Media Mining Digest 161 – 12 Dec 2014: Agriculture and Soil, Animal Weapons, Assisted Death Appeal, Blood Transfusion Problems, Cancer Drugs, Colbert’s Job, Conflicts of Interest, Denialism, End of Life, Englishness, Food Shortages, Fowl Stories, Fracking Impact, Germans in Texas, Good Guide, Graffiti Pioneers, Guatemala Mental Hospital, Iceland Jubilee, Immigration Plan, Inflatable Men, Investment Returns, Mars Rover Engineer, Michael Brown Death, Midlife Crisis, Mindfulness, Nuisance Flooding, Oil Prices, Osteopathic Doctor, Pablo Escobar, Peter Buffett, Pregnant Workers, Ray Rice, Rewilding, Sharing Economy, Single Sex Education, Slow Motion Apocalypse, Superintelligence, Survival Medicine, Texas Climate Crisis, Tuberculosis, Vasopressor Basics, War on Terror, White Supremacy, Zen and Motorcycles

The following audio files come from a larger group of 167 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 46 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Agriculture and Soil 27 mins – “Unhealthy soil prevalent across sub-Saharan Africa; Climate defence plans at a stand-still in developing countries; Wetlands are in decline across China; Important mangrove forests in need of conservation.” At the link find the title, “Scia: African Soil Report; Climate Defence Plans; China’s Wetlands; Mangrove Conservation,” right-click “scia_20141204-2030a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal Weapons 23 mins – “We talk with biologist Douglas Emlen, who says that the evolution of animal weapons, in everything from dung beetles to saber tooth tigers, has him very worried about our HUMAN weapons (starts 4:20).” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Assisted Death Appeal 31 mins – “Dr. Brian Goldman’s full conversation with physician assistant Maureen Taylor, the widow of Dr. Donald Low.” At the link find the title, ”White Coat Mini Podcast – Maureen Taylor full interview,” right-click “Download White Coat Mini Podcast – Maureen Taylor full interview” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blood Transfusion Problems 18 mins – “Blood transfusions have been identified as one of the most overused therapies both in the United States and the UK. In this podcast Lawrence Tim Goodnough, from Stanford University Medical Center’s Transfusion Service, and Michael Murphy, from NHS Blood and Transplant, explain the physiological reasons why liberal blood transfusion will not be beneficial.” At the link find the title, “Too much blood: when transfusions do more harm than good,” right-click “Media files 180113553-bmjgroup-too-much-blood.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Drugs 12 mins – “Your medicine cabinet might be full of cancer-fighting drugs.” Reference is made to the ReDO Project: “The Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)Project seeks to repurpose well-known and well-characterised non-cancer drugs for new uses in oncology.” At the link find the title, “White Coat Mini Podcast – Cancer Fighters,” right-click “Download White Coat Mini Podcast – Cancer Fighters” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Colbert’s Job 38 mins – “On Ep. 1 of Working, Slate’s David Plotz talks with Stephen Colbert on how he puts his show together and turns himself from Stephen Colbert into the character “Stephen Colbert.” At the link right-click beside “Direct Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conflicts of Interest 10 mins – “The BMJ has a new policy on competing interestings – from 2015 we will have zero tolerance for them in authors who write education articles or editorials. Cath Brizzell and Mabel Chew explain what that policy is about, and why we think it’s important.” At the link find the title, “Zero tolerance for competing interests,” right-click “Media files 179962481-bmjgroup-zero-tolerence-for-competing.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Denialism 17 mins – “A growing mistrust of science has brought with it whooping cough epidemics and GMO bans, stalling society’s progress, argues Michael Specter, author of “Denialism: How Irrational Thinking Hinders Scientific Progress, Harms the Planet, and Threatens Our Lives.“At the link find the title, “The Fight Against Science – and Why it’s Dangerous” right-click “IHUB-120614-D.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

End of Life 27 mins – “Two big, important issues: Palliative care and assisted death. Should one really come before the other or do they go hand in hand towards helping Canadians achieve a so-called “good death?” Reference to an Australian book, “The Pill” may refer to “The Peaceful Pill”. At the link find the title, “WCBA – Palliative Care vs Assisted Suicide: The False Dichotomy,” right-click “Download WCBA – Palliative Care vs Assisted Suicide: The False Dichotomy” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Englishness 24 mins – “…so recently we’ve chatted about some cultural matters and I’ve also given you a broad overview of the failed dynastic politics of Northumbria and where this is all headed. But we really didn’t cover too much of what was going on elsewhere. We hinted at it, but I’m sure you’re curious about the other heavy hitter in England. Mercia. As Northumbria lost steam faster than a boy band approaching its 30’s… Were the Mercians going through a similar collapse?….” But, before that discussion there’s some talk about what makes the English the way they are. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Shortages 48mins – “The World Food Program came out with a troubling announcement this week: it lacks the funding to continue delivering needed food aid for up to 1.7 million Syrian refugees. No more trucks or vouchers. No assurances when or if the program will restart or if the food will come. Vulnerable refugees left to face the cold winter season. Their fourth since fleeing Syria. And the crisis is exploding .There’s not enough funding—not enough food– for refugees around the world. This hour, On Point: the global food aid crisis and what the world needs to do, now. “ At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fowl Stories 57 mins – “We bring you our sort-of-annual holiday tradition: The Poultry Slam! Stories of what happens when humans and fowl collide, including the tale of one notorious turkey who unleashed a long reign of terror on an unsuspecting neighborhood.” At the link you can listen and purchase the podcast; also, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Fracking Impact 3 mins – “Hydraulic fracking linked to higher levels of groundwater pollution.” At the link find the title, “Episode 444 – December 03 2014,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements Dec3_2014.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Germans in Texas 4 mins – “…Olmsted was the founding father of American landscape architecture, but his travel narratives of the south were an important contribution to the debate on slavery, which raged before the Civil War… A group of German noblemen had organized immigration to Texas in the 1840s, initially with catastrophic results. The death toll among the first wave of settlers was appalling, due to poor timing and provisioning, and unrealistic expectations. But the Germans quickly recovered and built thriving centers at New Braunfels and Fredericksburg—both named for noblemen who were a part of the immigration scheme. According to Olmsted’s figures, Germans comprised nearly a third of the population in towns like San Antonio; they were the dominant group in many counties in the Hill Country….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Good Guide 30 mins – “When you’re perusing the shelves, be they virtual or actual, what matters to you? Beyond price, quality and value what about knowing how the company that made this product treats its workers, the extent to which production depletes natural resources, and what impact this product has on the environment? Many of us care about these things in the abstract, but it would be awfully arduous to research all of that while we are out there trying to get our shopping done. If only there were an app. But there is! Our guest this week is Dara O’Rourke, UC Berkeley professor and co-creator of Good Guide, a website and smart phone app that consumers can use to make informed decisions on what they’re buying. Just scan the barcode and get a product’s score on topics ranging from social justice to greenhouse gas emissions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graffiti Pioneers 27 mins – “In 1974, New York City became the canvas for a new generation of Graffiti pioneers. Who were the teens behind the ‘tags’ – now the veterans of the scene? Why did they create this movement? We meet some of those who defied the law (and their parents) and diced with death to chase fame and acceptance of their peers.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Graffiti: Kings on a Mission,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20141203-0232b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guatemala Mental Hospital 27 mins – “ For Assignment, Chris Rogers goes undercover to reveal the hidden shame of Guatemala’s hospital for the mentally ill.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The World’s Most Dangerous Hospital,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20141204-0230a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iceland Jubilee 19 mins – “There’s an idea that dates back at least to biblical times. There should be a moment when debts are forgiven. Its called a jubilee. The jubilee has not gotten a lot of traction in the modern world. You may remember after the financial crisis, some of the Occupy Wall Street protesters were calling for a jubilee. But it basically ended there. Today on the show: the story about a country that is actually trying a jubilee. Iceland.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Plan  62 mins – “While public attention surrounding President Obama’s November 20 announcement of executive action on immigration has focused on the estimated 5.2 million unauthorized immigrants potentially eligible for deferred action, the president also announced a number of additional reforms that touch on other facets of the U.S. immigration system. In this webinar, Migration Policy Institute (MPI) experts discuss the impact of less-noted aspects of the president’s plan, including in the areas of immigration enforcement, changes to the legal immigration system, and efforts to promote immigrant integration by creating a White House Task Force on New Americans.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” fromt he pop-up menu.

Inflatable Men 17 mins – “…The tube guy origin story begins with celebrated artist and “mas man” Peter Minshall. He made a name for himself in Trinidad & Tobago (and beyond) for his Carnival bands, featuring larger than life puppets which dance through the street to the beat of Calypso music. In the early 1990s, Peter Minshall had gained fans among members of the planning committee for the Olympics and in 1995, he found himself in a stadium in Los Angeles working with a bunch of different artists, trying out different ideas for the opening ceremonies for the Atlanta Games the following year. As Minshall tells it, he was was trying to do something using inflatable tubes, but it wasn’t working. And then Minshall realized that if they were made to look like people, they would dance just like people did back home in Trinidad & Tobago—limpid, loose, and gracefully….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Returns 20 mins – “Experts conclude that over 90% of long term investment returns come from your choice of asset classes.  In this podcast Paul discusses 8 separate decades of asset class returns so that you realize that the next 10 years may look a lot different from the expected long term return.  This information will hopefully help investors understand the unpredictability of short term returns and allow them stay the course after a period of disappointing returns. Decade Returns from 1930 through 2009 for the S&P 500, Total Stock Market, Large Cap Value, Small Cap Blend and Small Cap Value Indexes” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mars Rover Engineer 86 mins -”Mars Rover Curiosity’s chief engineer Rob Manning talks about his firsthand account of the trials and tribulations of engineering one of the most complex pieces of space technology and what future Mars missions might bring. “ At the link right-click the blue arrow beside “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Michael Brown Death 51 mins – “President Barack Obama met with civil rights leaders and law enforcement officials yesterday to talk about ways to build trust between the local police and residents in African American communities. That trust has been especially strained since last when a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri voted against indicting a police officer who had shot and killed Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager. Many welcome the president’s focus on the issue, but hope that much more can be done to improve race relations, police procedures and economic opportunity in America’s disadvantaged neighborhoods. Please join us [5 guests] to talk about prospects for change.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Midlife Crisis 46 mins – “When you’re young, you probably think that by the time you turn 40, you’ll have it all figured out. A good job, perhaps marriage, children, hopefully some cash in the bank.  But more and more research shows that your 40s are often a time of emotional upheaval, re-evaluation and dissatisfaction. A mid-life crisis?  Perhaps. Our guest today says your happiness might be in a holding pattern. Wait until your 50s—even beyond, to find lasting happiness.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mindfulness 51 mins – “Harvard psychologist Ellen Langer is known as the “mother of mindfulness.” Her research focuses on the many benefits of purposefully paying attention,and in contrast,the psychological and professional costs of thought patterns that limit awareness. Ellen Langer describes what it takes to become more mindful and why it can have such profound effects on our health, ability to learn and overall well-being. Please join us for a conversation with Ellen Langer on harnessing the power of thought.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Nuisance Flooding 27 mins – ““Nuisance flooding” is a term for minor flooding that is not catastrophic or life-threatening, but which causes various problems for cities and towns, including overflowing storm water management systems, roads that must be closed to traffic, and deterioration of infrastructure not designed to be under water and in contact with salt-water. Much has been written in recent years about climate-related sea level rise, but a study released this July by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, focuses on the impacts of sea level rise as manifested in increasing frequency and magnitude of nuisance tidal flooding – and the findings are dramatic….” At the link under that title right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Prices 51 mins – “Global oil prices have fallen by nearly 40 percent since the summer. A surge in U.S. production combined with low demand in Asia and the Eurozone are behind the decline. OPEC met last week and decided not to cut production. Some say the cartel is engaging in a price war with U.S. oil producers. Here in the U.S., gas prices have fallen below $2.88, putting more money in consumers’ pockets. But in Russia, Iran and Nigeria, falling oil prices are devastating the economy. Diane and [3] guests discuss falling global oil prices and what it means for U.S. consumers, the environment and geopolitics.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Osteopathic Doctor 40 mins – “In this episode, Ryan interviews Dr. Anita Showalter, the Assistant Dean of Clinical Education at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences, an osteopathic medical school in the State of Washington. Dr. Showalter also teaches Women’s Health, Obstetrics & Gynecology. Today, we’re going to talk about her path to medicine, including some push back from her parents, starting undergrad on a nursing track, and taking a detour to having four children, and ultimately deciding to go back and accomplish her dream of becoming a physician with the support of her husband. We will tackle things about osteopathic philosophy and some myths associated with DO’s and so much more.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pablo Escobar 27 mins “Two decades after the death of notorious drug baron Pablo Escobar in 1993, he still looms large in the Colombian psyche. In some quarters, there is an ambivalence towards this ruthless killer, an admiration for the man who made an estimated US $20 billion and built homes for the poor. But many reject the Robin Hood image, and see his legacy as deeply corrosive. Linda Pressly meets victims, a cartel-insider, and Pablo Escobar’s sister as she finds out how the story of this most notorious drug baron still resonates in the city of Medellin.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Cult of Pablo Escobar,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20141202-0315a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peter Buffett 58 mins – “Peter Buffett – What’s it like to be the son of the richest man on Earth? This week we interview Peter Buffett, youngest son of the “Oracle of Omaha” and once dubbed “richest man on Earth”, Warren Buffett.  In this interview we ask Peter what it was like to have a household name as a father, what advice did his dad pass along to him, how did the shadow of his last name affect his childhood, and what went on behind the scenes at the Buffett family dinners. This unique upbringing and lessons learned are the foundation for his New York Times Bestselling book, Life Is What You Make It: Find Your Own Path to Fulfillment. Additionally, we discuss his esteemed music career which includes winning an Emmy Award and composing the most famous scene in the film Dances with Wolves.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pregnant Workers 51 mins – “In 2006 a pregnant woman named Peggy Young was advised not to lift anything heavier than 20 pounds. Her employer – United Parcel Service – refused to put her on temporary light duty. She was placed on unpaid leave instead, causing her to lose her health benefits, pension and months in wages. She filed a lawsuit, alleging discrimination. Today, the U.S. Supreme Court hears her case. Business groups have sided with UPS, saying the company acted within the law. President Barack Obama, many members of Congress and employees’ rights groups disagree. Join us as we [3 guests] discuss Young v. UPS and its broader implications.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Ray Rice 47 mins – “Ray Rice has been reinstated to the NFL on appeal. Now Rice and his wife Janay are appealing to the public to give him a second chance. It was the “only time he ever hit me, “ says Janay.  “My wife is an angel. I take full responsibility for my actions,” says Ray. The elevator incident in Atlantic City sparked a national conversation about domestic violence in the NFL and beyond. Deep conversations about why men hit.  And why women stay.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rewilding 15 mins – “Wolves were once native to the US’ Yellowstone National Park — until hunting wiped them out. But when, in 1995, the wolves began to come back (thanks to an aggressive management program), something interesting happened: the rest of the park began to find a new, more healthful balance. In a bold thought experiment, George Monbiot imagines a wilder world in which humans work to restore the complex, lost natural food chains that once surrounded us.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rewilding 51 mins – “Diane talks with environmentalist and journalist George Monbiot about “rewilding” nature. It’s the process of freeing ecosystems from human intervention and allowing them — in some cases for the first time in millennia — to resume their natural ecological processes. Monbiot makes the case that returning ecosystems to the wild will not only benefit nature, but humans as well.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Sharing Economy 54 mins – “Anne Wright-Howard examines how the sharing economy challenges 20th century notions of ownership, commerce, government regulation, wealth and personal identity.” At the link find the title, “The Sharing Economy,” right-click “Download The Sharing Economy” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Single Sex Education 47 mins – “More and more schools are looking at single-sex education as a fix to boost student performance.  The Department of Education just issued new guidelines this week.  Those in favor say that if Eric learns differently from Erica, let’s structure classrooms around their different learning styles.  But the ACLU says “no”.  That separating children by sex is comparable to separating children by race.  We’ll hear from the head of a single-sex school and from a principal of a school that abandoned single-sex education.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slow Motion Apocalypse  54 mins – “This week we feature a panel discussion presented by the Center for the Study of Europe in collaboration with the Latin American Studies Program.  Our speakers are: Kostis Kornetis, Assistant Professor at the Center for European and Mediterranean Studies at New York University; and Alex Khasnabish, Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Mount Saint Vincent University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Tonight’s discussion is titled “Social Resistance in Times of Austerity.’”

Superintelligence 69 mins – “Nick Bostrom of the University of Oxford talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book, Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies. Bostrom argues that when machines exist which dwarf human intelligence they will threaten human existence unless steps are taken now to reduce the risk. The conversation covers the likelihood of the worst scenarios, strategies that might be used to reduce the risk and the implications for labor markets, and human flourishing in a world of superintelligent machines.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Survival Medicine 60 mins – “This week, we’re learning about the limits of the human body, and the essential science of survival. We’ll talk to Dr. James Hubbard, creator of TheSurvivalDoctor.com, about emergency measures to take when a disaster has cut off your access to medical care. And Dr. Rob Tarzwell of One Minute Medical School returns to explain what to do – and not do – when you’re stranded in the wilderness.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Texas Climate Crisis 15 mins (3 parts) – “…Texas is the nation’s top greenhouse gas polluter — bringing the state closer to a potential environmental and economic catastrophe. And Texas’s leaders are largely in denial about the problem, saying they remain unconvinced by the overwhelming scientific consensus that human pollution is changing the climate. …“If Texas were more proactive in dealing with climate change, that would send a signal more broadly,” says Michael Levi, a senior fellow for energy and environment at the Council on Foreign Relations. “The states have a direct impact on emissions,” Levi says. “The more states are doing to reduce emissions, the easier it is for the federal government to accomplish broader goals.” …But in some respects, says Larry Soward, a former state environmental regulator “we’re already too late” to contain the risks to Texas…. “ At the link are three sound bars. Right-click on the down-pointing arrow of each and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menus.

Tuberculosis 29 mins – “Keith is on location once again at the Galveston National Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch, to talk with Janice Endsley of the Department of Microbiology/Immunology.  Endsley studies coinfections, in particular, the common coinfection of HIV with tuberculosis.  About 30% of the world’s population have latent TB and show no symptoms.  However, if they are infected with HIV, the latent TB has a very good chance of being activated.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vasopressor Basics 31 mins – “There is a ton to speak about regarding vasopressors, but before we get to the edge cases, we need to set-up a foundation. Types of Shock: Obstructive, Hypovolemic, Cardiogenic, Distributive… When we put someone on a vasopressor, what are we hoping to accomplish? Critical Perfusion Pressures (Heart will get better, but may look worse); Increase Venous Return; Avoid Gut Ischemia and Flow Reduction… Why Not Dopamine? Vasopressin, Phenylephrine, Epinephrine….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War on Terror 60 mins – “James Risen talked about his book Pay Any Price: Greed, Power and Endless War, in which he explores some of the hidden costs of the war on terror since September 11, 2001, both around the world and in the U.S. He spoke about billions of dollars disappearing in Iraq, and abuses of power involving monetary fraud by Americans in the warzones of Iraq and Afghanistan. He also talked about civil liberties issues and the National Security Agency’s (NSA) domestic surveillance program.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: James Risen,” right-click “Media files program.374093.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White Supremacy 23 mins – “In the wake of decisions by grand juries in both Missouri and New York’s Staten Island not to indict white police officers in the deaths of unarmed African-Americans, this week we present an encore broadcast of Bill’s conversation earlier this year with journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates. First telecast in May 2014, Coates had just written a cover story in The Atlantic magazine, provocatively titled “The Case for Reparations.” It urged that we begin a national dialogue on whether the United States should compensate African-Americans not only as recognition of slavery’s “ancient brutality” — as President Lyndon Johnson called it – but also as acknowledgement of all the prejudice and discrimination that have followed in a direct line from this, our original sin….” At the link find the title, “Full Show: The United States of Ferguson,” right-click “Media files Moyers and Company, 348_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zen and Motorcycles 54 mins – “Robert Pirsig’s Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance has been called the most widely read book of philosophy ever written. Forty years after its publication, Tim Wilson revisits an extraordinary interview he did with its author.” At the link find the title, “The Motorcycle is Yourself, right-click “Download The Motorcycle is Yourself” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 4800 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 21+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

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Media Mining Digest 160 – 5 Dec 2014: Aimee Semple McPherson, Air Pollution, Astrophysics, Birth of a Nation, Bob Dylon, Broadband in Michigan, Calcium Crisis, Carotenoids, Chestnut Trees Return, Civil War Prequel, Computer Cabling, Corruption in America, Cryptowall, Cuban Internet, Deception in America, Diet Agnostics, Disaster Responses, DNA Research, Dread Pirate Roberts, Ebola Conference, Ebola Research, Empathy, Epilepsy Case, Extinction in America, Food Fads, Grave Matters, Green Chemistry, Interstellar Movie, Leishmania Parasites, Linux Comparison, Middle East Lecture, Oil in America, Oratory in America, Orson Wells, Patent History, Pneumatic Tubes, Police Problems, Reenactments, Rewilding, Robot Uses, Satire, Sexting, Shopping Trends, Speed Reading, Starbucks Concept, Startups, Sugar History, Surveillance in America, Teachers Add Value, Trilobites, Utopias, Westgate Terrorist Attack, World War One Letters

The following audio files come from a larger group of 244 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 53 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Aimee Semple McPherson 27 mins – “The story of Canadian-born Aimee Semple McPherson and how she went from farm girl to invent broadcast evangelism, becoming among the most famous and glamorous women in America in the 1920s and 30s.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Sister Aimee,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20141125-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Air Pollution 27 mins – “What’s causing severe pollution haze events over Beijing?; Resilience of humans to extreme weather; Tracking the journey of a hammerhead shark; IUCN Red List turns 50; Studying cancer with naked mole rats,” At the link find the title, “SciA: Air Pollution in Beijing; Preparing for Extreme Weather…” right-click “scia_20141127-2030a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astrophysics 60 mins – “This week we’re talking about the mindbending science trying to understand the inner workings of the Universe. Astrophysicist Ethan Siegel returns to discuss the BICEP2 experiment, and its search for the fingerprints of cosmic inflation. And we’ll talk to theoretical cosmologist Roberto Trotta about his book “The Edge of the Sky: All You Need to Know about the All-There-Is,” which explains the history and concepts of cosmology using the 1,000 most common words in the English language.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Birth of a Nation 52 mins – “Six of this year’s nine nominees for Best Picture at the Oscars are films based in history. That may seem like a lot, but for the past 40 years, the majority of Best Picture winners have had an historical bent. On this episode we ask what makes history such a popular subject for American filmmakers. From the early days of film — when people thought movies would replace textbooks in the classroom — to the Cold War — when the government and Hollywood thought they could control behavior through film — the History Guys look at the impact of history on celluloid culture, and at how movies have made and remade history. They also debate the merits of current Oscar nominees (Lincoln, Zero Dark Thirty, and Django Unchained) and consider the ways those movies reflect contemporary thinking about history.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bob Dylon 48 mins ­ “For a music giant, a cultural touchstone, Bob Dylan has long been one of the most inscrutable of artists.  Beyond his towering music, he doesn’t share.  Doesn’t open up.  We do not get close.  But Victor Maymudes did.  For forty years, from Dylan’s earliest days in Greenwich Village.  He was tour manager and a lot more.  Left the tapes that tell the inside story.  His son Jake was written them up.  He’s with us.  This hour, On Point:  Another Side of Bob Dylan.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Michigan 14 mins – “The small village of Sebewaing has become the first gigabit village in the state of Michigan. Superintendent of Sebewaing Light and Water utility Melanie McCoy joins us to discuss the project on episode 126 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast….” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3 file…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Calcium Crisis 11 mins – “Acid rain has depleted calcium in lakes, leading to an overpopulation of jelly-coated organisms. The problem of acid rain is one of the few success stories we’ve had in controlling pollution, as the industrial emissions that cause it have been cut substantially. But the environmental damage and disruption caused by acid rain still echo in the wilderness. One example discovered by Professor John Smol, a biologist and Canada Research Chair in Environmental Change at Queen’s University in Kingston, and his colleagues, is what they’re calling the “jellification” of temperate lakes. Acid rain depleted the environments around these mineral-poor lakes of calcium, which is essential to lake organisms. Without calcium entering the lakes in run-off, some crustaceans at the base of the aquatic food chain, which make their exoskeletons from the mineral, are at a disadvantage, and they’re being displaced by species that have a jelly-like coating. These jelly-organisms are inedible to many predators, and disruptive to the lakes’ ecological balance.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Carotenoids 28 mins – “Chris Cazzonelli talks about carotenoids:… Carotenoids for example are colourful pigments found in plants that are essential for human health. In plants, carotenoids are required for photosynthesis, photoprotection and the production of signaling molecules (e.g. hormones and volatiles) that promote chloroplast to nucleus communication, shoot branching, root-mycorrhizal symbiosis, parasitic weed germination and abiotic stress resistance (Cazzonelli and Pogson, Trends in Plant Science 2010; 15: 266-274).” The Chris segment starts at the 10 minute mark and continues to the end. If the reference to an extended interview does not work, use this link. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chestnut Trees Return 10 mins – “A century ago, the American Chestnut was a tremendously important species in the forests of Eastern North America, representing more than a quarter of forest trees in a swath from Georgia to Ontario. But a fungus introduced on imported Asian chestnut trees turned out to be catastrophic for the American Chestnut, and killed billions of trees, essentially wiping out the species by the 1950’s. Breeding a blight-resistant tree has proved laborious and difficult, so now a team led by Dr. William Powell, a professor at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse, New York, has developed a genetically modified American Chestnut that uses a gene from wheat to resist the fungus. They are currently going through the regulatory approval process, but believe this could be the first attempt to use a GM organism in an environmental restoration project.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil War Prequel 53 mins – “…The episode explores the concept of “union” and its power in the northern psyche, and the equally strong pull of “home” for the white southerner; how slavery factored in to each man’s decision to fight, most compellingly, for those former slaves recruited into the Union Army after the Emancipation Proclamation; and it looks to the women who soldiers often saw themselves fighting for, but who were left to fend for themselves as the war unleashed other terrors off the battlefield.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Cabling 67 mins – Chris Jones, owner of a computer company in Middle Tennessee, Computer and Communications Innovations, began his career nearly 33 years ago as a systems installer for a cable television company. Here he discusses the finer points of cable installation which are frequently overlooked and the source of code violations. At the link right click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in America 52 mins – “It’s a worry as old as the Republic: Do politicians look out for the public good, or their own private interests? But what exactly Americans consider the corruption of public office has changed over time. This week, BackStory shines a light on fears of corruption in America–from back room deals in Congress, to paying bureaucrats on commission, to the taint of corporate money in modern politics.”

Cryptowall 33 mins – “Fighting and preventing Cryptowall 2.0 and other ransomeware.” Mention is made of shadow copying, a standard feature in most Windows products that should be checked to make sure it is turned on. Links at the site include several free protection programs. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Internet 50 mins – “British journalist Nick Baker and Anglo-Cuban journalist Arnaldo Hernandez Diaz discover a vivid snapshot of Cuba including topics around the internet and online communication, LGBT issues and a surprising medical story.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Human Cubans,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20141123-2005a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deception in America 54 mins – “In America, you can be anything you want to be. Or anyone. Literally. So on this April Fools edition of BackStory, we dig into the long story of confidence men and counterfeiters. We discover a time when fake money jump-started the economy, and take a look at the long, strange history of “the truth compelling machine.” And, oh yeah… we try to sell the Brooklyn Bridge.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diet Agnostics 75 mins – “On today’s show: Healthy low-carb diets: fact or fiction? What is the Paleo-Vegan diet? Can supplements assist with memory improvement and Alzheimer’s prevention? Why are the Maasai being handed an eviction slip? We also talk a bit about the late physicist Richard Feynman. In the Moment of Paleo segment, does nudging the world in a better direction matter? And After the Bell, we close with a TED talk about the psychology of positive thinking.” (Reference is made to the Australian show, Catalyst.) At the link right-click “Download MP3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Responses 52 mins – “In this week’s episode, the Guys explore “historic” weather in historic time: everything from the year without a summer (1816), to experiments with rainmaking in the later 19th Century, to extreme weather as entertainment in the 20th – courtesy of Coney Island sideshows. And they look to the major questions raised by major weather events: what kinds of disaster responses have been useful and which ones have been, well, disastrous? And how much is any “natural disaster” entirely down to nature?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Research 55 mins – “On the show this week we talk to journalist and science writer Christine Kenneally about her latest book, The Invisible History of the Human Race: How DNA and History Shape Our Identities and Our Futures.” At the link click “Download” and select “OK” from the pop-up menu to ”Save File.”

Dread Pirate Roberts 20 mins – “Today on the show, the story of the Dread Pirate Roberts of the internet age. A man who dreamed of setting up a utopian marketplace, a place where you could buy and sell almost anything in secret. The pirate created a market with no contracts, no regulations, and really no government interference. The Dread Pirate believed in total economic freedom, but in order to make his market work, he had to do some very bad things.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Conference 91 mins – “The current Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has sickened over 14,000 people and has killed over 5,100. Health workers from around the world are attempting to halt this deadly disease. On November 19th, the American Society for Microbiology featured two of these health workers, Dr. Joseph Fair and Dr. Michael Callahan, who have extensive experience with the virus, including direct field work during the current outbreak. In this presentation they discuss the virus, the response, and potential solutions.” At the link right-click “MP3 Audio Only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Research 29 mins -”Keith is on location at the Galveston National Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston TX.  He talks with Thomas Geisbert, an infectious disease researcher at the GNL, who was the co-discoverer of the Reston strain of Ebola, made famous in the bestselling book “The Hot Zone” by Richard Preston. Geisbert talks about this first encounter with Ebola, and how the GNL is working to develop vaccines and treatments for this devastating disease. Geisbert also describes why the virus is so difficult to contract, and why the virus must be stopped at its source – Africa.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Empathy 52 mins – “The philosopher Roman Krznaric has spent years thinking about empathy, and he suggests you forget the idea that it’s some fluffy, feel-good concept. Krznaric argues that empathy is radical and dangerous, because it offers the possibility of real change. He also says it’s not a concept to reserve for the down and out. To really address the world’s empathy deficit, we must equally apply it to our neighbors and to people in power. Wednesday, we’ll talk about our capacity for empathy and why it matters. Roman Krznaric is a founding faculty member of the School of Life in London. His new book is called Empathy: Why It Matters, and How to Get It.” At the link right-click the play button beside ”Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Epilepsy Case  54 mins – “In continuing with Epilepsy Awareness as the topic for November, Joyce welcomes The Honorable Tony Coelho, author of the Americans with Disabilities Act and former congressman from California to the show. Mr. Coelho will discuss his journey living with epilepsy, and the progress that has been made nationally to end the stigma.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Extinction in America 55 mins – “Some 20,000 species across the globe are at high risk of extinction, experts say – many here in the United States – and some of our natural fauna have already disappeared. So in this Earth Day episode, the American History Guys explore how Americans have grappled with the idea of extinction over time, and what the loss of native species has meant for our ecosystems and everyday lives. When did we first realize that species could go extinct? To what extent did earlier extinctions shape the emergence of today’s environmentalism? And how have ideas about biological extinction factored into American thinking about human cultures? These are just some of the questions the American History Guys and their guests explore in this episode, with stories on our obsession with dinosaurs, the bird that helped birth the conservation movement, the unlikely fish that galvanized a new generation of environmental activists, and much more.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Fads 58 mins – “Until recently, the link between a high fat diet and heart disease was one of the touchstones of modern medicine. But new research has thrown that connection into question, just as numerous studies over the years have brought new advice about health and diet to the fore. So in this episode, the Guys take the long view on nutritional advice and explore some of the more surprising ways that past generations have defined “health food.’” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grave Matters 52 mins – “On Memorial Day, we pay public tribute to those who lost their lives fighting for our country. But how do we live with the memory of the dead the rest of the year? In this special Memorial Day episode, the Guys and their guests explore Americans’ changing attitudes about death: historian Drew Gilpin Faust talks about how the Civil War altered the American way of dying; writer Kate Sweeney explores the 20th Century shift toward private, restrained mourning; and our own Ed Ayers tours Richmond’s Hollywood Cemetery — and discovers his own gravesite.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Chemistry 25 mins – “ There’s a lot of attention right now on creating environmentally friendly technology, non-toxic and sustainable manufacturing, but as Dr. John Warner explains it, it all has to start with the chemistry. John Warner is a chemist, professor and co-founder of the Warner-Babcock Institute for Green Chemistry. He speaks profoundly about learning methods from nature to create safer, more resilient and more elegant chemistry.  John was also the recipient of this year’s Perkin Medal, one of the highest honors in the field of chemistry.” (Starts about the four minute mark.) At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interstellar Movie 23 mins – “To prepare for this episode, we had to do a little homework: see the movie Interstellar. As we were walking out of the theater, we knew we had to invite Kip Thorne back to the show.  As Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics, Emeritus, at the California Institute of Technology, Kip Thorne is the scientific advisor and executive producer of Interstellar.  Listen to the show as Kip joins us to discuss Interstellar, the science in the movie, and how it might inspire us to dream about our future.” At the link find and right-click “Download” (the mp3…) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leishmania Parasites 91 mins – “Hosts Vincent Racaniello and Dickson Despommier discuss the spread of P. knowlesi in Malaysia, and how Leishmania parasites protect the sandfly gut from bacterial infection.” Both parts concern changing disease patterns, the first with malaria and the second with Leishmania. At the link right-click “TWIP #79” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linux Comparison 102 mins – “Nov 22: #262 – Computer America #79: Larry’s second last appearance as the regular Linux correspondent on Computer America. Topic: The computer operating system doesn’t matter anymore… so you should use Linux! Call me ‘cheap’ or just ‘frugal’ but I don’t like spending money without a good reason. As long as you have an Internet connection and a browser, why do you need a specific computer? You don’t need an expensive computer. Even a modest one with a good Internet connection can run cloud applications quickly — because most, if not all, of the processing takes place on the Internet.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Middle East Lecture 54 mins – “Director, author, actress and journalist Nelofer Pazira peels back the layers of the western media’s simplified black-and-white coverage of the Middle East in the 2014 Dalton Camp Lecture in Journalism.” At the link find the title, “Recognizing Grey,” right-click “Download Recognizing Grey” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil in America 54 mins – “…At the beginning of the 20th century, oil was hardly on America’s energy map. Coal was king, supplying as much as 90% of the nation’s energy needs. And the second most used energy source? Wood. But in just a few short decades Americans would come to depend on oil to heat their homes, get to work, power their military, and supply the plastics for their appliances. By the dawn of the 21st century, President George W. Bush would declare America “addicted” to the substance. So in this episode, the guys and their guests look to the roots of that addiction, and explore how oil has shaped the American lifestyle and economy over time.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oratory in America 52 mins – “November 19th, 2013 marks the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. It’s one of the most iconic speeches in American history, but in 1863, it got decidedly mixed reviews – one newspaper even called it “silly, flat and dishwatery.” So how did it become one of the most famous speeches in the United States? This episode of BackStory explores the evolution of an icon, and asks, more generally, what kinds of speeches – and speakers – endure in American history. From the fiery sermons of traveling preachers in the 18th century to the teleprompted prime-time addresses of presidents today, we’ll look at how audiences’ expectations of orators have shifted, and ask why some speeches loom so much larger — or smaller — in our memory than they did in their own times.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Orson Wells 50 mins – “Director Orson Welles was asked to write his life story in his later years. He declined but was convinced by his friend Henry Jaglom to discuss his life over a weekly lunch at their favourite Hollywood restaurant, Ma Maison. The hundreds of tapes, recorded from 1983 to 1985, reveal extraordinary, frank, conversations between Welles and the independent director Jaglom.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Lost Tapes of Orson Welles,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20141130-2005a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patent History 52 mins – “Can genes be patented? Are downloaders inhibiting musical creativity – or enhancing it? Questions about “intellectual property” are everywhere today – but what exactly is intellectual property? And what are these kinds of rights supposed to achieve? In this episode of BackStory, the American History Guys look to the past for answers. Where the Constitution gave Congress the power “To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts” through a patent and copyright system, the Guys uncover how industrial piracy actually propelled the economy of the early Republic – and with the Government’s stamp of approval! We hear how an author’s copyright used to extend little further than the letters on the page, and why it has come to embrace so much more. And as the Supreme Court gets ready to rule on gene patents, the Guys get perspective from the first scientist to patent a living organism.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pneumatic Tubes 17 mins – “In the world before telephone, radio, and email, the tasks of transmitting information and moving material objects were essentially the same challenge. The way you sent someone a message was pretty much the same process as sending someone a package—you had to send a piece of physical media through the post, or on a ship. It was really the telegraph that divided telling someone something from far away and  giving someone something from far away. But every day people didn’t speak morse code (or have telegraph equipment). The message had to be deciphered, written on a slip of paper, and then that was delivered to the recipient. For many cities, the pneumatic tube was essential in getting these slips of paper to the intended recipient quickly. It’s no surprise that electronic communication eventually killed most of the need for pneumatic tubes. But you may not know that it was the telegraph itself that also put pneumatic tubes into widespread use.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Problems 60 mins – “Ira talks to reporters John Diedrich and Raquel Rutlidge, from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. They got a call from a landlord who said agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives had trashed his place. (9 minutes)… After John and Raquel published their story, the U.S. Congress got involved. And they found some very surprising things happening in other parts of the country. (10 minutes)…If you haven’t spent much time in the southwest, you may not know about this, but there are these border patrol checkpoints that are just in the middle of interstate highways and other roads… not at the border. They’re as far as a hundred miles away. Reporter Debbie Nathan used to go through these checkpoints regularly when she lived in El Paso in the ’80s and ’90s. But not long ago, she discovered something that made her see the checkpoints in a whole new way. (25 minutes)….” At the link right-click a download option may not exist or cost $.99; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Reenactments 52 mins – “Americans have a fascination with their past – not just discussing it, but actually reliving it. And we’re not just talking about the Civil War. Every weekend, there are people in various parts of the country putting on the clothes of old time baseball players, enslaved people — even KKK members. And so on this episode, we’re asking what drives Americans to the scripts of the past. Is it purely educational? Or is there something deeper, more personal, at stake? What events do we reenact and why? Are there some chapters of American history that are still off-limits for this sort of treatment?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rewilding 54 mins – “After centuries of negative human impact on our landscapes, some people are calling for rewilding: allowing landscapes to revert back to a natural state. Anik See takes a look at rewilding efforts in Canada and in the Netherlands.” At the link find the title, “Rewilding,” right-click “Download Rewilding” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Uses 47 mins – “Human imagination got so far out front, so fast, on robots that robot reality has been vaguely disappointing for a long time.  Isaac Asimov and “WALL-E” and the Terminator put our real robots to shame.  They still do.  But things are changing.  Sensors and chips and AI and mechanics and “the cloud” are coming together to push robot dreams and reality into new terrain.  There is need – we have aging societies that could use the help.  There is risk – talk of jobs lost to robots and “killer robots.”  And there is reality – they’re moving in.  This hour On Point:  the rise of the robots.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Satire 19 mins – “Satirical commentary on public events is nothing new, but now may be a greater force in shaping modern discourse. On this episode, Sophia McClennen discussed how satire is saving the nation.” At the link right-click “Listen to episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexting 52 mins – “Tuesday, our guest is the journalist Hanna Rosin. Her latest article for The Atlantic asks what we should be doing about teens and sexting. Now before you cry, “Not my kid!” consider this: surveys show nearly a third of older teens have sent provocative selfies. Rosin says most often the pictures land where they’re intended, but the consequences when they don’t can be devastating. We’ll discuss the legal and social fallout of sexting and what the trend tells us about our kids. Read Hanna Rosin’s Why Kids Sext in the November issue of The Atlantic.” At the link right-click the play button beside ”Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shopping Trends 18 mins – “’Tis the season – for elbowing your way through crowded lines at malls to get the best deals…and the best presents. As the holiday shopping frenzy begins, brick-and-mortar retailers are rolling out new tools to engage increasingly finicky customers – from personal shopper apps to Macy’s location-based, digital coupons. But that may not be enough in the long term to keep pleasing consumers. “Retail will see more change in the next five to 10 years than perhaps we’ve seen in the last 50 or 100 years,” says Courtney Reagan, CNBC’s retail reporter.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Speed Reading 51 mins – “Jonathan Levi – Here on Smart People Podcast we get the opportunity to talk with a lot of amazing authors. Doing this on a consistent basis has turned us into what you might call “book worms”. However, with only so many hours in the day, there are still thousands of books that we’ll probably never have the time to read. If only there were an easier way? What if you could increase your reading speed by five, ten or twenty times and also increase your retention? …Well thanks to one of our top fans (thanks Charlie!) we were introduced to this weeks guest, Jonathan Levi. Jonathan is an entrepreneur, and an expert in speed reading and advanced memorization. His online course is ranked as one of the top selling of all time on Udemy and has been personally recommended by the CEO. Join us this week as we learn how to speed read, remember more, and be a Super Learner. To receive 90% off of Jonathan’s SuperLearner course, go to jle.vi/smartpeople or go to Udemy and use the coupon code smart-people.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Starbucks Concept 14 mins – “These days, the green-and-white Starbucks logo is about as ubiquitous as stop signs. With more than 21,000 stores in over 65 countries, it’s a good bet that there’s a Starbucks within a block of wherever you’re reading this. But it wasn’t always thus. Back in the early 1980s, the current CEO of Starbucks, Howard Schultz, was a salesman at a Swedish housewares company, when he noticed that one little shop in Seattle was buying a whole lot of coffee filters. “He’s a very good listener, and has very good antennae, both at the micro level and the macro level,” says Nancy Koehn, a Harvard Business School historian and author. Schultz followed his antennae, and left his job to work for the little upstart company. Starbucks’ founders then sent him on what would turn out to be a life-changing buying trip to Italy, where he got an idea that would transform the American coffee scene….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startups 53 mins – “Entrepreneur and venture capitalist Ben Horowitz shares which entrepreneurial skills truly matter, and why learning to manage well may be the most critical skill of all. Horowitz, a founding partner of Andreessen Horowitz, discusses the value of learning inside a large company, some of the exciting technology frontiers ahead, and the purpose and philosophy of his firm, in conversation with Stanford Engineering Professor Tom Byers.” At the link and “Podcast” right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sugar History 52mins – “Valentine’s Day is around the corner, and that means candy, chocolate, cakes – all the sweet stuff for your sweetheart! It’s just one of the ways sugar has seeped into our personal lives, but it hasn’t stopped there. From the triangle trade to the rise of high-fructose corn syrup, sweetness in America has been a political question too. So why has sugar been so intimately linked to power over the centuries? And how has our national sweet tooth shaped our political and economic priorities? This episode of BackStory finds out, exploring how sugar has shaped, if rarely sweetened, American history. “ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance in America 53 mins – “Last month, Americans learned that the NSA has been collecting data on millions of American’s phone calls, and tapping into data gathered by tech companies like Google and Yahoo. The revelations set off another round of debate over the scope of personal privacy in a democratic republic like ours, and the means by which the government “keeps tabs” on citizens. So in this episode, the Guys explore the changing ways we’ve collected information on each other – and when it crosses from something necessary into something invasive. From early attempts to determine people’s credit rating to the accumulation of data about Americans’ “racial purity,” the History Guys and their guests look at how, and why, Americans have kept tabs on each other, and consider how earlier generations have balanced the need-to-know with expectations of privacy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teachers Add Value 28 mins – “We’ve all heard the depressing numbers: when compared to kids from other rich countries, U.S. students aren’t doing very well, especially in math, even though we spend more money per student than most other countries. So is the problem here as simple as adding two plus two? Is the problem here that our students aren’t getting very bright simply because … our teachers aren’t very bright? “ At the link find the title, “Is America’s Education Problem Really Just a Teacher Problem?“ right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trilobites 4 mins – “…Trilobites Trilobites were ancient arthropods. They appeared in the Cambrian era, 540-million years ago. The nearest thing to a trilobite today is the horseshoe crab with a very similar exoskeleton. Trilobites lasted over 300-million years and finally died out not long before dinosaurs arose. Dinosaurs then lived another 160-million years. (By the way, the hardy cockroach, still with us today, once coexisted with trilobites.)….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Utopias 52 mins – “The New Year is here and many of us have resolved to make this one better than the last. But throughout our history, some Americans have set their sights a bit higher: building transformational communities from the ground up. In this episode, we explore their efforts: from a transcendental, vegan commune in the 1840s to a Gilded Age factory town dubbed “The Most Perfect Town In The World.”  Throughout, Ed, Brian, and Peter explore the utopian yearnings in the American past, and the ways they still resonate today. What allows some utopian communities to endure for decades, while others collapse within months? How have mainstream Americans viewed their utopian-minded brethren? And is America itself a utopian project?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Westgate Terrorist Attack 37 mins – “In the wake of public tragedy there is a space between the official narrative and the stories of the people who experienced it. Today, we crawl inside that space and question the role of journalists in helping us move on from a traumatic event. NPR’s East Africa correspondent Gregory Warner takes us back to the 2013 terrorist attacks on the Westgate Mall in Nairobi, Kenya. Warner reported on the attack as it happened, listening to eyewitness accounts, sorting out the facts, establishing the truth. But he’s been been wrestling with it ever since as his friends and neighbors try not only to put their lives back together, but also try to piece together what really happened that day.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One Letters 54 mins – “Soldiers from Perth County in Southern Ontario went to the First World War and sent letters home to their loved ones, writing about their daily experiences: what they were seeing and doing, as well as their fears of dying.” At the link find the title, “Letters from the Front,” right-click “Download Letters from the Front” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 4700 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 21+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

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Media Mining Digest 159 – 28 Nov 2014: Analog Computers, Antibiotic Issues, Berlin Wall, BobMarley, Car Dealership, Carbon Capture, Cattle Cop, Civilized Inequities, Climate Change Solutions, Cuba Embargo, Cystic Fibrosis, Daily Satellite Images, Data Center Energy, Data Law, Drone Photography, Ebola Stories, Education in NYC, ENCODE Project, Energy Conversion, Energy Storage, Evidence Based medicine Is Crap, Evolution Update, Favela Art, Film Production, Gridlock History, Immigrant Work in Europe, Infographics, Journal of Visualized Experiments, Keystone Pipeline, Like a Glove, London Mayor on Churchill, Mass Movements, Medical BS, Medical Literature, Menieres Disease, Mission Pilot, Mushroom Poisoning, Net Neutrality Wiki, Nonie Darwish, Obama Foreign Policy, Open Access Journals, Pirates of West Africa, Productivity, Psilocybin and Mescaline, Responsive City, Secret Service Hearing, Sneakers, Taliban Hunting in Pakistan,Virunga, Windmills

The following audio files come from a larger group of 210 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 55 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Analog Computers 111 mins – “This episode is about analog computers, which are computers that compute using a physical model of a real system, often using analog electronic devices. Our guest is Bernd Ulmann who runs the Analog Computer Museum near Wiesbaden, Germany. In the episode we talk about what analog computers are (mechanical, electronic, digital), how they are programmed, what they are used for and why they should (and will?) be used in modern computing as well. We close the episode with a short discussion of the VAX and the AN/FSQ-7, both computer systems near and dear to Bernd.” At the link find the title, “59 – Analog Computers,” right-click “Media files omegatau-159-analogComputers.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotic Issues 13 mins – “Antibiotics put Canadians at risk because of two potentially serious side effects.  Researchers from Australia did a review of studies that looked at the risks and  benefits of prescribing of the amoxicillin alone or in combination with clavulinic acid or clavulin in adults and children. Amoxicillin with clavulin is one of the most  commonly prescribed antibiotics for respiratory infections. The researchers found twenty-five studies that included close to 11,000 patients – a little more than half getting antibiotics and a little less than half getting placebo. The results: compared to placebo, the patients who got amoxicillin were twice as likely to have diarrhea and those who got amoxicillin and clavulin were three times as  likely to get diarrhea….” At the link find the title, “White Coat Mini Podcast – Antibiotics,” right-click “Download White Coat Mini Podcast – Antibiotics” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Berlin Wall (3 parts) 163 mins – “On the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, former East German citizens Ralph Kabisch and Toralf Pilz talk about their incredible journeys out of East Germany.” At the link find the title, “Escaping East Germany,” right-click “Media files IM_20141115.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Then “Barrie Dunsmore, who covered foreign affairs for ABC News for 30 years, recounts his live coverage from Berlin on the night the Berlin Wall fell. During his career at ABC, Dunsmore focused on events in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union as the Iron Curtain began to disintegrate.” At the link find the title, “Eyewitness to History: Former ABC Reporter Barrie Dunsmore,” right-click “Media files IM_20141108_02.mp3,” etc. Finally, “Author Mary Elise Sarotte talks about her new book, “The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall,” which reveals how a perfect storm of decisions by underground revolutionaries, disgruntled Stasi officers and dictatorial party bosses sparked an unexpected series of events culminating in the fall of the wall.” At the link and the title, “The Collapse of the Wall,” right-click “Media files IM_20141108_01.mp3,” etc.

Bob Marley 48 mins – “It’s Bob Marley’s most famous lyric — “Let’s get together and feel all right.”  The song was called “One Love.” But the world Marley lived in was anything but peaceful.  Jamaica in the 1970s was filled with gangs, drugs,  unspeakable violence. With Bob Marley in the middle of it all — tugged and claimed by both sides of political upheaval.  Jamaican writer Marlon James imagines how it all went down in a breathless new novel. A re-telling of the story from the perspectives of gang members, a CIA-operative, a journalist, and more. This hour, On Point: power, corruption and the story of Bob Marley.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Dealership 77 mins – “We spend a month at a Jeep dealership on Long Island as they try to make their monthly sales goal: 129 cars. If they make it, they’ll get a huge bonus from the manufacturer, possibly as high as $85,000 — enough to put them in the black for the month. If they don’t make it, it’ll be the second month in a row. So they pull out all the stops.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Capture 30 mins – “Did you know that the production of cement is responsible for 5% of the carbon dioxide emissions on the planet? Our guest today on Sea Change Radio is geologist, biomineralization expert, and entrepreneur, Brent Constantz. His start-up company, Blue Planet Ltd., hopes to use biomimicry to transform carbon dioxide to a calcium carbonate base that can be used to build, pave and even roof.”At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cattle Cop 19 mins – “On September 9th, BJ Holloway’s life savings were stolen. His 6 cows were taken in the dead of the night from his land in Spencer, Oklahoma. BJ looked everywhere for his stolen cattle. He asked his neighbors. He filed a police report. But out in Oklahoma, when cows are stolen, it’s hard to find the thief. The cows all look alike, and the evidence disappears when they’re turned into steaks. Luckily for BJ, there’s a cattle cop on his case, Jerry Flowers. Flowers is a special agent in charge of the law enforcement section for the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, and he’s determined to find the outlaws who took BJ’s cattle.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civilized Inequities 60 mins – “Karen Armstrong talks about her book, [Fields of Blood], in which she examines the intertwined relationship of faith and violence by walking through the history of every major religion, including Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism and Daoism.” At the link find the title, “After Words: Karen Armstrong,” right-click “Media files program.374970.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Solutions 47 mins – “This year’s Sense About Science lecture considered a dramatically different approach to our biggest challenge as a species: anthropogenic climate change. Guardian science editor Ian Sample and environment site editor Adam Vaughan spoke to this year’s lecturer, Professor Steve Rayner of Oxford University about his radical proposal. Also, in the final 7 minutes of the show we review the past week’s hottest science news, including The US & China reaching a landmark climate deal; Jean-Claude Juncker axing the role of European chief scientific adviser; and the future of the Philae lander on Comet 67P.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuba Embargo 51 mins – “It’s been more than 50 years since the U.S. cut ties with Cuba. The longstanding trade embargo and travel ban have increasingly been called relics of the cold war: no longer relevant in the modern day. According to some, now is the time for change, with recent economic reforms out of Havana pointing to the possibility of a more hopeful future and a productive relationship with the United States. But others say these changes do not go far enough, and that lifting the embargo would reward a regime that has caused decades of suffering. We look at the debate over lifting the U.S. embargo on Cuba, and prospects for the future of U.S.-Cuban relations.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Cystic Fibrosis 51 mins – “The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation raises about $130 million a year in its ongoing effort to help people who suffer with the deadly disease, but that amount seems small change in comparison with the $3.3 billion it just received related to an investment it made years ago in small drug development company. For a health-related nonprofit, $3.3 billion is a jaw dropping amount. It gives the foundation the means to explore all kinds of new ways to help patients and to look for a cure, but the projected per patient cost of this drug, $373,000 per year, raises concerns. Please join us to discuss new questions about venture philanthropy.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Daily Satellite Images 8 mins – “Satellite imaging has revolutionized our knowledge of the Earth, with detailed images of nearly every street corner readily available online. But Planet Labs’ Will Marshall says we can do better and go faster — by getting smaller. He introduces his tiny satellites — no bigger than 10 by 10 by 30 centimeters — that, when launched in a cluster, provide high-res images of the entire planet, updated daily.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Center Energy mins – “Computers use energy. So much energy, it’s becoming a problem. A big problem. A desktop computer uses about as much energy as fifty fluorescent light bulbs. The problem’s magnified in data centers….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Law 63 mins – “One of the enduring issues in cyberspace is which laws apply to online activities. We see this most clearly today in the reaction to revelations about government surveillance: on one hand, individuals are increasingly seeking assurances that their content is protected from government overreach, while governments want to ensure they have access to information to enforce their laws, even if that content is stored outside their borders. We see this same tension in debates over privacy protection for data placed on line by consumers. Brad Smith — Microsoft’s general counsel and executive vice president of Legal and Corporate Affairs — and Jonathan Zittrain — Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and co-founder of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society — explore the role of law in protecting our rights in the physical world online, the complementary roles of law and technology in achieving this protection, and the need for governments to come together so that companies (and customers) don’t face conflicting legal obligations.” At the link “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Photography 61 mins – “This week we talk with Robert Rodriquez, the founder of the Society of Aerial Cinematography (AKA SOAC), for a discussion about the use of Multirotors and helicopters in the the motion picture industry. Also discussed in this show are some cool new multirotor products and upcoming flying events.” At the link right-click “Direct Download: 290_Robert_Rodriguez.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Stories 50 mins – “How Ebola is affecting not just health services in West Africa, but tourism, agriculture and investment across the entire continent. Paul Moss travels to Ghana and Senegal to assess the wider impact of Ebola in Africa.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Ebola – The Impact on Africa 21 Nov 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20141121-1154a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education in NYC 51 mins – “In 2002, Mayor Michael Bloomberg won control over New York City’s public school system. In a controversial move, he appointed Joel Klein as its leader. A career lawyer, Klein found himself at the helm of what many considered a sinking ship. Over the next eight years, he implemented an aggressive series of changes aimed at increasing accountability and improving performance. He clashed with the teachers union as he took on the issues of evaluation and tenure. He closed down scores of failing schools, opened more than 100 charter schools and championed a data-driven approach to reform that spread to cities throughout the country. Joel Klein joins us to talk about what it takes to improve public education in the United States.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

ENCODE Project 19 mins – “A decade ago, the Human Genome Project revealed that only 1% of our DNA codes for the proteins that make our bodies. The rest of the genome, it was said, was junk, in other words with no function. But in September another massive international project, called ENCODE, announced that the junk DNA is useful after all. Adam Rutherford reports on the significance of this major discovery. He visits the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute outside Cambridge where the vast amount of data about our genome is produced and analysed. And he finds out how this new information is beginning to give insights into the origin and treatment of diseases, such as cancer. Adam also discovers that the study of genomes has changed dramatically since he finished his PhD: it’s now all done in machines and not at the lab bench.” At the link find the title, “Encode Project, Mon, 21 Jan 13,” right-click “Download 9MB” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ENCODE Project Impact 30 mins – Starting at the 7 min mark “Dr. Leonard Lipovich’s determination to prove genetic matter once deemed “junk” has a place in clinical medicine is bringing the Wayne State University School of Medicine to the forefront of a burgeoning field occupying genome enthusiasts in the United States, Asia and Europe. The work, on long non-coding ribonucleic acids, or lncRNAs, could lead to new therapeutics for cancer and other diseases.” Here he discussed how his work involves ENCODE and the implications. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Conversion 93 mins – “We delve into energy conversion efficiencies of solar photovoltaics, fuel cells, the Hydrogen Economy, steam and hydro-turbines and ways you can conserve energy in your home.” This is Episode 46 and reference is made to Episode 2 (135 mins), about batteries. At both link right-click “Download AAC” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Storage 86 mins – “The Age of Intelligent Storage: Distributed Systems, Smart Software and Control Systems:This discussion is a featured event of Solar One and NYC ACRE’s cleantech panel discussion series, Clean Energy Connections.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is in the blog archive.

Evidenced Based Medicine Is Crap 16 mins – “While making Episode 24, we had a little aside talking about the pitfalls of evidence based medicine.  It did not really fit in with the full episode, so here it is in all its half episode glory.  Dr. Kaminstein makes his feelings known, and we talk about those feelings.  Some great points are raised and debated regarding the art and practice of our specialty, and how EBM fits in.  What do you think?  Let us know in the comments below.” At the link find the title, “Episode 24.5: “EBM is Crap” right-click “EBM_is_CRAP.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evolution Update 52 mins – “In the century and a half since Charles Darwin wrote his seminal On the Origin of the Species, our understanding of evolution has changed quite a bit. For one, we have not only identified the inheritance molecule DNA, but have determined its sequence in many animals and plants. Evolution has evolved, and we take a look at some of the recent developments. A biologist describes the escalating horn-to-horn and tusk-to-tusk arms race between animals, and a paleoanthropologist explains why the lineage from chimp to human is no longer thought to be a straight line but, instead, a bush. Also, New York Times science writer Carl Zimmer on the diversity of bacteria living on you, and which evolutionary concepts he finds the trickiest to explain to the public.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Favela Art 11 mins – “Artists Jeroen Koolhaas and Dre Urhahn create community art by painting entire neighborhoods, and involving those who live there — from the favelas of Rio to the streets of North Philadelphia. What’s made their projects succeed? In this funny and inspiring talk, the artists explain their art-first approach — and the importance of a neighborhood barbecue.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Film Production 45 mins – “It’s a century-old pursuit: Book authors hoping to make it big in the movie business. The explosion of video on the Web now lets authors introduce books and concepts to agents, producers and directors more quickly and easily than ever before. Newly-formed Bookstofilm.tv knows what Hollywood wants because it lives there. As company founder Rocky Lang explains, “in today’s post-MTV generation, people are looking for immediate gratification, [something] that stimulates their fantasies of the characters and the development of the project.”

Gridlock History 52 mins – “On this episode of BackStory, Brian, Ed, and Peter take an in-depth look at stalemate in American history. Are there other times when the system has so routinely ground to a halt? Is compromise the main way of ending legislative standoffs, or does accommodation just tend to kick the day of reckoning further down the road? And if deadlocks are endemic to national politics, could they actually have a silver lining?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the soundbar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Work in Europe (3 parts) 268 mins – “…The event concludes an MPI-ILO research project, funded by the European Commission, that examines employment prospects of foreign-born workers and the effectiveness of integration and workforce development policies in helping foreign-born workers overcome barriers and move up into middle-skilled positions in six case study countries: the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Read reports from the series here.” At the link right-click “Download” for each part and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infographics 53 mins – Leo Laporte interviews Gareth Cook, a Pulitzer Prize-winning magazine journalist, a contributor to NewYorker.com, and the series editor of “The Best American Infographics.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journal of Visualized Experiments 4 mins – “…For the most part, scientists are hard-working, ethical people. They come to science to solve big problems. What is happening there is the deficiency of the medium,” Pritsker said. “And text doesn’t work for effective knowledge transfer. It doesn’t even work for cooking, right?” Pritsker thinks of it this way: Someone asks you to write down the step-by-step recipe for a dish you’ve made a million times. It’s second nature to you, and so chances are you might forget a pinch of this or dash of that. It’s pretty much the same for a scientist who may have been working on an experiment for years. When it comes time to write it all down, he might forget, or misinterpret a few steps. So Pritsker, now out of Princeton, thought of a way to make sure those second nature details don’t get lost: He started the “Journal of Visualized Experiments,” or JOVE, a peer-reviewed video journal.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Keystone Pipeline 51 mins – “It’s been six years since TransCanada Corp. applied for a permit to build the Keystone XL pipeline, which would transport oil from Alberta, Canada to the Gulf States. So far, President Barack Obama has not approved the pipeline, citing environmental concerns. But following the recent midterm elections, the pipeline is back in the spotlight. Last week, the House of Representatives voted again to approve Keystone. And last night, the Senate came within one vote of passing a similar bill offered by embattled Louisiana Sen. Mary Landrieu. Diane and [3] guests discuss the political showdown over the Keystone XL pipeline and where it goes from here.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Like a Glove 1 min – “A product launched at the Demo Conference in Silicon Valley consists of snug fitting garments with sensors that precisely measure your body to help you get the right size clothes when you shop on-line.” It’s called Like A Glove. At the link you can download the file, dated 20 Nov 2014, but the content is the same.

London Mayor on Churchill 28 mins – “What is Boris Johnson? A better question might be: what isn’t Boris Johnson? He is, inter alia, the Mayor of London; a prolific author, journalist and, as of this month, a biographer of Winston Churchill; a once and possibly future Member of Parliament; a potential future Prime Minister himself despite being a “self-styled joke” who occasionally gets stuck on a zip-line; an American by birth (and U.S. passport holder)….” At the link find the title, “The Man Who Would Be Everything,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Movements 15 mins – “We can see the power of distributed, crowd-sourced business models every day — witness Uber, Kickstarter, Airbnb. But veteran online activist Jeremy Heimans asks: When does that kind of “new power” start to work in politics? His surprising answer: Sooner than you think. It’s a bold argument about the future of politics and power; watch [or listen]and see if you agree.” At the link clidk “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio”9or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical BS 28 mins – “Accurate jargon is a staple on medical dramas like The Night Shift because it gives a sense of gripping realism. But it can also come across as earnest and boring. While he might be a medical malpractice suit waiting to happen, Dr. Nick Riviera of The Simpsons can’t be accused of being dull or earnest. That take on medicine is funny because like all satire, there a kernel of truth in it.  And the truth about medical culture is that doctors don’t always have all the answers.  Just like their fake TV counterparts, sometimes they serve up what can only be called  “doctor BS.”  This week on White Coat, Black Art, a crash course on ‘BS’ — hospital-style.  Much of the bluff and bluster from doctors is self-serving but does it serve a greater purpose? Two of our favourite guests, Dr. Zubin Damania aka ZDoggMD and Dr. Erin Sullivan talk about how the patients who always expect an answer might end up getting a shot of BS.” At the link find the title, “Doctor BS Podcast,” right-click “Download Doctor BS Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Literature 21 mins – “In Episode 24, EM Res vets Drs. Kaminstein and Kochert return with Dr. Becker to talk about how residents should approach reading medical research articles.  Do you need to read everything?  What should you read?  How do you do it?  All this and more in the first of a series on reading original research for residents.” At the link find the title, “Episode 24: What do I read, and how do I do it?” right-click “Journal_reading_podcast_final.m4a” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Menieres Disease 17 mins – “A clinical review on the bmj.com looks at Meniere’s disease. Corine from The Netherlands discusses her experience of having the disease and explains how the symptoms of vertigo and tinnitus have affected her everyday life. She also offers her top tips on coping with the disease to others with the condition. “Menieres disease – a patient perspective,” right-click “Media files 176708033-bmjgroup-menieres-disease-patient.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mission Pilot 87 mins – “When we watch movies and television the life of a bush pilot seems glorious. I envision a bush pilot swooping down from the heavens above to provide emergency medical supplies to a sick child. Later that day we slowly climb above the bright green canopy of trees to a burnt orange sunset smiling from ear to ear as we glide towards our next adventure. Well I am sure there are many days like these flying as a mission pilot in the bush but there are also many challenges. Today I have with me someone who can help us understand what it is really like to be a bush pilot because he lives it every day. Brian Pottinger is a mission pilot flying in the mountains and jungles of Papua, Indonesia. Today he will give us the real story behind being a bush flying as a mission pilot.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mushroom Poisoning 50 mins – “In this episode we talk about the spectrum of mushroom po isoning from Amanita to magic mushrooms. Contributors include Matthew Zuckerman and the UMass Toxicology team Kavita Babu, Katie Boyle, Lynn Farrugia, Stephanie Carreiro, Peter Chai, and Viral Patel along with Mark Neavyn. Mushroom pictures are available here [a pdf].” Audio quality is poor, but content useful. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Net Neutrality Wiki 29 mins – “Law Professor Tim Wu, who coined the phrase “net neutrality,” talks about technology issues and the debate over how to manage the internet. He also discusses his views on President Obama’s recent call for Title II regulation of the internet.” At the link find the title, “The Communicators: Tim Wu,” right-click “Media files program.375757.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nonie Darwish 60 mins – “Author and activist Nonie Darwish, founder and president of Former Muslims United and Arabs for Israel, discusses growing up in Egypt and Gaza, her father’s death at the hands of Israelis, life under Sharia law, and why she’s broken with Islam.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Nonie Darwish,” right-click “Media files program.372075.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obama Foreign Policy 55 mins – “Is American foreign policy making the world a more dangerous place? That’s the question participants discuss in the most recent Munk Debates. On the “yes” side: Bret Step hens and Robert Kagan. On the “no” side: Fareed Zakaria and Anne-Marie Slaughter.” At the link find the title, “The Munk Debates: A More Dangerous Place?” right-click “Download The Munk Debates: A More Dangerous Place?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Access Journals 59 mins – “While Open Access is helping mission-driven publishing societies to disseminate knowledge, it is also causing them to re-evaluate their financial business models. On Tuesday, October 21, Deni Auclair, Vice President & Lead Analyst, Outsell Inc.; Esmeralda Galán Buchanan, Journals Director, American Cancer Society; Rachel Burley, Vice President & Director of Open Access, John Wiley & Sons; Philip Wright, Chief Executive, The Physiological Society offered an audience of society publishers and editorial staff their “real world” case studies for launching successful Open Access journals. The program was co-sponsored by CCC and Wiley. With CCC’s Chris Kenneally moderating, the panel shared insights, challenges and solutions for Open Access across a spectrum of society publishing programs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pirates of West Africa 50 mins – “There are now more pirate attacks in the Gulf of Guinea than off the coast of Somalia – once considered the global ‘piracy hotspot’. The BBC’s Mary Harper travels to Lagos, one of the busiest ports in Africa, to explore the highly complex world of piracy.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Chasing West Africa’s Pirates,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20141115-1905a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productivity 51 mins – “Advice on how to increase personal productivity is everywhere. We can download apps with algorithms to help with time management, read articles about how to avoid distractions at the office, and watch YouTube videos on the most efficient way to organize email. The latest trends come from pressure to get more done with less time and from a modern management theory that gives workers more control over how they do their jobs. While many Americans think of productivity as a virtue, others question its increasing dominance in our personal and professional lives. Diane and her [3] guests discuss the pressure to be productive.” t the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Psilocybin and Mescaline 8 mins – “Simon Cotton explores our hallucinogenic horizons with psilocybin and mescaline.” At the link find the title, “Psilocybin & Mescaline: Chemistry in its element,” right-click “CIIE_Psilocybin.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Responsive City 15 mins – “Susan Crawford, author of Captive Audience and now co-author of The Responsive City: Engaging Communities Through Data-Smart Governance joins us for Community Broadband Bits #125. We discuss the idea of a Responsive City. Susan contrasts her visions of a Responsive City with more traditional notions of a “smart” city and notes that having fiber throughout a community is a necessary base. We discuss a few of the examples from the book that discuss how local governments are being transformed and how we would like to see them continue to transform in coming decades….” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3 directly…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Secret Service Hearing 102 mins – “Joseph Clancy, the acting director of the U.S. Secret Service, testifies before the House Judiciary Committee as it holds a hearing focused on oversight of the agency responsible for security of the president.” At the link find the title, “Hearing on Secret Service Oversight,” right-click “Media files program.376447.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sneakers 16 mins – “Nike is a smart multi-billion dollar company, but some sneaker fans have figured out how they can get a better price for Nike sneakers than Nike can. Some pairs trade like stocks — selling for double, quadruple, 12 times their retail price after they leave the store. Even used sneakers. Josh Luber, of sneakerhead data company, estimates that Nike let resellers walk away with 230 million dollars in profits last year — that’s money that did not go to Nike. Today on the show, why would a multi-billion dollar company give up its profits to some scrappy guys on the street?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taliban Hunting in Pakistan 28 mins – “Mobeen Azhar is in Karachi, Pakistan’s biggest city, where police are fighting an increasingly desperate war against the Taliban. Every day an officer is killed in the struggle.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Hunting The Taliban – 20 Nov 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20141120-0230a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virunga 46 mins – “’Virunga’ is an astonishing new documentary about corruption, compassion, and the imperiled gorillas and people of the Congo. The film is named after a national park in the Congo, where some of the world’s last mountain gorillas live. It’s the story of an oil company and local rebels trying to control their land and fearless Congolese park rangers, an intrepid investigative journalist and soft-spoken Belgian warden fighting to protect it. This hour on point, “Virunga” and the gorillas of the Congo.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Windmills 4 mins – “The problem of pointing windmills into the wind is a century old. Medieval mills had a long strut that let millers turn the whole fan structure on a central post as the wind shifted. Mid-18th-century British engineers invented a secondary fan blade, rather like the control propeller on a helicopter tail. It was set perpendicular to the main fan. When it turned it drove a mechanism that turned the mill until it faced straight into the wind….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 4700 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 21+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 158 – 21 Nov 2014: Artificial Blood, Boarder Closing, Booker T. Washington, Brain Mapping, Bus Theft, Car Safety, Climate Change Impact, Computational Biology, Counterfeit Detection, Critical Thinking, Dark Web, Design Thinking, Drug and Cancer Research, Dying, Ebola Wiki, Engineer Education, Epilepsy, Harold Warp’s Museum, Human Extinction, Immigration Resistance, Internet Openness, Jobs Act, Martin Luther King, Military Mental Health, Pacific Rim, Palliative Care, Proton Therapy, PTSD Fix, Public Speaking, Reconciliation Limits, Seven Years War, Spice Incubator Kitchens,Teenage Alcohlic, Text Book Arbitrage, Virus Researcher, War Failure, Wolfram Alpha, X-ray Crystallography

The following audio files come from a larger group of 201 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 62 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Artificial Blood 2 mins – “You’ve probably given blood at least once in your life because of the ongoing need for it. But blood has to be refrigerated and checked for infectious diseases. Getting it to sites of natural disasters, war zones, and impoverished rural locations is challenging. So, for eighty years, scientists have striven to develop an artificial blood substitute and one group is getting close.” At the link under the title, “Artificial Blood” right-click “MP3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boarder Closing 16 mins – “In west Africa right now, there are two kinds of countries: Those that have Ebola and those that do not. Liberia for instance, has reported more than 6,000 cases of Ebola and 2,697 people have died. Right next door, in the country of Ivory Coast, there have been zero cases. Zero. Ivory Coast would desperately like to stay in that zero category. The solution that Ivory Coast has come up with to stay Ebola free is simple. Ivory Coast will shut down its border. It will stop trade with Liberia, stop commerce and stop people from coming in… Today on the show, we go to a tiny tiny town on the border between Ivory Coast and Liberia. On one side of the line, Ebola is raging. The other side is Ebola-free so far. We ask: How do you close a border? And can you really?” At the link find the title, “#582: Guarding The Secret Path,” right-click “npr_363635338.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Booker T. Washington 79 mins – “Chester Fontenot talked about the life and legacy of Booker T. Washington. Professor Fontenot spoke about Mr. Washington’s early years at Tuskegee University and looks at his ideological platform which encouraged African Americans to establish their own economic base. While Booker T. Washington helped create many institutions for African Americans, such as the National Negro Business League, he also had opposition to his ideas, both during his lifetime and since. Fontenot also compared the ideas and tactics of Booker T. Washington and Martin Luther King, Jr.” At the link open “Lectures in History,” right-click “Life and Legacy of Booker T. Washington” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Mapping 6 mins – “One of the great mysteries of the human body is the awesome ability of the brain. Some say there are more connections in a human brain than stars in our galaxy. We are talking about 100 billion neurons. Brain research is one of the great frontiers of scientific endeavour. And the race is on. A greater understanding of the brain could allow us to combat debilitating diseases such as dementia and psychosis, as well as unlocking unimagined potential. As a major conference on brain mapping gets underway in Brisbane, Katie Silver reports.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bus Theft 17 mins – “Ira recounts the story of William Cimillo, a New York bus driver who snapped one day, left his regular route, and drove his municipal bus down to Florida.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Car Safety 47 mins – “Airbags that project shrapnel. Ignition switches that switch off on their own. Unintended acceleration. Millions of cars on American roads affected by recall notices that just keep on coming. What’s wrong with how automobiles are made? What’s wrong with how government regulates the industry? Are cars really becoming less safe? Is your confidence shaken? We’ll hear from a leading journalist covering the industry, a crusader for safety improvements, and an auto industry executive. This hour, On Point: An iconic American industry under the microscope.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Impact 60 mins – “What is climate change? It is not an event. It is a complete change of context in which events take place… Today we’re going into the humanities, to ask scholar David A. Collings “What does it mean?” Collings has written about romanticism, poetry, and “monstrous society”. David is a Professor of English at Bowdoin College in Maine. Now he’s turned to the largest news of this or any generation: human disruption of the climate. His new book is titled “Stolen Future, Broken Present: The Human Significance of Climate Change.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computational Biology 19 mins – John Quackenbush, Ph.D., Professor, Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Cancer Biology Center for Cancer Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, discusses the impact and benefits of a current growing deluge of research data. At the link right-click “Harnessing the Data Deluge for Systems Biology” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Completion of a registration form may be required.

Counterfeit Detection 3 mins – “New color shifting ink inspired by a [Longhorn] beetle could help thwart counterfeiting.” At the link find the title, “Episode 438 – November 12 2014,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements_Nov12_2014.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Critical Thinking 52 mins – “Nuclear fission powers the Sun. Or is it fusion? At any rate, helium is burned in the process, of that you are certain. After all, you read that article on astronomy last week*. You know what you know. But you probably don’t know what you don’t know. Few of us do. Scientists say we’re spectacularly incompetent at recognizing our own incompetency, and that sometimes leads to trouble. Find out why wrongness is the by-product of big brains and why even scientists – gasp! – are not immune. Plus, a peek into the trash bin of history: the biggest scientific blunders and the brighter-than-bright brains that made them. Including Einstein. *Oh, and the Sun burns hydrogen to produce helium. But then, you knew that.” At the link right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dark Web 5 mins – “You’ll rarely hear anything about the “dark web,” that space on the Internet where average people tend not to visit — or even know about. That is, unless you’re in the market for illegal or dangerous stuff: drugs, child pornography, weapons.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right-end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Design Thinking 40 mins – “As founder of IDEO, David Kelley built the company that created many icons of the digital generation—the first mouse for Apple, the first Treo, the thumbs up/thumbs down button on your Tivo’s remote control, to name a few. But what matters even more to him is unlocking the creative potential of people and organizations so they can innovate routinely. David’s most enduring contributions to the field of design are a human-centered methodology and culture of innovation. More recently, he led the creation of the groundbreaking d.school at Stanford, the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design. Kelley was working (unhappily) as an electrical engineer when he first heard about Stanford’s cross-disciplinary Joint Program in Design, which merged engineering and art. What he learned there—a human-centered, team-based approach to tackling sticky problems through design—propelled his professional life as a “design thinker.’” At the link find the title, “Uncommon Knowledge with David Kelley on creativity, innovation, and design,” right-click “Media files 20141112.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug and Cancer Research 9 mins – “An-Dinh Nguyen interviews Avi Ma’ayan of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai on February 20, 2014. Dr. Ma’ayan will be a featured speaker during the shared session for the Systems Pharmacology and Cancer Informatics meetings at Bio-IT World Conference & Expo 2014, April 29-May 1 in Boston, MA. Topics include the emergence of systems biology in drug research, promising datasets that can accelerate drug discovery and personalized medicine, methods for extracting knowledge from data, the potential research impact of systems pharmacology and more.” At the link click “Download,” then “OK” on the pop-up menu to download the file.

Dying 24 mins – “Surgeon, writer, and researcher, Atul Gawande is best known for the development of surgical checklists, but the death of his father has inspired him to write his latest book exploring medical and societal attitudes to death. We joined him for breakfast during his whistle stop tour of the UK recording this year’s BBC Reith Lectures….” At the link find the title, “Atul Gawande – It’s about having a good life not a good death,” right-click “Media files 175772097-bmjgroup-atul-gawande-good-life-not-good-death.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Wiki 60 mins – “This week, we’re talking about Ebola: how it works, how it spreads, and how we’re trying to stop it. We’ll talk to infectious disease epidemiologist, professor and blogger Tara C. Smith about how Ebola is being handled here in North America, and perceptions surrounding the Ebola outbreak. We’ll also speak with physician Dr. Tim Jagatic from Doctors Without Borders Canada and discuss the situation on the ground in Africa, and we’ll speak to immunology professor Vincent Racaniello about the race to create an Ebola vaccine.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineer Education 87 mins – “We talk with Gary Bertoline about graphics communication, computer-aided design, credentials, and competency-based degree programs in this episode of The Engineering Commons.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Epilepsy 54 mins – “In recognition of November as national Epilepsy Awareness month, Joyce welcomes Peggy Beem-Jelley, CEO of the Epilepsy Foundation of Western/Central PA. Ms. Beem-Jelley will discuss the mission of this organization and the programs and services it has in place to foster greater awareness of epilepsy.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Harold Warp’s Museum 4 mins – “Pioneer Village in Minden, Nebraska, violates all the rules. Pioneer Village celebrates American progress. It’s a huge collection of the domestic technology that’s transformed us. Twenty acres of washing machines, chuck wagons, barbed wire, telephones, windmills, bicycles — 350 old cars, 100 old tractors! “Everything used by the average person since 1830,” the signs tell us. Why 1830? The signs hint that, after 1830, we left thousands of years of static life and began to progress into the modern age…Pioneer Village was built by Harold Warp. Warp, a Nebraska farm boy, developed a new kind of plastic window for chicken coops during WW-I. He called it Flex-O-glass. During WW-II he created a whole array of plastic products for home and farm use. Then, in 1948, he heard that his old one-room schoolhouse was for sale. He bought it, says Schwartz. Out of that grew the museum….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Extinction 60 mins – “This week, we’re looking at the ways that people are changing the planet, and the consequences for all of us if we don’t start doing it responsibly. We’re joined by Fred Guterl, Executive Editor at Scientific American, to discuss his book The Fate of the Species: Why the Human Race May Cause Its Own Extinction and How We Can Stop It. From climate change to superbugs, we’ll talk about the ways humanity could take itself out, and how (or if) we can stop it before it’s too late. And we’ll talk to John Cook, creator of Skeptical Science, about the political arguments over climate change.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Resistance 70 mins – “Professor Edward O’Donnell talked about the pejudice many immigrants faced in the 19th century with regard to religion, customs, and social status. This was from a course titled the “Irish American Experience.’” At the link open “Lectures in History,” right-click “Discussion on 19th Century Anti-Immigration Movements” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Openness 29 mins – “Law professor Christopher Yoo talked about the debate over how to ensure an open Internet. In January 2014, a federal appeals court ruled the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) rules governing the internet were not legal. Professor Yoo was asked by the FCC to participate in roundtables addressing the subject.” At the link open “The Communicators” section, right-click “The Communicators: Christopher Yoo“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jobs Act 30 mins – “A series about what happens when someone who knows nothing about business starts one. With Alex Blumberg from This American Life & Planet Money.” Much of the discussion centers on the Jobs Act and its impact on innovation since passing in 2012. Forbes Magazine in its Nov 2014 issue reports 242,000 innovative jobs have appeared in the last 10 years as part of an accelerating trend typified by WeWork. [Also see Spice Incubator Kitchens topic.] At the link find the title, “#7 How Listeners Become Owners, November 10, 2014” and right-click “Media files 176185715-hearstartup-how-listeners-become-owners.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martin Luther King 59 mins – “Tavis Smiley talked about his book, Death of a King: the Real Story of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Final Year, about the final year of the civil rights leader’s life.” At the link open the “Q&A” section, right-click “Q&A: Tavis Smiley” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Mental Health 48 mins – “It’s Veterans’ Day — when we honor those who’ve served our country in the Armed Forces. But the meaning of the observance is changing as we move further away from the era of universal military service. The small number of soldiers we depend on bears larger and larger burdens — not just in combat, but afterward through debilitating post-traumatic stress that has provoked a rising number of suicides. We’ll talk to a general who lost two sons, an author and two veterans-turned-Congressmen about what we can do. This hour, On Point: helping veterans overcome PTSD.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pacific Rim 8 mins – “The Pacific Age: Under American leadership the Pacific has become the engine room of world trade. But the balance of power is shifting, writes Henry Tricks.” At the link find the title, “Special report: The Pacific,” right-click “Media files 20141311_pacific_sr_aa.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Palliative Care 69 mins – “Becky Liddicoat Yamarik, Hospice Palliative Care Physician, talks to EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the joys and challenges of providing care for terminally ill patients. The two discuss the services palliative care provides, how patients make choices about quality of life and when to stop receiving treatment, conflicts of interest between patients and families, and patients’ preparedness to make these decisions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Proton Therapy 29 mins – “Keith is once again on location in Houston, Texas, at the MD Anderson Cancer Treatment Center Proton Therapy Center, and he talks with clinical physicist Michael Gillin. Gillin explains why protons, and not other elementary particles, are used in this treatment…and why proton therapy harms less healthy tissue than standard radiation treatment for cancer.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PTSD Fix 52 mins – “ When Larry Cesspooch returned from the Vietnam War, his family told him to “go into the Sundance and wipe yourself off.” Cesspooch is a member of the Ute Indian Tribe, and cleansing ceremonies are a deep part of Native American warrior traditions. Now, with suicides accounting for more US military deaths than combat, people are looking for ways to deal with the horrors of PTSD. Monday, director Taki Telonidis joins us to talk about a new film that explores how these traditions could help our veterans. Healing the Warrior’s Heart was produced by The Western Folklife Center in collaboration with Gary Robinson of Tribal Eye Productions and KUED Channel 7.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Speaking 39 mins – “Christine Clapp – Back by popular demand, more than a year later, we are talking with our favorite communications expert – Christine Clapp. In this episode we cover crucial topics such as the most common mistakes amateur speakers/presenters make, the most powerful ways to persuade others through communication, the 5 steps of Monroe’s motivated sequence, and the best system for speaking off the cuff. Christine covers all of these topics and many more in great detail in her brand new book, Presenting at Work: A Guide to Public Speaking in Professional Contexts.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reconciliation Limits 54 mins – “Twenty-five years ago this November, East and West Berliners began chipping away at the iconic wall that had kept them apart for three decades, and symbolized the deep divisions that the Cold War had inflicted on the world at large. As this piece of history crumbled, the Western press was almost euphoric: Freedom, we were told, had triumphed over political repression and cultural imprisonment. But the fall of the Berlin Wall also set in motion a long and difficult process of reconciliation among German citizens. And, indeed, of reconciling the First and Second Worlds — a process still fraught with tension and uncertainty. On this episode, the Guys dig up buried hatchets to help us explore some of our own best and worst efforts at making amends. How have Americans tried to restore ties and move beyond strain and strife? When does it work? And what are the limits of reconciliation?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seven Years War 4 mins – “Today, the last naval battle of The Seven Years War…To the north of Canada’s Gaspé Peninsula is the St. Lawrence Seaway, the old Northwest Passage to the Great Lakes region, the route used by French explorers and settlers since the early 16th century. To the south is the smaller Restigouche River. When The Seven Years War began, in 1756, the Restigouche valley was home to some French Acadian settlements, but it primarily remained part of the Mi’kmaq Indian nation. We in America call that war, The French and Indian War, but it was a much larger conflict — a worldwide political realignment that touched all Europe as well as America. In North America, it was the British against the French and their Native American allies over control of Canada as well as much of what would later be part of the US.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spice Incubator Kitchens 2 mins – “Organizers of the Spice Kitchen Incubator, a program which helps refugees start their own businesses, unveiled their new kitchen space in Salt Lake City yesterday. Natalie El-Deiry is the department director at the International Rescue Committee and oversees the Spice Kitchen Incubator project. She says her organization had received a growing number of requests from the refugee community for help establishing food businesses. After training entrepreneurs in non-permanent spaces across the city, El-Deiry said she’s excited to see the program finally have a space of its own…” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teenage Alcoholic 22 mins – “Tina Dupuy was a teenage alcoholic. She joined Alcoholics Anonymous at the age of 12, got sober by 13. And she learned to tell the hell out of her story at speaking events. She even became “AA Famous.” But at the age of 33, she had a sudden realization that made her question the very story she was famous for.”

Text Book Arbitrage 14 mins – “There’s a term in economics, arbitrage, that basically means free money. It’s finding a difference in price, a pricing mistake, you can exploit to make money. Arbitrage is a risk-free way to buy low and sell high. Every day there are loads of people and sophisticated computer algorithms searching for an arbitrage opportunity, but true arbitrages are almost impossible to find. Today on the show, we meet two guys who say they’ve found one, and we visit the storage locker in Utah where they keep their secret.” At the link find the title, “#581: Free Money,” right-click “npr_362312467.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Researcher 59 mins – “Vincent Racaniello and Glenn Rall meet up with Ann Skalka and talk about her long and productive career in virology, from biochemistry to bacteriophage lambda to retroviruses.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 310” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Failure 47 mins – “America has been at war ever since 9/11 – thirteen years and counting, longer than World Wars I and II combined. American soldiers are returning to Iraq to fight the Islamic State after it appeared they had left for good. Will we also have to reverse course in Afghanistan, where soldiers are scheduled to depart by year-end? Are we winning, losing or something in between? Or have we already lost? That’s the argument in a new book from a retired three-star general – who accepts personal responsibility for the outcome. This hour, On Point: taking stock of our Global War on Terrorism.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wolfram Alpha 18 mins – Stephan Wolfram discusses the application of information technology to biology. Reference made to an April conference concerns a 2015 event. At the link right-click “Making the World’s Knowledge Computable,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Completion of a registration form may be required.

X-ray Crystallography 10 mins – “X-ray crystallography allows the structure and shape of small but highly complex molecules such as proteins, viruses or insulin to be determined. It is a complicated and labour-intensive technique sometimes taking years of patient work to produce a usable crystal. The idea was pioneered by William and Lawrence Bragg who won the Nobel Prize in 1915. Elspeth Garman describes some of the technological advances which have allowed X-ray crystallography to revolutionise biology.”  Several mentions of this link are made for a video describing the process. At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

================================================================

ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 4700 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 21+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 157 – 14 Nov 2014: Adolescence, Affordable Care Act Status, Africa Leadership, Black and Latino Coalitions, Chevron Loses, Childhood Development, Chinese Bloggers, Climate Change, Climate Issues, Creative Commons, Displaced People, European Economy, Fig Man, Food Ignorance, Food Science, Jefferson Davis, Jury Duty, Kid Paralysis, Lie Detection, Lincoln and the Press, Lost Innocence, M.D. vs D.O., Mars Rover History, Mushrooms, Music Future, National Business Aviation Assoc Convention, Noodles Worldwide, Ocean Garbage, Online Medical Resources, Palliative Medicine, Personal Empowerment, Peter Paul and Mary, Rape Kit Backlog, Robot Gardener, Science Books, Sleep Deprivation, Snap Judgement, Street Harassment, Water Supply

The following audio files come from a larger group of 203 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 42 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Adolescence 27 mins – “…whether we like it or not, adolescence was the time when our brains were at the peak of their malleability and the time when we made some of our strongest memories. On this episode, Temple University Professor of Psychology Laurence Steinberg discussed the neuroscience of adolescence and how the brain changes during this formative time. He’ll also tell us how adolescence has lengthened over time and why that’s not necessarily a bad thing.” At the link right-click “Listen to episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Affordable Care Act Status 51 mins – “It’s been more than a year since the rocky rollout of the Affordable Care Act and the number of uninsured Americans has fallen about 25 percent. But those numbers are just one part of the story. The law has raised a host of concerns from changing premiums to difficulties finding a doctor.,,Joining me to talk about how the Affordable Care Act is performing so far, Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Ceci Connolly of PWC’s Health Research Institute and Margot Sanger-Katz of the New York Times….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Africa Leadership 13 mins – “Before he hit eighteen, Fred Swaniker had lived in Ghana, Gambia, Botswana and Zimbabwe. What he learned from a childhood across Africa was that while good leaders can’t make much of a difference in societies with strong institutions, in countries with weak structures, leaders could make or break a country. In a passionate talk the entrepreneur and TED Fellow looks at different generations of African leaders and imagines how to develop the leadership of the future.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black and Latino Coalitions 54 mins – “This week we have a panel discussion presented by the Boston University African American Studies Program, titled “Black and Latino Coalitions from the 1960s to Today.” Our speakers are: Babson College Professor of History and Foodways, Frederick Douglass Opie; and Boston Chief of Health and Human Services, Felix Arroyo.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chevron Loses 25 mins – “…In the small city of Richmond, California, a slate of progressive candidates faced off against a challenge from pro-business candidates backed to the tune of more than $3 million by the energy giant Chevron. For years, Chevron has treated Richmond like a company town and its large refinery there has been a constant source of health and safety concerns… This year, Chevron fought back with an expensive barrage of negative campaign media. But on Election Day, the progressive slate triumphed, despite the roughly $250 per vote Chevron spent.” At the link find the title, “Full Show: Facing Down Corporate Election Greed,” right-click “Media files Moyers_and_Company_344_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childhood Development 37 mins – “Integrating nutrition and early childhood development interventions may amplify the benefits of both for the world’s underprivileged children. Almost a quarter of children under the age of five do not reach their full developmental potential as a result of chronic undernutrition, a lack of developmental and educational opportunities, and high social and environmental risks. Children everywhere need access to healthy food to develop their bodies and stimulating activities to develop their minds. Traditionally, these needs have been addressed separately, but would they both be more effective if combined into a single effort? Experts from around the world gather at the headquarters of UNICEF to discuss.” At the link find the title, “Nutrition and Early Childhood Development, June 26, 2014,” right-click “NutritionandECD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Bloggers 47 mins – “A Chinese blogger whose harsh anti-American essays have a huge following in China just got a big embrace from China’s top leadership.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change 46 mins – “UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon sent the world a double-edged message on Sunday: When it comes to climate change, “Time is not on our side.” We only have around thirty years to fix the way we live and do business. But he also said we can do it. “All we need is the will to change.” While, there’s plenty of despair all round, There are men and women –scientists, sociologists, politicians—who work daily to map out solutions–basically, to map out the planet’s salvation. What now? Where do we go from here?” At the link right-click “Listen to this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Issues 60 mins – “SUMMARY: Super-scientist Mark Jacobson from Stanford explains soot-causing warming + a way to run the world on clean energy by 2030. We visit an Ultra-Mega coal power plant in India. Manzoor Qadir on the farm soil loss larger than France since 1990.” At the link right-click “lo-fi” where it says, “Download or listen ..” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creative Commons 55 mins – “…As funders roll out mandates globally for Open Access archiving of public research, scholarly societies have a responsibility to understand the OA licensing options mean. No two licenses are the same. The one you choose should respect your author’s wishes and protect your journal’s future. While scientists have shared access to networked archives since the 1970s, open access, as we understand it today, has only recently become a force remaking scholarly publishing. For publishers and societies, the OA movement is a direct challenge to longstanding business models of paid subscriptions. So-called article processing charges, however, have emerged as one leading way for publishers to recover the costs of publishing. Society publishers, particularly, have watched all these developments keenly. In the new environment, there are many questions related to copyright and licensing. What are the pros and cons of different OA licenses? What options should you give your authors? At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Displaced People 18 mins – “50 million people in the world today have been forcefully displaced from their home — a level not seen since WWII. Right now, more than 3 million Syrian refugees are seeking shelter in neighboring countries. In Lebanon, half of these refugees are children; only 20% are in school. Melissa Fleming of the UN’s refugee agency calls on all of us to make sure that refugee camps are healing places where people can develop the skills they’ll need to rebuild their hometowns.” At the link right-click “Download” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

European Economy 51 mins – “By most accounts, Europe’s economic situation is bleak. While fears of a euro break-up are past, price and wage deflation are a growing concern. And as Europe faces a possible third recession since 2008, the renewed downturn is dragging on global markets. Economic stagnation is also feeding nationalism across the continent. In Britain, Prime Minister David Cameron is confronting growing pressure to cap immigration. But German Chancellor Angela Merkel warns that limiting immigrants from other European Union countries would be a “point of no return” that could increase the risk of Britain leaving the Union.” [4 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Fig Man – 35 mins – “We are joined by Lloyd Kreizter, also known as the fig man. Lloyd has been a fig hobbyist and germplasm collector for many years in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area. Today, Lloyd joins us to talk about the history and origins of the fig, the adaptability and variability of the fig, and the light and passion the fig inspires in him and others.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Ignorance 22 mins – “Sharing powerful stories from his anti-obesity project in Huntington, West Virginia — and a shocking image of the sugar we eat — TED Prize winner Jamie Oliver makes the case for an all-out assault on our ignorance of food.” At the link you can only download video by clicking “Download” and then right-clicking “Video” to get the file.

Food Science 25 mins – “Food author Harold McGee reveals the chemistry of cooking and what is it like to work with Heston Bluementhal. And finally we find out why James Bond prefers his Martini shaken, not stirred.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jefferson Davis 59 mins – “James McPherson talked about his book, Embattled Rebel: Jefferson Davis as Commander in Chief, in which he presents Confederate president Jefferson Davis as an astute military strategist who best articulated the South’s “quest for an independent nation.” In his book, the author argues that the though the Confederacy lost the war, the loss was not due to the failures of Jefferson Davis. He spoke with Abraham Lincoln expert James Swanson.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Jury Duty  51 mins – “Jury duty is a key element of the American justice system. But absenteeism is a growing problem. In our nation’s capital, only 20 percent of those summoned actually show up to serve. And that trend spans much of the nation. Some courts have enacted strict punishments, from fines to jail time. Others say the answer is better education about jury service and how it benefits not just our legal system, but the individual serving. Studies show that political engagement can actually rise for people who deliberate on a jury, and satisfaction with our courts may increase as well. But for many Americans, a jury summons still represents a burden. Join us to discuss jury duty in America today and how some say it can be improved.” [4 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Kid Paralysis 21 mins – “More than a hundred children in the US — and at least six in Canada — have developed a mysterious form of paralysis. Health officials are trying to determine if it could be related to Enterovirus D68 which has hospitalized hundreds of kids in North America.” At the link find the title, “White Coat Mini Podcast – Mystery Paralysis and Makayla`s Choice Reaction,” right-click “Download White Coat Mini Podcast – Mystery Paralysis and Makayla`s Choice Reaction” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lie Detection 19 mins – “On any given day we’re lied to from 10 to 200 times, and the clues to detect those lie can be subtle and counter-intuitive. Pamela Meyer, author of Liespotting, shows the manners and “hotspots” used by those trained to recognize deception — and she argues honesty is a value worth preserving.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lincoln and the Press 59 mins – “Harold Holzer talked about his book, Lincoln and the Power of the Press: The War for Public Opinion, in which he examines Abraham Lincoln’s relationships with the press. He talked about Lincoln’s strong-armed tactics with newspaper owners, using their power to steer issues such as slavery, union, and his own political career. He also talked about Lincoln’s authorization of some of the most widespread censorship in the nation’s history, as he closed down “disloyal” papers, jailed their editors, and took over the nation’s use of the telegraph.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Harold Holzer, November 02, 2014,” right-click “Media files program.367891.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lost Innocence P4 54 mins – “World War Two drew everyone into its aura of excitement, danger and drama. For teenagers, it was a special time to be growing up — the war set the stage of magical beginnings of innocent relationships, infatuations, and love.” At the link find the title, “Lost Innocence, Part 4 – Like There Was No Tomorrow,” right-click “Download Lost Innocence, Part 4 – Like There Was No Tomorrow” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

M.D. vs D.O. 44 mins – “Neal started as a minister, now he’s a medical student. Listen to his journey, why he decided to change careers, how he went about it with his family, and how he’s liking medical school!” He also discusses the differences between a DO and MD degree. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mars Rover History 32 mins – “Curiosity is the name of the Mars rover that has recently begun exploring the red planet for signs of past habitability. On this episode, Rob Manning, chief NASA engineer on the project, discusses the challenges of constructing the rover.” At the link right-click “Listen to episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mushroom World Savers 18 mins – “Mycologist Paul Stamets lists 6 ways the mycelium fungus can help save the universe: cleaning polluted soil, making insecticides, treating smallpox and even flu viruses.” At the link you can only download video by clicking “Download” and then right-clicking “Video” to get the file.

Mushrooms by Stamets (2 parts) 67 mins – “Mycologist and visionary Paul Stamets joins us for an hour long interview, presented here in two parts, about mushroom mycelium and how we can use mycelium to help heal the damage that humans are causing to the Earth. In Part I, Paul takes us on a journey through time, explaining the evolution and role of the mycelial mass in Earth’s history; he then tells us of the symbiosis between humans and mushrooms. [In Part II]…Stamets tells us how mushrooms can indeed help save the world. From remedies for small pox, to revolutionary biological pesticides, and the remediation of toxic wastes, Paul articulates a vision built on the five pillars of mycorestoration. As Paul describes it, his newest book, Mycelium Running, will be a gateway for other pioneers, and will lead to many important developments in the future. You can purchase Mycelium running and other books at Fungi Perfecti.” At the link (part 1) right-click “Download” for Part 1 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part 2.

Mushrooms for Phosphorous 17 mins – “Biologist Mohamed Hijri brings to light a farming crisis no one is talking about: We are running out of phosphorus, an essential element that’s a key component of DNA and the basis of cellular communication. All roads of this crisis lead back to how we farm — with chemical fertilizers chock-full of the element, which plants are not efficient at absorbing. One solution? Perhaps … a microscopic mushroom.” It’s in French with English subtitles.” At the link you can only download video by clicking “Download” and then right-clicking “Video” to get the file. An English transcript is also available there.

Music Future 20 mins – “As it enables greater access to information, technology sheds light in corners of the media industry long obscured by fog and shadow. In Washington last week, at the 14th annual Future of Music Policy Summit, musicians and music industry executives shared a stage with attorneys and entrepreneurs for an illuminating discussion of “transparency” in their business, as seen from many angles….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Business Aviation Assoc Convention 74 mins – “Carl and Eric report live from the National Business Aviation Association Convention 2014. Carl interviewed Mark Miller from WSI about weather related products they make for GA pilots, including predicting turbulence, storms, radar, etc. You can buy a subscription to their iPad app for $120.00/year. Marina from Wyvern discussed being an advocate for the Cedar Key Airport, and the challenges associated with flying in and out of the airport. AvPlan-EFP: Plan smarter, fly sooner with Bevin Anderson. This app serves as an electronic flight plan and does everything a flight bag does but electronically. ForeFlight Intelligent apps for pilots produces another electronic flight bag product. Veterans AirliftCommand: Flying post-9/11 veterans for medical and other compassionate reasons outside the airline system as volunteers. Carl also spoke with a veteran and passenger of Veterans Airlift Command.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Noodles Worldwide 47 mins – “Noodle-mania. We track the birth story of a staple from China to Italy. Its savory history.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Garbage 51 mins – “The world’s oceans cover more than 140 million square miles and have remained stable for most of human history. But in the last 30 years, man’s impact on the seas has taken a heavy toll: human garbage is polluting our oceans and killing marine life. A recent study by a United Nations panel estimates that the recent buildup of trash in the world’s oceans could cause more than $13 billion in damage to marine life and habitats. The biggest culprit is plastic, which doesn’t fully degrade and is difficult to recycle. For this month’s Environmental Outlook: garbage in the world’s oceans and what can be done about it.” [3 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Online Medical Resources 10 mins –“For health professions learners of all levels, staying abreast of the literature can seem like an insurmountable task as the number of clinically oriented articles continues to grow at an increasing rate. Fortunately, there has been a veritable explosion of online secondary resources that endeavor to digest the expanding medical literature and present it in a format that is optimized for adult learners. Particularly in emergency medicine, these resources have been dubbed “free open access medical education,” also known as free open access meducation (FOAM). The FOAM movement has figured prominently in the proliferation of blogs and podcasts made available online by practicing clinicians. As an unintended consequence, learners must now contend with an exponentially expanding library of both primary literature and secondary online resources. To make effective use of this stream of knowledge, learners must filter and choose from myriad resources. Simple digital tools can be used to organize and manage this otherwise overwhelming amount of information. This article outlines 5 strategies to help learners and practicing physicians stay abreast of both foundational and cutting-edge literature by using digital solutions.” At the link right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Palliative Medicine 60 mins – “My lastest Books and Ideas podcast is an interview with Dr. Amos Bailey, who is a genuine pioneer in both Hospice and Palliative Medicine. He gives us an inside look at how Palliative Medicine emerged out of the incredible technical advances of modern medicine. He also dispells some of the most common misunderstandings.” At the link right-click “Listen to Episode 56 of Books and Ideas” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Personal Empowerment 51 mins – “We’re examining the unprecedented power at peoples’ fingertips ¬and its consequences. First up, highlights from the recent IHub live event about how power is shifting away from big companies and towards individuals. Panelists include: Jason Pontin, editor-in-chief of the MIT Tech Review; Karim Lakhani, a Harvard Business School professor; Nicco Mele, the author of “The End of Big“; Jessica Banks, founder of Rock, Paper, Robot. Then, Nicholas Carr, author of “The Glass Cage: Automation and Us” discusses the personal and social ramifications of our growing dependence on computers. Plus, Jonathan Eig discusses his book “The Birth of the Pill” and the history around the invention of the birth control pill.” At at the link find the title, “11.8.14 – Power at Your Fingertips,” right-click “IHUB-110814-FullShow.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peter Paul and Mary 51 mins – “In the 1960s, the group Peter, Paul and Mary brought folk music out of the coffeehouses and onto the airwaves. With their seamless three-part harmonies, they achieved the commercial success that paved the way for performers like Bob Dylan and John Denver. Their political lyrics struck a chord with the baby boom generation, as they gave voice to the struggle for civil rights, the women’s movement and efforts to end the war in Vietnam. They played together as a trio for nearly five decades, until the death of Mary Travers in 2009. A new book chronicles their time together in a series of photographs and written reflections. “Peter, Paul and Mary: 50 Years in Music and Life.’”

Rape Kit Backlog 51 mins – “Tens of thousands of untested rape evidence kits have been found in police storage facilities across the country. Many of these kits contain DNA evidence, like blood, taken from victims of sexual assaults. Some evidence has been sitting untested on shelves for years. When the first 2,300 unprocessed kits from the Cleveland Police Department were tested, it yielded 950 matches in the national DNA database and more than 200 indictments. Similar backlogs have been found in other cities, including Las Vegas and Detroit. Diane and a panel of [4] guests discuss the efforts to address the backlog in untested rape evidence kits.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Robot Gardener 55 mins – “Recorded from the floor of the 2014 South by Southwest conference, Frank welcomes three innovators in the Arduino for agriculture space: Will Bratton, Luke Iseman, and Sam Bagot to discuss the nature and challenges of the Internet of Things as it applies to agriculture. Topics of discussion include what is Arduino, why and how it is useful for sustainable agriculture, the failures of the open source community, competition from mega corporations like Verizon, fragmentation in the Arduino space, and how to jump start a movement towards a standard, open platform for managing agricultural microcontrollers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Books 29 mins – “On the show this week, Ian Sample looks at the shortlist for this year’s Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books, with Robin McKie, the Observer’s science and technology editor, and Professor Nicky Clayton, a University of Cambridge neuroscientist, and chair of the judges of the 2014 Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books. Also on the show we have our picks from the week’s science news, including the upcoming attempt to land a European space probe on a speeding comet, and the announcement that Fabiola Gianotti, who led one of the teams that discovered the Higgs boson, will be the new leader of the Cern particle physics lab near Geneva.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep Deprivation 27 mins – “This special edition of White Coat, Black Art was recorded live as part of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons’ International Conference on Residency held in Toronto. Dr. Brian Goldman hosted a lively panel with the provocative title “Is a Tired Doctor a Safe Doctor?” In the audience were residents, leading physicians and the public. The voices you’ll hear on the panel belong to four experts.” At the link find the title, “WCBA – Sleepy Docs Podcast 1101,” right-click “Download WCBA – Sleepy Docs Podcast 1101” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Snap Judgement 55 mins – Thousands of insightful stories presented in small batches once a week since 2011. This sample includes a teacher, summer camp, baseball, and young love. Well done. At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Street Harassment 47 mins – “An internet video of a woman showered in catcalls on the street goes viral. We’ll look at women and men in public space. The catcall culture.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Street Harassment 47 mins – “An internet video of a woman showered in catcalls on the street goes viral. We’ll look at women and men in public space. The catcall culture.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Supply 58 mins – “Creating and maintaining a clean, sustainable water supply means delivering drinking water and collecting wastewater while dealing with pathogenic microorganisms and infrastructure challenges. It’s not all challenges, however. Two speakers; Sudhir Murthy, PhD, PE, BCEE, Innovation Chief at DC Water, and Kellogg Schwab, PhD, Director of the Johns Hopkins University Water Institute, will speak to Microbes After Hours about promising new endeavours in water management as well as issues of water safety.” At the link you can watch, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in the blog archive.

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 4200 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 21+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

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Media Mining Digest 156 – 7 Nov 2014: Aging and Memory, Alcatel-Lucent, Alimentary Canal, Animal Sex, Bicycle Trends, Biological Networks, Blood Pressure Drugs, Body Toxins, Book Market, Cancer and Obesity, Cancer Research Process, Car Trends, Cocoa and Memory, Commodore 64 Storeis, Diabetes Gum Disease, Ebola Hype, Eco Examples, Engineering Needs, Epidemiology, Evolution, Grocery delivery, Histotripsy, Home Ownership, ICU Assesment, Immigrant Legal Services, Immigration reform, Industrial Internet, Islam in America, IV Bags, Jerry Lee Lewis, Medicaid Aid Issues, Meditation Health, Mexico Student Massacre, Micronutrients, Middle East Research, Migration Polic Politics, MS Story, Myth Busters, Obesity Battle, Predictive Coding, Protein Production, Public Lands Controversy, Quarantine History, Sight Science, Silk Road, Small Arms Technology, Spinal Cord Repair, Sushi, Swiss Child Labor, Technology Progressing or Not, Virtual Humanity, Vitamins, Voting Issues, Worst State for Women

The following audio files come from a larger group of 280 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 59 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode. Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging and Memory 18 mins – “Columbia University neurologist Scott Small uses fMRI imaging on mice to research our aging brains. Turns out, you’ve got some control over how sharp you stay.” At the link find the title, “Forget Me Not, March 13, 2009,” right-click “031309small.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcatel-Lucent 13 mins – “…Many regular listeners to this podcast will know of Alcatel-Lucent, the sprawling multinational telecommunications company. As well as providing much of the wired and wireless networking infrastructure that supports the Internet… But despite its major role in keeping the modern world spinning along, Alcatel-Lucent is not well known outside the world of high tech. This inspired a nonprofit organization known as Writers in Residence to seek out a writer who could spend months visiting Alcatel-Lucent facilities around the world and reflect deeply on what he saw… The resulting book, called Kitten Clone: Inside Alcatel-Lucent, …tries to find out what it means to have a global company of 60,000 people single-mindedly dedicated to making it easier, cheaper, and faster for anyone or anything to communicate with another.” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alimentary Canal 24 mins – “Gulp [starts at 4:25] Bestselling author, Mary Roach has been billed as American’s funniest science writer. In “Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal“ she takes readers on a journey through the alimentary canal, extolling the marvels of spit on the beginning end, then moving on to the man who had a hole in his stomach that allowed a doctor to observe his digestion… Roach even interviews a prison inmate about “rectal smuggling” (including cell phones).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal Sex 21 mins –“Think sex for animals is all about mating? You’re wrong. Learn about the diversity and biology behind the sex lives of animals at the Museum of Sex’s new exhibit. Warning: Explicit Content.” At the link find the title, “The Sex Lives of Animals, August 22, 2008,” right-click “082208animalsex.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bicycle Trends 51 mins – “According to a new report from the Governors Highway Safety Association, there has been a 16 percent increase in bikers killed in motor vehicle crashes in recent years. This comes after years of steady decline. But many groups say these numbers are misleading, and a more important takeaway is the rising use of bikes in urban areas, with cities like New York and Washington, D.C. putting millions into bike infrastructure projects. But all parties agree: there is much to be done to safely incorporate cyclists onto our roadways, from adding bike lanes with physical protective barriers to stricter enforcement of traffic laws across the board. We take a look at sharing the road with bikes.” [5 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download: however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Biological Networks 42 mins – “NYU scientist Richard Bonneau delves into the complex interactions in biological systems – using the genome as his map.” At the link find the title, “The Circuits of Life’s Program, May 01, 2009,” right-click “050109bonneau.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blood Pressure Drugs P1 27 mins – “Vasoactive is an umbrella term for any drug that makes your heart rate and/or blood pressure go up or down. Vasopressor, on the other hand, is a term for a drug that makes your blood pressure goes up by the process of vasoconstriction (squeeze). A positive inotrope is different from a vasopressor in that an inotrope affects cardiac contractility in a positive way- e.g. it makes your heart pump stronger. So a positive inotrope increases the strength of the muscular contraction and a negative inotrope weakens the strength of the muscular contraction. Some drugs act as both a vasopressor and an inotrope. Drugs can also affect chronotropy which simply means a change in heart rate. Positive chronotropy means an increase in heart rate and negative chronotropy means a decrease in heart rate…” Drugs discussed: epinephrine, eosynephrine/phenylephrine, norepinephrine/Levophed, and Epineprine/Adrenalin. At the link find the title, “The post Vasoactives and Low Blood Pressure Part I,” right-click “Media files Vasoactives_Part_1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blood Pressure Drugs P2 24 mins – “Dopamine is used with septic shock and cardiogenic shock…Dobutamine is used for severe heart failure that is refractory to other medical treatments. It is also used in cardiogenic shock (e.g. a patient who has had a severe myocardial infarction)….Vasopressin is synthetic ADH (anti-diuretic hormone)… In high drip concentrations, Vasopressin causes increased peripheral vascular resistance through arterial vasoconstriction- which hopefully aids in the increase of blood pressure. This is easy to remember because Vasopressin sounds just like vasopressor… Basically, the goal with hanging Vasopressin is to help wean down other vasoactive drips.” At the link find the title, “Vasoactives and Low Blood Pressure Part II,” right-click “Media files Vasoactives_Part_2.mp3,” and click on “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Body Toxins 18 mins – “’Experimental Man” David Ewing Duncan and toxicologist Matt Bogdanffy delve into the dangers (and myths) of toxins in our everyday environment.” At the link find the title, “Our Toxic World? April 03, 2009,” right-click “040309toxic.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Market 76 mins – “eReaders have many advantages over paperbacks and although Amazon would have you believe that eBooks are leading the way, the paperback is far from dead and we look at both sides of the debate.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer and Obesity 26 mins – “You’ve heard it once, you’ve heard it a thousand times: the U.S. has a big problem with obesity. But did you know that there are demonstrated links between obesity and all kinds of serious health problems—including cancer? In this episode, Science & the City explores the obesity-cancer connection.” At the link find the title, “Unraveling the Obesity-Cancer Connection, March 26, 2012,” right-click “03282012_ObesityCancerConnection.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Research Process 17 mins – “Visit the lab of Hunter College’s Jill Bargonetti, a biologist researching cancer. Her team studies P53, a natural tumor-suppressor protein found in our bodies with a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde personality.” At the link find the title, “Looking for the Key in P53, October 16, 2009,” right-click “101609cancer.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Trends 27 mins – “Car crashes kill 1.2 million SciA: 30 Oct 14: Driverless Cars Special people globally, each year. Could robots be better than human drivers?” At the link find the title, “SciA: 30 Oct 14: Driverless Cars Special,” right-click “scia_20141030-2030a.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cocoa and Memory 21 mins – “Neuromyths in the classroom, how the brain keeps time, and a compound found in cocoa staves off memory decline in older adults.” The cocoa segments starts at 7 mins and lasts 7 mins. Inexpensive and low calorie cocoa powder that is not alkalinized (Dutch style) should contain 6% of flavanols that enhance memory, so a tablespoon should exceed the amount of 800mg used in the reported research. At the link find the title, “The NeuroPod: October 2014,” right-click “Media files neuropod-2014-10-30.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Commodore 64 Stories 121 mins – Bil Herd was a key player in the development of the C64 in the 1980’s. Here he tells how an early nerd came to join Commodore International and what it was like to work in a high-pressure seat-of-the-pants engineering department with some less elegant solutions to problems that got the job done. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Numerous links are also listed at the site in the notes concerning ideas, parts, and systems and products discussed in the podcast

Diabetes Gum Disease 13 mins – “Good oral hygiene helps prevent tooth decay and gum disease, but the health of your mouth may have a big impact on the rest of your body too—especially if you have diabetes. Find out more in this special edition podcast from The Sackler Institute for Nutrition Science.” At the link find the title, “The Diabetes-Gum Disease Connection, April 14, 2011,” right-click “04142011_DiabetesGumDisease.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Hype 11 mins – “Panic over the Ebola virus in the U.S. has dominated headlines and cable news. So, we put together a template to help the discerning news consumer see through the media’s over-the-top coverage. It’s our Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook: Infectious Disease Edition.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eco Examples 30 mins – “This week we re-visit conversations with two innovators making everyday items greener. First, we hear from Eben Bayer, one of the founders of Ecovative, a company that has developed a mushroom-based alternative to Styrofoam. Bayer tells us how Ecovative’s biologically-based material is replacing packaging, insulation and maybe soon food storage containers that were previously the exclusive domain of polluting, non-biodegradable stuff. Then, we hear from Geoff Larson, co-founder of Alaskan Brewing Company, a craft brewer that’s just as committed to environmental stewardship as it is to making a tasty libation. Larson and his team are at the cutting edge of what they call beer-powered beer, using technological advances to make beer without a drop of energy wasted.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineering Needs 74 mins – “James Trevelyan speaks with us about the skills and talents of expert engineers, and how those of us who have not yet achieved “expert” status can improve our ability to complete engineering projects on time and within budget… Our guest is James Trevelyan, a professor of Mechatronics Engineering at The University of Western Australia. Some of our listeners may remember Dr. Trevelyan from Episode 19. (Yes, Jeff said Episode 17 during the podcast, but he was wrong!) Dr. Trevelyan has recently published a book, The Making of an Expert Engineer.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Epidemiology 52 mins (2 parts) – “In this first section, the panel considers the evolution of viruses, the spillover of pathogens from animals to humans, and some cultural practices that increase the rate of this phenomenon. The discussion is moderated by award-winning author David Quammen. The panelists are Dr. Ian Lipkin, Captain Daniel B. Jernigan, and author Maryn McKenna. In [part 2]…the panelists discuss factors involved in preventing outbreaks from reaching pandemic scales. The SARS virus and SARS-like virus that appeared earlier this year in Saudi Arabia provide interesting case studies for considering containment policy.” At the link find two titles, “Wrath Goes Viral: Part 1 [and Part2],” right-click “20121128_WrathGoesViralPart1.mp3” and “20121205WrathPart2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” for each from the pop-up menu.

Evolution 53 mins – “Richard Dawkins launches his newest book in the third S&C Provocative Thinkers in Science event. He argues evolution is an indisputable fact, despite nearly half of Americans believing the opposite.”At the linkfind the title, “The Greatest Show on Earth, October 22, 2009,” right-click “102309dawkins.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grocery Deliveries 47 mins – “The Digitized, Home-Delivered Future Of Our Food Supply: Will going to the grocery store be history? How the online order and delivery business is reshaping our food economy.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Histotripsy 4 mins – “Surgery is moving more and more toward minimally‐invasive procedures — using laparoscopic approaches with instruments inserted through tiny incisions or catheters placed in blood vessels through puncture sites. These techniques minimize the risks to the patient such as bleeding complications or infection during surgery. Taken a step further, high‐intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can provide a tool to accomplish many of the same procedures without any incision at all….” At the link you can view the video portion, but nothing can be downloaded; however, a copy of the audio portion is in the blog archive.

Home Ownership 47 mins – “Home ownership rates are at a 20-year low. Millennials and more aren’t buying. We’ll look at what American’s think now about owning a home.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

ICU Assessment 42 mins – “Every ICU has a slightly different requirement as far as what you are assessing as the RN. Even though every patient is unique, there is a general ICU assessment that will work for most. In this audio only version, we will go through a basic ICU assessment and cover Neuro, Cardiac, Respiratory, GI/GU, Skin, and other miscellaneous items that will help you form a plan and help you attempt to form your own assessment “flow”.” For us lay people this discussion demonstrates what we can check when we visit someone in an ICU! At the link right-click “The ICU Assessment,” right-click “Media files Assessment.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Legal Services 93 mins – “The last several years have witnessed extraordinary developments related to the adjudication and representation of persons facing possible removal from the United States. This panel from the 11th annual Immigration Law and Policy Conference—organized in October 2014 by the Migration Policy Institute, Catholic Legal Immigration Network Inc., the Center for Migration Studies, and Georgetown University Law Center—highlights innovative new legal service-delivery programs, including government-funded counsel in New York City, the Immigrant Justice Corps fellowship program, the Justice Americorps Program, nongovernmental organization initiatives to represent the growing numbers of unaccompanied child migrants (UACs) and others. It also discusses challenges related to the accelerated adjudication of proceedings for minors, the expansion in non-court removals, legal representation of persons apprehended near the U.S.-Mexico border, and an economic analysis of government-funded legal counsel in immigration proceedings.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Reform – State and Local 84 mins – “As federal immigration legislation continues to languish, state and municipal governments across the country are forging ahead and taking decisive action to integrate immigrants into their communities. This panel from the 11th annual Immigration Law and Policy Conference—organized in October 2014 by the Migration Policy Institute, Catholic Legal Immigration Network Inc., the Center for Migration Studies, and Georgetown University Law Center—examines different approaches to advancing immigrant laws and policies at the state and local levels. Panelists discuss recent measures adopted by city and state governments to expand immigrants’ access to education and health care, limit local involvement in immigration enforcement, and enhance immigrants’ ability to participate in civic life and revitalize local economies. The panelists are: Nisha Agarwal, Commissioner, New York City Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs; the Hon. Ricardo Lara, Senator, 33rd District, California State Senate; and Steve Tobocman, Director, Global Detroit.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Industrial Internet 27 mins – “The Industrial Revolution had a profound effect on manufacturing — will the industrial Internet’s effect be as significant? In this podcast episode, Nate Oostendorp, co-founder and CTO of Sight Machine, says yes — where mechanization ruled the Industrial Revolution, data-driven automation will rule this next revolution:…” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right-end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islam in America 55 mins – “The fastest growing major religion in the world today, Islam has some 1.6 billion followers practicing a wide array of religious traditions and speaking hundreds of different languages. And yet, even as more and more Americans convert to the faith and foreigners emigrate to the U.S. from all over the Islamic world, Muslims are still often caricatured in the American imagination. This time on BackStory, we look at the longer history of America’s relationship with Islam, from the Barbary Wars and the narratives of Muslim slaves in the New World, to the Nation of Islam and the Black Power movement of the 1960s. What has it meant to be Muslim in America — and how has the idea of Islam in the U.S. changed over time?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the ring end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IV Bags 29 mins – “Ever wondered what kind of fluids are hanging in your IV bag and why? Hopefully, this audio podcast will answer all of your questions about: Crystalloids; Isotonic Solutions: Normal Saline, Lactated Ringers, D5W; Hypotonic Solutions: D51/2 NS, .45% NS, D5W; Hypertonic Solutions: D5NS, D5LR, 3% NS, 10%NS; Colloids: Hetastarch, Albumin, Mannitol, Dextran” At the link find the title, “What’s in your IV bag?” right-click “Media files IVFluids.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jerry Lee Lewis 49 mins – “Jerry Lee Lewis. A rock and roll pioneer. “The Killer” on the piano. Friend to Elvis, Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins. Notorious womanizer. Married seven times, including to his 13-year-old cousin. Addicted to pills and alcohol. Survived the deaths of wives and children. Now he’s shared it all with Pulitzer Prize-winning author Rick Bragg.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medicaid Aid Issues 19 mins – “Nina Owcharenko, Heritage Foundation Director of the Center for Health Policy Studies and Preston A. Wells, Jr. Fellow, sat down with our state team to discuss her chapter on the state side of Medicaid reform in Mercatus’ recent book, The Economics of Medicaid. In under 19 minutes, Owcharenko describes Medicaid funding, how states constrain ballooning costs, quality of care, and the waiver process and private option.” At the link right-click “Download the MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meditation Health 44 mins – “Can meditation have long-term beneficial effects on the plasticity of our brains? Bon meditation practitioner Alejandro Chaoul and oncologist Lorenzo Cohen evaluate the healing potential of meditation in a discussion from the Rubin Museum of Art’s Brainwave Festival.” At the link find the title, “Meditating Health, Friday, March 12, 2010,” right-click “031210meditation.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexico Student Massacre 46 mins –“If you thought mass graves and torture were just Islamic State issues these days – far away and unthinkable – look closer to home. To Mexico. Last month, just a hundred miles south of Mexico City, 43 young college students from the countryside were rounded up and “disappeared” in a town where officials and drug lords are all wrapped up together. All kinds of bodies have now been found. Burned. Face peeled. Eyes torn out. Even for Mexico, this is too much. Too far. The country is in uproar.” Program guests include Tracy Wilkinson, Mexico bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times, Andrew Selee, executive vice president at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Author of “Decentralization, Democratization, and Informal Power in Mexico.” Co-editor of “Mexico and the United States” and “Mexico’s Democratic Challenges.” And Anabel Hernandez, Mexican investigative journalist. Author of the book, “Narcoland: The Mexican Drug Lords and Their Godfathers.” Contributor to Reporte Indigo.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Micronutrients 30 mins -In this first of a two-part series, experts from various sectors explore the available options to reduce “hidden hunger”—micronutrient deficiencies in a population. In this podcast series, the many partners of The Sackler Institute for Nutrition Science offer perspective on their work to better understand human nutrition, and to find new and better ways of feeding the world. For this episode, experts from DSM, DuPont, Pepsico, Nestlé, Pfizer, the Food Fortification Initiative, the Mathile Institute, and Ajinomoto discuss the many ways people are solving the problem of supplying people everywhere with adequate vitamins and minerals.” At the link find the title, “Micronutrients: Supplementation, Fortification, and Beyond,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Middle East Research 25 mins – “A geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey discusses the challenges he’s faced when doing science in the Middle East, and his research on the Dead Sea basin.” At the link find the title, “Science in the Middle East, June 19, 2008,” right-click “Mideast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Children 92 mins – “Children from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras have been coming to the United States without a parent or guardian for many years. In 2008, Congress enacted the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act to provide special protections for this vulnerable population. In recent years, the number of unaccompanied child migrants (UACs) from these countries has increased significantly, culminating in much larger numbers arriving at US borders in 2014. This panel, from the 11th annual Immigration Law and Policy Conference organized in October 2014 by the Migration Policy Institute, Catholic Legal Immigration Network Inc., the Center for Migration Studies, and Georgetown University Law Center, considers several key issues that have arisen with respect to U.S. and regional responses to the cross-border movements of these children, in particular with respect to due process, enforcement actions in the United States and Mexico, and Central American government plans to address the violence affecting these children in their home communities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migration Policy and Politics 94 mins – “This panel from the 11th annual Immigration Law and Policy Conference—organized in October 2014 by the Migration Policy Institute, Catholic Legal Immigration Network Inc., the Center for Migration Studies, and Georgetown University Law Center—examines the use of executive action in implementing immigration policy, the numbers of those who may potentially be affected by such action, underlying legal issues, and any challenges in implementation. The panelists—Ana Navarro, a Republican political contributor to CNN, CNN en Español, and ABC News; Norman J. Ornstein, Resident Scholar, American Enterprise Institute; Simon Rosenberg, President and Founder, New Democrat Network (NDN); and Marc R. Rosenblum, Deputy Director, U.S. Immigration Policy Program, Migration Policy Institute—discussed the possible political ramifications for future immigration reform policy during a conversation moderated by MPI Senior Fellow Doris Meissner.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MS Story 52 mins – “Jason DaSilva was 25 when he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. As a filmmaker, he eventually decided to try and make sense of the disease through his art form. So, he set out to capture what he calls the transformative experience of becoming disabled. DaSilva let the camera run as he dealt with his loss of vision, muscle control, and many other complications. Next week, we’re screening When I Walk as part of the Through the Lens documentary series.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Myth Busters 36 mins – “Adam Savage – Live on Stage in San Francisco On the show this week Indre talks to Adam Savage about the future of science communication (and why it’s terrifying TV networks), why he’s worried Elon Musk might become a Marvel supervillain, and why it’s so important to him that women be better represented in his field. Indre also talks to host of The Story Collider, Ben Lillie, about the Antares Rocket explosion, flavonols, and Ben explains why he’s fascinated by institutional review boards.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obesity Battle 13 mins – “Obesity rates in Canada have tripled over the past thirty years. Now an editorial just published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal is calling for tough action to deal with obesity. Dr. Brian Goldman explains.” At the link find the title, “White Coat Mini Podcast – Obesity,” right-click “Download White Coat Mini Podcast – Obesity” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Predictive Coding 33 mins – “Discovery, as all lawyers know, is the process of collecting and exchanging information about the court case to prepare for the trial. Traditionally, this was done by many lawyers over countless billable hours in which every page of potential evidence was examined for important information. Because of this, the more information existed in reference to a case, the more expensive the case was. As technology developed, law firms began using computers to do keyword searches and conceptual searches. Unfortunately, there were problems including picking the right keywords or concepts, misspelled words, how to structure the items, and that these searches only yielded 20% of important data. Recently, technology has advanced to predictive coding, or teaching a computer program to think like a lawyer would. But how cost effective and practical is predictive coding, and how well does it actually work?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Protein Production 33 mins – “Experts discuss innovations in food science and programming that are aimed at sustainably producing adequate protein for the global population. Population growth and changes in dietary practices globally have led to a tremendous rise in the demand for animal-source foods. While consuming the required amount of protein is fundamental to human health, supplying protein to meet increasing worldwide needs can lead to environmental and health problems. This podcast is brought to you by the Sackler Institute for Nutrition Science.” At the link find the title, “The Problem with Protein, May 28, 2014,” right-click “ProblemwithProtein.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Lands Controversy 47 mins – “If you saw Cliven Bundy and his armed supporters on horseback this spring in Nevada, you saw one face of a movement to get the federal government’s hand off of vast lands in the American West. The suit-and-tie version of that movement wants control handed over to the states. And we’re talking a lot of land. Eighty-one percent of Nevada – federal-controlled. Sixty-seven percent of Utah. Forty-eight percent of California, Wyoming. Critics say the new Sagebrush Rebellion is about oil and gas and development. Supporters say “states’ rights.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Quarantine History 46 mins – “The history of quarantines, from the Spanish Flu to polio to Ebola and the challenge of fighting an epidemic and fear of the epidemic. Quarantines –isolating the sick —have a long history, from the bubonic plague to polio. And now, quarantines are back as governors try to stop Ebola and public panic. But the first official effort to quarantine a nurse just back from Africa backfired. New Jersey Governor Chris Christie started out this past weekend playing it tough. By the end, he was backpedaling furiously after one angry nurse stood up to his quarantine order. She had a whole lot of science and the American medical establishment backing her up.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sight Science 29 mins – “See What You’ve Been Missing: Christof Koch and Apollo Robbins – There’s a lot more to vision than first meets the eye. An ex-magician and cognitive neuroscientist team and tackle the science of sight.” At the link find the title, “See What You’ve Been Missing, January 23, 2009, “right-click “012309vision.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Silk Road 18 mins – “Take an anthropological tour of the Silk Road exhibit at the AMNH with its curator, Mark Norell. The 4,600-mile trail was the most important trade route in the Eastern world for more than 3,000 years.” At the link find the title, “The Silk Road, Friday, January 22, 2010,” right-click “012210silkroad.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Small Arms Technology P1 8 mins –“In the first installment of this podcast, series editors Benjamin King and Glenn McDonald talk to us about the need for arms control policies that take these developments into account, with a detailed discussion of new polymers and additive manufacturing…. The Small Arms Survey has drafted a series of discussion papers to be presented at the UN First Committee on Disarmament and International Security in October 2014. These papers, which are due for public release later in the year as chapters in an Occasional Paper, cover a range of subjects: the additive manufacturing (also known as 3D printing) of small arms; the use of new polymers; modular weapons design; smart technologies; and the conversion of replica firearms to fully functioning firearms.” At the link find the title, “New Technologies, New Control Challenges, Part 1: Polymers, 3D printing, and appropriate policies,” right-click “Media files SAS-Podcast-26-New-Technologies-New-Control-Challenges-Part-1.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Small Arms Technology P2 8 mins – “Benjamin King and Glenn McDonald explain how the modular design of weapons systems complicates weapons marking, record -keeping, and tracing. They also examine the issues raised by the conversion of replica firearms into viable weapons; and they consider how new weapons technology presents opportunities for improved stockpile management….” At the link find the title, “New Technologies, New Control Challenges, Part 2: Modular weapons, conversion, and smart technologies,” right-click “Media Files SAS-Podcast-27-New-Technologies-New-Control-Challenges-Part-2.mp3”

Spinal Cord Repair 20 mins – “Biologist Marie Filbin says new discoveries in spinal nerve regeneration are giving researchers hope in the race to cure spinal cord injuries.” At the link find the title, “Back Me Up, April 17, 2009,” right-click “041709spinal.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sushi 15 mins – “Danish biophysicist Ole Mouritsen also happens to be an expert on, and lover of sushi. This week, we talk to him about his new book, Sushi: Food for the Eye, the Body, and the Soul.” At the link find the title, “The Science of Sushi, January 01, 2010,” right-click “010110sushi.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Swiss Child Labor 26 mins – “Kavita Puri goes to Switzerland to hear the extraordinary stories of survivors who lived as indentured child labourers.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Switzerland: Stolen Childhoods – 30 Oct 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20141030-0232c.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up media.

Technology Progressing or Not 45 mins – “In this episode of Uncommon Knowledge, guest Peter Thiel, one of Silicon Valley’s leading investors and thinkers, discusses his new book Zero to One [interesting site]. In it Thiel explains his theories on markets, monopolies, and the lack of new technology. Born in Germany, raised in California, Thiel is a US-ranked chess master and cofounder of PayPal and Palantir.” At the link find the title, “Peter Thiel on markets, technology, and education.” right-click “Media files 20141024.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virtual Humanity 58 mins (2 parts) – “Online games offer immersive, three-dimensional worlds populated by thousands of characters who form intense relationships, functional economies, complex societies, and rich cultures. Often these virtual connections not only mimic real-world interactions but sometimes even supplant them. But just how far can virtual worlds take us? …Thomas M. Malaby of the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee and Lee T. Guzofski of G2G Enterprises…[discuss]… the ways in which natural reality blends and blurs with the virtual reality of online games.” At the link find the titles, “Virtual Humanity – Part 1, December 15, 2011” and “…Part 2, December 26, 2011,” right-click ” 20111215_Guzofski.mp3” and “20111222_Malaby.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menus.

Vitamins 25 mins – “Scurvy was once the scourge of the seven seas, but it turned out to have a simple solution: Vitamin C. In the second installment of our nutrition series, learn all about the power of vitamins, minerals, and other micronutrients.” At the link find the title, “A Thought for Food: Tiny Amounts, February 27, 2012,” right-click “02292012_TinyAmounts.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Issues 28 mins – “What are changes in voting laws doing to democracy in the USA? Rajini Vaidyanathan travels to North Carolina to investigate voting rights in the United States.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Politics at the Polling Station 28 Oct 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20141028-0905a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Worst State for Women 52 mins – “A study released last week declared Utah the “worst state for women.” According to the business media website 24/7 Wall St., women in Utah earn significantly lower wages than their male counterparts, hold relatively few management positions in business, and make up a very small percentage of our state legislature. Tuesday, we’re assembling a panelist of female guests to discuss whether the study accurately reflects life on the ground for Utah’s women, and we hope to hear from our listeners, too.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 4200 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 21+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

 

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Media Mining Digest 155 – 31 Oct 2014: Alzheimer’s Cure Prospect, Bad Paper, Beer Culture, Bonkbuster Sex Drugs, Brain Development and Imaging, British History, Buckminister Fuller, Car Future, Champagne Bubbles, Chemical Weapons, Child Safety Excesses, Chocolate and Health, Cholesterol History, Climate Change, Contractionism, Crap, Cutthroat Science, Data Collection, Death With Dignity, Digital Health, Discipline in School, E Book Report, Ebola-Debrief-In Canada-Recovery, Evolution by Zimmer and Research, Feeding the Planet, Food Mods, Gamergate, Green Skyscraper,Hedge Funds, Hospitals by Toyota, Improv for Scientists, India in World War One, Irish Church Scandal, Linux Laptops, Lost Innocence, Magnesium Chloride, Malaria Update, Microbiome, Modern Surveillance, Molecule Handedness, Myth of Prosecution, Nutrition Research, Online Harassment, Phages, Quantum Moment, Qubits, Rating Television, Recycling NYC Paper, Religious Objections, Right to Vote, Russia in 1914, Russians, Scotch Whiskies, South Pass Route, Stem Cell Research, Sugar Overview, Toll Roads, Venter on Research, Village Projects, Viral Research, War Dogs, Water Supply, White Bread

The following audio files come from a larger group of 245 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 77 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Alzheimer’s Cure Prospect 60 mins – “Alzheimer’s Disease is a growing health and economic concern worldwide, prompting innovative efforts to better understand the disease and translate that understanding into effective interventions. The search for a treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease becomes increasingly urgent as global populations grow and age. In the United States alone, 16 million people are projected to suffer from AD by 2050. In this podcast, leading experts from different sections of the R&D pipeline discuss cutting-edge approaches to developing a cure.” At the link find the title, “Alzheimer’s Disease: Prospects for a Cure, June 30, 2014,” right-click “ProspectsforaCure.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bad Paper 59 mins – “Jake Halpern talked about his book, Bad Paper: Chasing Debt from Wall Street to the Underworld, in which he argues that the collection industry is full of unregulated and questionable practices that can often compound the problems of working class citizens. He talked with author and former Wall Street executive Nomi Prins.” You can listen/watch at the link, but the audio download cost $.99; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Beer Culture 12 mins – “While ancient civilizations were building pyramids and mapping the globe, they also brewed up a new use for grains. William Bostwick, author of “The Brewer’s Tale,” discusses the intersection between beer and innovation.” At the link find the title, “Brewing Up Innovation” right-click “IHUB-102514-C.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Bonkbuster Sex Drugs 21 mins – “A thrice failed antidepressant is at the centre of a new marketing campaign to win approval for what could become the world’s first blockbuster sex pill for women. Frustrated by the drug’s repeated rejection, proponents have orchestrated a fierce attack, accusing the regulator of unfairness, and enlisting support from several well connected…” At the link find the title, “The blockbuster sex drug for women; creating a feminist issue,” right-click “Media files 172404390-bmjgroup-the-sex-drug-for-women.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Development 65 mins – “The Origin of Brain Degenerative Disorders: Patrick Hof – A Mt. Sinai School of Medicine neuroscientist explains the morpho-molecular features that render certain neuronal populations of the brain vulnerable to degeneration.” At the link find the title, “The Origin of Brain Degenerative Disorders, April 04, 2008,” right-click “hof.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Imaging 20 mins – “Blavatnik Award winning scientist Dr. Jonathan Fisher discusses the power of various visualization techniques in researching—and educating about—the brain. Dr. Fisher is the Founder and Director of the Neurodome Project, which adapts immersive visualization techniques used in planetariums to introduce new audiences to neuroscience.” At the link find the title, “Your Brain: The Final Frontier, November 21, 2013,” right-click “VisualizingtheBrain.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British History 27 mins – “Today’s episode will take place in the turbulent years from 686 to 692 and the main characters will be… Aldfrith – King of Mercia, son of Oswiu, brother of Ecgfrith, and scholarly dude. Wilfrid – Former Bishop of York, friend of the terrifying pagan king Caedwalla, and man you really don’t want to cross. and Aethelred – King of Mercia, son of Penda, brother of Wulfhere, and (despite his rather pious upbringing) he really was his father’s son….” (Interesting discussion of the culture with such things as adoption of silver coins to cope with adulterated gold coins.)” At the link right “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Buckminster Fuller 23 mins – “Hear the story of one of the greatest innovators of the 20th century – the man behind the geodesic dome, Dymaxion Car and Dwelling Machine, and other inventive ideas.” At the link find the title, “Buckminster Fuller, July 03, 2008,” right-click “fuller.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Car Future 46 mins – “The future of the car: from the fuels they’ll run on, to the materials they’ll be made of, to the computers that may drive them. In the year 2025, cars and the rules of the road could look a whole lot different. Cars that drive themselves. Run on hydrogen. Made out of futuristic materials. That know your musical preferences. Favorite places to shop and eat. And get this: They’ll even sense if you’re having a heart attack. Companies are dreaming up and road testing the next generation of automobiles. And not too far down the road, today’s gas-guzzling, road clogging, unreliable cars could be left behind in the rear view mirror. This hour On Point: Driving ambitions and the future of cars.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Champagne Bubbles 41 mins – “Gerard Liger-Belair has been studying the science of champagne bubbles for 10 years. Learn just how important bubbles are to the taste this celebratory drink – and find out the science behind it.” At the link find the title, “The Science of Champagne, May 16, 2008,” right-click “champagne.mp3” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu. Some interesting visual aids are used, but no video of this talk is available. However, a similar TED talk in French by the same person for 17 mins is here.

Chemical Weapons 44 mins – “Chemical weapons have played a chilling role in human history ever since they were first used in World War I. As reports of more recent use continue to cycle through the news, we decided to take a deeper look. We wanted to understand why chemical weapons were created in the first place, the ethical dilemmas inherent in their use, and the complicated process of getting rid of them. The story begins in Belgium, where reporter Helena de Groot visits a farm in Flanders Fields—the frontline during World War I—and discovers that for some people the war isn’t yet over…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Safety Excesses 52 mins – “There’s been a lot of talk recently about religious freedom, and it seems to have intensified as gay marriages have become legal in many states. Sen Orrin Hatch calls judges “uniformly hostile to religion.” Pundits see Sen Ted Cruz building a presidential campaign on the idea that religious liberty has “never been in more peril.” But the researcher and activist Jay Michaelson says this is a political strategy to marshal allies in the ongoing culture wars. He’ll join us to dissect what he sees as a “covert campaign against civil rights.”

Chocolate and Health 55 mins – “Jeffrey Blumberg, a nutrition scientist from Tufts University, gives an overview of the health benefits of chocolate. Sponsor: Chocolate Manufacturers Association. At the link find the title, “Science of Chocolate, February 29, 2008,” right-click “chocolate.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cholesterol History 4 mins “Next time your doctor tells you to get a cholesterol test, stir up some trouble. Ask who ordered it. There are probably a few answers to that question, but here’s mine: the order came from a doctor — of oceanography!— turned physiologist named Ancel Keys. It was Keys who first studied the correlation between diet and heart disease in large ethnic populations. He came to a conclusion that we now take for granted. High levels of serum cholesterol are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and more important, we influence that number every day by what we eat. It’s not quite so simple, though. We now know about “good” cholesterol, HDL, and we know that even so-called “bad” cholesterol, LDL, comes in two different sizes, one of which is relatively benign. Genes and lifestyle complicate matters further. But Keys’ work, which he began in the 1950s, was groundbreaking.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 2469, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change 35 mins – “The Rapidly Changing Climate System: Michael Oppenheimer – A lead author with the Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change gives a global warming overview.” At the link find the title, “The Rapidly Changing Climate System, March 21, 2008,” right-click “climate_change.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Contractionism 60 mins – “Then Gail Zawacki savages what’s left, while she campaigns against the unknown threat of ozone smog. It’s a panorama of inner conversations in twisted times. Author Frank Rotering from British Columbia, Canada hosts contractionism.org He called for the usual progressive bottom-up revolution against the consumer society. Now it’s too late for that, Frank says. We need to push a schism in the wealthy capitalists who control the game. Some billionaires are beginning to see they will be wiped out along with the rest of us in ecocide.” At the link right-click find the title, “Talk in Twisted Times,” right-click “CD” or “Lo-Fi” quality beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crap 8 mins – “Warning: This talk might contain much more than you’d ever want to know about the way the world poops. But as sanitation activist (and TED Fellow) Francis de los Reyes asks — doesn’t everyone deserve a safe place to go? Francis de los Reyes works with cutting-edge microbiological techniques in environmental biotech. But his passion, both professionally and personally, is helping to improve the plight of the world’s 2.5 billion people living without adequate sanitation.” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crap Again 14 mins – “It’s 2013, yet 2.5 billion people in the world have no access to a basic sanitary toilet. And when there’s no loo, where do you poo? In the street, probably near your water and food sources — causing untold death and disease from contamination. Get ready for a blunt, funny, powerful talk from journalist Rose George about a once-unmentionable problem… Rose George looks deeply into topics that are unseen but fundamental, whether that’s sewers or latrines or massive container ships or pirate hostages or menstrual hygiene.” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cutthroat Science 32 mins – “From publish-or-perish to the race for ever-decreasing research dollars, scientists are under pressure to produce new scientific findings. Recent reports suggest an increase in the number of scientific articles published in journals, accompanied by an enormous increase in retractions. Has the competitive culture of science gone too far to ensure the integrity of scientific findings? How do scientists maintain ethics in the face of such pressure?” At the link find the title, “Envy: The Cutthroat Side of Science, May 16, 2013,” right-click “cutthroat science.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Collection 59 mins – “Adam Tanner, fellow at the Institute of Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University; author and Forbes contributor” talks about the world of personal data. At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death With Dignity 51 mins – “In a video that has been viewed by millions in recent weeks, 29-year-old Brittany Maynard explains her plan to end her life on Nov. 1, 2014. Maynard suffers from terminal brain cancer. Instead of waiting for the disease to kill her, she decided to move to Oregon with her husband and mother so that she could legally obtain a lethal prescription and end her life on a day of her choosing. Currently, her plan is a legal option in only five states. Advocates say it can be a critical component of end-of-life care should be more widely available. Diane and a panel of guests discuss the debate over “aid in dying,” also known as doctor-assisted suicide.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Digital Health 50 mins (2 parts) – In part one (25mins): “Dr. Joseph Kvedar, Founder and Director of the Center for Connected Health, Dr. Martin Kohn, Chief Medical Scientist for Health Care Delivery at IBM Research, and Dr. Marc Triola, Associate Dean for Educational Informatics at NYU School of Medicine and Director of the Division of Educational Informatics, discuss the emerging roles of digital technology in healthcare.” In part two (25 mins ): ” Dr. Robert Kaplan, Director of the National Institutes of Health Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, and Dr. Barbara Barry, research scientist with the Northeastern University Relational Agents Group, discuss the evolving role of technology in addressing the behavioral aspects of health.” At the link find the titles, “Digital Healthcare Technology Part 1: Virtual Patients, AI Doctors, and Beyond, Thursday, March 14, 2013″ and “Digital Healthcare Technology Part 2: Take One App a Day with Food, March 20, 2013,” then right-click ” transmed digitalhealth 1 [ and 2].mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Discipline in School 63 mins – “Stories of schools struggling with what to do with misbehaving kids. There’s no general agreement about what teachers should do to discipline kids. And there’s evidence that some of the most popular punishments actually may harm kids. When it comes to disciplining young people, teachers are winging it. We ask middle school teachers all over the country to walk us through how they get a kid to take his hat off. The book Ira mentions is called Building a Better Teacher by reporter Elizabeth Green; it’s eye-opening in a number of ways.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

E Book Report 15 mins – “National e-book markets are like snowflakes. No two are alike. Emerging markets particularly engage in approaches of their own. In India, domestic platforms lead the way; while in Brazil, Apple shows a surprising lead in eBook distribution over the usual suspect. First published in 2011, the Global eBook Report follows international market evolution in e-books, as well as the controversies and debates that inevitably surround the move away from print and toward digital. From the 2014 Frankfurt Book Fair, Global eBook Report author Rüdiger Wischenbart joins CCC’s Chris Kenneally to share details on the just-launched fall 2014 update.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Debrief 27 mins – “Ebola is now regarded as an international threat to peace and security, according to the World Health Organisation. Up to 10,000 people a week could soon be infected in west Africa, with cases also reported in Europe and the US. Simon Cox asks why it took so long for the world to wake up to the threat posed by Ebola.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Ebola: What went Wrong,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20141022-0332a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola in Canada  17 mins – “Should health care workers have the right to take a pass on caring for patients with Ebola?” At the link find the title, “White Coat Mini Podcast – Refusing to Treat Ebola,” right-click “Download White Coat Mini Podcast – Refusing to Treat Ebola” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Recovery 27 mins – “This week Health Check focuses on Ebola, looking at proposed treatments and the timeline for vaccines.” At the link find the title, “HealthC: Ebola, blood treatment, vaccines,” right-click “Media files healthc_20141022-2030a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evolution by Zimmer 18 mins – “S&C chats with science writer Carl Zimmer about his newest book on evolution. Hear what’s changed since Darwin.” At the link find the title, “The Tangled Bank September 04, 2009,” right-click “090409zimmer.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evolution Research 24 mins – “The theory of evolution explains how the fittest traits survive in a species, but not how those traits arise in the first place.  On this episode, Andreas Wagner discussed the arrival of the fittest.” At the right-click “Listen to  episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feeding the Planet 44 mins – “Alan Weisman, a journalist and nonfiction writer, came to the New York Academy of Sciences on September 25, 2013, to discuss his latest book, Countdown: Our Last Best Hope for a Future on Earth? Weisman considers difficult global issues in his work, peppering hard facts with compelling stories and extensive research. His previous book, A World Without Us, in which he imagines how our planet might adjust if humans disappeared, has been translated into 30 languages. In Countdown, Weisman explains why we need to address the global population crisis and offers some of the solutions to overpopulation he observed while traveling as a journalist.” At the link find the title, “Can We Feed the Planet? October 12, 2013,” right-click “feedingtheplanet.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Modification 23 mins – “People have been modifying their food for thousands of years – but not in a lab. Amy Harmon, an award-winning NY Times reporter, and Pamela Ronald, genetics professor and co-author of “Tomorrow’s Table,” talk about where GMOs are headed.” At the link find the title, “A Genetically Modified Menu,” right-click “IHUB-102514-B.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gamergate 48 mins – “#GamerGate. Sexism, misogyny and rough stuff in a video game world culture clash. Hashtag “Gamergate” is all over the world of online fisticuffs lately. If you’re in it, you know all about it. Gamers – video gamers, online gamers – on an online tear, charging corruption in the incestuous world of video game journalism. Standing as the new citizen activist. Warriors at the Alamo. Critics, charging that raging gamers are a bunch of culturally-privileged largely young white guys ready to unleash very real menace and misogyny to defend a passing era of supremacy.The threats are real and ugly and maybe the future of culture clash. This hour On Point: Inside Gamergate.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Skyscraper 20 mins – “Take a tour of the new Bank of America building at One Bryant Park – now the greenest office tower in New York City, with a Platinum LEED ranking. The building’s lead architect and mechanical engineer join to give context to this skyscraper’s ultra-sustainable features.” At the link find the title, “One Bryant Park, July 25, 2008,” right-click “one_bryant.mp3,” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Hedge Funds 22 mins – “This podcast is in response to the latest announcement by CALPRS, the California Public Employees’ Retirement System, that they have decided to liquidate their $4 billion in hedge fund investments. Paul discusses the sad truth about the expense, returns and slippery nature of the hedge fund industry. Here is just one of the many aspects he reports: At the end of 10 years only 5% of the hedge funds will still be in business. Does that sound like an investment you’d like to make? Of course, as long as it’s part of the 5%. Paul also discusses a hedge fund he helped form in 1995. The good news is it’s still in business.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hospitals by Toyota   27 mins – “Nearly forty years ago, Toyota adopted an efficiency system they called Toyota Way. Today, people in health care and other industries call it LEAN because it’s all about cutting waste. Is it a way for hospitals to better care for patients and save money?”  At the link find the title, “WCBA – The Toyota Way Podcast,” right-click “Download WCBA – The Toyota Way Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Improv for Scientists 19 mins – “Actor/director Alan Alda talks to us about problems in science communication today and why improv—yes, improv—can help scientists connect better with their audience. Physicist and World Science Festival co-founder Brian Greene joins in the conversation as Science & the City goes behind the scenes of the 2011 Festival.” At the link find the title, “Improv for Scientists, Friday, June 10, 2011,” right-click “110610_ImprovforScientists.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India in World War One 50 mins – “In the Indian capital Delhi stands India Gate, the largest memorial to the war for which 1.5 million Indian men were recruited. But Anita Rani discovers that World War One is something of a forgotten memory today, seen as part of its colonial history. She sets out to uncover some of the forgotten stories.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: India’s Forgotten War,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20141024-1105a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Irish Church Scandal 27 mins – “Women abused in institutions run by the Catholic Church are demanding answers from religious authorities and the government. But will the latest inquiry give them any peace?” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Ireland’s Forced Labour Survivors,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20141023-0330a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from te pop-up menu.

Linux Laptops 103 mins – “Apple was right! The magic of hardware and operating system made for each other. Everything just works when a computer’s hardware and software are designed to work together.” At the link find the title, “Oct 17: #258 – Computer America #78,” right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lost Innocence P2 54 mins – “A rebroadcast of the highly-acclaimed award-winning CBC Radio series commemorating the outbreak of World War II.” At the link find the title, “Children on Lost Innocence, Part 2 – War At A Distance the Canadian home front tell of their fears and excitement,” right-click “Download Lost Innocence, Part 2 – War At A Distance” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lost Innocence P3 54 mins – “Livia Bittman-Jackson and Mariam Steiner were young girls when the Nazi’s marched into their villages and deported them to concentration camps. They recall the horror of the Holocaust.” At the link find the title, “Lost Innocence, Part 3 – Children of the Holocaust.” right-click “Download Lost Innocence, Part 3 – Children of the Holocaust” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Magnesium Chloride 6 mins – “Many of the simple inorganic compounds have a common name – because they are familiar from some everyday use – but magnesium chloride remains resolutely in the shade of other salts, and, despite being widely used, it has nothing to make it sound more friendly. Like many such compounds there is no clear date of discovery, but we do know that Michael Faraday produced magnesium metal by electrolysis of magnesium chloride back in 1833 and this process is still a major industrial source of the metal. The magnesium salt is typically extracted from salt water, particularly high salt content sources like the Dead Sea and the Great Salt Lake in Utah,…” At the link right-click “Download: CIIE_MagnesiumChloride.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malaria Update 13 mins – “Fatoumata Nafo-Traoré is the executive director of the Roll Back Malaria Partnership. In this podcast, she updates us on recent successes in the global effort to control the disease. A second podcast examines the effect of the current ebola outbreak on the prevention and treatment of malaria, and other diseases, in affected regions.” At the link find the title, “Update on malaria – new technologies helping to tackle the disease, October 24, 2014” right-click “Media files 173658604-bmjgroup-update-on-malaria-new-technologies-helping-to-tackle-the-disease.mp3” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Microbiome 37 mins – “The genome of the bacteria that colonize our bodies vastly dwarfs our human genome! How will this new finding change how we understand our health? Dr. Martin Blaser, Director of the Human Microbiome Program at the NYU School of Medicine; Dr. Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello, Associate Professor of Medicine at New York University Medical Center; and Dr. Lawrence Brandt, Professor of Medicine and Surgery at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine discuss the consequences of our co-evolution with bacteria and debate the implications for medical research. Christine Gorman, Senior Editor for Health and Medicine at Scientific American, moderates.” At the link find the title, “Hats Off to Bacteria! December 12, 2013,” right-click “hatsofftobacteria.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Modern Surveillance 59 mins – “In 1787, British philosopher and social reformer Jeremy Bentham conceived of the panopticon, a ring of cells observed by a central watchtower, as a labor-saving device for those in authority. In French philosopher Michel Foucault’s groundbreaking 1975 study, Discipline and Punish, the panopticon became a metaphor to describe the creeping effects of personalized surveillance as a means for ever-finer mechanisms of control. Years later, the available tools of scrutiny, supervision, and discipline are far more capable and insidious than Foucault dreamed, and yet less effective than Bentham hoped. Shopping malls, container ports, terrorist holding cells, and social networks all bristle with cameras, sensors, and trackers. But, crucially, they are also rife with resistance and prime opportunities for revolution. In this talk authors Emily Horne — a creator of the webcomic A Softer World — and Tim Maly — writer and Fellow at Harvard’s metaLAB — discuss their new book The Inspection House, and paint a stark, vivid portrait of our contemporary surveillance state and its opponents.” At the link right-click “Download the MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Molecule Handedness 13 mins – “Kent Kirshenbaum, an NYU chemistry professor, explains his team’s recent discovery of how to make molecules with a twist – these molecules can fold in to twisted helical shapes that can accelerate selected chemical reactions.” At the link find the title, “Twisted Molecules August 28, 2009,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Myth of Prosecution 52 mins – “Religion scholar Candida Moss began thinking about Christian martyrs when she heard a sermon comparing the plight of today’s believers to that of the early church. But when she started exploring what early Christians really endured, she learned that these stories of victimization had been exaggerated and even invented to inspire the faithful. Friday, Moss joins Doug to talk about what she calls the myth of persecution and how those stories continue to create the “us vs them” mindset of today. Candida Moss is a Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at the University of Notre Dame. Her book is called The Myth of Persecution: How Early Christians Invented a Story of Martyrdom.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Nutrition Research 70 mins (3 parts) – In Part One: “Scientists, health professionals, and food industry representatives discuss the process of putting the Research Agenda for Nutrition Science into action. Creating the agenda was a great first step, but effectively activating it is just as complex and important. A cross-section of experts from around the world discusses this process and their hopes and plans for the future of the field. In Part Two: “What, how and why we eat is a broad and complex issue touching on almost every discipline of the sciences, so how does a scientist know what questions have the potential to make the greatest impact? The Academy’s own Mandana Arabi discusses the creation of a roadmap for the study of human nutrition….” In part Three: “Experts from all aspects of the nutrition community, from food science to food production and beyond, gather at the Academy to discuss the nutrition science agenda, and how it can best be developed and used to move the field forward.” At the link find the titles, “A Research Agenda forNutrition Science: Why and How?,” “A Research Agenda for Nutrition Science: Mobilizing the Community,” and “A Research Agenda for Nutrition Science: Activating the Agenda,” then right-clicking, in turn, “NutritionResearchAgenda1.mp3,” “NutritionResearchAgenda2.mp3,” and “NutritionResearchAgenda3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menus.

Online Harassment 51 mins – “#GamerGate has put the issue of women and online harassment in the headlines. It started as an ex-boyfriend’s rant and turned into a debate about the video game industry. Alongside the legitimate online discussion, there emerged a campaign of cyber threats against female game developers and critics. Anonymous messages on Twitter became so violent that three women have fled their homes, while others were forced offline. Yet, no arrests have been made, and the cyber attacks continue. This case is extreme, but it reflects an experience that is not unique. A study from 2012 found that one in five adults in the U.S. has suffered online harassment –- and the majority of victims are women. Today on the show: a look at online harassment of women and why it’s so hard to address.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Phages Fight Bacteria 9 mins – “This episode: Some phages can fight back against bacterial defenses with recently discovered genes!” At the link find the title, “BacterioFiles 180 – Phage Functions Fight Fortifications,” right-click “Download episode” and select and “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phages for Acne 3 mins – “This episode: Scientists find that phages might be good for treating acne!” At the link find the title, “BacterioFiles Micro Edition 106 – Bacteriophages Bust Blackheads,” right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phages in Bacteria 11 mins – “This episode: Defective phages in bacterial genomes can still have burdensome effects! Why do the bacteria keep them around?” At the link find the title, “BacterioFiles 179 – Functionless Phages Feel Fatiguing,” right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phages in the Gut 5 mins – “This episode: Gut bacteria use phages to beat their competition!” At the link find the title, “BacterioFiles Micro Edition 108 – Firing Phages to Fight faecalis,” right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save LinkAs” from the pop-up menu.

Phages Protect Food 14 mins – “This episode: Phages could be used to reduce infection with dangerous bacteria from meat and vegetables!” At the link find the title, “177 – Phages Fight Food Filth,” right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Quantum Moment 9 mins – “Politicians, writers, and even Lady Gaga have referenced quantum physics, but in its early, more scientific days, quantum mechanics was the source of a tussle between Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr.” At the link find the title, “Quantum: a Pop Culture Moment,” right-click “IHUB-102514-D.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Qubits 29 mins – “Russ talks with Kyriakos Porfyrakis, Head of Laboratory for Carbon Materials at the University of Oxford. Kyriakos is studying endohedral fullerenes, or “qubits” – atoms that are inserted into spherical fullerene molecules in order to induce electronic properties. Qubits may help revolutionize electronic devices in the near future.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rating Television 12 mins – “TV shows live and die by Nielsen ratings, but does their data still matter in a Netflix world? It all depends on advertisers, says TIME media critic James Poniewozik.” At the link find the title, “Rating Television,” right-click “IHUB-102514-A.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Recycling NYC Paper 21 mins – “From your old magazines to a brand new recycled paper pizza box, we take a trip to Pratt Industry’s Staten Island paper recycling facility to see how NYC’s paper is reused.” At the link find the title, “New York’s Paper Solutions Thursday, September 18, 2008,” right-click “091908recycling.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Religious Objections 52 mins – “There’s been a lot of talk recently about religious freedom, and it seems to have intensified as gay marriages have become legal in many states. Sen Orrin Hatch calls judges “uniformly hostile to religion.” Pundits see Sen Ted Cruz building a presidential campaign on the idea that religious liberty has “never been in more peril.” But the researcher and activist Jay Michaelson says this is a political strategy to marshal allies in the ongoing culture wars. He’ll join us to dissect what he sees as a “covert campaign against civil rights.’” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Right to Vote 25 mins – “This past weekend, the Supreme Court upheld Texas’ harsh voter ID law for the upcoming midterm elections, potentially disenfranchising some 600,000 mostly black and Latino voters. The Lone Star state’s voter ID law is part of a nationwide effort to suppress the vote, nurtured by the right’s desire to hold onto power, as demographic changes are altering the electoral landscape. In the last four years, close to half the states in the US have passed laws restricting the right to vote, the most fundamental principle of democracy…This week, Bill talks with an attorney and journalist about the ongoing vote suppression controversy. Sherrilyn Ifill is president and director-counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, a noted civil rights litigator whose work has included landmark voting rights cases.” At the link find the title, “Full Show: The Fight — and the Right — to Vote,” right-click “Moyers_and_Company_342_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russia in 1914 50 mins – “The Romanovs ruled Russia for centuries until World War One brought revolution and an abrupt end to their imperial reign. Allan Little explores the legacy of revolution and the hidden impact of WW1 on Russian policy today.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: St Petersburg: Revolution,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20141018-1805a.mp3

Russians 51 mins – “Morning Edition co-host David Greene spent five years in Russia as NPR’s Moscow bureau chief. During that time, he took a trip on the Trans-Siberian railway, reporting on the impressions, hopes and dreams of ordinary Russians. The experience affected him so deeply that Greene returned last year for another train trip. This time, he traveled nearly 6,000 miles, from Moscow to Vladivostok, interviewing people from all different parts of the country, including Siberia. The Russians he meets share the same struggle with old soviet ghosts of corruption and oppression. But most are deeply ambivalent about democratic reform. A cross-country journey into the heart of modern Russia.” [Greene’s book is Midnight in Siberia.] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Scotch Whiskies 17 mins – “Simon Brooking is the master ambassador for Ardmore and Laphroaig Single Malt Scotch whiskies. A well-known expert on Scotch whisky, he has worked for a number of leading Scotch distilleries, learning the art and science of distilling from the world’s foremost master distillers and blenders. Born in Edinburgh, Scotland and a member of the Robertson Clan, he traces his roots back to the 13th Century and the Celtic Earls of Atholl. For over 10 years, Simon has led hundreds of Scotch whisky tastings for consumers, bartenders, and social organizations. Both informing and entertaining, his presentations have made him an in-demand speaker and spokesperson. At the Academy Brooking will present a talk titled “The Science and Craft of Single Malt Scotch from Malting to Maturation: An Exploration of ‘The Water of Life.'” At the link find the title, “The Science of Scotch, May 2008” right-click “scotch.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Pass Route 51 mins – “The Rocky Mountains have always posed a forbidding obstacle for travelers, but there’s one place where “God ran out of mountains,” and passage is relatively easy. For generations, Indians, fur traders, missionaries, and explorers moved through South Pass, a treeless valley in southwestern Wyoming. It’s a place rich with history and extraordinary tales, and it’s the focus of historian Will Bagley’s latest book. He joins us to explain how South Pass figured in the development of the American West… Bagley is an independent historian and author of numerous books. His latest is South Pass: Gate to a Continent.” At the link right-click on the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stem Cell Research 32 mins – “Dr. John Murray, a lawyer and geneticist, and Dr. Chris Henderson, scientific director of Target ALS, discuss the field of stem cell research and a recent legal challenge. The Supreme Court recently refused to hear a case challenging federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. Experts discuss the case and its consequences, as well as exciting research being done with stem cells towards a treatment for Lou Gehrig’s disease.” At the link find the title, “Lab Bench Meets Federal Bench: The Supreme Court and Stem Cell Research, February 15, 2013,” right-click “stem cell research.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sugar Overview 39 mins – “The battle of wills to resist the last cupcake isn’t the only one being waged over sugar. In fact, sugar—or fructose to be more precise—is one of the most hotly contested subjects in the world of nutrition. Find out why in the fifth edition of our nutrition series.” Mentioned during the podcast is that there are forty-eight names for sucrose. At the link find the title, “A Thought for Food: Sugar in the Morning… June 27, 2012,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Toll Roads 41 mins – “Toll roads make up a fraction of America’s highways, but their number is growing. More than 5,000 miles of U.S. roads require tolls today, up 15 percent over the past decade. One reason: The highway trust fund is in crisis. It’s currently financed by a federal gas tax that has not risen since Bill Clinton was president. So states are looking for other ways to pay for much needed transportation projects. Current laws prohibit the tolling of existing interstate highways. But many infrastructure advocates would like to change that. Others argue public roads should be accessible to all Americans. Diane and her [5] guests discuss how best to pay for highways and the future of toll roads.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Venter on Research  62 mins – “The leader of the private-sector human genome project has published an autobiography.” In this interview he refers to it, but focuses on genomic research. At the link find the title, “A Life Decoded: Craig Venter, February 22, 2008,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Village Projects 24 mins – “Engineering students in the Projects for Underserved Communities program at UT Austin are proving you’re never too young to make a difference by putting science to good use.” At the link find the title, “Engineering Sustainable Futures, February 13, 2014,” right-click “EngineeringSustainableFutures.MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Viral Research 40 mins – “As the US government calls a temporary halt to experiments that can make viruses more transmissible or virulent, we explore the pros and cons of this research and the impact of the moratorium. In the studio are Wendy Barclay, professor of influenza virology at Imperial College London, Nicola Davis of Observer Tech Monthly, and Azeen Ghorayshi, a freelance science journalist based in London. And down the line is Marc Lipsitch, professor of epidemiology at Harvard.” This takes 35 mins and the remaining time deals with brain games and dinosaurs. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Dogs 51 mins – “Dogs were not officially made a part of the U.S. military until 1942. But their history of working on battlefields worldwide stretches back much further. Today, American military working dogs detect improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, with remarkable accuracy. They also provide comfort to men and women in uniform suffering emotional and physical wounds of war. But they are not always given the recognition that journalist Rebecca Frankel believes they deserve. When she began her weekly column on U.S. war dogs in 2010, she found that many were unaware of the critical role they can play in U.S. military missions. Frankel joins Diane to take us inside the world of war dogs.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Water Supply 58 mins – “Creating and maintaining a clean, sustainable water supply means delivering drinking water and collecting wastewater while dealing with pathogenic microorganisms and infrastructure challenges. It’s not all challenges, however. Two speakers; Sudhir Murthy, PhD, PE, BCEE, Innovation Chief at DC Water, and Kellogg Schwab, PhD, Director of the Johns Hopkins University Water Institute, will speak to Microbes After Hours about promising new endeavors in water management as well as issues of water safety.” At the link right-click “MP3 Audio Only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White Bread 19 mins – “The first print advertisement for Wonder Bread came out before the bread itself. It stated only that “a wonder” was coming. In a lot of ways, the statement was true. Wonder Bread was the perfect loaf. “Slow food” advocates have pronounced industrial white bread of any brand a symbol of a modern grocery problem: consumers don’t know where our food comes from. The funny thing is that industrial white bread—that evenly sliced, squishy, moist, perfectly white and wondrous loaf—was once a highly designed solution to that very same problem.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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