Media Mining Digest 127 – 18 Apr 2014: African City, Alcoholism Stories, AutismAnalysis, Bicycles, Blood Tests, Brain Genetics, Cancer Genetics, Cancer Treatment, Central African Republic Conflict, College for Free, Dog Genome, Economic Indicators, Education Economics, Farm Workers, Financial Literacy, Fracking History, Funerals, Genomic Researchers, Humanitarian Intervention, Internet and NSA, John Wayne, Marijuana Legalization, Microaggression, Numenta Brain Simulator, Pee in Pool Is Bad, Pharma Doctor, Power Grid, Rwanda Genocide, Rwanda Hero, Saturated Fats, Seniors and Tech, South African Violence, Stock Trading, Technology Transformation, Terraform Mediterranean, Vaccinating Children, Vermeer’s Secret, Vietnam Reporters, WomenEarn Less

The following audio files come from a larger group of 172 for this week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts. A zip file of all 39 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

African City 11 mins – “A group of beautiful, accomplished women are on the hunt for love —and great clothes— in a vibrant metropolis. No, Carrie Bradshaw is not returning for another run of Sex and the City. It’s the story of the new web series. The show follows the adventures of five young women who’ve returned to their home country of Ghana after years spent abroad. The stories of An African City may present a side of Africa that viewers have never seen before.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcoholism Stories 55 mins – “Michael Enright talks to two authors who have written about the bottle and the damage done: Ann Dowsett Johnston, author of Drink: The Intimate Relationship Between Women and Alcohol, and Olivia Laing, author of The Trip to Echo Spring: Why Writers Drink.” At the link find the title, “The Enright Files – Drink,” right-click (here or there) “Download The Enright Files – Drink” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Analysis 59 mins – “Autism is a general term for a spectrum of disorders of brain development that range in severity from mild to severe. Because autism is  not a single disease, it has been difficult to identify its causes. Dr. Christopher Walsh describes how recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have made it possible to study large cohorts of patients and find genes that are most commonly disrupted in children with autism. These studies show that all currently known genes associated with autism are also associated with other neurological diseases, and that they affect the mechanisms of communication between neurons.” At the link find the title, “2013 Genomics: Cancer and Autism Lecture 3,” right-click “Media files 13Lect3_400.mp4″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the video, only. An audio version is in the zip collection mentioned in the introduction for this episode.”

Bicycles 30 mins – “This week on Sea Change Radio, we hear from Michael Payne, a wind energy executive-turned-bicycle-advocate. He talks with host Alex Wise about the efforts his non-profit, Bike Houston, is undertaking to change policy, attitudes, and habits in the nation’s 4th largest city.  While it’s unlikely this work will transform Houston into a Southwestern Amsterdam anytime soon, the lessons from the work of Payne and his colleagues may well inspire similar bicycle revolutions in other cities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blood Tests 51 mins – “Blood tests have long been a routine part of medicine; complete blood counts,red and white cell counts, blood chemistry and a number of other tests give doctors valuable information about a patient’s health. But researchers are discovering blood tests may also offer critical information about an even wider variety of illnesses and conditions, including the early detection of some cancers and the possibility of Alzheimer’s disease. For patients, the chance to avoid invasive procedures such as biopsies and the prospects for earlier intervention are clear benefits, but there are ethical questions as well.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the zip collection noted in this episode’s introduction contains a copy of the audio file.

Brain Genetics 60 mins – “The human brain is a complex network of cells whose organization and function are controlled by many genes. By working with patients who have developmental brain disorders, Dr. Christopher Walsh and his team have begun to identify genes that are required for proper brain development. This research has led to some surprising insights, such as a connection between cell division orientation and cell fate during the development of the cerebral cortex.”  At the link find the title, “2013 Genomics: Cancer and Autism Lecture 1,” right-click “Media files 13Lect1_400.mp4″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the video, only. An audio version is in the zip collection mentioned in the introduction for this episode.

Cancer Genetics 59 mins – “Despite decades of research, cancer continues to be a major cause of death in the United States. The disease is traditionally treated by a combination of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, which can have severe side effects. Recent  advances in cancer biology have led to the development of targeted drugs as new and effective treatment options for some types of cancer. Dr. Charles Sawyers presents an overview of cancer biology and describes how understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in a type of cancer, chronic myeloid leukemia, resulted in the development of Gleevec, one of the first targeted cancer drugs.” At the link find the title, “2013 Genomics: Cancer and Autism Lecture 4,” right-click “Media files 13Lect2_400.mp4″ and select “Save File As” to get the video, only. An audio version is in the zip collection mentioned in the introduction for this episode.

Cancer Treatment 58 mins – “Based on early successes with targeted drug therapy, the cancer research community prioritized sequencing the genomes of thousands of tumor samples to identify every gene mutated in cancer. Approximately 140 such genes have been identified to date. They can be classified into three main functional groups according to their roles in normal cell biology: genes that affect cell growth and survival, cell fate, and genome maintenance. Cancers can now be classified not only by the type of tissue and cell that they affect, but also by the genes that are mutated.  As Dr. Charles Sawyers reveals, both types of classification are necessary for devising new, targeted therapies.” At the link find the title, “2013 Genomics: Cancer and Autism Lecture 2,” right-click “Media files
13Lect4_400.mp4″ to get the video, only. An audio version is in the zip collection mentioned in the introduction for this episode.

Central African Republic Conflict 27 mins – “Can a unique friendship between two men of god end the killings in the Central African Republic? Tim Whewell investigates.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Central African Republic – A Road Through Hatred – 10 Apr 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140410-0330a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College for Free 10 mins – “The Kalamazoo Promise pays for the higher education of students in the Michigan school district’s public education system. It’s the latest chapter in Tell Me More’s series about paying for college.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dog Genome 29 mins – “Dr. Elinor Karlsson of the Broad Institute discusses using dogs in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and the genetic evidence for dog domestication, as revealed by copy-number variations in the amylase gene.” At the link find the title, “2013 Genomics: Cancer and Autism Discussion 1,” right-click “Media files 13Discussion 1_400.mp4″ to get the video, only. An audio version is in the zip collection mentioned in the introduction for this episode.

Economic Indicators  58 mins – “Zachary Karabell talked about his book, The Leading Indicators: A Short History of the Numbers that Rule Our World, in which he argues that gross national product, balance of trade, unemployment, inflation, and consumer confidence should no longer be the primary basis for business plans or monetary policy. He argued that the information revolution has made considerably more data available. He spoke with Wall Street Journal reporter Kimberly Strassel.”  You can watch online, but not download the program; however, it’s included with the zipped collections for the last half of 2012 noted at the end of each Media Mining Digest.

Education Economics 63 mins – “In this week’s episode, Roberts talks with EconLog blogger Bryan Caplan about higher education. In the spirit of continuing conversation, here are some things to consider…What is the earning premium to college relative to high school, and how has it changed over time? What “psychological changes in the economy” have accounted for this change, according to Caplan….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Workers 7 mins – “The film Cesar Chavez focuses on the Mexican-American activist who helped organize farm workers. But some say the movie ignores the Filipino laborers in that movement. Filmmaker Marisa Aroy explains.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Literacy 38 mins – “Carrie Schwab-Pomerantz – President of the Charles Schwab Foundation, Senior Vice President at Charles Schwab & Co., and the daughter of Charles Schwab! Her newest book is The Charles Schwab Guide to Finance After Fifty: Answers to Your Most Important Money Questions.  This week we discuss what it was like for Carrie growing up, how finance was in her blood, her deep understanding of the tough financial questions and what you can do to tackle your toughest money issues at any age. Through Carrie’s popular “Ask Carrie” columns, her leadership of the Charles Schwab Foundation, and her work across party lines through two White House administrations and with the President’s Advisory Council on Financial Capability, she has become one of America’s most trusted sources for financial advice.” Ten minutes into the podcast she talks about a teenage financial literacy program. At the link right-click “Download” toward the page bottom, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking History 46 mins – “Every day, one hundred new oil and gas wells are drilled and hydraulically fractured in America. The recent fracking boom has produced immense amounts of energy, income and a whole lot of controversy. In a new book called The Boom, Wall Street Journal reporter Russell Gold attempts to cut through the noise from both sides to understand how we can best procure the energy we rely on every day. Gold joins us Tuesday to examine the economic, environmental and social impacts of where our energy comes from. Russell Gold is an investigative journalist at The Wall Street Journal. His new book is called The Boom: How Fracking Ignited the American Energy Revolution and Changed the World [Amazon|Indiebound].” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Funerals 45 mins – “The latest trend in burials gives a whole new meaning to the phrase “bite the dust.”  Eco-friendly, personalized funerals. The perfect way to end a low-impact environmentally friendly life. Some are replacing a casket with a burial shroud. Opting to place a family member’s cremated remains on the ocean floor. Or going high-tech, putting computer chips in your burial blot. Modernizing the burial ritual – it’s increasingly popular… reflecting the values of an aging baby boomer generation. This hour On Point: new ways to say goodbye to eco-conscious, tech savvy loved ones.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genomic Researchers 37 mins – “Dr. Charles Sawyers and Dr. Christopher Walsh discuss wide-ranging topics with students, including autism, cancer, and scientific career choices.” At the link find the title, “2013 Genomics: Cancer and Autism Discussion 2,” right-click “Media files 13Discussion2_400.mp4″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the video, only.  An audio version is in the zip collection mentioned in the introduction for this episode.

Humanitarian Intervention 52 mins – “In 1898, President McKinley called for war with Spain to liberate Cuba from the “barbarities, bloodshed, starvation, and horrible miseries now existing there”—offering a humanitarian justification that has underpinned other interventions, from Haiti in 1915 to Libya in 2011. But in 1994, President Clinton took a stance against intervening in Rwanda, even as the scale of the humanitarian crisis there became clear. As we mark the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide, BackStory takes on the history of humanitarian intervention….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow above the sound bar on the right side and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up men.

Internet and NSA  89 mins – “The long-term viability of an unowned, open Internet remains in question. Any analysis of where the Internet is headed as a protocol and a platform must take into account the activities of both public and private entities that see the Internet as a source of intelligence — and a field of contention. Yochai Benkler, Bruce Schneier, and Jonathan Zittrain of the Berkman Center are joined by John DeLong and Anne Neuberger of the National Security Agency in a conversation moderated by Berkman Faculty Director Terry Fisher on the future of an open internet in the face of challenges to privacy in an unsecure world.” At the link right-click “MP3″ beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

John Wayne  51 mins – “John Wayne was one of the most popular film actors of the twentieth century. Between 1926 and 1976 he appeared in more than 170 films – including some of the best westerns ever made. Wayne often portrayed lonely and flawed men of dignity and strength searching for justice. But over the course of his five-decade career John Wayne became something much greater than a movie star: he became a symbol of America itself. But while many Americans viewed Wayne as a hero, others vilified him for his controversial political causes. Diane and her guest explore the life and legend of John Wayne.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the zip collection noted in this episode’s introduction contains a copy of the audio file.

Marijuana Legalization 90 mins – “Panelists talked about the impact of marijuana legalization and argued that certain adverse consequences could be avoided through strong federal actions that would allow states to legalize marijuana while removing large corporations from the picture. Professor Mark Kleiman said the current state-by-state approach to legalization had the potential to increase marijuana abuse and decrease tax revenues as the industry grew in size and influence. Topics included Washington and Colorado, the two states that had legalized recreational use of marijuana.“The Corporate Takeover of Marijuana: How Not To Make a Hash out of Marijuana Legalization” discussion at the New America Foundation was co-sponsored by Washington Monthly.” You can watch at the link, but audio download costs $.99; however, the zip collection noted in this episode’s introduction contains a copy.

Microaggression 11 mins – “Has a colleague ever said something to you that wasn’t outright racist, sexist, or homophobic, but kind of rubbed you the wrong way? Tell Me More looks at how to handle microaggressions at work.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Numenta Brain Simulator 57 mins – Host Leo Laporte interviews Jeff Hawkins the founder of Palm Computing and Handspring, who has turned to work on neuroscience, founding Numenta to reinvigorate artificial intelligence development using cutting edge neurological research. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pee in Pool Is Bad 4 mins – “Wee! Something you really shouldn’t do in the pool.” It reacts with chlorine to produce hazardous results. At the link find the title, “Episode 352 – April 10 2014,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements April10_2014.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pharma Doctor 24 mins – “MSHQ 072 : A Look Into the Pharmaceutical Industry with a Chief Medical Officer” At the link right-click “Download” and elect “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Power Grid 24 mins – “The speaker and guest in our studio today is Maggie Koerth-Baker.  She writes a monthly column, “Eureka,” for The New York Times Magazine and is also the science editor at BoingBoing.net.  She enjoys exploring the intersection between science and culture, and you can “Find your daily dose of Maggie science” through her website at maggiekb.com, and her pages on Facebook and Twitter.   She has co-authored a book titled: “Be Amazing: Glow in the Dark, Control the Weather, Perform Your Own Surgery, Get Out of Jury Duty, Identify a Witch, Colonize a Nation, Impress a Girl, Make a Zombie, Start Your Own Religion.”  Her recent book, and with a shorter title, is called: “Before the Lights Go Out: Conquering the Energy Crisis Before It Conquers Us.”  And that is the topic that brings her here today.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rwanda Genocide  54 – ” The brutality and bloodshed of the Rwandan genocide 20 years ago was unfathomable. And whether we learned enough to prevent it from happening again is questionable. Jean-Paul Samputu tells his story reconciliation with the man who killed his family.” At the link find the title, “Rwanda Reconciliation,” right-click (here or there) “Download Rwanda Reconciliation” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rwanda Hero 27 mins – “The story of Capt Mbaye Diagne, one of the unsung heroes of Rwanda’s genocide. Working as a Senegalese UN peacekeeper, he saved the children of murdered Hutu Prime Minister Agathe Uwilingiyimana and many more. Mark Doyle travels to Rwanda, Senegal and Canada to meet the people who knew Mbaye Diagne.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: A Good Man in Rwanda,” right-click “Media files
docarchive 20140405-1806a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saturated Fats 46 mins – “For years we were told “cut the fat, cut the fat.”  Especially the saturated fat.  “Fat free” was the label that sold.  Now comes a big new study with a more nuanced message.  A little butter won’t kill you.  Saturated fat is not the dietary third rail for heart disease.  Don’t roll in it.  Don’t go crazy.  Pay attention to your whole diet, with lots of plants in there.  Stay clear of trans-fats.  Watch out for sugar and processed food.  But the new meta-study found no evidence that eating saturated fat increased heart disease.  This hour On Point:  we’re taking on board the latest findings on fat.” At the link right-ccick “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seniors and Tech 7 mins – “There are plenty of stereotypes when it comes to seniors and technology, but the Pew Research Center says those don’t always ring true.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South African Violence 55 mins – “Twenty years after the first free elections in South Africa, the country still struggles. But across the bitter divides of race and class, there is hope. Philip Coulter tells the story of a massacre, and one woman’s act of grace and reconciliation.” At the link find the title, “Unfinished Business ,” right-click (here or there) “Download Unfinished Business” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stock Trading 63 mins – “Michael Lewis, the best-selling author of several books about Wall Street, published his latest, titled Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt… In his book, Mr. Lewis looks at the world of high-frequency stock trading and argues that high-frequency traders and big Wall Street banks have rigged the system to gain an advantage over regular investors. He also talked about a group of traders who, having discovered how the market now operates, created their own stock exchange to try to level the playing field.” You can watch at the link, but audio download costs $.99; however, the zip collection noted in this episode’s introduction contains a copy.

Technology Transformation 52 mins – “Happy Birthday, World Wide Web! The 25-year-old Web, along with the Internet and the personal computer, are among mankind’s greatest inventions. But back then, who knew? A techno-writer reminisces about the early days of the WWW and says he didn’t think it would ever catch on. Also, meet an inventor who claims his innovation will leave your laptop in the dust. Has quantum computing finally arrived? Plus, why these inventions are not as transformative as other creative biggies of history: The plow. The printing press. And… the knot? And, why scientific discoveries may beat out technology as the most revolutionary developments of all. A new result about the Big Bang may prove as important as germ theory and the double helix.” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terraform the Mediterranean 4 mins – “Herman Sörgel, born in 1885,…wanted to reduce the size of the Mediterranean, to irrigate much of North Africa, and to create land links to Africa. He would dam the Bosporus to block off the Black Sea to the east. On the west, he wanted to build a huge semicircular earth gravity dam — arcing out into the Atlantic at Gibraltar. He would also redirect African rivers to create vast freshwater inland seas in northern Africa. Once the Mediterranean was isolated, evaporation would cause it to drop several feet per year. That would eventually expose more than a hundred thousand square miles of new land. Most of the Adriatic Sea would vanish, and an expanded Sicily would link to Italy and almost touch Tunisia…” It would be called Atlantropa. At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Vaccinating Children 16 mins – “Health officials are on edge after outbreaks of measles and whooping cough. Colorado lawmakers want to make it tougher for parents to opt out of immunizing their children. A panel of parents weigh in.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vermeer’s Secret 35 mins – Host Leo Laporte interviews Tim Jenison who talks about his documentary, “Tim’s Vermeer,” where Tim attempts to solve how 17th century Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer was able to paint so photo-realistically during an era without today’s technology. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Vietnam Reporters 46 mins – “Journalist David Halberstam says when the government is twisting the truth, reporters have their biggest role to play. The new film DATELINE – SAIGON explores that idea through the work of Halberstam and other young reporters who in the early days of the Vietnam War, found themselves at odds with the Kennedy White House, and on a South Vietnamese assassination list. Thursday, director Thomas Herman joins Doug to talk about the journalists who set the standard for front-line war reporting.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women Earn Less 46 mins – “Ladies, you’ve probably heard: if you want to rise at work it’s up to you. Lean in! And guys, have you seen the news that with women’s advances, boys are being left behind? Hillary Clinton. Marissa Mayer. Sheryl Sandberg. Three strong women on top means the glass ceiling is gone. Right? Wrong. The authors of a new book say more subtle forms of bias in the workplace are preventing women from advancing on their merit. They call it a new “Soft War on Women”. This hour, On Point: women at work — the facts and the fight.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of over 2800 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. Jan-Jun 2013 files in 18 zip segments (832 podcasts) can be downloaded hereand a list of those files here; Jul-Dec 2013 files in 13 zip segments (720 podcasts) downloaded here, and a list here;  Jan-Jun 2012 files in 8 segments (360 podcasts) and a list are here, and Jul-Dec here in 13 parts (593 podcasts).  For 2011 a list and 5 segments  (184 podcasts). For 2010 and earlier 64 podcasts are listed here and zipped  as Part 1 and Part 2. (Dead links in old episodes are due to updating; try a current episode.) Over 180 feeds used to prepare this weekly blog are harvested with Feedreader3. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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Media Mining Digest 126 – 11 Apr 2014: ABA Tech Show, Affordable Care Act, Bad Kids, Bar Code Inventor, Black Families Survey, Broadband in Georgia, Climate Change, Coding Python, Contraceptives Case, Contribution Limits, Corruption in Ukraine, Cosmic Concepts, Crypto Wars, Elementary Science, Evolution, Fair Wages, FBI Burglar, Foreign Service Jobs, Funding Science, Grad School Cost, Guns in America, Health Care Debate, Holocaust Death Marches, Human Rights, Immigration, Innovation, Invasion Biology, Japanese Whaling Stops, Jared Diamond, Kenya Climate Change, Kidney Shortage, Light Up for Kids, Malaria Rising, Martin Luther King, Michio Kaku, Missing Migrants Project, Money Paradox, Navigation, Network Movie, Nuclear Watts Bar, Robot Ethics, School Privatization, Tunneling Electrons, Under Employment, Work Evolution

The following audio files come from a larger group of 161 for this week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts. A zip file of all 45 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

ABA Tech Show 23 mins – “Breaking all of its previous attendance records, ABA TECHSHOW 2014 will certainly go down as one of the most successful. True-to-form, many of the attendees were from small firms and solo practices. With the introduction of How-To sessions, lawyers will be getting more out of ABA TECHSHOW for many years to come….” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Affordable Health Care 51 mins  – “…Republican leaders continue to criticize the ACA. But supporters say the White House is vindicated by the enrollment numbers. Diane talks with a panel of [3] health care experts about the first phase of the new health insurance law and challenges that lie ahead.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Bad Kids 59 mins – “They’re small. And they’re cuddly. But sometimes it feels as though our babies were replaced with demon replicas — controlling, demanding, or just downright awful. This week, stories of infants and children who dominate the adults around them with their baditude, or whom adults have painted with the “bad” brush from early on. We also ask the question: at what age does badness begin?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bar Code Inventor 19 mins – “…A time without bar codes is hard to imagine now. But it wasn’t that long ago, and the story doesn’t start with George Laurer. It starts with an engineer named Joseph Woodland. In 1948 Woodland was trying to come up with simple symbol that, when scanned, would translate to a number that a computer could use to identify a product….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Families Survey 10 mins – “The well-being of the black family has been the subject of public debate. Ebony and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation are out with the Survey of African American Families. Tell Me More takes a look.”  At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Georgia  14 mins -”While at the SEATOA Conference in Raleigh last week, I met Mike Foor, the President and CEO of the Georgia Communications Cooperative (GCC). Given the important role GCC is playing in expanding great Internet access in rural Georgia, we wanted to interview him for Community Broadband Bits.” At the link right-click (there or here) “download this Mp3 file…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change  5 mins – “…A new report from the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is out and makes it clearer than ever that global warming is already changing the world and affecting our lives, and that the impacts are only going to get worse. The report contains a litany of sobering impacts, from too much water some places, to too little water elsewhere, shifting disease risks, failing infrastructure and food shortages….Note: This report reflects a correction from the original broadcast version. The IPCC’s AR 5 Working Group II report has roughly 750 (745) authors and editors, not 1,500, along with 1,729 expert and government reviewers.” At the link right-click find the title, “UN scientists tell us, ready or not, here comes climate change,” right-click “Media files 033120141.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coding Python 42 mins – Hosts Fr. Robert Ballecer, SJ and Shannon Morse introduce Python coding as a new module with Code Warrior Dale Chase! At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Contraceptives Case  89 mins – “Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby Stores Oral Arguments: The Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby Stores, combined with the case of Conestoga Wood Specialties Corporation. The cases involved the provision of the Affordable Care Act that mandates contraception coverage, and whether for-profit corporations can deny employees that coverage based on the religious beliefs of its owners.This program contains the audio recording released by the court.” Listen at the link, but a download costs $.99; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Contribution Limits 46 mins – “The Supreme Court strikes down overall limits on personal political campaign contributions. We’ll look at the court’s vision of wide-open, big-money politics.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in Ukraine 27 mins – “Lucy Ash talks to the Ukrainian volunteers and activists who are painstakingly restoring a stash of documents dumped in a lake on the abandoned estate of ex-president Yanukovich.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Ukraine – The Criminal Paper Trail,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140403-0350a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cosmic Concepts 51 mins – “Physicists are calling the findings of a recent experiment that may have provided a glimpse of what happened an instant after the Big Bang “huge,” “extraordinary” and “spectacular.” Claims that scientists at the South Pole have detected signs of gravitational waves in the fabric of space-time are renewing hopes of finding a complete theory of how the cosmos began. Some cosmologists say this is one of the biggest discoveries in the field in 20 years. Others argue more direct evidence is needed. For this month’s Environmental Outlook, Diane and her guests discuss possible proof of the Big Bang Theory.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Crypto Wars 27 mins – “Hacking, security, encryption: Gordon Corera explores the history of the war between governments and geeks to control computer cryptography.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Crypto Wars,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140402-0905a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the the pop-up menu.

Elementary Science 30 mins – “Elementary science has been on our minds recently.  So it is fitting that our guest this week has been working hard helping elementary teachers tackle the Next Generation Science Standards.  As Coordinator for Elementary Science in Baltimore County Schools, Eric Cromwell has the task of moving a large number of schools and teachers into an NGSS based curriculum.  Listen to the show to hear of Eric’s experience in this transition as we discuss how elementary schools can embrace the NGSS.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evolution 27 mins – “It’s hard to imagine the twists and turns of evolution that gave rise to Homo Sapiens. After all, it required geologic time, and the existence of many long-gone species that were once close relatives. That may be one reason why – according to a recent poll – one-third of all Americans reject the theory of evolution. They prefer to believe that humans and other living organisms have existed in their current form since the beginning of time.” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fair Wages 55 mins – “…Along with their guests, Ed, Brian, and Peter discuss how slaves in the antebellum period could sometimes be brought into the wage economy, and how convict labor played havoc with wages in the wake of the Civil War. They discover why early 20th century feminists cheered the demise of state minimum wage legislation in the 1920s, and find out how the federal minimum wage came to be, a decade later.” At the link right-click the down-arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FBI Burglary 60 mins – “Betty Medsger, author of The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI, talked about the events of March 8, 1971, when a group of people broke into an FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania, and stole every document in the building. Ms. Medsger talked about four members of the group: John Raines, Bonnie Raines, Keith Forsyth, and Bill Davidon. She explained how they mailed her copies of the stolen documents when she was a reporter for the Washington Post in July of 1971, and how her article about the documents revealed a wide-ranging FBI program of illegal surveillance on numerous ordinary Americans. The burglary also exposed an FBI program known as COINTELPRO, in which the Bureau illegally targeted groups such as the Black Panthers.” Listen at the link, but a download costs $.99; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Foreign Service Jobs 45 mins – Hinckley Forum: Interest in a Career in Foreign Service by  D. James Bjorkman, Vice Consul, U.S. Embassy, Managua, Nicaragua: preparation for, applying, family involvement and internships. At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Funding Science 22 mins – In the Science Podcast: 4 April Show Jennifer Couzin-Frankel in the first half talks about how biomedical scientists are adapting to major changes in research funding, then the remaining half is devoted to a roundup of news stories from our daily news site with David Grimm. At the link right-click “Download MP3 file for this show” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Betty Medsger, author of The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI, talked about the events of March 8, 1971, when a group of people broke into an FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania, and stole every document in the building. Ms. Medsger talked about four members of the group: John Raines, Bonnie Raines, Keith Forsyth, and Bill Davidon. She explained how they mailed her copies of the stolen documents when she was a reporter for the Washington Post in July of 1971, and how her article about the documents revealed a wide-ranging FBI program of illegal surveillance on numerous ordinary Americans. The burglary also exposed an FBI program known as COINTELPRO, in which the Bureau illegally targeted groups such as the Black Panthers. – See more at: http://series.c-span.org/search.aspx?For=Medsger#sthash.tTlYzr1O.dpuf
Betty Medsger, author of The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI, talked about the events of March 8, 1971, when a group of people broke into an FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania, and stole every document in the building. Ms. Medsger talked about four members of the group: John Raines, Bonnie Raines, Keith Forsyth, and Bill Davidon. She explained how they mailed her copies of the stolen documents when she was a reporter for the Washington Post in July of 1971, and how her article about the documents revealed a wide-ranging FBI program of illegal surveillance on numerous ordinary Americans. The burglary also exposed an FBI program known as COINTELPRO, in which the Bureau illegally targeted groups such as the Black Panthers. – See more at: http://series.c-span.org/search.aspx?For=Medsger#sthash.tTlYzr1O.dpuf
Betty Medsger, author of The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI, talked about the events of March 8, 1971, when a group of people broke into an FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania, and stole every document in the building. Ms. Medsger talked about four members of the group: John Raines, Bonnie Raines, Keith Forsyth, and Bill Davidon. She explained how they mailed her copies of the stolen documents when she was a reporter for the Washington Post in July of 1971, and how her article about the documents revealed a wide-ranging FBI program of illegal surveillance on numerous ordinary Americans. The burglary also exposed an FBI program known as COINTELPRO, in which the Bureau illegally targeted groups such as the Black Panthers. – See more at: http://series.c-span.org/search.aspx?For=Medsger#sthash.tTlYzr1O.dpuf

Grad School Costs 12 mins – “Tell Me More looks at the growing amount of debt that graduate students have taken on, and how it’s become difficult for them to pay it off while continuing their studies.”  At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guns In America 54 mins – “More gun deaths are due to suicide than homicide in the US. But what happens to the fiancée left behind, to friends and to the law enforcement officers involved? And, in the wake of the Clackamas mall shooting, we hear from people about their fear of violence, rational or not, that drives the fierce opposition to gun control.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Guns in America,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140329-0906a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Panel 62 mins – “Hinckley Forum: When Less is MORE in Health Care:  A panel discussion addressing waste and unnecessary health care in our community.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Holocaust Death Marches 45 mins – “Hinckley Forum: Does the Bystander Foster Extremism – The Holocaust Death Marches…Amos Guiora, Professor of Law, Co-Director, Center for Global Justice, S.J. Quinney College of Law” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Rights 55 mins – “British scholar and broadcaster Baroness Helena Kennedy explores new human rights challenges emerging in the 21st century. It’s part of the special lecture series Fragile Freedoms: the Global Struggle for Human Rights.” At the link find the title, “Fragile Freedoms – Helena Kennedy,” right-click (here or there) “Download Fragile Freedoms – Helena Kennedy” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration  19 mins – “For the first time in a while, there’s political momentum building to change the U.S. immigration system. On today’s show, we ask three economists: What would the perfect system look like? If we could scrap the mess of a system that we currently have and replace it with anything, what would it look like? Among the answers: Let in lots more doctors and engineers; Auction off immigration slots to the highest bidders; Open the gates, and let everyone in.” At the link find the title, “#436: If Economists Controlled The Borders,” right-click “Media files npr_298393820.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Methods 16 mins – “This week, Innovation Hub looks at what happens when you embrace the unexpected and flip ideas on their head. Guests include Dave Gilboa, the co-CEO of glasses company Warby Parker; Mahzarin Banaji, author of “Blindspot: The Hidden Biases of Good People” and a psychologist at Harvard; and Yale professors Barry Nalebuff and Ian Ayers, authors of “Why Not? How to Use Everyday Ingenuity to Solve Problems Big and Small.” At the link find the title, “4.5.14 Full Show – Flipping It,” right-click “Media files IHUB-040514-FullShow.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Invasion Biology 54 mins – “Millions of YouTube viewers have seen the jumping silver carp. It’s just the newest in a long line of “celebrity alien invaders”. Barbara Nichol examines the phenomenon of invasive species: a story as much about human nature as about nature.” At the link find the title, “Bioinvasion: Attack of the Alien Species!,” right-click (here or there) “Download Bioinvasion: Attack of the Alien Species!” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
[mp3 file: runs 00:54:00]

Japanese Whaling Stops 4 mins – “Whale activists got some good news today. Japan’s whale hunting near Antarctica should stop immediately. The UN International Court of Justice (ICJ) ruled Monday that Japan’s whale hunting must cease, because it’s not for scientific research purposes. That had been Japan’s argument, they they were doing it for science. The waters around Antarctica were declared a whale sanctuary in 1994… Virtually all of the world’s countries have agreed to a ban on commercial whaling, but a few, primarily Japan, Norway and Iceland, have resisted restrictions.” At the link find the title, “Japan told it can’t hunt whales near Antarctica,” right-click “Media files 033120142.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jared Diamond 45 mins – “Starkest warnings yet this week from the UN panel charged with forecasting the coming impact of climate change.  It’s going to be bad, they said. Flooding, thirst, heat, food shortage.  And we are not prepared.  Jared Diamond is listening.  He’s famously written the stories of civilizations that have fallen before in environmental collapse.  Written “Guns, Germs and Steel,” and more.  Now he’s thinking about the young, and how they will grapple with the world this century’s environment will create.  This hour On Point:  Jared Diamond and the world our young will inherit.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kenya Climate Change 4 mins – “One of the warnings from the new climate change report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC, is food insecurity: It will be harder to grow many crops in parts of the world. That includes staple crops like corn, wheat and rice. In Kenya, this could dramatically shift societal norms, where corn is life….” At the link find the title, “A shifting climate could mean trouble for one of Africa’s staple crops,” right-click ” Media files 040120146.mp3″and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kidney Shortage 51 mins -”Close to 100,000 Americans are on the wait list for a kidney transplant. Each day 14 of those people will die. Some patients are too sick to be saved, but many of those deaths could have been prevented if they had received a new kidney in time. Meanwhile, rates of hypertension and diabetes continue to rise, which means demand for transplant organs will only increase. A discussion about why the list is growing, how to increase life-saving donations and the ethical questions involved.” [4 guests] You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Light Up for Kids 49 mins – “Josh Chan and Tarun Pondicherry, founders of Light Up (@Lightup or on Facebook), returned to the show. In episode 7, they were midway through their kickstarter, planning to make a product to teach electronics to elementary and middle school students. They’ve start shipping, even distributing, their MiniKits (other kits will ship soon!). Elecia asks them if building their business and shipping the product went according to plan.” At the link right-click “Download MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malaria Rising 74 mins – This Week in Parasitism “hosts Vincent Racaniello and Dickson Despommier  discuss an increase in the altitude of malaria distribution in warmer years in the highlands of Colombia and Ethiopia.” At the link right-click “TWIP #69″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martin Luther King 54 mins – “In 1967, Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered the Massey Lectures. They were produced by Janet Somerville. Now — for the first time — she reveals the behind-the-scenes story leading to King’s message of hope.” At the link find the title, “To Heal A Sick Nation: Martin Luther King, Jr. and IDEAS,” right-click (here or there) “Download To Heal A Sick Nation: Martin Luther King, Jr. and IDEAS” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Michio Kaku 41 mins – “Dr. Michio Kaku – He is the face (and mind) of science! Dr. Kaku is a theoretical physicist, the Henry Semat Professor of Theoretical Physics at the City College of New York, a futurist, and a communicator and popularizer of science. He has written two New York Times Best Sellers: Physics of the Impossible and Physics of the Future. His most recent book was released in February and is titled, The Future of the Mind: The Scientific Quest to Understand, Enhance, and Empower the Mind. Additionally, Dr. Kaku is the host of the weekly, one-hour radio program Exploration. You probably recognize Dr. Kaku from TV – he’s basically been in every science related show that was released in the past 20 years!” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Missing Migrant Project 54 mins – “Each year, thousands of Latin American migrants illegally cross the US border via a treacherous journey, walking for days across the Arizona desert. Some succeed, others are deported, while many drop dead from exhaustion. The BBC’s Mexico Correspondent Will Grant travels to Tucson, Arizona, to meet the team behind The Missing Migrant Project, which works to identify the remains of the dead and, ultimately, return them to their family. ” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Missing Migrants 29 Mar 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140329-2000d.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Money Paradox   51 mins – “How does money motivate, trick, satisfy and disappoint us? In this hour, TED speakers share insights into our relationship with money.” At the link right-click “Download” beside “Listen to Full Show” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Navigation 46 mins – “Time was, a good map was rolled out in captain’s quarters on a rolling sea or a king’s table far from the front.  Splotched with gravy.  Embellished with mermaids.  A grand, rough approximation of the world as we knew it.  Flash forward to the smartphone in your pocket, the apps all over, the future rushing at us, and we’ve got maps gone wild. Cartography on digital steroids.  Maps loaded with terabytes of data.  3D maps.  Maps you can zoom over, zoom into.  Walk through.  Now Google and Apple are squaring off over the next great map frontier.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Network Movie 52 mins – “In a new book, New York Times culture reporter Dave Itzkoff examines the lasting influence of the wildly popular and incendiary 1976 feature film Network. According to Itzkoff, the film’s legacy is due in large part to the genius of screenwriter Paddy Chayefsky, who poured into it all his angst, anxiety and paranoia. The result was a film that used one mass medium to indict another, while also assailing the degradation and emptiness of modern American life. Itzkoff joins us Thursday to talk about it.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Watts Bar 20 mins – “Unlike Germany, which is closing down all its nuclear facilities in response to the disaster in Fukushima, Japan, the U.S. will see completion of a new nuclear power plant in 2015 – the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Watts Bar 2 nuclear plant, located in east Tennessee. The hosts talk about the details of this plant, and about the outlook for nuclear power in general, with Gary Mauldin, General Manager of Project Assurance and Support Services for Watts Bar at the TVA.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Ethics 27 mins – “…We’re at this cusp of time when educators have the power to enable their students to really push back on the world… Using robotic technologies, students aren’t just in this ivory tower anymore. They can measure water pollution, they can measure air pollution, they can make a robot that does something sculptural in the park. That power though, means that students need a sense of design, and a sense of ethical and moral thinking that we never thought we needed at that young age…  we can invent stuff now that used to be the problems of research labs. So educators not only need to give students the power to invent – because they need to be creators – but they need to teach them what it means to think about the process of invention. To think about the ethics of society. And that’s not a lesson that we’ve ever been busy teaching people in say, middle school and high school before….” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

School Privatization 23 mins – “Public education is becoming big business as bankers, hedge fund managers and private equity investors are entering what they consider to be an “emerging market.” As Rupert Murdoch put it after purchasing an education technology company, “When it comes to K through 12 education, we see a $500 billion sector in the US alone.” Education historian Diane Ravitch says the privatization of public education has to stop. As assistant secretary of education under President George H.W. Bush, she was an advocate of school choice and charter schools; under George W. Bush, she supported the No Child Left Behind initiative. But after careful investigation, she changed her mind, and has become, according to Salon, “the nation’s highest profile opponent” of charter-based education.” At the link find the title, “Public Schools for Sale?” right-click “Media files Moyers and Company 312 Podcast.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tunneling Electrons 29 mins – “Keith & Russ welcome K.W. Hipps, Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science at Washington State University.  Hipps tells us some of the childhood “mad scientist” experiments that inspired him to become a scientist.  He also introduces us to “tunneling,” in which electrons “slide” through an electron cloud without losing any energy. Visit the Hipps Tunneling Group at WSU: http://public.wsu.edu/~hipps/” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Under Employment  11 mins – “The National Urban League’s new “State of Black America” report finds that African-Americans are still struggling to find jobs, but there’s plenty they can do to recover from the recession.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Work Evolution 50 mins – “This week on Marketplace Money, guest host Lizzie O’Leary and personal finance expert Jill Schlesinger tackle questions from our listeners. We’re all trying to save money, but there are some times when being cheap costs you more in the long run. Personal finance writer Daryl Paranada tells us about times when spending can actually help you save. The latest monthly jobs report is released, more people are quitting their jobs but the unemployment rate continues to drop from the height of the recession. Good news or bad news? Tim Wu tells us about how the rise of convenience means we’re spending more time than ever under the “tyranny of tiny tasks….’ ” At the link find the title, “04/04/2014 Marketplace Money – The costs of being cheap,” right-click “Media files
marketplace_money_v2_20140404_64.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of over 2800 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. Jan-Jun 2013 files in 18 zip segments (832 podcasts) can be downloaded hereand a list of those files here; Jul-Dec 2013 files in 13 zip segments (720 podcasts) downloaded here, and a list here;  Jan-Jun 2012 files in 8 segments (360 podcasts) and a list are here, and Jul-Dec here in 13 parts (593 podcasts).  For 2011 a list and 5 segments  (184 podcasts). For 2010 and earlier 64 podcasts are listed here and zipped  as Part 1 and Part 2. (Dead links in old episodes are due to updating; try a current episode.) Over 180 feeds used to prepare this weekly blog are harvested with Feedreader3. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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Media Mining Digest 125 – 4 Apr 2014: Aircraft Black Boxes, Alaska Earthquake, Alibaba in China, Amyloid Proteins and Tooth Decay, Austism Play, Berlin Wall Tunnel, Big Data Isses, Brain Training Games, Cell Phone Inventor, Climate Change Debate, Computer Repair Show, Computer Systems, Condom Testing, Crisis Text Line, Disruptive Law, Greek Economic Recovery, Hadoop and ESRI, Interns in Utah, Law Ads on TV, Mathematical Models, Mosquito Control, Mudslide Science, Music Recording, My World 2015, NSA and Lawyers, Oculus Rift Goggles, Paleo Diet, Polio in Turkey, Prison Reform, Probability, Programming Perls, Recessions, Sitting Is Bad, SpinRite Creator, Teen Health,Tipping for Service, Troll Control, Tuberculosis

The following audio files come from a larger group of 173 for this week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts. A zip file of all 38 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months.  Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Aircraft Black Boxes 5 mins – “…Now, as the world waits for answers about MH370, there is yet another question to ask. Why, in 2014, do we depend on 1960s technology to explain why a plane crashed? “What we’re actually doing is using VCR technology in the age of Netflix. [And then] we take the VCR and throw it into the ocean, and then we try to find it,” said Clive Irving, contributor at The Daily Beast and a senior consulting editor at Conde Nast Traveler. Clive has reported on both Air France Flight 447 and Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. He says live streaming technology is “readily available right now,” and should be used to replace black boxes….” At the link find the title, “Why do we depend on 1960s technology to locate missing planes?” right-click “Media files 032620146.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alaska Earthquake 35 mins – “Today marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake. To commemorate the quake, we’re posting this extended version of the interview we broadcast on March 25, 2014, with Dr. Mike West, the Alaska State Seismologist and Director of the Alaska Earthquake Center. How On Earth host Beth Bartel talked with Dr. West about his recent paper, “Why the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake Matters 50 Years Later,” published in Seismological Research Letters.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alibaba in China 46 mins – “Alibaba is coming to the U.S.A.  The Chinese Internet giant – China’s Amazon and more – is coming to Wall Street for an IPO.  A giant stock offering.  Maybe the biggest tech offering ever.  It’s opening a huge window into China’s alternate Internet universe.  Alibaba as its Amazon.  Baidu as its Google.  Tencent as its Facebook.  Now breaking all the rules and lines and competing with each other.  It’s been called the Internet’s World War I, and it’s all happening inside China.  It could change the Internet.  It could change China.  This hour On Point: Alibaba, and all the Internet in China.

Amyloid Proteins and Tooth Decay 81 mins – This Week in Microbiology “Hosts: Vincent RacanielloElio SchaechterMichael Schmidt and Michelle Swanson…discuss a symbiosis between a bacterium and fungus that increases the virulence of oral biofilms, and the assembly of amyloid fibers, which are needed for biofilm formation.” At the link right-click TWIM#75 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Play 52 mins – “… we’re trying to understand autism through the eyes of a child. Our guide is a fictional character, an 11-year-old named Caitlin at the center of Utah playwright Julie Jensen’s latest work. Caitlin is navigating the classroom, the playground and an unexpected tragedy at home, while her teachers and father work to help her make sense of it all. Jensen and the Weber State University cast will join us, along with expert Dr. Sam Goldstein, for a conversation about kids on the autism spectrum.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Berlin Wall Tunnel 22 mins – “… in 1961, East Germany closed its border to West Berlin with a wall. But this isn’t a story about the design of the Berlin Wall. This is a story about one design to get through it—or really, underneath it. Ralph Kabisch, then a 20-something-year-old university student, was there….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Data Issues 21 mins – “Guests: Patrick Tucker, author of “The Naked Future” and NYU professor Gary Marcus; technology investor Esther Dyson; Nobel prize-winning economist Bob Shiller; Zachary Karabell, author of “The Leading Indicators: A Short History of the Numbers that Rule Our World“.  At the link find the title, “Bob Shiller on Housing Bubbles, Bill Gates, and the Failure of Math,” right-click “Media files IHUB-032914-C.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Training Games  51 mins – “For centuries, scientists believed the human brain was fully formed in childhood and did not change. But in recent years, studies have found the brain continues to make new connections over a person’s lifetime. In 2008, researchers found that older adults who engaged in brain-training drills could improve cognitive abilities. This set off a flurry of new brain-training websites promising users could slow memory loss and other effects of aging. Now, millions of Americans visit these sites every day, playing games and solving puzzles. But critics say the online training doesn’t have real-life benefits. Diane and a panel of [4] experts discuss the surge in brain game applications and whether or not they work.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Cell Phone Inventor 70 mins – This Week in Technology host Leo Laporte interviews Marty Cooper, the inventor of the handheld cellular mobile phone. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Debate 65 mins – “John Christy of the University of Alabama in Huntsville and Kerry Emanuel of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about climate change. Topics discussed include what we know and don’t know about global warming, trends in extreme weather such as hurricanes, rising sea level, the likely change in temperature in the next hundred years. Both scientists also give their perspective on what policies might be put in place to reduce risk from climate change. This episode was recorded before a live audience at the College of Business Administration at the University of Alabama in Huntsville.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Repair Show 41 mins – The creator of Mike Tech Show in episode 500 talks about the creation of the show and lessons he has passed on as the show developed. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Systems 21 mins – “Computer business systems have been designed to streamline and increase productivity in various organizations. But, have these systems been implemented appropriately? On this episode, Simon Head discussed why smarter machines are making dumber humans.” At the link right-click “16.6″ below “VBR MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Condom Testing 78 mins – This Week in Virology hosts Glenn Rall and Ann Skalka   meet up with Professor of Virology Vincent Racaniello  – creator of TWIV as well as This Week in Parasitism and This Week in Microbiology –  to talk about his career in science and science communication, which included an early job in a company that made condoms and spermicide. At the link right-click TWIV 277 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crisis Text Line 55 mins – The first of four topics in this variety show deals with the evolution and large size of the Crisis Text Line. The other topics include upload speeds in Canada, audio games and data centers. At the link find the title, “245: Crisis text lines for teens….,” right-click “Media files spark_20140323_96811.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disruptive Law 97 mins – “Privacy impacting technology, lessons from Uber, Popcorn Time can’t be stopped, and more. Guests: Robert Scoble, Larry Downes”  At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow beside “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Greek Economic Recovery 14 mins – “For the past few years, life in Greece has been like that movie Groundhog Day. Every year, it’s been the same thing over and over. The official statistics come out, and the news is bad. The economy shrank this year, the economy shrank this year, the economy shrank this year. But this year, things might be different.* The official forecasts are that the amazing shrinking economy will finally stop shrinking. This might sound like good news, but for people living in Greece it’s been a painful process. Elias Tilligadas is a government food inspector in Greece. Recently, his pay was cut 45 percent. “The numbers are getting better; the people are getting worse,” Elias says. “Our lives are getting worse.’” At the link find the title, “#527: The Amazing Shrinking Economy Might Stop Shrinking,” right-click “Media files npr_294887396.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hadoop and ESRI 10 min – “Esri‘s Mansour Raad explains why an open source methodology for tackling Big Data makes perfect sense.” At the link find the title, “Open Source Big Data Analytics,” right-click “Media files staff_raad.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interns in Utah 56 mins – Five people associated with the Hinckley fellowship and internship program discuss the program value and impact on local and international relationships for the state. At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Law Ads on TV 21 mins – “When it’s three o’clock in the morning and everything is going wrong in your life, there’s a certain kind of ad you might see on basic cable. Lawyers–usually guys–promise to battle the heartless, tight-wad insurance companies on your behalf. There’s disaster footage and stiff readings off of cue cards. The ads look like they were made in a high school A.V. class….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mathematical Models 21 mins – “Think you know what caused the economic meltdown? Nobel prize-winning economist Bob Shiller talks about the reliance on mathematical models that clouded peoples’ thinking.” At the link find the title, “Bob Shiller on Housing Bubbles, Bill Gates, and the Failure of Math,” right-click “Media files IHUB-032914-C.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mosquito Control 22 mins – “…Ever since there have been humans, mosquitoes have been biting us, and we’ve been trying to kill them. And, for the most part, the mosquitoes have been winning. Today there are over 3000 species on pretty much every corner of Earth. Mosquito-borne diseases kill around 1 million people a year (most of them children) and make more than 500 million people sick. But thanks to Hadyn Perry and his team of scientists, that might be about to change. Producer Andy Mills talks with author Sonia Shah about the difficulties of sharing a planet with mosquitoes and with science writer David Quammen about the risks of getting rid of them….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mudslide Science 46 mins – “Michael Lincoln and his wife were sleeping Saturday morning when the mountain gave way above them in Oso, Washington.  They heard banging and bolted, in seconds, with a neighbor.  It sounded “like the end of the world,” they said of the mudslide coming down.  Like the sound of ten thousand things hitting each other.  In Washington state they are still pulling out the bodies of those who did not escape the giant slide.  The geology, the science, of that much earth letting loose that fast is amazing.  So is the risk, if you’re in the way.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Recording 67 mins – Scott Wilkinson and his guest, Allen Sides, of Ocean Way Recording — Ocean Way Recording is the world’s most awarded studio complex. Recordings made at our studios have sold in excess of 1 Billion units. — talk about music recording and playback equipment. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

My World 2015 47 mins – “Corinne Woods – Director of the UN Millennium Campaign, which supports citizens’ efforts to hold their governments accountable for achieving the Millennium Development Goals and leads the outreach to citizens and stakeholders to get their voices and concerns to feed into the Post-2015 global development agenda. Previously, she served in a variety of roles at UNICEF, including as Senior Adviser on the HIV/AIDS Global Campaign Coordination and as Chief of Advocacy and Partnerships in India, the agency’s largest country operation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

NSA and Lawyers 24 mins – “Some technology experts believe it’s not a matter of if law firm communications can be hacked, but when. With continuing reports of the NSA and foreign entities monitoring the privileged attorney-client communications of US law firms, lawyers may be required to take additional measures to protect client information. On this edition of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek discuss the growing dangers and evolving duties for clients and attorneys with cyber security expert David Ries from Clark Hill Thorp Reed.” At the link find the title, “The Ethical Implications of NSA Surveillance for Lawyers,” right-click “Media files NSA Surveillance for Lawyers.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oculus Rift Goggles 47 mins – “Strap on the Oculus Rift and you’re in another world.  A big headset – goggles – covering your eyes.  A huge spread of virtual reality filling your field of vision.  Another world.  Less than two years ago, Oculus was a Kickstarter campaign and a dream.  This week, Facebook announced it will buy Oculus for $2 billion.  Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg says virtual reality is key to social media’s future.  Virtual presence.  Hanging out with people who aren’t actually with you.  You might think Facebook is a virtual reality already.  This hour On Point:  Facebook’s virtual reality play with Oculus.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paleo Diet 110 mins – “On this week’s information-packed show: an update on prebiotics and probiotics with Tim Steele; Is child obesity really down? Is meat and cheese really as bad as smoking? Are antibiotics making us fat? Plus, a Moment of Paleo and After the Bell.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 Audio” just below the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Polio in Turkey 27 mins – “Tim Whewell travels to the Turkish border and to Lebanon to talk to the doctors and health care workers struggling to cope with a growing crisis.” At the link find the title, “Docs: The Silent Enemy – 27 Mar 2014,” right-click “Media files
docarchive 20140327-0030a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Reform 46 mins – “One category in which the United States leads the world is in its prison population.  Highest rate of incarceration in the world?  American.  Highest absolute prison population – numbers?  American.  For years now, it’s been too much too handle financially — those millions behind bars.  And, many say, morally – particularly as long “war on drugs” mandatory sentences devastated lives and whole communities.  Now, there’s a bi-partisan push on to reform sentencing laws and draw down incarceration rates. This hour On Point:  the push to bring down America’s world-leading prison population.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Probability 46 mins – “All you had to do to win a billion dollars was pick the winners in college basketball’s March Madness.  Fill in a perfect bracket.  Warren Buffet made a billion-dollar bet that nobody would do it.  And Warren Buffet was right.  We live in a world of probabilities and odds.  Of winning lotteries.  Winning the U.S. Senate.  Finding a downed airliner.  Picking the perfect bracket.  And yet, the reality of probability often eludes us.  It’s often just beyond our intuition.  Our quick assessment.  This hour On Point: from March Madness to Nate Silver’s political picks, to a lost airliner – the science and emotion of odds.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Programming Perls 53mins – “This week we chat with Randal Schwartz, host of “FLOSS Weekly” and co-author of “Programming Perl”, “Learning Perl”, “Learning Perl for Win32 Systems”, and “Effective Perl Programming”, as well as writing regular columns for “WebTechniques”, “PerformanceComputing”, “SysAdmin”, and Linux magazines.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recessions 19 mins – “We all know how lousy a recession feels. And we know how much long-term damage a recession can cause. But there’s still a lot we don’t know about recessions — like, if you’re in a recession, what’s the best way to get out? Today, we tackle the question of how to escape a recession, by going small. Economist Tim Harford walks us through two tiny self-contained economies, a babysitting co-op and a prisoner of war camp, facing what he calls “toy recessions.’” At the link find the title, “#525: Trouble Inside A Babysitting Economy,” right-click “Media files npr_291533350.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sitting Is Bad 53 mins – The first twenty minutes of the five segments in this variety show cover the details of why sitting is bad and what to do about it. At the link find the title, “Are We Sitting Ducks?, plus Stretch Marks From The Birth Of The Universe, Peacocks and Fake Sex Sounds, and more – 2014/03/22,” right-click “Media files quirksaio 20140322_91565.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

SpinRite Creator 74 mins – This Week in Technology host, Leo Laporte, interviews Steve Gibson,  a computer programmer, inventor of SpinRite and host of Security Now! At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teen Health  51 mins  – “At age 76, Jane Fonda hasn’t slowed down one bit. She has a recurring guest role on HBO’s “The Newsroom,” she’s co-starring in a new Netflix comedy to be aired in 2015, her philanthropic activities are in full swing and she’s just released a new book. It’s called “Being a Teen: Everything Teen Girls Need to Know about Relationships, Sex, Love, Health, Identity and More.” A discussion with Jane Fonda on the teenage years.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Tipping for Service 51 mins – “This week, guest host Lizzie O’Leary and personal finance expert Lauren Lyons Cole answer listeners’ questions about money. Plus, we explore the tensions that arise in neighborhoods where gentrification has caused both economic and cultural shifts and discuss how raising the minimum wage would affect the day-to-day lifestyles of families and individuals. Also, who do you tip and why? A new Starbucks app makes it easy to add gratuity to your purchases, but just because it’s convenient, does that mean people will pay?” At the link find the title, “03/21/14 Marketplace Money – Gentrification,” right-click “Media files marketplace money v2_20140321_64.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Troll Control 72 mins – “Berkman Center for Internet & Society Podcast: Susan Benesch on Troll Wrestling for Beginners: Data-Driven Methods to Decrease Hatred Online…” At the link right-click “Download the MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tuberculosis 51 mins  – “One third of the world’s population is infected with tuberculosis. That means every time you take a subway, taxi or board a plane, chances are you’re coming into contact with TB. While the number of tuberculosis cases reported in the U.S. is on the decline, in less developed countries the disease never went away and is getting worse. A new study finds that 1 million of the 8 million new infections each year are in children -– twice as many as previously thought. And worse yet, more than 30,000 of those children have drug-resistant strains of TB. Diane and her [3] guests discuss the global health challenge of treating tuberculosis.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of over 2800 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly.  Jan-Jun 2013 files in 18 zip segments (832 podcasts) can be downloaded hereand a list of those files here; Jul-Dec 2013 files in 13 zip segments (720 podcasts) downloaded here, and a list here;  Jan-Jun 2012 files in 8 segments (360 podcasts) and a list are here, and Jul-Dec here in 13 parts (593 podcasts).  For 2011 a list and 5 segments  (184 podcasts). For 2010 and earlier 64 podcasts are listed here and zipped  as Part 1 and Part 2. (Dead links in old episodes are due to updating; try a current episode.) Over 180 feeds used to prepare this weekly blog are harvested with Feedreader3. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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Media Mining Digest 124 – 28 Mar 2014: African Innovation, Assembly Lines, Book Publishing, British Health Care Program, Bubble Houses, Car Arrival Impact, Car Buying, Chesapeake Energy Scandal, Chicken Industry, Children Books, CIA vs Senate, College Costs, Crowd Control, Dreyfus Affair, Drone Training, Electronic Medical Records, Electronics Design, Empire State Building, Fast Freezing, Government Hacking, Government Surveillance, Green Color History, Heathen School, Herbert Hoover, iPad U, Ireland Famine, Lime Prices, Liquid Biopsies, Lyme Disease, Malaysia Flight 370, Maple Sugar, Matternet, Medals of Honor, Media Corruption in India, Millenium Villages Project, Navajo Military, Pakistan, Palliative Care, Performance Reviews, Peru, Quatrefoil, Repair Cafe, Research Gate, Russia Today Program, Serendipity, Shia-Sunni Conflict, Sleep, Solar Energy Research, Soldering, Stop and Frisk, Subdural Haematoma, Success, Telecommunications Act, Terrorism in Cities, Ukraine Famines

The following audio files come from a larger group of 163 for this week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts. A zip file of all 55 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months.  Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

African Innovation 8 mins – “Are the simplest phones the smartest? While the rest of the world is updating statuses and playing games on smartphones, Africa is developing useful SMS-based solutions to everyday needs, says journalist Toby Shapshak. In this eye-opening talk, Shapshak explores the frontiers of mobile invention in Africa as he asks us to reconsider our preconceived notions of innovation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Assembly Lines 25 mins – “The assembly line was invented 100 years ago. It’s time to invent the disassembly line…  The world’s first assembly line was developed at the Ford Motor Co. in 1913, making this its centenary year. We think of it as the moving production line—it’s what we see Charlie Chaplin racing against in the movie Modern Times and Lucy and Ethel in the I Love Lucy episode in a chocolate factory. But according to a new book, that’s just one of five key developments, and in some ways it’s the least important of them.” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Publishing 36 mins – “…  how exactly do you go about publishing books—and make no mistake, these are physical books, not e-books—that might have an audience of one, without losing your shirt.” At the link right-click “download podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British Health Care Reform 45 mins – “Each year at the Nuffield Trust Health Policy Summit, The BMJ hosts a breakfast roundtable. It has been one year since the Health and Social Care Bill for England was enacted, and the reconfiguration of the NHS continues, so this year we asked our panel to give the bill an end of year report. Taking part were: John Richards – Southampton Clinical Commissioning Group; Nigel Edwards – CEO Nuffield Trust; Jennifer Dixon – CEO Health Foundation; Terence Stephenson – president Academy of Medical Royal Colleges; Maureen Baker – Chair RCGP; Hugh Taylor – Chairman Guys and St Thomas’ Foundation Trust; Nick Hicks – CEO COBIC Ltd; Jeremy Taylor – National Voices; Tim Ferris – VP for population health management, Partners Healthcare, MA;
Nick Timmins – Senior Associate Nuffield Trust” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bubble Houses 25 mins – “…The process was called “airform.” First, a big slab of concrete was poured in the shape of a giant coin. Next, they inflated a giant balloon in the shape of a grapefruit, with the flat side down. This balloon was tied down to the foundation using steel hooks.  After the balloon was inflated it was coated in a fine powder. And then it was cover with a magical substance called gunite – the product of water and dry cement mix combined at a high pressure and shot out of a gun….” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Arrival Impact 24 mins – “On the streets of early 20th Century America, nothing moved faster than 10 miles per hour. Responsible parents would tell their children, “Go outside, and play in the streets. All day.” And then the automobile happened. And then automobiles began killing thousands of children, every year.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Buying 18 mins – “…In survey after survey, people rank buying a car as one of their least favorite experiences. Why hasn’t anyone figured out a better way to sell cars? Why can’t you just go to a car store and shop for cars from a bunch of different manufacturers? Why don’t cars have real price tags — with real prices, that people actually pay? Today on the show: Why car buying is so unpleasant, and what your local legislators may be doing to keep it that way.” At the link find the title, “#435: Why Buying A Car Is So Awful,” right-click “Media files npr_290246994.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chesapeake Energy Scandal 30 mins – “…Imagine how you’d feel if instead of paying you the usual $5,000 a month, your employer suddenly whittled your paycheck down to $500 a month – in order to pay for your boss’s new private jet. Well, that’s pretty much how thousands of landowners who leased their land to natural gas giant, Chesapeake Energy feel right about now. When we think of the downside of the natural gas boom in this country, we usually think of the potential of environmental harm. But as residents in places like Pennsylvania and West Virginia are discovering, financial hazards lay in the weeds as well….” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chicken Industry 52 mins – “Just a handful of companies raise nearly all the meat consumed in America, and among them, Tyson Foods is king. According to the journalist Christopher Leonard, Tyson wrote the blueprint for modern meat production. He says there’s no better way to understand how our food is produced than to know how the company works. In a new book, Leonard explores how Tyson mastered the economics of factory farming to rise to the top, and how it transformed rural America and the middle class economy in the process. He joins us Monday to talk about it….” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Children Books 46 mins – “News from the snuggly world of children’s bedtime books lately.  The world of our first reading to little ones one and two and three and four years old.  The world of “Good Night Moon” and “The Runaway Bunny.”  From an old trunk of “Good Night Moon” author Margaret Wise Brown, a new trove of songs and poems.  She died in 1952.  She’s back.  And a new study saying in the thousands of children’s books published last year, still few with children of color.  What are we reading to our littlest ones these days?  Are we reading? This hour On Point:  what we seek and share in young children’s books.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA vs Senate 46 mins – “…Senator Dianne Feinstein, chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, has defended the U.S. intelligence establishment through thick and thin, even when things looked pretty bad. She’s defended N.S.A. mass surveillance. Called Edward Snowden’s whistleblowing “an act of treason.”  But this week, it is Senator Feinstein unloading on the C.I.A.  Charging the C.I.A. has spied on the Senate to keep torture charges out of view. Charging that this intelligence agency has breached the separation of powers.  Serious charges. The C.I.A. is punching back. This hour On Point: the C.I.A. and Senate Intelligence Committee go to war….” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Costs 11 mins – “How did college get so expensive, and do families have the information they need to manage costs? Stanford University economist Caroline Hoxby and former college dean Marcia Cantarella discuss.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crowd Control 27 mins – “Fighting for Freedom: A special programme on the safety of public protest and the dilemmas faced by those who police them.” At the link find the title, “HealthC: Fighting for freedom 19 Mar 14,” right-click “Media files healthc 20140319 2000b.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dreyfus Affair 4 mins – “It was a case of military injustice that threatened government stability and shaped the future of human rights. The Dreyfus Affair is a tangled story of espionage, deceit, abuse of power, warring political factions, and the future of France in the twentieth century. It’s also a story of bad mathematics.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Training 14 mins – “Looking to reboot your career? How about going back to school for an MBA, or video-game programming, or power engineering, or drone piloting? Yep, NBC News reported recently that the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration “predicts that 10 000 commercial drones will be operating in the U.S. within five years.” Camera drones alone are expected to be a [US] $5 billion industry.” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electronic Medical Records 4 mins – “… If we want to make electronic medical records work, do we have to introduce a third party, a scribe, to arbitrate patients’ complaints about what the electronic medical record is doing to their relationship with their doctor?”
You can listen and read at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Electronics Design 57 mins – “Want to learn how to get from idea to schematic, through layout, all the way to physical boards? Elecia spoke with Chris Gammell about his Contextual Electronics course to teach the missing steps between what an EE learns in college and what an design engineer’s job entails.” At the link right-click “Download MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Empire State Building 17 mins – “… On July 28, 1945, an airplane crashed into the Empire State Building. A B-25 bomber was flying a routine mission, chartering servicemen from Massachusetts to New York City….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flash Freezing 24 mins – “When we started reporting a fantastic, surreal story about one very cold night, more than 70 years ago, in northern Russia, we had no idea we’d end up thinking about cosmology. Or dropping toy horses in test tubes of water. Or talking about bacteria. Or arguing, for a year. Walter Murch (aka, the Godfather of The Godfather), joined by a team of scientists, leads us on what felt like the magical mystery tour of super cool science. Are you ready? We’re not sure we’ve recovered.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Hacking 78 mins – “Governments around the world are hacking into IT-systems, with deep implications for privacy, IT-security, the legal process and geopolitics. Should governments actually have the ability and the right to hack, and to weaken global communications networks? And do conventional concepts such as privacy and communications secrecy sufficiently capture the status quo, or do we need a new constitutional right for IT-security as proposed by the German court? In this talk Axel Arnbak — Berkman fellow and researcher at the Institute for Information Law, University of Amsterdam — explores three real-life cases to unpack the implications of government hacking.” At the link right-click “Download the MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Surveillance 36 mins – “…Wizner: We’re trying to plant our flag at the point where science and technology and civil liberties intersect. The rapid developments in science and surveillance technologies really do have an impact on a whole range of rights, not just privacy, and we want to have the institutional expertise to be able to identify what those issues are and shape sophisticated responses. So the project has lawyers, but not only lawyers. We have two full-time computer scientists on our staff who are technologists, who are experts in encryption, secure communications, surveillance technologies. And they’ve been able, not only to help us respond with more intelligence, I would say, to the intelligence surveillance scandal, but also to help identify issues that we might not have intuitively understood to be civil liberties issues….” At the link find the title, “Snowden’s Legal Counsel: Forget About Orwell, Worry About Kafka,” right-click  “Media files
winship-wizner-podcast-MP3-for-Audio-Podcasting.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Color History 53 mins – “…From the Green Mountain Boys in colonial America, to the Irish Brigade’s emerald-green flags in the Civil War, and the green superheroes fighting crime in 1970s comic books, this episode captures the varied and verdant ways green has worked its way into our history and culture….” At the link right-click the down arrow on the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heathen Schools 51 mins – “In Cornwall, Conn., in the early 19th century, a group of Protestant missionaries created a unique school they thought would save the world. Derisively known as “the heathen school,” the project recruited boys from Native American nations and around the world, including China and Hawaii. The multicultural school prospered for years and several graduates became famous. But in a new book, historian John Demos reveals the school’s disruptive impact and how it set off a chain of events that culminated in the Trail of Tears.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Herbert Hoover 58 mins – “George Nash, editor of The Crusade Years 1933-1955: Herbert Hoover’s Lost Memoir of the New Deal Era and Its Aftermath, talked about what is referred to as “the missing link” in the the Hoover memoirs. In the memoir, the thirty-first president provides his political philosophy, his analysis of the Depression, and his views on World War II. Mr. Nash talks with Calvin Coolidge biographer Amity Shlaes.” You can listen/watch at the link, but not download (for free — 99 cent download)); however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

iPad U 14 mins – “Tablets are changing the world of computing in lots of ways—they’re cutting into the markets for laptops and e-readers both; they’re clearly the direction that newspaper and magazine publishers need to pursue; and they’re already babysitters of our toddlers par excellence pace a Spectrum feature less than a year ago that claimed that smartphones would play that role. There’s also been a lot of talk of tablets replacing textbooks on college campuses. But despite a lot of talking the talk, there’s been very little walking the walk. One institution taking some firm strides down that path is Lynn University, a private school of about 2000 students in Boca Raton, Florida….” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jewish History 51 mins – “Historian Simon Schama’s latest book, “The Story of the Jews,” is also a five-part documentary series airing on PBS. Schama talks with guest host Frank Sesno about his chronicles of the 3,000-year-old history and what being Jewish means to him. Simon Schama, professor of art history and history, Columbia University. He is the author of 16 books and the writer-presenter of more than 40 documentaries on art, history and literature.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however,
the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Ireland Famine 54 mins – “Hunger and starvation are more often the result of human action rather than nature’s caprice. Philip Coulter visits Ireland to tell the story the great famine of the 1840s.” At the link find the title, “The Great Hunger, Part 2 – Ireland,”  right-click (here or there) “Download The Great Hunger, Part 2 – Ireland” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lime Prices 6 mins – “The price of limes in the U.S. is skyrocketing, and that could have something to do with Mexico’s drug war. Gustavo Arellano explains why. He writes the syndicated column ‘Ask a Mexican.’ ” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liquid Biopsies 6 mins – “I first heard the words “molecular pathology” from my professor of pathology as a medical student in Alabama in about 1955. I heard them again only rarely for the next 40-50 years. But now, because of giant leaps in technology, mostly gene-oriented, it is the hottest topic in medicine. The concept of liquid biopsy — using blood as the cancer sample — serves as a metaphor for the entire field.” At the link you must first register for a free account and can then listen, only; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Lyme Disease 51 mins – “Each year an estimated 300,000 Americans are diagnosed with Lyme disease, and many say this number is likely to be low because not all cases are reported. Those cases that are reported are concentrated in the Mid-Atlantic states into New England and in the Upper Midwest. The disease is associated with a number of debilitating symptoms including fever, joint pain and headaches. Antibiotics can usually be effective an treatment but not always. Guest host Frank Sesno and [4] panelists discuss the challenges of diagnosing and treating Lyme disease.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Malaysia Flight 370 132 mins – “The Malaysia Airlines B777 is still missing. We may never know what happened. The only winners here are the big cable news outlets, which are reaping huge viewing numbers by continuing to sensationalize the investigation. Apparently, a steady string of “aviation experts” is helping to hold our interest… even if the credentials of some of these so-called “experts” is highly questionable.” An experienced pilot talks about the aircraft, its parts and the incident for the first thirty minutes of his podcast, followed by incidents with other aircraft. An insider’s viewpoint! At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maple Sugar Industry 46 mins – “It’s sugar season in the maple forests of the U.S. and Canada. We’ll look at the secrets of the maple syrup industry, and how it’s dealing with climate change.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Matternet 12 mins – “Amazon’s talk of package delivery drones may just be pie-in-the-sky, but start-up Matternet has already begun testing a delivery-drone network in developing countries.” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medals of Honor 80 mins – “Twenty-four Army veterans were awarded the Medal of Honor in recognition of their valor during major combat operations in World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. The recipients were found to have been wrongly denied the nation’s highest military award because of prejudice. The ceremony was attended by the three living recipients and family members of those no longer alive.” At the link you can watch/listen;  however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the
introduction to this episode.

Media Corruption in India 27 mins – “Does ‘paid media’ threaten democracy? Shilpa Kannan investigates corruption in India where there are 250 radio stations, 850 TV channels and 93,000 newspapers and magazines.” At the link find the title, “Docs: India – Press for Sale 18 Mar 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140318-0905a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Millennium Villages Project 84 mins – “Jeffrey Sachs of Columbia University and the Millennium Villages Project talks with EconTalk host about poverty in Africa and the efforts of the Millennium Villages Project to fight hunger, disease, and illiteracy. The project tries to achieve the Millennium Development Goals in a set of poor African villages using an integrated strategy fighting hunger, poverty, and disease. In this lively conversation, Sachs argues that this approach has achieved great success so far and responds to criticisms from development economists and Nina Munk in her recent EconTalk interview.” Over 80 comments follow. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Navajo Military 8 mins – “The Navajo Nation promised its veterans housing to thank them for their service. But many are still struggling to live in substandard conditions. The Los Angeles Times‘ Cindy Carcamo explains.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pakistan 60 mins – “Hinckley Forum: War and State Building – Pakistan in Comparative Perspective by T.V. Paul, James McGill Professor of International Relations, McGill University, Montreal; Leading scholar of international security, regional security and South Asia.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Palliative Care 33 mins – “End-of-life care and palliative care are very tired together. To palliate, means to make less severe, without removing the cause. End stage cancer is a great example of palliative care. At some point, some cancers don’t respond to treatment, and the decision has to be made to stop trying to “remove the cause” and treat the patients symptoms or “make less severe” – hence palliation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Performance Reviews 51 mins – “Performance reviews are perhaps the most hated workplace ritual we have. A recent survey found nearly 90 percent of employees think they’re a waste of time. And it’s not only those being evaluated who feel that way, but also managers and even the HR professionals who run the process. Some high profile have scrapped their appraisals, yet most still rely on them to determine promotions and bonuses and provide accountability.” (Three guests) You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Peru 54 mins – “Machu Picchu – World Heritage site, testimony to the Inca civilization;
Wild grass could supply genes to combat wheat root disease; Gold and the Incas – Lost World of Peru” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Quatrefoil 17 mins – “…The quatrefoil has been re-interpreted and re-contextualized in a phenomenon to which architectural and art historians refer as “iconographical drift.” The associations with the shape are  constantly shifting depending on where it’s used, who is using it, and what purpose it is used for. Yet no matter where it’s used, it implies the same thing:  fanciness….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Repair Cafe 8 mins – “Putting people who like to fix things together with those who need something fixed makes everybody happy. And that’s what the Repair Café movement is all about…” At the link right-click “download podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Research Gate 20 mins – “…Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Google Plus, Orkut, Ning…How many social networks do we need? And do we need ones for specific professions? Police? Engineers? Scientists? In the case of scientists, at least, in 2008, a virologist at Harvard, Ijad Madisch, and two colleagues decided they did. They founded ResearchGate, which, though it sounds like CNN’s name for a plagiarism scandal, is a social network with, they claim, more than 3 million members. They aim to change how researchers find each other, collaborate, and publish. They aim, in fact, for ResearchGate to win a Nobel Prize. My  aim is to find out from Madisch how ResearchGate is coming along so far. He joins us by phone from Germany. ” At the link right-click “download podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russia Today Progam 51 mins – ” The effort to preserve journalistic freedom during the Crimean crisis. Plus, Bob Garfield issues a special report on the streaming video revolution.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Serendipity 16 mins – “Yahoo’s CEO, Marissa Mayer, ignited a firestorm earlier this year when she ordered the company’s entire workforce back into the office, banning telecommuting throughout the organization. Other CEOs rushed to condemn her action, and only a handful of management experts defended it in the interests of spurring innovation. One was John Sullivan, who on this show pointed out that Google—the company Mayer worked at for many years—doesn’t allow telecommuting  and works hard to ensure workers come together, in the hallways, at the coffee bar, and in the cafeteria, to spur their innovative collaborations. Sullivan said, And the Google data shows, incidentally,…its interaction between engineers and finance, engineers and design, engineers and production or marketing. Those are where the interactions—they’re called “serendipitous interactions” or “casual interactions”—that’s where the collaboration and the innovation comes from.” At the link right-click “Download podcast” and select “Save Link Ass” from the pop-up menu.

Shia-Sunni Conflict 27 mins – “Since the beginning of the Arab Spring, the Middle East has experienced a proliferation of new TV channels keen to spread religious and political messages to audiences. There are new media stars – TV evangelists and religious leaders. But some of what is broadcast has been described as openly sectarian, provocative and even blasphemous. We look at two countries where this kind of broadcasting proliferates – Iraq and Egypt – and try to uncover the reasons for it, and the possible consequences.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Freedom to Broadcast Hate,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20140315-0932a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep 70 mins – ” BSP 107 is an interview with Penelope A. Lewis, author of “The Secret World of Sleep: The Surprising Science of the Mind at Rest.”  At the topic link right-click (here or there) “Direct download: 107-BSP-Lewis.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Energy Research 29 mins – Dr Wonyong Choi discusses the many efforts he and others are making to produce energy from the sun using organic and inorganic approaches, to include those which capture carbon dioxide. At the link right-click the Windows logo at the right side of the screen and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soldering 74 mins – “Phil King of Weekend Engineering returned to give Elecia advice on how to fabricate a board, both in a professional capacity and for garage projects.  EaglePCB is a commercial package which is also available as a free, noncommercial version for small 2-layer boards. Other open source packages mentioned include Kicad and gEDA. Some board fabricators provide free tools that work only with their fab houses (such as ExpressPCB).  Digikey’s SchemeIt  provides a way to get a PDF schematic (and a BOM), but falls down by not providing a way to generate a net list, a critical part of board fabrication…” At the link right-click “Download MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stop and Frisk 12 mins – “Different versions of the “stop-and-frisk” policy are playing out in several major cities. Writer Daniel Bergner and educator Gemar Mills discuss how it works in Newark, New Jersey.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Subdural Haematomas 19 mins – “Subdural haematoma is more common in elderly patients, yet the condition is easy to miss in this group. John Young, a consultant geriatrician at Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, describes what clinical signs to look out for, and what tests can confirm a diagnosis of subdural haematoma.”  At the link find the title, “Recognising a subdural haematoma in the elderly,” right-click “Media files 139013762-bmjgroup recognising a subdural.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Success 51 mins – “In this hour, TED speakers share ideas about what makes us successful.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow beside “Listen to Full Show” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Telecommunications Act 30 mins – “If all had gone according to the plan behind the 1996 Telecommunications Act, we would have lots of competition among Internet service providers, not just cable and DSL but other technologies as well. Alas, the competing technologies never really appeared and various incarnations of the FCC effectively gutted the common carriage requirements at the heart of the Act. Earl Comstock joins us today to explain what they had in mind when they spent years developing the goals and text of the Act….” At the link right-click “…download this MP3 file….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism in Cities 54 mins – “It used to be that countries waged war against each other on a battlefield. But now cities are the new conflict zone. Hassan Ghedi Santur explores what happens when our neighbourhoods become high value targets.” At the link find the title, “Conflicted Cities,” right-click (here or there) “Download Conflicted Cities” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ukraine Famines 54 mins – “Hunger and starvation are more often the result of human action rather than nature’s caprice. Philip Coulter visits Ukraine to tell the story the Holodomor, “hunger extermination”, which took place in the 1930s, an event that shapes Ukraine to this day.” At the link find the title, “The Great Hunger, Part 1 – Ukraine,” and select (there or here) “Download The Great Hunger, Part 1 – Ukraine” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of about 2500 hyperlinked descriptions in pdf format is here and updated quarterly. Jan-Jun 2013 files in 18 zip segments (832 podcasts) can be downloaded hereand a list of those files here; Jul-Jul Dec 2013 files in 13 zip segments (720 podcasts) downloaded here, and a list here;  Jan-Jun 2012 files in 8 segments (360 podcasts) and a list are here, and Jul-Dec here in 13 parts (593 podcasts).  For 2011 a list and 5 segments  (184 podcasts). For 2010 and earlier 64 podcasts are listed here and zipped  as Part 1 and Part 2. (Dead links in old episodes are due to updating; try a current episode.) Over 180 feeds used to prepare this weekly blog are harvested with Feedreader3. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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Media Mining Digest 123 – 21 Mar 2014: Arduino Workshops, Basketball, Brain Mapping, Cartoon Creators, City Concerns, Congo News, Creative Class, Cyberthreat Culture, Driverless Cars, Electronics for Kids, Elephant Poaching, Face Recognition, Fukushima Review, GE Geek Toolkit, Gentrification, Gun Safety, History of Time, Internet Addresses, Jones Act, Kickstarter Example, Kowloon Walled City, Mars Mission, Med School Dean, Med Procedure Removal, Migrating Children, Nano Materials, Natural Gas, New Product Development, Nigerian Finance Minister, Photovoltaics, Podcasting Basics, Public Speaking, Recycling, Renewable Energy, Robots, Single Payer System, Social System Repair, Solar Decathalon, Stem Cell Print, SxSW, Telecommuting Disadvantage, Tinkering, Ukraine Natural Gas, Walking, Wikipedia Goals, Women in Tech

The following audio files come from a larger group of 273 for this week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts. A zip file of all 52 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months.  Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Arduino Workshop 61 mins – “Akkana Peck (@akkakk) joins Elecia White to talk about an introduction to Arduino workshop for high school students. Arduino boards are a fantastic way to encourage people into embedded systems. The boards are cheap, the starter kits are great, there are lots of things you can do with them, and the compiler software is free. Akkana’s site (Shallow Sky) has the workshop outline, going from morning general activities to afternoon specific ones. The really simple circuit for the photo-theremin we had on the show is linked from there (and the latest code is on github). A separate post describes the the cheap motor boards she’s been working on, including the specific chips (including the H-bridge)….” At the link right-click “Download MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Basketball and Biology 15 mins – “A systems biologist looks at basketball games through the prism of graph theory….” At the link right-click “Download podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Basketball History 13 mins – “Regardless of how you feel about basketball, you’ve got to appreciate the way it can bring groups of strangers together to share moments of pure adulation and collective defeat. Case in point: the buzzer beater:…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Mapping 15 mins – “Ten months ago, a group of researchers proposed a “large-scale, international public effort [that] aimed at reconstructing the full record of neural activity across complete neural circuits. This technological challenge,” they said, “could prove to be an invaluable step toward understanding fundamental and pathological brain processes.” The group called this proposed effort “the Brain Activity Map Project,” [PDF] and in March, it spelled out its vision in an article in the journal ACS Nano. Last week, President Obama put the weight of the U.S. federal government behind the idea, creating what he called the BRAIN Initiative, where the letters B-R-A-I-N stand for Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies….” At the link right-click “download podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cartoon Creators 18 mins – “Layout artists create a painstaking works of art that allow viewers to instantly register where they are and what mood they’re supposed to feel—and then animators plop their drawings right on top of them.  The dynamic is kind of like the straight man in a comedy duo—layout artists set up the gags, but it’s usually the animators who get the glory. Layout artists are, both figuratively and literally, working in the background. Even though Maurice Noble never drew characters, he was able to cultivate a distinctive style in his landscapes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

City Concerns 17 mins – “…it seems obvious that cities are bad for the environment. They’re dirty, noisy concentrators of people and pollution. They suck up natural resources from the countryside and spit back out vast quantities of waste, human and otherwise. What could be less natural than these inland oceans of concrete? And yet, in what might be the most sustained attempt to question that common wisdom, a new book published last month argues that the weight of our scientific knowledge falls the other way. By and large, cities are environmental pluses, and the more densely populated they are, the more beneficial they are….”At the link right-click “download podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Congo News 46 mins – “Freelance In Africa: A Young Reporter’s Story – We go to Congo with a young journalist who lived and reported there and look at how we get our foreign news today.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creative Class 27 mins – “How is the shift from an industrial to an innovation economy affecting you? Urban studies theorist Richard Florida examines how we are inventing new forms of work.” At the link find the title, “Rethinking Jobs In an Innovation Economy,” right-click “Media files IHUB-031514-A.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyberthreat Culture 5 mins – “Israel is a country at the forefront of cyber security technologies. That’s no big surprise, considering the number of Israeli soldiers trained in the art of cyber-warfare. When they leave the military, many of them get jobs protecting business, infrastructure and commerce from the kinds of attacks they themselves knew as soldiers. But one Israeli techie learned all about the vulnerabilities of cyberspace way before army age. “I believe cyber security represents a threat, honestly, even more than most of the threats that you can think of,” says Israeli cyber expert Nir Gaist.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Driverless Cars 16 mins – “Electrical Engineer Ümit Özgüner and his team at the Ohio State University are working on integrating self-driving cars with human drivers in urban environments—from small communities to big cities….  Electrical engineer Keith Redmill gives me a tour of the team’s mock urban environment. We’re in a room about 1200 square feet—with a painted road that winds around boxes representing buildings. There are intersections, stop signs, traffic lights—even an overpass.” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electronics for Children 49 mins – “Jordan Hart from Digital Media Academy joined Elecia to discuss ways to make science, technology, and engineering fun for kids through Minecraft, Arduino robotics, and music….”  At the link right-click “Download MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Elephant Poaching  51 mins – “Efforts to halt the slaughter of African elephants have been far less successful than many had hoped. An international ban on the elephant ivory trade was put in place in 1989. Elephant populations began to rebound. But ivory traders exploited loopholes and poachers became more efficient – and more brazen – in their methods. Today, poachers kill as many as 35,000 elephants a year. Conservationists warn that unless more is done, those great land mammals could become extinct. For this month’s Environmental Outlook, guest host Tom Gjelten and a panel of [3] experts discuss how to stop the elephant ivory trade.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Face Recognition 14 mins – “Despite thousands of cameras on the scene, the Boston Marathon bombers weren’t caught by face recognition technology…” At the link right-click “Download podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.-

Fukushima Review  9 mins -(2 parts) “In the days and weeks after a massive tsunami led to a triple meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on March 11, 2011, Japan launched many investigations into what went wrong that terrible day. But most of those inquiries were linked, in one way or another, to Japan’s nuclear industry or its government. So Yoichi Funabashi, a former journalist who once headed one of Japan’s leading news organizations, decided what was needed was a truly independent investigation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  part 2  “In the weeks before the third anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster on March 11, 2011, PBS NewsHour sent science correspondent Miles O’Brien to Japan to report three Fukushima-related stories, then on to the Philippines for additional stories. O’Brien had expected that the riskiest part of his trip would be his visit to the highly-contaminated Fukushima plant. But then in the Philippines, as he was loading his car, a heavy box of video gear fell on his arm. It hurt more than it should have and before he knew it … well, let’s get first to what O’Brien reported in his series for NewsHour. Which is no doubt what he’d want us to do.” At the link (part 2) right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GE Geek Toolkit 29 mins – “A complete collection of over 250 Portable Freeware Tech Related programs, all accessible from one Menu Launcher Utility. There’s even a program to update all the essential programs automatically, all contained on a USB⁄Flash drive for travel. It’s a Personal tool kit I put together for my job and peers that I am just sharing with everyone to help make everyone’s jobs a little easier.” It’s evaluated in this episode of Mike Tech Show starting at the eight-minute mark for about twenty minutes. Perhaps a later podcast will address the virus alerts that occur when the toolkit is unpacked. At the link right-click “download” under the playback bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Gentrification  16 mins – “Many cities are undergoing economic change as new residents and businesses move in. We hear from a housing expert and residents on both sides of America’s gentrification debate.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Safety Technology 14 mins – “The United States is currently engaged in a vibrant national debate about guns, gun violence, and the balance between gun regulations and the right to bear arms. But surprisingly little is being said about the various technologies that might be deployed to reduce the hazard of guns while safeguarding the freedoms of gun owners. There are a number of potential biometric controls—ways that guns can be made to fail to fire if they don’t recognize the person holding them. Could they have spared the life or well-being of a Sandy Hook student? An Aurora moviegoer? A Tucson congresswoman? We can’t know till we ask the question.” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

History of Time 53 mins – “…In this episode, we look at the changing ways Americans have experienced the 24-hour day — from pre-industrial times right on up through today’s era of time-shifted media. Along with their guests, Peter, Ed, and Brian examine the role of economic forces in shaping our relationship with the clock – like the powerful Gilded Age railroad officials who got together in 1883 and carved the continental U.S. into five time zones, introducing Americans to the idea of “standard time.” And they explore how people have experienced the rhythm of night and day — and why the advent of electric lighting changed that rhythm forever. And finally, they ask, is unlimited time always a good thing? A loving look at basketball’s iconic “shot-clock” offers answers.

Internet Addresses 28 mins – “Fadi Chehadé, President & CEO of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, explains ICANN’s role in assigning new internet domain names, how people apply for new top level domains, and how disputes are resolved in the naming protocols.” At the link in “The Communicators” section locate the title, “The Communicators: Fadi Chehadé,” right-click “Media files 317453-1-MP3-STD_01.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jones Act 15 mins – “If you want to send a bunch of oranges by truck from Florida to Baltimore, no one cares who made the truck. Or if you want to fly computer chips across the country, it’s fine if the plane is made in France. But if you want send cargo by ship, there’s a law that the ship has to be American made. Here’s why: a 90-year-old law, called the Jones Act. Every time you want to send something from one US port to another, the cargo must travel on a ship built in the US, staffed by mostly Americans, and flying the American flag. Today on the show, we look at the all the unexpected places this law pops up: on cruise ships, cattle farms, and in New Jersey, where a guy really, really needs salt.” At the link find the title, “#524: Me and Mr. Jones,” right-click “Media files npr_289634788.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kickstarter Example 21 mins – “TOPICS ADDRESSED IN THIS AUDIO PODCAST EPISODE: – What is this all about? – How is it being funded? – What is the key measurements for success? * Different levels of backers with their own rewards * Target funding for each level * the deadline….” At the link find the title, “230- Case study: crowd-funding success by Entrepreneurs for niche conference,” right-click “Media files 019-Entrepreneur Case study for funding via Kickstarter -Podcast Movement.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kowloon Walled City 16 mins – “Kowloon Walled City was the densest place in the world, ever. By its peak in the 1990s, the 6.5 acre Kowloon Walled City was home to at least 33,000 people (with estimates of up to 50,000).  That’s a population density of at least 3.2 million per square mile.  For New York City to get that dense, every man, woman, and child living in Texas would have to move to Manhattan.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mars Mission 43 mins – “Elecia White and Amy Button discuss Amy’s dream of going to Mars, her previous role in training astronauts to handle disasters, and her current work on a magic box of rocks that will keep Orion’s air breathable….” At the link right-click “Download MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Medical Procedure Removal 4 mins – “… In 2010, writing in the New England Journal of Medicine, Howard Brody pointed the way. He called for medical societies to take the lead in the country’s best interests by identifying 5 medical actions in the sphere of their specialty practices that were invalid or questionable, and to ask their members to stop doing them. As President of the American Board of Internal Medicine, Christine Cassel picked up this challenge and opportunity, and the ABIM Foundation took ownership of this concept and created the Choosing Wisely® campaign…More than 60 medical societies have named hundreds of routine actions or tests that are unnecessary and shouldn’t be done, speeding the momentum of this effort….” At the link find the title, “Wisely Choosing the Right Care,” right-click “Media files 821036.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical School Dean 39 mins – “… Dr. Benjamin Chan is the Assistant Dean of Admissions at the University of Utah School of Medicine and currently works as an inpatient attending physician at the University of Utah Neuropsychiatric Institute (UNI). He also hosts the “Talking Admissions and Med Student Life” Podcast….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrating Children Increase 90 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute event with UN High Commissioner for Refugees António Guterres features findings from UNHCR’s report, Children on the Run, which examines the increasing numbers of children from Central America and Mexico who head off alone to find refuge in the United States, fleeing violence, insecurity, and abuse in their communities and at home….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nano Materials 29 mins – ” Here’s a little exercise: take a pen and a blank piece of paper and write down everything you know about nano-technology. If you do this, you may find your essay to be pretty brief. You could take comfort to know you’re not alone in your ignorance of nano-technology. But perhaps you should not be feeling so comforted. In a 2013 Orion Magazine article, “Pandora’s Boxes,” this week’s guest on Sea Change Radio, journalist Heather Millar, points out that nanoparticles are ubiquitous.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Natural Gas 46 mins – “Russian energy – its natural gas and pipelines – give it a big stick over Ukraine and Europe.  A lot of leverage.  But the U.S. suddenly has a lot of natural gas too – a flood unleashed in a handful of boom years of fracking.  Now, with Russian troops all over and around Crimea and Ukraine, the call has gone up for the United States to unleash American natural gas exports and cut Russia’s energy leverage down to size.  Environmentalists say watch out.  American manufacturers, too – warning of higher prices.  But the push is on.  This hour On Point:  the push for an American gas export juggernaut.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New Product Development  51 mins – ” Jen Costillo surfaced briefly from her startup-induced blackout to share her wisdom about manufacturing consumer products. They discussed new product development and working from (and making modifications to) Hacker Dojo in Mountain View, CA. Jen and Elecia pined for this (probably not really a two pack) microscope.” At the link right-click “Download mP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Nigerian Finance Minister 12 mins – “Nigeria is set to overtake South Africa as the continent’s biggest economy. Tell Me More looks at that growth with Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, the country’s first female Finance Minister.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Photovoltaics 29 mins – “Keith talks with Fred Wudl of the University of California-Santa Barbara, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry.  Wudl is a materials scientist who is looking into whether carbon compounds can conduct electricity.  To create an organic photovoltaic, there need to be a compound that can donate electrons and another compound that can accept them.  The carbon molecules known as fullerenes have been found to work best as electron acceptors.  These photovoltaics can be used to effectively transform solar energy to electrical energy.  http://www.chem.ucsb.edu/people/academic/fred-wudl.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcast Basics 54 mins – “Christopher White ( @stoneymonster) emerges from his producer responsibilities to chat with Elecia about starting a podcast: the gadgetry, the software, the distribution, and, the big question, why we do it.” At the link right-click “Download MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Speaking 43 mins – “Carmine Gallo – “Talk Like Ted: The 9 Public-Speaking Secrets of the World’s Top Minds“, Former anchor and correspondent for CNN and CBS, communications coach for the world’s most admired brands, best-selling author, columnist for Forbes and Monster.com. Carmine has worked with Coca-Cola, Intel, LinkedIn, Stanford, Cisco, and many more. Learn the secrets of how these companies communicate!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recycling Evolves 4 mins – “Susan Collins, president of the Container Recycling Institute in Los Angeles, wants to correct a fairy tale many of us like to believe about recycling. “The public has been trained to put their stuff in their bin at the curb, and for the stuff to just go away. And of course there is no such thing as away, away is always somewhere,” Collins says. Somewhere, for more than a decade, has most often been China. Chinese recycling plants have made a lot of money reprocessing our trash and selling the raw materials. But around a quarter of the bottles, cans, and paper we were sending there were getting mixed in with too much food and trash, or even comingled with the wrong type of recycling. The bottles, cans, and cardboard that couldn’t be recycled ended up in Chinese landfills. Last year, China decided it’d had enough of being the world’s trash dump. They enacted a new policy: they call it the “Green Fence.”…” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right side of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Renewable Energy 55 mins – “Carbon pricing needed to control greenhouse gas emissions – BHP chief Solar energy challenges conventional power on price. Scale the trick to getting algal biofuel cost down. Milestone for the fusion reaction. Fuel cell gets the power out of poo. Changing ocean currents change fish habitats. Deep sea being damaged by mining, trawling.” At the link find the title, “Renewables take off – how the game is changing,” right-click “Media files ssw_20140308.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Invasion 52 mins – “…The machines are coming! Meet the prototypes of your future robot buddies and discover how you may come to love a hunk of hardware. From telerobots that are your mechanical avatars … to automated systems for the disabled … and artificial hands that can diffuse bombs. Plus, the ethics of advanced robotics: should life-or-death decisions be automated? And, a biologist uses robo-fish to understand evolution.” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from pop-up menu.

Robots and Jobs  17 mins -”For half a century, we’ve watched as computers, sensors, and robots have eliminated jobs—sometimes entire job categories—but also been responsible for them. Sometimes both. For example, technology created 350,000 telephone operators, only to lose them. By the way, that’s roughly the same number of people employed at—take your pick—HP, Panasonic, or Samsung, plus Intel. For decades, it’s been generally believed that the effect is net positive, that is, that technology has always created more jobs than it’s destroyed. But as worker productivity continues to rise, while the legion of the unemployed remains large as well, some experts believe we may be reaching a tipping point.” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Single Payer Health Care 99 mins – “Health care professionals and analysts from Taiwan, Canada, Denmark, and France testified on single payer health care systems in their countries.” The hearing focused on lessons the U.S. can take from those systems.” You can listen/look at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Social System Repair 51 mins – “Solving It:  In this hour, TED speakers share some big ideas on how to solve the seemingly impossible.” (laws and law suits vs regulations; land problems) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow (or ‘download’) beside “Listen to full show” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Decathalon 13 mins – “…College students, as we all know, have lots of energy—energy enough to stay up all night and still get to class during the day. If you could harness that energy, you could power a small city. Well, we haven’t quite figured out how to do that, but what if you took some of that energy and put it toward building solar-powered, energy-efficient, attractive, and cost-effective houses? Some innovative things just might happen. That’s the intent of the Solar Decathlon, a program run by the U.S. Department of Energy that challenges teams of college students to create solar houses. They have two years to design and build their entries—and then they have to take them apart, truck them to the competition site, and reassemble them for judging.” At the link right-click “download podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stem Cell Printing  13 mins – “3-D printing is being used for all sorts of things, from small plastic parts and microprocessors to a titanium jawbone for transplantation, from wedding cakes, as we’ll be describing in an article in our June issue, to an entire car body, as we’ll be hearing about in a podcast next month. Everything from computer chips to chocolate chips, in other words. But the most unusual and potentially one of the most beneficial uses has to be that of human embryonic stem cells.” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

SxSW Event  90 mins (3 parts) –  Hosts Tonya Hall and Sarah Lane hold interviews during South by South West Interactive Day 1 of the 2014 Festival with guests Marshall Kirkpatrick, Jason Torchinsky, and Michael Hoffman;  Day 2 with guests Hugh Forrest, Elissa Shevinsky, Todd Wasserman, Harper Reed, and Graeme Noseworthy, and a Day 3 wrap-up with  Joseph Volpe, Tim Hayden, and Hugh Forrest. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  Here for part 2.  Here for part 3.

Telecommuting Disadvantages 16 mins – “Yahoo’s CEO, Marissa Mayer, and its executive vice president of HR, Jacqueline Reses, started a firestorm a few weeks ago with a memo that called all its work-at-home personnel back into the office, beginning in June. By some reports, that’s only a few hundred employees, but it seems others, who work at home regularly for part of the week, or who less regularly but more than occasionally work at home, would no longer be allowed to work remotely as well. On the one side of the argument are voices like that of business tycoon Richard Branson, no stranger to managing tens of thousands of employees, who quickly blogged on the matter and tweeted, “Perplexed by Yahoo stopping remote working. Give people the freedom of where to work, and they will excel,” and Matt Mullenweg, founder of WordPress, who commented that he “is 100 percent committed to being distributed—130 of our 150 people are outside of San Francisco.” At the link right-click “Download podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tinkering 47 mins – “Featuring Elecia “El” White (@logicalelegance), Jen Costillo (@rebelbot @r0b0ts0nf1r3), and Star Simpson (@starsandrobots). This show was recorded at DesignWest, the embedded systems conference. Board and parts vendors: Sparkfun and Adafruit (both have great tutorials); Getting started boards Arduino  (and AVRFreaks) and Raspberry Pi; Light things up with ThingM; Find components (and datasheets) at Digikey. And Mouser, Future (Octopart). Avoid Alibaba.com. Amazon has a wide range of electronics tools at generally ok prices. For sharing: Make Magazine (ideas in writing), Github (software) Open Design Engine (hardware).” At the link right-click “Download MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ukraine Natural Gas 14 mins – “On today’s show, how a policy that made natural gas very cheap for every household in Ukraine almost bankrupted the nation. And how that led, in part, to the conflict between Russia and Ukraine.” At the link right-click “#523: The Fight Over Ukraine’s Gas Bill” and select “Media files npr_287456592.mp3″ from the pop-up menu.

Walking 108 mins (2 parts) – “Ever since our ancestors rose to their feet, our species has been defined by walking upright. But the act involves our minds as well as our bodies. Marilyn Powell explores the world of walking and what it means to us.” At the link find the titles, “Walking Matters, Part 1,” and “Walking Matters, Part 2,” then right-click “Download Walking Matters, Part 1″ and “Walking Matters, Part 2,” then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wikipedia Goals 33 mins – “Shane Greenstein, Kellogg Chair in Information Technology at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management, discusses his recent paper, Collective Intelligence and Neutral Point of View: The Case of Wikipedia, coauthored by Harvard assistant professor Feng Zhu. Greenstein and Zhu’s paper takes a look at whether Linus’ Law applies to Wikipedia articles. Do Wikipedia articles have a slant or bias? If so, how can we measure it? And, do articles become less biased over time, as more contributors become involved? Greenstein explains his findings.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wikipedia News 12 mins – “Is Wikipedia a Real-Time News Source?
After a mass shooting or natural disaster, Wikipedia’s volunteers are on the story within hours and make thousands of edits in the first days.” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Tech 12 mins – “Tell Me More looks at how to connect investors to women-owned businesses. Indiegogo co-founder Danae Ringelmann and Pipeline Fellowship’s Natalia Oberti Noguera share their ideas.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

===============================================================                                                                     ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of about 2500 hyperlinked descriptions in PDF format is here and updated quarterly. Jan-Jun 2013 files in 18 zip segments (832 podcasts) hereand a pdf list here; Jul-Jul Dec 2013 files in 13 zip segments (720 podcasts) here, and a list here;  Jan-Jun 2012 files in 8 segments (360 podcasts) and a pdf list are here, and 593 in 13 parts for Jul-Dec here.  For 2011 a list and 5 segments 184 podcasts. For 2010 and earlier 64 podcasts are listed  in this PDF and are zipped here as Part 1 and Part 2. (Dead links in old episodes are due to updating; try a current episode.) Over 180 feeds used to prepare this weekly blog are harvested with Feedreader3. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader can import. A PDF list of feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads to remove  duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used to boost playback speed to 1.5x. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 122 – 14 Mar 2014: Banjo Master Trischka, Beringia, Brain Research, Chimps, Economy History, Edison, Gary Indiana, Google Glass, Habitat Heat Load, Haitian Poverty, Honey Bees, Ingrid Betancourt, Medical Directives, Navy Ship Life, Neural Cell Repair, Online Sweepstakes, Open Innovation, Origami Batteries, Parasite Therapy, Personal Robots, Plastic Threat, Poverty War, Racial Issues, Smart Grid, Solitary Confinement, Sports Greening Project, Things That Fly, Web Site Improvement

The following audio files come from a larger group of 175 for this week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts. A zip file of all 29 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months.  Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Banjo Master Trischka 48 mins – “Some musical recordings – just a few in the flood – open up whole new realms.  Miles Davis’s Bitches Brew.  Bob Dylan’s Blonde on Blonde.  The Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper.  In the world of banjo, says writer-composer Bill Evans, the music that marked the change came from Tony Trischka.  Up out of bluegrass and country and then all over.  To roots in Africa.  To heights of jazz.  Banjo, unbound.  Tony Trischka set it free.  With Bela Fleck.  With Jerry Garcia.  With the world.  This hour On Point:  the great banjo liberationist, Tony Trischka.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beringia 42 mins – “…Here’s an  extended version of an interview about how Native Americans came to be.  It’s about a CU-Boulder study that appeared in Science Magazine in February 2014, and promptly made headlines around the world.  The study involves top-notch detective work that shows how, almost 30,000 years ago, a major Ice Age trapped Asian explorers on a land bridge between Asia and Alaska for 10 THOUSAND years.  Back then, the “Beringia” (bare-IN-gee-ah) land bridge was 30 miles long and 600 miles wide. Glaciers had buried Northern America, but Beringia was just warm enough, the trapped explorers survived and thrived….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Research 52 mins – “In his new book, “The Future of the Mind,” theoretical physicist Michio Kaku explores how the next century of scientific innovation will expand the brain’s abilities. Kaku joins us to discuss the latest in neurological research, how the brain resembles a corporation, and the fantastic inventions that will change everything from entertainment to spying.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chimps 28 mins – “What can our closest living relatives – great apes like the chimpanzee and bonobo – teach us about ourselves? Are we the only species that tells lies or wages war? Do other apes have culture? On this episode, Dale Peterson joins us to discuss these fascinating, yet sadly endangered, animals.”  At the link in the Individual Files section and Audio subsection right-click “21.5 MP3″ under “VBR MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economy History 15 mins – “If you asked someone on the street 100 years ago, “How’s the economy doing?” They wouldn’t have had any idea what you were talking about. On today’s show: How we started boiling down entire nations into a single number. And how that number made people think they could control everything.” At the link find the title, “#522: The Invention Of ‘The Economy,” right-click “Media files npr 286446811.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Edison 31 mins – “Topping Life magazine’s list of the most important people of the last 1000 years, Thomas Edison is widely regarded as one of the world’s greatest inventors. His influences on industry and technology remain with us today, over 80 years after his death. Joining us for this program is Edison biographer Leonard DeGraaf to discuss the life and works of the historic innovator and businessman, Thomas Edison.” At the link in the Individual Files section and Audio subsection right-click “39.2 MP3″ under “VBR MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gary Indiana 46 mins – “President Obama got personal and, unusually, he got racial last week to call for more attention to the circumstances of many young men of color in America.  The statistics, he said – of poverty and more – “should break our hearts.”  And he announced a new push to help called “My Brother’s Keeper.”  We’re going today to Gary, Indiana and its outspoken mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson – who is trying to lift one of the most troubled cities in America and its young men.  Some days, she says, that job brings her to her knees. This hour On Point:  My Brother’s Keeper, and the view from Gary.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Google Glass 3 mins – “We demonstrate a Google Glass-based rapid diagnostic test (RDT) reader platform capable of qualitative and quantitative measurements of various lateral flow immunochromatographic assays and similar biomedical diagnostics tests…  This wearable RDT reader platform running on Google Glass combines a hands-free sensing and image capture interface with powerful servers running our custom image processing codes, and it can be quite useful for real-time spatiotemporal tracking of various diseases and personal medical conditions, providing a valuable tool for epidemiology and mobile health.” Abstract Link. At the link find the title, “Episode 336 – March 05 2014,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements_March5_2014.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Habitat Heat Load   7 mins – “Before people moved in with houses and roads and vast areas of concrete and bitumen, there were plants and forests. The natural environment has with it a water cycle of evaporation and cooling. But the built environment has minimal evaporation, and has been shown to contribute to an additional heating effect… Adaptation strategies include cool roofs where roofs are painted white, and green roofs where soil and plants are introduced to roof tops.” At the link right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Haitian Poverty 52 mins – “Jared Diamond, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Guns, Germs & Steel (and Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed), offers some timely thoughts on why Haiti, once a fairly prosperous country, has sunk into enduring poverty — a condition not comparatively shared by its neighbor on the same island, the Dominican Republic.” in this interview right after the 2010 earthquake. At the link find and right-click “MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Honey Bees 52 mins – “This week, the Utah Symposium in Science and Literature is focusing on how humans make decisions. Among their guests is the animal behaviorist Thomas Seeley, who specializes in honeybees.  And what can these insects teach humans about making choices? Over millions of years, honeybees have evolved to act as a collective. Together, they identify and deliberate new nest locations and then navigate there as a swarm. Wednesday, Seeley joins us in studio to talk about the lives of bees and their democracy.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ingrid Betancourt 27 mins   – “Ingrid Betancourt – who was held captive for six years – explores how people’s minds can be free even while they are in captivity.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Freedom of the Mind,” right-click (here or there) “docarchive_20140304-1014a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Directives 23 mins – “People in La Crosse, Wisconsin are used to talking about death. In fact, 96 percent of people who die in this small, Midwestern city have specific directions laid out for when they pass. That number is astounding. Nationwide, it’s more like 50 percent. In today’s episode, we’ll take you to a place where dying has become acceptable dinner conversation for teenagers and senior citizens alike. A place that also happens to have the lowest healthcare spending of any region in the country.” At the link find the title, “#521: The Town That Loves Death,” right-click “Media files npr 284133888.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Navy Ship Life 59 mins – “Life aboard the USS John C. Stennis, an aircraft carrier that was stationed in the Arabian Sea and supported bombing missions over Afghanistan. Only a few dozen people on board actually fly jets. It takes the rest of the crew — over 5,000 people — to keep them in the air. This American Life producers visited the Stennis in 2002, about six weeks into its deployment. The hour is devoted to this one story. ” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neural System Repair 8 mins – “A new approach to repairing a damaged central nervous system involves use of the patient’s own cells which get reprogramed so they behave as if stem cells.  The first step is to introduce growth factors to the injury site. This encourages healing. The second is the use of the specially produced stem cells from the patient. Jim Faed describes his work with mesenchymal stromal cells (stem cells) to produce cells safe for human therapy.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online Sweepstakes 9 mins – “‘Sweepers” are people who spend their free time entering hundreds of online sweepstakes — the contests most of us skip because we’re sure they’re all scams. It turns out, we’re wrong. Some people win big. Reporter Laura Mayer takes us into the online sweepstakes universe.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Innovation 72 mins – “Most of society’s innovation systems –- academic science, the patent system, open source, etc. -– are “open” in the sense that they are designed to facilitate knowledge disclosures amongst innovators. An essential difference across innovation systems, however, is whether disclosures take place only after final innovations are completed, or whether disclosures relate to intermediate solutions and advances. Karim R. Lakhani — Harvard Business School professor and Berkman Faculty Associate — presents experimental evidence showing that implementing intermediate versus final disclosures qualitatively transforms the very nature of the innovation search process, and presents comparative advantages of intermediate disclosure systems.” At the link right-click “MP3″ next to “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Origami Batteries 29 mins – “Advertisers love to talk about the art of engineering. But this week’s guests on Sea Change Radio truly are fusing their high-tech research with art. By incorporating the principles of origami, the traditional Japanese art form of paper folding, with their work in the emerging field of paper battery technology, this Arizona State research team has come up with some exciting new ways to store energy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parasite Therapy 73 mins – “Moises Velasquez-Manoff, author of An Epidemic of Absence, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book–a discussion of why allergies and autoimmune diseases have been on the rise in the developed world for the last half-century. Velasquez-Manoff explores a recent hypothesis in the epidemiological literature theorizing the increase is a response to the overly hygienic environment in rich countries and the absence of various microbes and parasites. Velasquez-Manoff also considers whether reintroducing parasites into our bodies can have therapeutic effects, a possibility currently under examination through FDA trials. The conversation continues a theme of EconTalk–the challenge of understanding causation in a complex world.

Personal Robots 51 mins – “In this episode, TED speakers consider the promises and perils of our relationship with technology.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow to the right of “Listen to full show” or select segments and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plastic Threat 46 mins – “The Food and Drug Administration says the chemical bisphenol-A, or B.P.A., is safe – but bans it in baby bottles, baby cups, the packaging for baby formula.  The American Medical Association has deemed B.P.A. an “endocrine disrupting agent.”  Studies have found it mimics estrogen.  Have linked it to cancer, asthma, diabetes, obesity, infertility, heart disease.  Households across the country have cleared their shelves of B.P.A. plastic.  But what if the “B.P.A.-free” plastics – substitutes – are dangerous too?  There’s a huge fight over that right now. This hour On Point:  the safety of plastics.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plastic Threat II 52 mins – “A new investigation by Mother Jones magazine finds that plastics free of the controversial additive bisphenol-A (BPA) may actually be more harmful to humans than those containing it. Meanwhile, scientists continue to debate what doses of the chemical are harmful. We’ll discuss the latest news on the controversy over plastics, and why the plastics industry has fought hard protect these chemical additives from regulation.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty War 52 mins – “Improving prospects for the nation’s poor is a goal leaders of both parties claim to support, but there are clear differences on strategy. The $3.9 trillion dollar 2015 budget proposal President Obama unveiled yesterday includes funding for job training, early childhood education and a bump in the minimum wage. The proposals underscore his conviction that federal programs can be a key life line to low income families. Republican Congressman Paul Ryan has broadly criticized the government’s anti-poverty efforts. Although some programs work, he said, others undercut personal efforts to climb out of poverty. Please join us discuss how best to help low income Americans.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Racial Issues 46 mins (2 parts) – Bill Moyers interviews author and legal scholar Ian Haney López about how politicians use strategic racism to win votes in a two-part series. At the link find the titles, “The Dog Whistle Politics of Race, Part II,” “Ian Haney López on the Dog Whistle Politics of Race, Part One,” right-click “Media files Moyers and Company 309_Podcast.mp3,” “Media files Moyers and Company308_Podcast.mp3″ and select “Save Links As” from the pop-up menus.

Smart Grid 30 mins -”Keith talks with Emir Jose Macari, Dean of the College of Engineering & Computer Science at California State University – Sacramento.  He is also the Director of the California Smart Grid Center.  Macari talks about his early fascination with taking things apart which eventually led to his career as an engineer.  He introduces us to smart grid, which will eventually help develop devices to monitor electronic usage on a more personal scale.  Currently, most electricity in the nation is centrally located and has to travel for miles to reach customers.  Smart grid hopes to improve the production, delivery, and usage of energy.  Visit the California Smart Grid Center at http://www.ecs.csus.edu/csgc/” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solitary Confinement 16 mins – “About 80,000 prisoners in US and about 1,000 prisoners in Australia are kept in solitary confinement.  Some are confined for as long as twenty years or more. Former prisoner Robert King tells of the effects on his eyesight and how he becomes disorientated in once familiar environments. Huda Akil describes the changes in the brain. And Jules Lobel argues solitary confinement is deprivation of basic human needs. Our speakers were part of a panel at the 2014 meeting of the American
Association for the Advancement of Science  in Chicago.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sports Greening Project 30 mins – “This week’s guest on Sea Change Radio, Allen Hershkowitz, is a pioneer in the greening of the sports industry and a senior scientist at the NRDC. Dr. Hershkowitz is working to help decrease the carbon footprint of our nation’s sports teams while engaging sports industry leaders to speak up about environmental problems like climate change. He and host Alex Wise delve into the various ways that sports leagues and teams are starting to become leaders for change.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Things That Fly 54 mins – “This week Lucien and Daniel welcome Albert Tejera, owner of TME  [Teherea Microsystems Engineering] to the show as a new host. Also joining us this episode as our special guest we have Erick Royer, Executive Editor at Maplegate Media to talk about Several of their publications including Airsoft Insider, Fly RC, RC Heli Pilot and Multirotor magazines. We also get into a discussion about 3D printing, and some cool printers that are coming out soon.” At the link right-click “Direct Download: _287_-_Erick_Royer.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Web Site Improvement 73 mins – “Nowadays, Steve (Don’t Make Me Think) Krug is fixated on getting everyone to do their own usability testing. It’s almost sad, really. Bordering on an obsession. And it would be sad, except for the fact that usability testing turns out to be the best thing anyone can do to improve a Web site (or Web app, or desktop app, or iPad app—you get the idea) that they’re working on. Last year, he boiled down everything you need to know to do your own testing into 162 pages in his second book, Rocket Surgery Made Easy. Now, for people who haven’t got two hours to read a really short book (with lots of illustrations), he’s going to boil it down into a SxSW [South By Southwest] talk…complete with a live demonstration. You’ll leave the room ready—and eager—to start testing. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

===============================================================                                                                     ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of about 2500 hyperlinked descriptions in PDF format is here and updated quarterly. Jan-Jun 2013 files in 18 zip segments (832 podcasts) hereand a pdf list here; Jul-Jul Dec 2013 files in 13 zip segments (720 podcasts) here, and a list here;  Jan-Jun 2012 files in 8 segments (360 podcasts) and a pdf list are here, and 593 in 13 parts for Jul-Dec here.  For 2011 a list and 5 segments 184 podcasts. For 2010 and earlier 64 podcasts are listed  in this PDF and are zipped here as Part 1 and Part 2. (Dead links in old episodes are due to updating; try a current episode.) Over 180 feeds used to prepare this weekly blog are harvested with Feedreader3. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader can import. A PDF list of feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads to remove  duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used to boost playback speed to 1.5x. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 121 – 7 Mar 2014: Admiral Nimitz Gray Book, Adult Education, Alternative Energy, American Money History, Broadband Planning, Cambodian Mortgages, Cancer Treatment, Climate Change Adaptation, College Costs, Daniel Suarez, Deep State, Detroit Recovery Plan, Doctor in Wheelchair, Earthquake Proofing, Elder Finances, Fibromyalgia, Freelance Nation, Fukushima Aftermath, Gluten-Free, Hemp Products, Hydrocodone Products, Incubator History, Internet Security for Lawyers, IRS Problems, Lawyer Scams, Medical Stress, Medicare More Cheaply, Migrant Children, Minority Entrepreneurs, Oil Pollution Aftermath, Overhanging Books, Pirate History, Risk Management Business, Scents, Sixth Extinction, Social Entrepreneurs, Solitary Confinement, Subways, Tech Chick Tips, Transcription in Cells

The following audio files come from a larger group of 165 for this week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts. A zip file of all 40 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months.  Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Admiral Nimitz Gray Book 88 mins – “The Naval War College Library in Newport, R.I. publicly unveiled online the 4,000-page “Gray Book” collection of Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz communications that started in the wake of the Pearl Harbor attack and ran right up until the closing days of the war…  The event was held on the anniversary of Nimitz’ 129th birthday. It featured a lecture discussing the Gray Book as well as a question & answer session with U.S. Naval Academy Professor of History Emeritus Craig L. Symonds, PhD, author of numerous books including “The Battle of Midway,” in which he recounts the pivotal role played by Nimitz in what was the turning point of the war in the Pacific.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Adult Education  7 mins – “Adults wanting to go back to school have the odds stacked against them. They juggle many responsibilities, there are and often there isn’t a connection between what they learn in class and the skills they need to get a job. But a program offered in Washington state has been so successful in getting adult students into the workforce that more than 20 states are. It’s called Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training, better known as  I-BEST.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alternative Energy 30 mins – “A couple of decades who could have imagined that a gust of wind wafting across a Wyoming plain could power an air conditioner as far off as Southern California? But it very well may be happening soon. This week on Sea Change Radio, host Alex Wise speaks with Shalini Ramanathan, a Texas-based wind energy consultant who gives us a peek into new advances in the wind industry and how these are enabling wind to blow open our nation’s interstate power grid.”  At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Money History 52 mins – “There’s a lot of talk about Bitcoin these days—the digital currency that’s been gaining ground. Bitcoin allows online payments to be made person-to-person, instead of via a bank, and sidesteps government involvement, too. Is it a more democratic approach to financial exchanges? Could it be “the future” of money? Brian, Ed, and Peter look to American history for answers.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow above and at the right end over the sound bar then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Planning 26 mins – “More communities are today considering how they can improve Internet access in their community than at any other time. Having a gigabit is quickly becoming the standard – not because we all need 1,000 Mbps  but because we know that everything we want to do is possible on a gigabit connection. Video games aren’t going to interfere with Netflix streaming or someone working from home. In this week’s Community Broadband Bits podcast, Joanne Hovis joins me to talk about a recent paper stuffed with valuable information for communities seeking opportunities for better networks, whether publicly or privately owned. Joanne is the President of CTC Technology and Energy, which has just released Gigabit Communities: Technical Strategies for Facilitating Public or Private Broadband Constructions in your Community. The paper was financially supported by Google.” At the link right-click “Download this MP3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cambodian Mortgages 13 mins – “If you’ve applied for a mortgage recently, you know how hard it can be. The bank demands all kinds of obscure documents and wants proof of almost every asset you own. But an innovative mortgage program halfway around the world will evaluate your application without any extra documentation — and if you’re approved, it will give you a 15-year fixed-rate mortgage. There’s just one catch: The mortgages are only for low-income people in Cambodia. The program is a throwback to the days when bankers got to know their customers — and trusted them. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Treatment 29 mins – This interview with Professor George McLendon focuses on his most recent research into treatment of cancer based on work done with the cytochrome complex “George McLendon is the Howard R. Hughes Provost and Professor of Chemistry at Rice University. McLendon holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at El Paso and a doctorate from Texas A&M University… McLendon’s research is focused on inorganic and physical biochemistry. He has published over 200 peer reviewed papers and received national research awards, including the American Chemistry Society Pure Chemistry Award, the Eli Lilly Award in Biological Chemistry, Sloan Dreyfus Award, and Guggenheim Fellowships. His publications range from solar nanotechnology to cell death pathways… He has been involved in launching several biotech startups, including Tetralogic Pharmaceuticals.” At the link right-click the windows square to the right and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Adaptation 8 mins – “Rain is so important in Malawi’s agriculture-based economy that there are names for different kinds of it, from the brief bursts of early fall to heavier downpours called mvula yodzalira, literally “planting rain.” For generations, rainfall patterns here in the southeast part of Africa have been predictable, reliable. But not now…. “The agriculture and farming systems have been completely altered,” says Victor Mughogho, executive director of. “Adaptation to climate change in our context is a matter of life and death. It’s not an option.’” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Costs 17 mins – “College is expensive these days. Yet, most universities argue an undergraduate education is actually worth much more than what students pay for it. Clearly there is an emotional logic to this argument. But what do the numbers tell us? In today’s episode, Planet Money takes a behind the scenes look at Duke’s balance sheet and considers the university’s case that $60,000 a year is actually a discount.” At the link find the title, #520: Duke’s $30,000 Tuition Discount,” right-click “Media files npr 283165088.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Daniel Suarez 70 mins – “Host Leo Laporte interviews Daniel Suarez, “…author of the New York Times bestseller Daemon, Freedom (TM), Kill Decision, and Influx. He is joined by Jeff Gurner, who is an actor and narrator of Influx.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow beside “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deep State 22 mins – “Everyone knows about the military-industrial complex, which, in his farewell address, President Eisenhower warned had the potential to “endanger our liberties or democratic process” but have you heard of the “Deep State?” Mike Lofgren, a former GOP congressional staff member with the powerful House and Senate Budget Committees, joins Bill to talk about what he calls the Deep State, a hybrid of corporate America and the national security state, which is “out of control” and “unconstrained.” In it, Lofgren says, elected and unelected figures collude to protect and serve powerful vested interests. “It is … the red thread that runs through the history of the last three decades. It is how we had deregulation, financialization of the economy, the Wall Street bust, the erosion or our civil liberties and perpetual war,” Lofgren tells Bill.” At the link find the title, “Full Show: The Deep State Hiding in Plain Sight,” right-click “Media files Moyers and Company 307 Podcast.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Detroit Recovery Plan 8 mins – “Detroit’s emergency manager laid out a plan for the Motor City’s future, including how it will handle the country’s largest municipal bankruptcy case.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doctor in Wheelchair 49 mins – “Cheri starts out by talking about how she became interested in a career in medicine. She grew up on a rural farm in Iowa. Her mother was a nurse, and Cheri was intrigued visiting her mother in the hospital. Cheri also had a lot of exposure to healthcare from a very young age and saw what worked and what didn’t – she wanted to become a physician to serve people better…. Cheri talks about how at 18 months old, she was in a farming accident and sustained a T10 complete spinal cord injury. She has utilized a wheelchair for as long as she can remember; she talks about how this has shaped her identity a lot.” At the link right-click “Download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Earthquake Proofing 20 mins – “…To explore the topic of seismic retrofits of concrete buildings, the hosts talk with Dr. Gregg Brandow, Professor of Engineering Practice at the University of Southern California, who is a leading expert on the seismic evaluation and retrofit of buildings.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elder Finances 51 mins – “Millions of elderly Americans suffer from dementia, Alzheimer’s disease and other disabilities that make them unable to make decisions about their finances. About a quarter of all people over the age of 65 rely on relatives, often their children, for help managing their money and assets. But the task of caring for elderly parents and managing their bills and property can be overwhelming and time consuming. It can also be filled with ethical and legal pitfalls and a source of family conflict. Join us for a discussion about the best ways to manage an elderly relative’s money.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Fibromyalgia 19 mins – “Most doctors are familiar with patients who describe chronic pain all over the body, which is associated with a range of other symptoms including poor sleep, fatigue, and depression. This complex of symptoms is sometimes referred to as fibromyalgia. Management of patients with this condition is often complex and challenging. The diagnosis of fibromyalgia has long been controversial, with some experts questioning whether it exists as a separate entity. In this podcast Anisur Rahman, professor of rheumatology at University College London, joins us to discuss diagnosis and management of the condition.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freelance Nation 18 mins – “More and more micro-entrepreneurs are using online services like Etsy, Kickstarter, Uber and Lyft to create their own jobs. Welcome to the new DIY economy. This week, New Tech City introduces you to the drivers, the Airbnb hosts and the other entrepreneurs making a living (or supplementing their income) in today’s “sharing economy.” “We are going through the greatest economic transformation in human history,” Richard Florida, author of The Rise of the Creative Class, tells host Manoush Zomorodi. According to one recent report, more than 40 percent of us will be freelancers, contractors and temp workers by 2020.” At the link right-clcick “stream m3u” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fukushima Aftermath  5 mins – “Japan will restart many of its nuclear power plants, but only after their safety has been established by the highest standards in the world. That’s the word this week from the government of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. It comes nearly three years after a massive tsunami caused a triple meltdown at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Nearly all of the country’s 48 nuclear plants have been offline ever since. Successive governments have struggled to address the post-Fukushima energy crisis.”  At the link find the title, ” In a post-Fukushima shift, Japan’s government charts a path back to a nuclear future,” right-click “Media files 022620145.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gluten-Free 46 mins – “Gluten-free” is everywhere now.  On banners and signs and food labels all over.  As if we are all gluten intolerant, or could all be saved by a gluten-free diet.  The claims are huge.  Save your weight, your heart, your mind, your life.  They put a lot off-limits.  Wheat and rye and barley and couscous.  Most beer and hot dogs, bouillon, soy sauce, baked beans, ice cream, ketchup, vodka.  Is it worth it?  For some, definitely.  For most – that’s another question.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hemp Products  3 mins -”Non-drug varieties of Cannabis sativa L., collectively namely as “hemp”, have been an interesting source of food, fiber, and medicine for thousands of years. The ever-increasing demand for vegetables oils has made it essential to characterize additional vegetable oil through innovative uses of its components… This study is an interesting contribution for C. sativa L. consideration as a source of bioactive compounds contributing to novel research applications for hemp seed oil in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic food, and other non-food industries.” At the link find the title, “Episode 334 – February 27 2014,” right-click ” Media files ScienceElements Feb27_2014.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hydrocodone Products 51 mins – “A coalition of consumers and health care groups is asking the Food and Drug Administration to revoke its approval of a powerful new opioid. Critics say the potential dangers of Zohydro outweigh its value as a pain killer. Guest host Elise Labott and her [5] guests debate the use and abuse of the new drug.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Incubator History 4 mins – “…Survival rates of the premature babies at the Paris maternity hospitals increased. But how would other doctors find out about this new technology? The answer was to exhibit the incubators at the World Exposition in Berlin in 1896. Six incubators were sent to Berlin with Dr Martin Couney, who persuaded the protectress of Berlin’s Charity Hospital, Empress Augusta Victoria, to provide premature infants for the exhibit. Despite having little chance of survival, according to Couney, none of them died….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Security for Lawyers 25 mins – “From malware and hackers to BYOD and TYOD, the biggest threat to law firm data could be the attorneys themselves. On this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon D. Nelson and John W. Simek interview data expert Ben M. Schorr and discover complex new threats to data security and the simplest solutions to reduce them. Schorr is a technologist and Chief Executive Officer for Roland Schorr and Tower, a professional consulting firm headquartered in Flagstaff, Arizona with offices in Hawaii and Oregon….  He’s been a Microsoft MVP for more than 15 years and involved with management and technology for more than 20 years.” At the link find the title, “The Kindergarten Version of Information Security for Lawyers,” right-click “Media files The Kindergarten Version…mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IRS Problems 45 mins – “Nobody loves the I.R.S.  The Internal Revenue Service.  The nation’s tax collector.  The heat was especially high last year when the I.R.S. was accused of going after political non-profits – conservative, then liberal, too.  But on the core function of the I.R.S., most would agree that if you’re going to have tax collection we need it done well.  Need an I.R.S. that’s efficient, competent, responsive, on top of fraud.  And some big reports are saying that we do not.  That fraud is rife, tax collections shrinking.  That the I.R.S. can’t keep up and may “fail at its mission.”  This hour On Point:  does the nation’s tax-collector still have what it takes to do the job?” At this link right-clcick “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lawyer Scams 25 mins – “In this edition of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway discuss check fraud with expert Dan Pinnington. Together, they reveal how lawyers are repeatedly falling into the trap of check fraudsters and what can be done to avoid it. Tune in for tips on how to spot a check fraudster in your practice or law firm. Pinnington is the Vice President of Claims Prevention and Stakeholder Relations at Lawyers’ Professional Indemnity Company (LAWPRO)….” At the link find the title, “Lawyer Scams and How to Avoid Them,” right-click “Media files Lawyer Scams and How to Avoid Them.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Stress 35 mins – “Today I am joined by the master of all things Mind of the Resuscitationist, Cliff Reid of resus.me and the Rage Podcast. In the first ever EMCrit Book Club, we discuss a book I read years ago and recently reread: On Combat by Dave Grossman has enormous relevance to resuscitationists. I feel the entire book is worth reading, but we zoned in on the really juicy bits. Section I – Physiology of Combat;Chapter Two – Stress Responses to Combat – We briefly discuss bowel and bladder control as they relate to stress; Chapter Three – Sympathetic & Parasympathetic Responses; Parasympathetic backlash-a time of cognitive danger….” At the link and way down at the bottom of the page right-click “download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Medicare More Cheaply 5 mins – “Fort Dodge, Iowa, is not exactly what you’d think of as a hotbed of health care innovation. But the small town in the western part of the state is part of a Medicare pilot project that economists say could be a pathway to the holy grail of health care: providing better care at a lower cost.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Children 67 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute panel discussion on unaccompanies minors focuses on a report by Kids in Need of Defense (KIND) and the Center for Gender & Refugee Studies (CGRS) at UC Hastings College of the Law, A Treacherous Journey: Child Migrants Navigating the U.S. Immigration System. The panel moderated by Kathleen Newland, Director of the Refugee Protection and Migrants at MPI, includes speakers Elizabeth Dallam, KIND National Legal Services Director, Lisa Frydman, CGRS Associate Director and Managing Attorney, Karen Musalo, CGRS Director, and KIND Executive Director Wendy Young. The discussion focuses on the conclusion that children face a system created for adults that is not required to consider the child’s best interests. Despite the potentially enormous impact of the proceedings on their lives and futures, unaccompanied children are not provided lawyers to help them navigate the complex requirements of immigration proceedings. The report is available at http://www.supportkind.org and http://www.cgrs.uchastings.edu.”; At the link, at the bottom of the page, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minority Entrepreneurs 17 mins – “Race and gender gaps can discourage people from getting the skills to make it in the tech world. But if you have what it takes, how do you get your startup off the ground?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Pollution Aftermath 54 mins – From the 2014 conference by the Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago: “Crude oil affects cellular function in fish, with implications for life-threatening arrhythmias in humans; Innovation a strong driver for economic growth; Designing robots to copy the work of termites; Therapeutic robots ease anxiety for dementia patients; How warmer temperatures are affecting the Arctic; Chemical analysis reveals Picasso’s use of house paint.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Overhanging Books 4 mins – “…Here’s a game you can try at home. Let’s call it overhanging books. All you need are some books and a table. For descriptive purposes, I’m going to assume all my books are two feet tall and identical, but you can play with any books on your bookshelf. If I take one of my two foot tall books and lay it on its side, I can slide it over the edge of the table until it sticks out about half its length, or one foot. Any further and it topples off. That’s not an especially exciting observation. So let’s take two books, one laid on top of the other, and see what we can do. I’ll slide the bottom book out, then slide the top book out a bit further. Done in just the right way, we can get the two book combination to stick out a half foot further than the single book. Try it yourself, or check the Engines website…” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pirate History 52 mins – “Thursday, our guest is journalist Colin Woodard, whose book “The Republic of Pirates” is the basis for a forthcoming TV series starring John Malkovich. Woodard tells the story of the Flying Gang, an 18th century coalition of men like Blackbeard and “Black Sam” Bellamy who were more than just criminals on the high seas. In age of oppressive governments and influential commercial interests, they had their sights set on social and political upheaval. We’ll talk about the “golden age” of piracy and the mark it left on our world.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Risk Management Business 62 mins – “Hemant Shah, co-founder and CEO of RMS, takes students on a ride through the highs and lows of growing and changing a company. From early days in an apartment with co-founders, to making the tough calls as a market leader in risk and catastrophe modeling, Shah discusses lessons around culture, business models, and pivoting a value proposition.” At the link right-click “A True Model for Embracing….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scents 55 mins – “Scent has been used for millennia to enhance sexual attraction and mask body odour. Cindy Bisaillon examines the psychology and neurology of smell and the fine line between scented sophistication and our own primal animal musk.” At the link find the title, “The Seduction of Scent (Encore Sept 24, 2013),” right-click (here or there) “Download The Seduction of Scent (Encore Sept 24, 2013)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sixth Extinction 60 mins – ” Listen to Elizabeth Kolbert discuss her new book, The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History, and take questions from the audience.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Entrepreneurs 13 mins – “If you walk into the lobby of the Soria Moria hotel near the famous Angkor Wat temple in Cambodia, it probably won’t strike you as a bold experiment in development and democracy. The Soria Moria, in the booming town of Siem Reap, is a three-star hotel with 38 rooms that is more cozy than fancy. It looks like a lot of hotels that cater to tourists: There’s wicker furniture in the lobby, a rooftop bar serves margaritas, and the tile floors are spotless. But now ask the people who staff the Soria Moria to describe their jobs, and you will begin to understand why this hotel is different: “I work here as a receptionist,” says Real Marideth, sitting behind the wooden counter. “I am the owner also.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solitary Confinement 124 mins – “Federal Bureau of Prisons Director Charles Samuels testified at a hearing on the use of solitary confinement in U.S. prisons. The U.S. holds more prisoners in isolation than any other democratic nation. Other witnesses included federal and state prison officials.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Subways 51 mins – “Diane and her guest discuss the rivalry between Boston and New York to build America’s first subway. It was a competition that played out in an era not unlike our own: one filled with economic upheaval, job losses, bitter political tensions, and the question of America’s place in the world.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Syrian Crisis 51 mins -” The humanitarian situation in Syria has deteriorated in recent weeks and months. Airstrikes against civilians are occurring with more frequency. Refugees are fleeing to border countries, straining already tapped resources. And within the country, an estimated 9 million people are in need of life-saving assistance. As peace talks have stalled, the Obama administration acknowledged a need to reassess policy toward Syria. The president is faced with the same challenging questions from the last three years of the civil war over how to respond. But many observers say while the options are difficult, they do exist. Diane and her guests discuss the crisis in Syria and the world’s failed response.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Tech Chick Tips 38 mins – Two teachers discuss eleven teaching-related sites and three apps they have found to be useful. The focus is on the lower grades, up through about the fifth or sixth. These are very busy teachers who still manage to squeeze in time for a podcast every couple months. At the link you’ll find all the site and app links, and can right-click “Download” at the bottom of the page, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transcription in Cells 19 mins – “In this month’s Cell Podcast, we learn about:  How fine-tuning of transcription factor activity may open up new avenues for disease treatment, with Mark Leid (0:00) (Trends in Pharmacological Sciences;  How the millions of species of gut bacteria can communicate with one another, with Simon Carding (11:28) (from Cell Reports); Plus, sample a selection of the hottest new papers from Cell Press (16:45)” At the link look for the February 2014 Cell Podcast and listen there or download via iTunes. The link allows downloads in the archive section, but it lags by several months. ===============================================================                                                               ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of about 2500 hyperlinked descriptions in PDF format is here and updated quarterly. Jan-Jun 2013 files in 18 zip segments (832 podcasts) hereand a pdf list here; Jul-Jul Dec 2013 files in 13 zip segments (720 podcasts) here, and a list here;  Jan-Jun 2012 files in 8 segments (360 podcasts) and a pdf list are here, and 593 in 13 parts for Jul-Dec here.  For 2011 a list and 5 segments 184 podcasts. For 2010 and earlier 64 podcasts are listed  in this PDF and are zipped here as Part 1 and Part 2. (Dead links in old episodes are due to updating; try a current episode.) Over 180 feeds used to prepare this weekly blog are harvested with Feedreader3. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader can import. A PDF list of feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads to remove  duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used to boost playback speed to 1.5x. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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