate to have Edward Alden, CFR senior fellow, and author of the indispensable new book Failure to Adjust: How Americans Got Left Behind in the Global Economy, and Myron Brilliant, who is executive vice president and head of international affairs for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The three of us will be talking for about twenty minutes or so, and then opening up the call to you all.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Transition 47 mins – “On the campaign trail, candidate Donald Trump promised to “drain the swamp” in Washington of a corrupt, money-driven establishment.  Politicians could be bought and sold, he said. He said he had done just that himself. Wall Street and lobbyists, he said, ruled. He would run them out. Now, Donald Trump’s transition team is digging in. What are they lining up to drain? What are they bringing in? This hour On Point, the real transition, and Donald Trump’s promise to “drain the swamp.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Trumps Campaign Promises 26 mins – “Candidates promise all kinds of things. But once they get into office, it’s not always possible to carry through on them. We ask, can Trump do the things he’s pledged to do?” At the link find the title, “#735: President Trump,” right-click “Media Files 20161111_pmoney podcast111116.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turkey Coup Backlash 27 mins – “Public employee one day, enemy of the state the next. The post coup reality in Turkey.” At the link find the title, “Cleansing Turkey, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04gk7k5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Utopian Groups History 52 mins – “In his recent book “Utopia for Realists,” Rutger Bregman advocates a 15-hour workweek, universal basic income, and open borders.  Sounds like paradise to us! From the Oneida Community’s dream of open or “complex marriage” to the rise and spectacular fall of Pullman’s model company town, the Guys look at why the idea of “utopianism” has such strong appeal to Americans.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Games for Good 26 mins – “Video games are the new self-help, and Jane McGonigal is here to tell us why. …she’s the director of game research and development at the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto, California where she’s spent years researching our brains during what she calls, “the state of play.” After wading through tons of research, she found that gaming is a wonderland of possibilities to make us smarter, happier, and more creative people… In fact, gaming can help cope with depression and combat anxiety, but it’s all about the dosage (i.e. how much gaming you’re doing)… Here are Jane’s prescriptions: If you’re trying to lose weight: “When you feel a craving coming on, play a visual pattern-matching game on your phone — like Tetris or Candy Crush Saga – for ten minutes. These games have been shown in scientific studies to reduce cravings, by monopolizing your visual imagination and blocking your brain’s ability to picture the thing you crave. Research shows that players make healthier eating choices in the hour after they’ve played!” …Research shows that twenty minutes of these flow-inducing games, three times a week, will help you focus your mind and calm yourself, and improve your mood for hours afterward. (Believe it or not, I’ve met many Buddhist monks who play Angry Birds!)” If you could use a boost of extra energy and motivation: “Play a really tricky puzzle game, like Sudoku, Cut the Rope, or The Room. Research shows that trying to solve a difficult puzzle increases dopamine levels in your brain, which is the neurotransmitter that increases your work ethic and will power. It doesn’t matter if you successfully complete the game or not – just trying will do the trick, and the harder the better. So if you have a difficult project to tackle, or a complex problem to solve, prime your brain for success with fifteen minutes of puzzling first.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virtual Engineering 68 mins – “This episode of The Engineering Commons finds Adam, Brian, Carmen and Jeff predicting how virtual and augmented realities might soon be incorporated into daily engineering activities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Concerns 48 mins – “How did everyone miss the Donald Trump supporters who were hiding in plain sight? On Reveal, we’ll learn why they kept a low profile – until Election Day that is – and hear what they have to say now that their candidate is headed for the White House. We’ll also meet an emerging leader of the alt-right movement who is packing his bags and leaving rural Montana for Washington D.C., where he’ll advocate for a white supremacist agenda.” At the link find the title, “The secret Trump voter, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files Scars-and-gripes-forever_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Issues 50 mins – “Come election season, it’s easy to get cynical. Why cast a ballot if your single measly vote can’t possibly change anything? In our first-ever election special, we set off to find a single vote that made a difference. We venture from the biggest election on the planet – where polling officials must brave a lion-inhabited forest to collect the vote of an ascetic temple priest – to the smallest election on the planet – where there are no polling officials, only kitty cats wearing nametags. Along the way, we meet a too-trusting advice columnist, a Texan Emperor, and a passive-aggressive mom who helped change American democracy forever.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Wine in California 63 mins – “Join our distinguished panelists as they share their year-long journey toward the 2016 vineyard harvest and their commitments to environmental stewardship, social responsibility and the desire to keep land and businesses sustainable for future generations. Following the program, continue the conversation with our panel and celebrate the holidays with a tasting of their outstanding wines.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working Women 29 mins – “Rachael Ellison and Leslie Ali Walker are two working moms who hatched the idea for Need/Done, an app that they think could help get more working parents — especially working moms — into top-tier positions, while also being present at home. How does the app work? Through a crowdsourced community of parents, the service provides reliable childcare, meal planning suggestions, and groceries delivered to your door. Think: Nextdoor meets Sittercity. In the second installment of our four-part series, the co-founders test out a prototype of the service on 20 Brooklyn moms, including one very eager and willing participant: Manoush….” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Workplace Diversity 24 mins – “The future belongs to those who embrace diversity, because one thing’s certain—a lack of it leads to dumb decisions and bad business. And it turns out you will find some diversity in Australian workplaces… it just varies by industry and level of job. In this episode of WorkLife, meet the firefighter who’s travelling around the world to learn how diversity’s being achieved elsewhere and hear from the youngest woman ever elected to an Australian parliament, whose workplace wasn’t even accessible to wheelchairs until her election. right-click “ At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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