Media Mining Digest 140 – 18 July 2014: AirBnB, Alaska, Abumin, American Red Light District, Antibiotic Impact on Health, Asphalt Sealers, Bakelite, Behavior Rewards, Blind Dining, Boko Harum, Bubble gum, CarShare, Cholesterol, Chosing to Die, College Voters, Cosmos Series, Education Trends, Experts and Research, FCC Internet Rules, Fire Escapes, Forensic Research, GMO Labeling, Graphene, Howard U, Innovation Districts, ISIS Defined, Jared Diamond, Jazz in India, Language and Technology, Libertarian Manifesto, Media Trends, Online Learning Research, Opsins, Petrol, Population Growth and Climate Change, Post Doc Surplus, Power and Leadership, Power Grid Future, Racism Struggle, Radioactive Waste, Real Estate Trends, Religion and Beliefs, Religion and the State, Salvarsan, Sharing Economy, Squalene, Taxi Drivers, Uber and Lyft, Whales vs Sonar

The following audio files come from a larger group of 257 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 49 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

AirBnB 46 mins – “Summertime, with a little luck, is vacation time at some point.  Pack the car.  Hit the road, the skies.  Head for the hills, the lake, the beach, the city of your dreams.  And when you get there?  Well, things are changing.  Maybe there’s a little cabin or motel or grand hotel you’ve always loved.  A house you’ve always rented.  And suddenly, everybody’s hopping online and sharing.  Snagging houses and apartments and cottages on Airbnb that take them right out of hotel lobbies and into, well, maybe your neighborhood.  This hour On Point:  summer vacations in the age of the sharing economy and Airbnb.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alaska  52 mins  – “Interior Alaska can be a forbidding place. The region is largely wilderness, covered with expansive stretches of tundra and towering mountain ranges. Winters are long and dark, with just a few hours of sunlight on the shortest days and temperatures that often plunge to -50F. Because of its isolation and climate, the region has long attracted people drawn to the challenges and opportunities of a wild, remote place. In this episode of SOTRU [State of the Re Union], we’ll meet a number of athletes, journalists, scientists, and activists who embody the spirit of Interior Alaska through their grit, determination, and iconoclasm.” At the link find the title, “Interior Alaska,” right-click “Alaska_Podcast.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Albumin 5 mins – “Albumin – the protein with an i – should not be confused with albumen with an e. Historically albumen with an e referred to any water soluble protein and is still used to refer to things like egg white. Albumin with an i refers to a specific protein found in blood plasma….” At the link right-click (or here) “Download: CIIE_Albumin.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Red Light District 61 mins – “The history of the American red light district is quite brief –- from railroad signal lights to hotel bathroom selfies -– and clouded in myth. Soon it may be lost. In this talk, Melissa Gira Grant — freelance journalist and author of “Playing the Whore: The Work of Sex Work” (Verso, 2014) — reconsiders how communication technologies shape sex-for-sale, proposes that sex work has merged with the network, and discusses what we can learn from how sex workers have remained a step ahead.” At the link (or here) right-click “Download the MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotic Impact on Health 51 mins – “The development of antibiotics in the 1940s ushered in a golden age of medicine. Bacterial infections and illnesses that were commonly fatal became treatable. But researchers now say the overuse of antibiotics has disturbed the natural balance of beneficial bacteria in our bodies. New studies indicate that some diseases – including obesity, childhood diabetes and asthma – may be on the rise because we have upset the delicate equilibrium of microbes in our gut and on our skin. In the next hour, Diane Rehm talks with two leading medical experts about this new research.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Asphalt Sealers 3 mins – “Pavement sealant ban lessens environmental risks.” At the link find the title, “Episode 389 – July 07, 2014,” right-click “direct link” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bakelite 5 mins – “When early humans first began to produce tools and other artefacts, they were limited to stone and living matter – whether wood, plant material or animal-based – as the basis for their manufacturing. With time, the ability to heat materials and process them added metals, glass and ceramics like pottery to that line up. But for a good two thousand years there was nothing else available. In the early 1900s a sixth type of substance, the first truly artificial manufacturing material, joined the original five. It was called Bakelite….” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Behavior Rewards 12 mins – “Congestion on city streets or mass-transit systems would be much less of a problem if more commuters were willing to shift their travel to off-peak times. Some cities, such as London, have tried to address this problem by charging drivers a congestion fee during busy times. But Balaji Prabhakar, a professor in the department of electrical engineering and computer science at Stanford University, believes that rewarding drivers for good behavior gets better results than punishing them for bad behavior. To this end, he has created a so-called nudge engine….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Dining  20 mins – “Red Szell tests the new and much-talked about SmartGlasses being developed by Oxford University, and are you self-conscious about eating out?” At the link find the title, “SmartGlasses; Eating Out,” right-click (here or there) “Download 9MB ” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boko Haram 27 mins – “Yalda Hakim hears from residents deep in Boko Haram territory, in northern Nigeria, who are caught between the Islamist militant group and the Nigerian military.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Nigeria Undercover,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20140710-0330a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bubble Gum 6 mins – “Our story begins in 1928. Walter E. Diemer, an accountant in a food company, liked to spend his spare time fiddling with recipes for new products. Generally, his experiments yielded duds. But one day, he hit on a magic formula – and also happened to find some pink dye lying around the factory. What did Walter Diemer create?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CarShare  29 mins – “Shared mobility – it’s a concept that might be a little foreign to the millions of Americans who get in their cars by themselves everyday and embark on a solo, carbon-intensive oh-so-individual drive to wherever they need to go. But there are new converts to the shared mobility model every day. City CarShare is a San Francisco Bay Area-based non-profit that provides its members with temporary cars. The organization’s mission is actually to take cars off the road by allowing more city-dwellers to eschew car ownership altogether.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cholesterol 6 mins – “Most people who know anything about Dorothy Hodgkin know that she solved the 3D structure of insulin. This was what she was most famous for – this and the technique she used: x-ray diffraction. But insulin’s fiendishly difficult structure took her three decades to crack – she began on it before the outbreak of the second world war and finished it in the year of the moon landing – and in the meantime she turned her attention to other important biological structures. In fact, she received her Nobel prize before the work for which she is best remembered was completed. By 1964, when the prize was awarded, she had already published the 3D crystallographic structures of penicillin and vitamin B12. But she is also credited with nailing the first 3D structure of a complex bio-organic molecule. And that molecule was cholesterol….” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chosing to Die 51 mins – “The aid in dying movement is growing. Montana, Oregon and Washington already have laws permitting right-to-die options. In January, a New Mexico district court authorized physicians to provide lethal prescriptions to mentally competent terminally ill adults. And last year, Vermont passed a law permitting patients to choose what advocates call “death with dignity.” Public support of assisted dying has expanded in recent years as baby boomers deal with the death of their parents, many of whom are living into their 80s and 90s and suffering from diseases linked to longevity, such as dementia and many types of cancer. Diane and her [4] guests discuss the aid in dying movement and what is driving its growth.” At the link you can listen to the audio but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

College Voters  9 mins – “College students in North Carolina say the state’s new voter ID law violates their right to vote based on age. They’re challenging the law in court. Host Michel Martin learns more about the case.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cosmos Series  45 mins – “…Fox’s and National Geographic’s new Cosmos series set a new milestone in television history. According to National Geographic, it was the largest global rollout of a TV series ever, appearing on 220 channels in 181 countries, and 45 languages…  At the center of the show is the “heir apparent” to legendary science popularizer and original Cosmos host Carl Sagan: astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, who we interview on this week’s episode about what it’s like to fill Sagan’s shoes. Tyson discusses topics ranging from what we know now about the Cosmos that Sagan didn’t to why science seems to have gotten so supercool again. This episode also features a discussion of whether bringing extinct species back to life is a good idea, and of new research suggesting that climate change led to the rise of Genghis Khan.” At the link click “Download” and “OK” with “Save File” on the pop-up menu.

Education Trends 16 mins – “Technology theorist Clay Shirky has been studying the Internet since before most of us had email. In the first part of our interview, he says that the media need to shape up, or prepare for extinction.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Experts and Research 55 mins – “Remember “Climategate”? It was the 2009 non-scandal scandal in which a trove of climate scientists’ emails, pilfered from the University of East Anglia in the UK, were used to call all of modern climate research into question. ..  Suddenly, these “experts” looked more like ordinary human beings who speak their minds, who sometimes have emotions and rivalries with one another, and (shocker) don’t really like people who question the validity of their knowledge…  On the show this week we talked to Collins about why scientific expertise matters—especially in a world where more and more people are getting their answers from Google searches. At the link click “Download,” then “OK” and “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

FCC Internet Rules 29 mins – “Kevin Werbach, Matt Wood, and Randolph May talked about the Federal Communications Commission’s proposed rules that could allow Internet service providers to charge content companies for faster delivery, and what the proposals mean for net neutrality and the future of the Internet.” At the link you can listen /watch, but an audio download costs $.99; however, a copy is included in the bog archive.

Fire Escapes 19 mins – “When designing a commercial structure, there is one safety component that must be designed right into the building from the start: egress. ” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Research 44 mins – “As a writer, Deborah Blum says she has a “love of evil chemistry.” It seems that audiences do too: Her latest book, The Poisoner’s Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York, was not only a bestseller, but was just turned into a film by PBS. The book tells the story of Charles Norris, New York City’s first medical examiner, and Alexander Gettler, his toxicologist and forensic chemist. They were a scientific and medical duo who brought real evidence and reliable forensic techniques to the pressing task of apprehending poisoners, who were running rampant at the time because there was no science capable of catching them. On the show this week we talk to Blum about this “golden age for poisoners” and the science that goes along with it. This episode also features an interview with Quartz meteorology writer Eric Holthaus about whether global warming may be producing more extreme cold weather in the mid-latitudes, just like what much of America experienced this week.” At the link click “Download,” then “OK” to “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Labeling 46 mins – “More than 60 countries around the world, and nearly all of Europe, require the labeling of genetically modified foods – GMOs.  The United States does not.  This spring, Vermont voted to require foods with GMO ingredients to be labeled.  First state to do it.  It’s a big deal.  Crack the fierce industry resistance in one state, and it could spread all over.  Oregon voters just submitted petitions to put GMO labeling to a popular vote in November.  Monsanto and big food distributors hate it.   Say we need the science and the GMO food.  This hour On Point:  the GMO labeling fight in America.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graphene 6 mins – “…Graphene has since amazed and inspired researchers with its abilities. It is 200 times stronger than steel, making it one of the strongest materials ever tested. In fact, it would take an elephant, standing on a pin, to produce enough pressure to break through the single sheet of atoms. It has both the highest electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity of any material at room temperature, beating silver and diamond respectively….” At the link (or here) right-click  “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Howard U  59 mins – “Wayne A.I. Frederick talked about the challenges facing Howard University and other historically black colleges, as well as the state of higher education in the United States. Mr. Frederick also spoke about his career as a surgical oncologist and his upbringing in Trinidad and Tobago, including his fight with sickle cell anemia.”  At the link you can listen/watch, but an audio download costs $.99; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Innovation Districts 46 mins – “Every city planner wants an “innovation district” these days.  That hot, hip, high-tech neighborhood where coffee shops and capital and talent churn together to turn out new businesses and economic growth.  They’re in Barcelona and Berlin, Seoul and Stockholm.  They’re up or coming in Boston, Seattle, St. Louis, Philadelphia,  Atlanta, Cleveland – all over.  Everybody wants their own urban Silicon Valley.  Well, almost everybody.  There’s pushback, too.  And a hot debate right now on the innovation bandwagon itself.  This hour On Point:  innovation districts in America.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Defined  46 mins – “Until they came bursting into Mosul last month with black flags and pick-up trucks, ISIS was – to most Americans – just part of a chaotic jumble of fighters in Syria.  The next thing we knew, they had taken over a huge swath of Iraq, declared themselves the Islamic State, and announced a new caliphate in the heart of the Middle East.  This weekend the self-proclaimed caliph of the caliphate – Abu Bakr al Baghdadi – purportedly stepped out of the shadows and spoke to the world.  They’re too brutal for al Qaeda.  They literally crucify.  And right now they rule.  This hour On Point:  ISIS and the Islamic State.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jared Diamond  52 mins   – “Jared Diamond, author of a suite of massive, bestselling books about the precarious state of our civilization (including the Pulitzer-winning Guns, Germs, and Steel), calls himself “cautiously optimistic” about the future of humanity.  …Diamond’s first book, The Third Chimpanzee: The Evolution and Future of the Human Animal… It’s a sweeping survey of who we humans are—evolutionarily speaking, that is—and what that says about whether we can solve the “various messes that we’re making now,” as Diamond puts it. And this month, The Third Chimpanzee has been released in a new, shortened and illustrated edition for young adults, underscoring Diamond’s sense that our entire future depends on “enabl[ing] young people to make better decisions than their parents.”  …This episode also features a discussion of the science (and superstition) behind this week’s “blood moon,” and the case of K.C., the late amnesiac patient who taught us so much about the nature of human memory.” At the link click “Download,” then “OK” to “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Jazz in India 27 mins – ” Sarfraz Manzoor charts the extraordinary story of jazz in India when some of the world’s most accomplished musicians including Dave Brubeck, Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong brought their talents to the east and mixed with performers such as Chic Chocolate, Micky Correa, Teddy Weatherford and Frank Fernand – all regarded in India today as jazz legends.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Bombay Jazz,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140709-0332a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language and Technology 11 mins – “To the annoyance of teachers everywhere, students now turn in papers with abbreviations they learned from texting, sentences with lower-case “i”s, and other grammatical taboos.  Frustrating, yes, but do these tiny shifts really change language itself? “People notice the novelties, the sudden inventiveness that people do when they get this new technology and they think ‘oh dear, oh dear the entire language is changing.’ But in actual fact, only small bits of the language are changing,” says David Crystal, a British linguist and author of over 100 books, including “How Language Works” and “Language and the Internet.’” At the link right-click on the down-pointing arrow on the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Libertarian Manifesto 59 mins – “Matt Kibbe talked about his book, Don’t Hurt People and Don’t Take Their Stuff: A Libertarian Manifesto, in which he argues that the U.S. Constitution gives Americans the right to self-determination, but politicians and corporate leaders have been steadily eroding that right for decades. In his book, Mr. Kibbe provides what he believes is a foolproof plan to restore Constitutional liberties. He talked with Tim Carney, director of the American Enterprise Institute’s Culture of Competition Project.” At the link you can listen/watch, but a download costs $.99; however, a copy is included in this blog’s archive.

Media Trends 16 mins – “Technology theorist Clay Shirky has been studying the Internet since before most of us had email. In the first part of our interview, he says that the media need to shape up, or prepare for extinction.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the right end of the top sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online Learning Research  78 mins – “Millions of learners on platforms like edX and Coursera are generating terabytes of data tracking their activity in real time. Online learning platforms capture extraordinarily detailed records of student behavior, and now the challenge for researchers is to explore how these new datasets can be used to advance the science of learning. In this edX co-sponsored talk Justin Reich — educational researcher, co-founder of EdTechTeacher, and Berkman Fellow — examines current trends and future directions in research into online learning in large-scale settings.” At the link (or here) right-click ” Download the MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opsins  7 mins – “Of all the complex compounds that make the human body work, it’s hard not to have a particular fondness for the opsins, sometimes called retinylidene proteins. These tangled molecules, formed of a bundle of seven helixes, change their signalling pathways in response to being hit by light. They are the compounds that give us sight.  Animals aren’t alone in making use of opsins – some bacteria use different members of the opsin family to produce energy from light – but it is the opsins in animal eyes that make such a difference in their sensory environment….” At the link right-click (or here) “Download: CIIE_Opsins.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Petrol 7 mins – “…A good way to get a feel for just how much energy petrol packs in is to compare it with the explosive TNT. Petrol has 15 times the energy per unit weight of TNT. The reason we think of TNT as packing such a punch is that it releases its energy so quickly – but a kilogram of petrol has much more oomph than a kilogram of TNT. Another useful comparison that illustrates the effectiveness of petrol is that it enables us to drive cars with, say, 100 horsepower. That’s around 75 kilowatts. To get that kind of power from current solar panels would require about 500 square metres – that’s a lot of solar panels on top of your car….” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Population Growth and Climate Change 44 mins – “This week, Chris Mooney talks to environmental journalist Alan Weisman, who explains why, following on his 2007 New York Times bestseller, The World Without Us, he decided to centrally take on the issue of human population. For his just-published book Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth?, Weisman traveled to 21 countries—from Israel to Mexico, and from Pakistan to Niger—to report on how different cultures are responding to booming populations and the strain this is putting on their governments and resources…This episode of Inquiring Minds also features a discussion of the latest myths circulating on global warming, and the brave new world of gene therapy that we’re entering—where being rich might be your key ticket to the finest health care.” At the link click “Download,” then “OK” to “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Post Doc Surplus 54 mins – “… According to Brandeis University biochemist Dr. Gregory Petsko, who recently chaired a National Academy of Sciences committee on the postdoctoral experience in the US, less than 20 percent of aspiring postdocs today get highly coveted jobs in academia. That’s less than one in five. Naturally, many more end up in industry, in government, and in many other sectors—but not the one they were trained for or probably hoping for… This episode also features a story about the upcoming release of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s report on global warming impacts, and a discussion about the difficult question of when screening for disease conditions is (and isn’t) a good idea.” At the link click “Download” then “OK” to “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Power and Leadership 68 mins – “Michael Lindsay, co-author of View from the Top: An Inside Look at How People in Power See and Shape the World, talked about the results of his ten-year study on power and leadership in America. Mr. Lindsay said that a few thousand people in the U.S. make decisions that impact the rest of us. He and his team conducted in-depth interviews with 550 government and business leaders to find out how they operated. After his remarks he was joined by his co-author, M.G. Hager, to answer questions from members of the audience….” At the link you can listen/watch, but an audio download costs $.99; however, a copy is included in the this blog’s archive.

Power Grid Future 11 mins – “…What will the power grid look like 50 years from now? More importantly, what do we want it to look like, and how will we supply reliable, affordable, and sustainable electricity to a global population that may reach 10 billion by midcentury? IEEE Spectrum considered those important questions as part of its recent special report “The Future We Deserve.” Clark Gellings is one of the world’s leading experts on the electricity system. He’s a Fellow of the Electric Power Research Institute in Palo Alto, California, and also a Life Fellow of the IEEE. During the course of his 46-year career, his ideas, his writing, and his testimony have really helped propel the electricity industry toward greater energy efficiency, more widespread adoption of the smart grid, and more integration of renewable energy and other clean technologies….” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism Struggle 27 mins – “Baroness Oona King, former British Labour MP, discovers her American family’s role in the fight for equality. Her grandfather and uncles worked with Martin Luther King in The Albany Movement, a campaign that tried to desegregate their home town in Georgia. Oona travelled to Albany to speak to members of the movement on the 50th anniversary of the passing of The Civil Rights Act.” At the link find the title, “My Family’s Fight for Civil Rights,” right-click ” Media files docarchive_20140702-0332a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radioactive Waste  30 mins – “…Edward H. Kraus Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences at the University of Michigan talks about how to keep materials from losing their structures when irradiated. He also explains how biological species are capable of storing radioactive material.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Real Estate Trends 46 mins – “…The American real estate market is not the same since the Great Recession.  Private equity firms buying up tons of houses.  Mortgage rates low, but mortgages still hard to snag.  And then there are the foreign home buyers.  More than ever.  From all over the world.  Looking at the US and seeing a great place to own.  To, in effect, stash money.  And sometimes to launder it.  When you hear “all-cash purchase,” that cash may well be from abroad.  They’re buying $90 million condos in New York, and maybe something on your block.  This hour On Point:  foreign buyers, American real estate.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Religion and Beliefs  54 mins   – “Public discussion of religion tends to polarize between two extremes. But much of what people actually believe falls somewhere in between. David Cayley speaks to five thinkers whose books have charted new paths for religion. Part 4: James Carse.” At the link find the title, “After Atheism: New Perspectives on God and Religion, Part 4 (Encore May 3, 2012),” right click (there or here) “Download After Atheism: New Perspectives on God and Religion, Part 4 (Encore May 3, 2012)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Religion and the State  54 mins – “Public discussion of religion tends to polarize between two extremes. But much of what people actually believe falls somewhere in between. David Cayley speaks to five thinkers whose books have charted new paths for religion. Part 3: William Cavanaugh.” At the link find the title, “After Atheism: New Perspectives on God and Religion, Part 3 (Encore May 2, 2012) ,” right click (there or here) “Download After Atheism: New Perspectives on God and Religion, Part 3 (Encore May 2, 2012)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salvarsan 7 mins – “A black and white movie; the scene is a doctor’s office. A young man is slumped dejectedly in his chair, head in hands, while the doctor impotently attempts consolation. ‘You mustn’t be disheartened,’ he offers, ‘there are many as badly off as you.’  …this is the opening sequence of a film made in 1940 and the scene itself is set over 100 years before today. The diagnosis is in fact syphilis and the film is Dr Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet: a biopic of Paul Ehrlich and the story of the first chemotherapeutic drug: Salvarsan, also known as arsphenamine. Syphilis was the 19th century version of today’s Aids epidemic – … no treatment existed that could successfully halt its progress through the stages of infection, ultimately leading to tumorous, necrotic growths, damage to the brain and heart, and eventually death….” At the link right-click (or here) “Download: CIIE_Salvarsan.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharing Economy 63 mins – “Mike Munger of Duke University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the sharing economy–companies like Uber, AirBnB, FlightApp, and DogVacay that let people share their houses, cars, or other assets with strangers in exchange for money. These companies dramatically increase the use of resources that would otherwise be idle and disrupt existing services such as hotels and taxis. Topics discussed include the regulatory response to these companies, the politics of that response, and the significance of these new products. The conversation closes with the potential impact of Uber combining with driverless cars to change the automobile industry and cities. ” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Squalene 5 mins – “…it is true that if sharks don’t keep swimming they will sink. The reason is that they don’t have a gas-filled balloon, known as a swim bladder, like most bony fish do. Instead sharks have evolved large, oil-rich livers that help boost their buoyancy, although not as much as if they carried around a bubble of air inside them. A major component of that shark liver oil is an organic molecule called squalene.   …it is less dense than saltwater, which is why it helps to keep sharks buoyant in the water column. Another property of this molecule is being harnessed by people, after researchers discovered that it helps to make vaccines more effective – in particular the flu vaccine. Squalene is used as what’s known as an adjuvant, an effect originally discovered in the 1920s by French researcher Gaston Ramon. He found that adding certain substances to vaccines produced a stronger immune response and he called them ….  At the link right-click ( or here) “Download: CIIE_Squalene.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taxi Drivers 27 mins – “Meet New York’s rookie cabbies – fledgling taxi-drivers trying to earn a living in the most stressful city in the world. Most are immigrants, already grappling with the challenges of a new language and a new culture. Now they have to deal with long hours, short fares, and grumpy passengers in the back.” At the link find thte title, “DocArchive: Yellow Cab Blues,” right click “Media files
docarchive_20140708-0332a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uber and Lyft 20 mins – “…Senior Research Fellow Matthew Mitchell and Associate Director of State Relations Michael Leland discuss taxi regulations that create barriers to entry for ridesharing applications and keep innovators from competing to create the best services available to consumers. Matt discusses red tape holding back taxi companies and how state regulators can move forward in a way that encourages innovation and is fair to existing firms.” At the link right-click “Download MP3″ and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whales vs Sonar 51 mins – “Whales ruled the oceans for tens of millions of years. Until man came along. Like other great creatures on Earth, they may have met their match in modern-day weapons and technology.  A new book tells the story of a fight for survival that pits whales against the U.S. Navy. It has been described as an eco-thriller, except it’s non-fiction. It begins in the Bahamas with a mass stranding of whales. A researcher passionate about marine mammals teams up with a relentless environmental lawyer, and together, they seek to prove that Navy sonar is harming whales. We discuss their battle as it goes to the U.S. Supreme Court – and continues today.” At the link you can listen to the audio but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.
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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3600 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , added to weekly, and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is there too,  and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 180 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

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Media Mining Digest 139 – 11 July 2014: Aero Ruling, Allied Fiber, Astronomy Overview, Bachpacking, Beer History, Caffeine and Athletics, Chair Lift Invention, Childhood Nutrition, Cold Case Crowdsourcing, Collaborative Economy, Declaration of Independence, Deforestation Rate, Democracy Skit, Dewey Decimal and Otlet, Doughboys of WWI, Drugs in Waste Water, Fallout Shelters, Farming Vertically, Fungi, Government Deceit, Government Finances, Hobby Lobby and Unions, Jellyfish Invasion, LBJ and Civil Rights Act, Marijuana Legalized Aftermath, Meat Consumption, North Korea Capitalits, Outsourcing Humanity, Racism, Radio Wave Hazard, Sexuality, Sharing Economy, Solar Assisted Heat Pump, Species Extinction, Storm Surges, Urban Movement, Vaccination Obstacles, World War One Legacy

The following audio files come from a larger group of 204 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 39 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Aereo Ruling 30 mins – “Former Senator Gordon Smith talked about the future of television and gave his perspective on the U.S. Supreme Court decision delivered that day on ABC v. Aereo, Inc. that Aereo was violating copyright law by allowing its subscribers to stream content from broadcast television networks. The National Association of Broadcasters had filed an amicus brief opposing Aereo. Other topics include spectrum auctions, the impact of mergers of large communications companies, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) under Chairman Tom Wheeler, and efforts to extend the Satellite Television Extension and Localism Act, which would expire during 2014.” At the link you can look/listen, but an audio download will cost $.99; however, an audio copy is included in the blog archive.

Allied Fiber 21 mins – “I recall first hearing about Allied Fiber a few years back and not thinking much about it. It seemed like another operator focused on connecting wireless towers and building long haul fiber… but then I heard Hunter Newby’s presentation at Mountain Connect in Colorado. When he noted the need to have infrastructure that financiers could not monopolize, I knew I wanted to have him on our show. Hunter is the Founder and CEO of Allied Fiber, which has just announced its route from Jacksonville to Miami is ready for service. We talk about how the carrier neutral Allied Fiber approach is different from other approaches, in part by combining colocation and ensuring other networks can interconnect almost anywhere along the route….” At the link right-click (here or there) “… download this Mp3 file directly from here…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronomy Overview 25 mins – “(starts at 4:10): how are new technologies and “big data” changing the way we study stars today and in years to come? To discuss those questions, we’re joined in our Boulder studio by Dr. John Bally, a professor of astronomy at the University of Colorado, and Dr. Seth Hornstein, director of the Sommers-Bausch Observatory on the CU campus.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bachpacking 51 mins – “Simone Dinnerstein began studying the piano later in life than most concert pianists. She dropped out of Julliard for a while. And she struggled for recognition. Then she scraped together the funds to record Bach’s Goldberg Variations – and her career took off. The album ranked number one on the U.S. Billboard Classical Music chart its first week out. Three subsequent solo albums also topped the charts. Now she’s taking classical music to public schools with a new endeavor she calls “Bachpacking.” Simone Dinnerstein speaks with Diane about her new album and why she’s passionate about sharing her love of Bach.” At the link you can listen to the audio but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Beer History 31 mins – “Our guests discuss the science behind beer, how modern craft breweries can help us understand ancient beers, and how technology has allowed us to drink like an ancient king. They also discuss the spiritual side of beer and the role beer has played in human evolution.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Caffeine and Athletics  23 mins – “(starts at 4:35): Chances are you’ve already had a cup of coffee this morning or, if you are like me, it was a cup of tea. Or maybe, if you are truly hedonistic, you started the day with a bar of chocolate. Either way, if any of these options are part of your daily routine you’d be one of the 90 percent of people in this country that regularly consumes caffeine, America’s drug of choice. In this week’s show we talk to Murray Carpenter, author of the book Caffeinated: How Our Daily Habit Helps, Hurts and Hooks Us.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chair Lift Invention 4 mins – “Jim Curran was an engineer with a special skill; a skill that led to a 1936 meeting with then president of the Union Pacific Railroad, Averell Harriman. The skill? Loading bunches of bananas onto rail cars….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childhood Nutrition 37 mins – “Experts discuss the merits of integrating nutrition and early childhood development interventions to nurture the physical and psychological health of underprivileged children.” At the link find the title, “
Nutrition and Early Childhood Development,” right-click “NutritionandECD.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cold Case Crowdsourcing  46 mins – “Do-it-yourself detectives.  A new army of freelance amateurs is using the Internet to solve cold cases –long-unsolved homicides—across the country.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Collaborative Economy 53 mins “Amber & Sarah chat with CrowdCompanies Founder Jeremiah Owyang about the collaborative economy, Facebook´s emotional manipulation apology, Vine adds loop numbers, & more!” Most of the program is devoted to the collaborative economy. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Declaration of Independence  51 mins – ” We celebrate its adoption on the Fourth of July – yet few of us have actually read the Declaration of Independence in its entirety. Political scientist Danielle Allen is out to change that. Her latest book, “Our Declaration”, makes the case for a new interpretation of the document – as a living, relevant text with an argument for equality at its core. Inspired by her experience teaching the Declaration to her adult night students, the book invites readers to carefully examine the historical document that Allen says holds particular significance today. For this Fourth of July, equality, democracy and a fresh reading of the Declaration of Independence.” At the link you can listen to the audio but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Deforestation Rate 4 mins – ““We’re continuing to lose forests at a stunning rate,” said Nigel Sizer, director of the forests program at the World Resources Institute in Washington.  “At the rate of 50 soccer fields a minute, every minute, every day, every year.” Sizer can rattle off these figures because he’s been watching deforestation happen in near real time.’” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Skit 12 mins – “A teacher gives his students lesson about democracy that they’ll never forget. Performed by Peter McNerney as Mr. Mohr, Russ Armstrong as Eric, and Alexis Lambright as Margaret, with  Fiona Bradford, Teddy Shivers, Oscar Montoya, and Ben Jones as the principal. From an outline by Louis Kornfeld. Produced & directed by Jonathan Mitchell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dewey Decimal and Otlet 4 mins – “In 1874, a student at Amherst College, Melville Dewey, saw that the problem of finding the specific information we wanted was growing hopelessly complex. Three years later, he’d developed his famous decimal system for classifying books and retrieving information. Then, in 1895, another young student, the Belgian Paul Otlet, took an interest in managing the still-growing information flood. Dewey’s system was in wide use, but Otlet realized that could lead to only one particular source. If you wanted more, you had to start over.” He created the first hyperlink. At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doughboys of WWI  52 mins – “At the center of author Richard Rubin’s latest book, The Last of the Doughboys, are several dozen extraordinary individuals, all more than a century old, all now passed away. They were the final survivors of the millions who made up the American forces that fought in World War I, 19th-century men and women living in the 21st century. Rubin’s book chronicles their remarkable stories and he joins us Monday to tell some of them and to relate how the forgotten war and its forgotten veterans created the modern world.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drugs in Waste Water  3 mins – “New analytical technique could enhance detection of illicit drugs in communities.” At the link find the title, “Episode 386 – June 30 2014,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fallout Shelters  24 mins – “…Abo Elementary is entirely underground, and its roof served as a playground for the kids. There were three separate stairways where kids entered  the building, each equipped with a 1,800-pound steel blast-door and decontamination showers….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Vertically 97 mins – Hosts Dickson Despommier and Vincent Racaniello “…provide an overview of the technologies that allow the practice of indoor farming.” At the link right-click “UrbAg 6″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fungi 6 mins – “Stick a shovel in the ground and you’ll dig up some soil, maybe a few little rocks and, of course, some roots… “When you hold this thing up to the light, what you can see is little tiny filaments,” says geneticist Ian Sanders, holding up a root in his lab at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland…“That’s the fungus,” says Sanders. Sanders is obsessed with fungi, because he thinks they can play a big role in solving the world’s big food challenges in a time of rapid climate change and population growth. In particular, Sanders is obsessed with a type of fungi that live on the roots of about 80 percent of the plants on the planet. Their tiny filaments help plants grow by drawing water and nutrients to the plant. In return, the plants feed sugars to the fungi…“Almost all our food plants naturally form this association with these fungi,” he says.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Deceit 27 mins – “As the exploding crisis in Iraq spotlights once again the tragic record of American policy in the Middle East, Bill speaks with investigative journalist Charles Lewis, whose new book, 935 Lies: The Future of Truth and the Decline of America’s Moral Integrity details the many government falsehoods that have led us into the current nightmare. Lewis details the deceptions and illusions that have caused “most Americans and their elected representatives to completely ignore facts, logic and reason in the rush to war.” A complicit partner, he says, is a media intent on preserving the status quo and never offending the ruling elite.” At the link find the title, “Full Show: The Lies That Lead to War,” right-click “Media files Moyers and Company_325_Podcast.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Finances 58 mins – “Kwasi Kwarteng talked about his book, War and Gold: A 500-Year History of Empires, Adventures, and Debt, in which he chronicles the history of money since the Spanish discovery of the Americas, its relationship to war, and the resulting impact the interconnection has on free markets worldwide. He spoke with Toby Harnden, Washington bureau chief of the Sunday Times of London.” At the link you can look/listen, but an audio download will cost $.99; however, an audio copy is included in the blog archive.

Hobby Lobby and Unions 51 mins – “Yesterday the Supreme Court ruled that some for-profit companies don’t have to include birth control for women in their company health plans as mandated by the Affordable Care Act. Closely held for-profit companies can be exempted if owners object for religious reasons. Supporters say the decision is a victory for religious freedom. Critics argue it will invite many more challenges to federal law on religious grounds. In another decision yesterday the Supreme Court ruled that home healthcare workers cannot be compelled to pay a fee to public unions who lobby on their behalf. Please join us [5 guests] to talk about both of these decisions and their implications.” At the link you can listen to the audio but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Hobby Lobby Court Ruling  46 mins – “To the Greens of Oklahoma, it was just logical.  Yes, they were billionaires.  Yes, their Hobby Lobby chain employed thousands of people.  But why would they cover contraception that their religious belief found offensive?  To many others, the logic ran just the other way.  The Affordable Care Act offered health care to all.  Contraception included.  Why would a woman be subject to the religion of Boss Green? Yesterday, the Supreme Court ruled for the Greens, for Hobby Lobby, for the religious rights of the company.  This hour On Point:  the high court, Hobby Lobby, and religion in the workplace. “At the link right-click “download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jellyfish Invasion 4 mins – “…it’s an unwelcome resident of the Trondheimsfjord in Norway. The fjord now holds an estimated 40,000 tons of these round, red-colored, sea creatures. And this invasive species is impacting local fishing stocks. Jarle Mork, a professor and researcher at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, has been studying the effects of the booming number of jellyfish. “They are very efficient predators,” Mork says. “The population can grow to huge sizes in relatively few years. And they eat the same food as the young stages of the commercial fishes. And in addition they eat small and young stages of those competitors.”…” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

LBJ and Civil Rights 51 mins – “Fifty years ago this week, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act into law, ending legal segregation in public places. He was an unlikely civil rights champion: As a powerful senator from the state of Texas, he regularly sought to block civil rights legislative efforts, but in his first few months as president he made civil rights a top priority. In Robert Caro’s fourth volume on LBJ, “Passage to Power” published in 2012, Caro details Johnson’s remarkable role in struggle for the civil rights. Please join our conversation with two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biographer Robert Caro on President Lyndon Johnson, the 1964 Civil Rights Act and political lessons for today.” At the link you can listen to the audio but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Marijuana Legalized Aftermath 46 mins “Six months after recreational marijuana got the green light in  Colorado, we look at the economic, social, and health impacts of embracing pot.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meat Consumption  51 mins – “The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization issued a report in 2006 on the carbon footprint caused by livestock production. The FAO said 18 percent of greenhouses gases could be attributed to raising animals for food. The World Bank followed with an even starker report. Producing meat requires huge quantities of feed, pesticides and water. Also, cattle and other animals release methane gas and waste. The meat industry and other critics say environmental harm from livestock has been greatly overstated. For this month’s Environmental Outlook, how meat consumption affects the planet.” [3 guests] At the link you can only listen, but a file copy is in the blog archive.

North Korea Capitalists 18 mins – “The dream of socialist North Korea was that the government would control every part of the economy. No need for private businesses or stores – the state would give you everything. People were not supposed to sell to each other. Ever. On today’s show: how markets sprung up anyway.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Outsourcing Humanity  57 mins – “…I’m pleased to post Show # 214, May 28, my interview with Prof. Evan Selinger of Rochester Institute of Technology on technology and the human experience. Evan’s work spans the range of technology, ethics and philosophy, an unusual but critical intersection as we consider the ramifications of algorithms, robotics, drones, 3D printers and social media, among many other innovations, on our lives. In our discussion, we focused on Evan’s concern about “outsourcing” our humanity to computers and technology and how it has and will impact our humanity. Evan is an insightful and original commentator and scholar….” At the link right-click “…post Show # 214, May 28, my…” in the description and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism 52 mins – “It seems like every week there’s news of a white person run afoul of racial etiquette. It often happens that he or she is compelled to apologize, resign, or be fired. Cliven Bundy, Donald Sterling, and a Utah legislator claiming the NAACP is a racist organization are just a few recent examples. But are these men outliers or symptoms of deeper cultural problems? Thursday we’re examining how racism in America has changed, asking where we’ve made progress on race relations where we’ve fallen short.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radio Wave Hazard  52 mins – “CU-Boulder Electrical Engineering Emeritus Professor Frank Barnes is the past president of the BioElectroMagnetics Society.  He recently chaired a National Research Council panel on research priorities related to the potential health effects of exposure to radio frequency energy from the use of wireless technology, such as cell phones.  As a scientist, Frank Barnes recently talked with a citizen activist, Katie Singer, about her new book, An Electronic Silent Spring.   This is an extended version of the interview we broadcast on June 3rd 2014.  – Shelley Schlender” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexuality  54 mins – “Is monogamy unnatural?  Or, as Christopher Ryan’s talk at the Sydney Opera House was entitled: ‘If you want fidelity, get a dog’. Christopher Ryan reviews the enjoyment of sex, evidence from prehistory, and even the charming behaviour of bonobos, to suggest that conventional monogamy is but a blip in human history, and basically, doesn’t work.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharing Economy 51mins – “More and more, consumers are turning to Uber to hail rides with their smartphones, or renting spare rooms from strangers online through Airbnb. These companies typify the sharing economy where everyone can be a micro-entrepreneur and provide valued services without a professional middleman. But as these peer-to-peer businesses explode in popularity, cities are dealing with major questions over how to regulate them. Following a wave of recent protests by taxi drivers across the U.S. and Europe, the debate over these services is heating up. Diane and her [3] guests have a conversation about regulating the sharing economy, and what it means for businesses and consumers.” At the link you can hear the audio file, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Solar Assisted Heat Pump 12 mins  – Vahid Vkiloroaya, an Australian researcher, talks about the development of a hybrid solar-assisted air conditioner system that can reduce power use between 70 and 90%. 25 and 43%. He starts talking  at the 5 minute mark for 12 minutes of the 29 minute program that can be downloaded at the link by right-clicking “Download MP3″ and selecting “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. A PDF describing the research with more details is here,  and it mentions a power savings of 25 to 43%.  The PDF does not mention the key compound, lithium bromide, discussed in the audio segment, but more information about it and the bromide absorption cycle is here.

Species Extinction  25 mins – “…(starts 7:08): Few people have thought as critically and deeply about the state of Earth and our role on it than Paul Ehrlich. Over the course of several decades, the Stanford University biologist and ecologist has written many books, including 1968’s controversial The Population Bomb, in which he predicted that hundreds of millions of people would starve to death in the 1970s due to overpopulation and limited resources. He has just come out with a new book, which he co-wrote with Michael Charles Tobias, an ecologist, filmmaker, book author and animal rights advocate. The book is called Hope On Earth: A Conversation… Both men join us by phone to discuss the book and the most pressing environmental issues of the day that it explores.

Storm Surges  5 mins – “Surges from big coastal storms are a bigger and bigger problem as climate change raises sea levels around the world. That’s why a new service from the US National Hurricane Center in Miami could be so important.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban Movement 16 mins – “If you strolled around Wall Street in the 1950s, you’d see hoards of businessmen bustling about, briefcases in hand. Visit today, and the view is a little different: the businessmen are still there, but they’re accompanied by something else – strollers. Leigh Gallagher, author of “The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream is Moving,” and Alan Ehrenhalt, author of “The Great Inversion and the Future of the American City,” say this is a trend that’s reshaping cities all over America. Once a place where people went to work – not live – younger generations are increasingly choosing to make the inner-city their home.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccination Obstacles 51 mins – “In 1966, scientists developed a vaccine for measles. By the year 2000, the disease was considered eradicated in the U.S., a major public health victory. Fast forward to today and cases of measles have reached a 20-year high. The reason, doctors say, is because people are choosing not to be vaccinated or have their children vaccinated. It’s a troubling trend for public health officials in the developed world. The story is quite different in poor countries where 22 million children have little access to basic vaccines. Diane and her panel of experts discuss efforts to eradicate polio, measles and other deadly diseases and why some U.S. parents are resisting.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

World War One Legacy 50 mins – “An epic exploration of the legacy of World War One begins with this panel and audience discussion from Sarajevo. It looks at the drive for nationhood during World War One and its impact on nationalism in Bosnia to this day.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Nationalism The War That Changed the World 28 June 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140630-1159a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3600 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , added to weekly, and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is there too,  and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 180 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

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Media Mining Digest 137 – 27 June 2014: Alzheimer’s History, Arab Spring Women, Assaults on the Blind, Bank Behavior, California Education, Child Immigrant Dispositions, Citris Tree Parasite, Dental Care, Diabetes, Eavesdrop Project, Elder Advice, Everest, Gay American, Global Family Reunion, High Heel Shoes, Highway Funding, Inequality, Iraq Revolution, Kenya Violence, Leadership Defined, Local Internet Choice, Placebo Value, Pneumonia, Prosthetic Sockets, Resilience Project, Robot Trends, Self Regulation Sickle Cell Trait, Smells, Smithsonian Pilot’s Day, Sting, Teacher Tenure, Vertical Farming, Yeardle and the Ogallala Road

The following audio files come from a larger group of 260 for this week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts. A zip file of all 37 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Alzheimer’s Defined 9 mins – “This week marked the 150th birthday of Alois Alzheimer – the man who first described the disease he gave his name to over 100 years ago in 1906. The condition is one of a number of disorders that we collectively call dementia. These are progressive diseases that gradually rob sufferers of their mental faculties. They also become more common as we age. In countries like the UK, 1 in 6 people over the age of 80 are affected to some degree. But it also has a very profound effect on the people who care for victims of Alzheimer’s….” At the link right-click “Download as MP3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. This is part of the show, “Untangling Alzheimers’ Disease.”

Arab Spring Women 27 mins – “Mona Eltahawey visits her home country of Egypt where women, who stood side-by-side with men during the protests, now fear to walk the streets without being assaulted. Mona hears from the women who are taking matters into their own hands, standing up to sexual harassers and saying ‘enough is enough’. ” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Women of the Arab Spring: Part Two,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140617-0332a.mp3″ and select  “Save Link As.” Also look at the web site, “Girl Rising.

Assaults on the Blind 20 mins – “Siobhan Meade fights back against hate crime with her own Respect campaign and The Amber Trust celebrates almost 20 years of funding visually-impaired musicians, including Anna Foo.” At the link find the title, “Campaigning against hate crime; The Amber Trust,” for the next couple weeks, right-click (there or here) “Download 9MB” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bank Behavior 12 mins – “One of the biggest banks in the world, BNP Paribas, is about to be punished. The financial cops are in the middle of deciding what they are going to do. They’re trying to figure out how to punish a bank in a way that actually makes it change. There are some standard ways to punish a bad bank. Fines are the first thing every regulator and judge tries. There’s also getting the bank to admit guilt. Now they might try something never done before. Today on the show: how to punish a bank.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Education 79 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute (MPI) webinar explores the findings of the new report, Critical Choices in Post-Recession California: Investing in the Educational and Career Success of Immigrant Youth. The authors of the report, MPI Director Margie McHugh, CEO and Director of Studies Michael Fix, and Policy Analyst Sarah Hooker discuss the implications of California’s public education system reforms for the state’s 3.3 million first- and second-generation immigrant young adults and their families. By virtue of sheer demographics, the outcomes of these youth—who include more than one-third of the country’s English Language Learner (ELL) students—will drive the success of national high school and college completion efforts and shape the record of the country’s success or failure in integrating today’s immigrants into the mainstream of society.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click the next “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Immigrant Dispositions  12 mins – “With thousands of unaccompanied children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, immigration judges are faced with deciding who stays and who goes. Host Michel Martin examines the court process.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Citrus Tree Parasite 7 mins – “An invasive pest called the Asian Citrus Psyllid is turning up in lemon, orange and lime groves. The bug sometimes carries a disease known as Citrus Greening, which can wipe out acres of crops. As the name implies, the psyllid comes from Asia, though it has since spread to the Middle East and Africa. It showed up in the US over a decade ago. But scientists may have found an answer in the form of a Pakistani wasp that lives to attack the psyllid. Its scientific name is Tamarixia radiata, says David Morgan with the California Department of Food and Agriculture, who is part of a $1.4 million state project to breed and release the Tamarixia wasps into the wild.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dental Care 51 mins – “It has been seven years since a 12-year-old Maryland boy died from a tooth infection because his mother could not afford to take him to the dentist. Lawmakers across the country vowed to do something to ensure nothing like that could happen again. But today, nearly 200 million Americans have no dental insurance. And even many who do put off visiting the dentist because their insurer reimburses too little – or none – of the cost. That’s one reason more than a third of Americans did not see a dentist last year. And the number of ER visits for dental problems has skyrocketed. A discussion of America’s dental health crisis – and some ideas for solving it.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Diabetes 47 mins – “If diabetes were an infectious disease, the media would be going crazy over it.  Twenty-nine million American adults affected.  The numbers surging, up another nine percent since 2010.  Terrible risks:  stroke, blindness, kidney failure, amputation.  Cost to the US economy – nearly $250 billion a year.  But diabetes isn’t infectious.  Type 1, just five percent of cases, comes on in childhood.  Type 2 – the big numbers – is practically a lifestyle disease.  Poor diet, obesity, lack of exercise – and millions are at risk.  This hour On Point:  America’s diabetes boom, and what to do about it.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eavesdrop Project 16 mins – “Planet Money’s Steve Henn wanted to know how much someone could learn about him by just sitting back and watching his internet traffic flow by. So he invited a couple computer guys to bug his internet connection for a week. On today’s show: What they discovered, and what that tells us about security, smartphones and free WiFi.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elder Advice 54 mins – “Scientist, broadcaster and author David Suzuki looks at the role humans have played in shaping the planet. We must look to biology to find a strategy for survival, according to Suzuki in the 2014 Milton K. Wong Lecture.” At the link find the title, “The Global Eco-Crisis: Diversity, Resilience and Adaptability,” right-click (there or here) “Download The Global Eco-Crisis: Diversity, Resilience and Adaptability” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Everest  27 mins – “In April [2014] 16 Sherpas lost their lives in an avalanche whilst working for expedition teams climbing Mount Everest. Navin Khadka reports.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Has Everest Lost Its Soul – 19 June 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140619-0330b.mp3″ and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Gay American 20 mins – “Writer Andrew Solomon has spent his career telling stories of the hardships of others. Now he turns inward, bringing us into a childhood of adversity, while also spinning tales of the courageous people he’s met in the years since. In a moving, heartfelt and at times downright funny talk, Solomon gives a powerful call to action to forge meaning from our biggest struggles.”  At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Family Reunion 10 mins – “You may not know it yet, but AJ Jacobs is probably your cousin (many, many times removed). Using genealogy websites, he’s been following the unexpected links that make us all, however distantly, related. His goal: to throw the world’s largest family reunion. [at GlobalFamilyReunion.com] See you there? ” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link as from the pop-up menu.

High Heel Shoes 16 mins – “As a fashion object and symbol, the high heel shoe is weighted with meaning. It’s also weighted with the wearer’s entire body weight. The stiletto might be one of the only designs that is physically painful but has somehow has persisted for centuries. At their origins, high heeled shoes were originally worn by men. As early as the tenth century, many horseback riding cultures wore heels on their boots and on their shoes, because heels help you stay in the stirrups (which is why cowboy boots have heels).” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Highway Funding  46 mins – “The nation’s Highway trust fund is running out of money. Congress can’t agree on a solution. How do we keep America’s roads and bridges up and running?..Sixty-three thousand bridges in need of significant repair.  Delaware, with its leaning interstate bridge tangling up I-95.  Seattle, with its I-5 span in the river.  This summer, the US federal fund supporting road and bridge repair is going broke.  Congress can’t agree – surprise, surprise – on how to replenish it.  This hour On Point:  road and bridge infrastructure in the USA in trouble.  Who will pay to rebuild?

Inequality 42 mins – “Branko Milanovic – Income inequality in the United States has been increasing since the early 1980′s, and it’s only getting worse. Perhaps even more worrisome is the continuing growth in the income gap on a global basis. The wealth gap between the richest and the poorest countries is becoming so large that our entire economic system is in danger. This week we are joined by Branko Milanovic, the former head economist in the World Bank’s research department as we discuss income inequality around the world and his most recent book, The Haves and the Have-Nots: A Brief and Idiosyncratic History of Global Inequality.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iraq Revolution 51 mins – “…the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria released photos allegedly documenting the mass execution of as many as 1,700 Iraqi security forces. The group, ISIS, which was once part of Al Qaeda, has taken control of a large swath of territory in Iraq, including the major cities of Mosul, Tikrit, and now, Tal Afar. The U.S. is considering air strikes as it also seeks new dialogue with Iran. While Iraqi prime minister Nouri Al Maliki has been seeking to stiffen his army’s resolve, many say the crisis stems in large part from his failure to create a representative government. Please join us to discuss the turmoil in Iraq and what, if anything, the U.S. can or should do in response.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Iraq Revolution 46 mins – “Iraq is, right now, coming apart at the seams.  What should the US do?  The White House isn’t saying yet.  But everybody else is, and the range of fervent recommendations is vast.  On the gung ho end:  get back in there.  Special forces, intelligence, drones, bombers, politics, arms into Syria, deals with Iran, boots on the ground.  Essentially, renewed American war.  At the other end, this firm advice:  do nothing.  Do not get involved.  Let Iran handle it.  Let it take its course.  And if a threat to the US develops, hit it then. This hour On Point:  what to do, what not to do, now, in Iraq.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kenya Violence 7 mins – “Recent attacks in Kenya have left as many as 57 people dead. Meanwhile, in Nigeria, the search for hundreds of missing schoolgirls continues amid more violence in the north.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leadership Defined 18 mins – “Simon Sinek has a simple but powerful model for inspirational leadership all starting with a golden circle and the question “Why?” His examples include Apple, Martin Luther King, and the Wright brothers … (Filmed at TEDxPugetSound.)” At the link click “Download” then “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-menu.

Local Internet Choice 8 mins – “…I discuss the Coalition for Local Internet Choice, CLIC, that was announced last week. This is a short episode that aims to answer some of the common questions about CLIC, including why we felt it was necessary to create this coalition now. You can still sign up to become a member of CLIC if you agree with our statement of principles that these important decisions should be made by communities, not preempted by states.” At the link right-click (here or there) “… can download this Mp3 file directly from here..” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Placebo Value 14 mins – “Anne Harrington, Harvard professor for the history of science and author of “The Cure Within“: Everyone has heard about the placebo effect, but most people only think about the phenomenon – erroneously – in the context of sugar pills. This singular focus may distract us from future research on “ways in which the placebo effect is a part of every medical intervention,” says Anne Harrington, Harvard professor for the history of science and author of “The Cure Within.” Placebo surgery, for example, can provide measurable relief to patients. In a landmark study, Dr. J. Bruce Moseley worked with a group of Korean War veterans who had been experiencing knee problems for years. He told patients that some of them would be getting surgery, but they wouldn’t be told who….”At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the ring end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pneumonia 42 mins (3 parts) – Dr Gil Porat, a practicing Colorado Hospitalist, Board Certified in Internal Medicine, defines pneumonia, discusses how it is diagnosed, its complications and treatment. At the link click “Download,” right-click the next “Download” and select “Save Link As” select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get Part 1. Do the same for Part 2  and part 3.

Prosthetic Sockets 5 mins – “What drove David Sengeh to create a more comfortable prosthetic limb? He grew up in Sierra Leone, and too many of the people he loves are missing limbs after the brutal civil war there. When he noticed that people who had prosthetics weren’t actually wearing them, the TED Fellow set out to discover why — and to solve the problem with his team from the MIT Media Lab.” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Resilience Project 11 mins – “What can we learn from people with the genetics to get sick — who don’t? With most inherited diseases, only some family members will develop the disease, while others who carry the same genetic risks dodge it. Stephen Friend suggests we start studying those family members who stay healthy. Hear about the Resilience Project, a massive effort to collect genetic materials that may help decode inherited disorders.” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Trends 46 mins – “Human imagination got so far out front, so fast, on robots that robot reality has been vaguely disappointing for a long time.  Isaac Asimov and “WALL-E” and the Terminator put our real robots to shame.  They still do.  But things are changing.  Sensors and chips and AI and mechanics and “the cloud” are coming together to push robot dreams and reality into new terrain.  There is need – we have aging societies that could use the help.  There is risk – talk of jobs lost to robots and “killer robots.”  And there is reality – they’re moving in.  This hour On Point:  the rise of the robots.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Self Regulation 54 mins – “What I.Q. was to the 20th century, self-regulation will be to the 21st. That’s the prediction of psychologist and philosopher, Dr. Stuart Shanker. For decades he’s been teaching kids how to self-regulate, so tantrums, meltdowns and lack of focus diminish.” At the link find the title, “Neuron Therapy,” right-click (there or here) “Download Neuron Therapy” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sickle  Cell Trait 8 mins – “It is one of the most common inherited blood disorders in the U.S., and most people who have it are African-American. Host Michel Martin learns more from pediatrician Dr. Leslie Walker.” Not addressed is the risk for offspring if a couple each has the trait.  At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smells 15 mins – “Do our smells make us sexy? Popular science suggests yes — pheromones send chemical signals about sex and attraction from our armpits to potential mates. But, despite what you might have heard, there is no conclusive research confirming that humans have these smell molecules. In this eye-opening talk, zoologist Tristram Wyatt explains the fundamental flaws in current pheromone research, and shares his hope for a future that unlocks the fascinating, potentially life-saving knowledge tied up in our scent.” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smithsonian Pilot’s Day 91 mins – “Recorded at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum during the 10th annual Become a Pilot Family Day and Aviation Display. This annual event at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, located in Chantilly, Virginia offers not only the Museum’s amazing exhibits, but also about 50 vintage, recreational, and home-built aircraft flown in for one day only. This year, United brought in a Boeing 777 that was open for a tour….”  At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the p0p-up menu.

Sting 23 mins  – “Sting’s early life was dominated by a shipyard—and he dreamed of nothing more than escaping the industrial drudgery. But after a nasty bout of writer’s block that stretched on for years, Sting found himself channeling the stories of the shipyard workers he knew in his youth for song material. In a lyrical, confessional talk, Sting treats us to songs from his upcoming musical, and to an encore of “Message in a Bottle.’” [Music will play slightly faster in the archived file.] At the link click “Download”then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teacher Tenure 51 mins – “Last week in California, a judge ruled the state’s teacher tenure laws unconstitutional, arguing the current system discriminates against children from low- income families. The decision is the latest battle in a movement to weaken teacher tenure laws across the country and it’s a battle that often pits school reform advocates from both parties against teachers’ unions. Since 2009, two-thirds of states have toughened tenure standards. The California ruling is the first time the issue has been decided in the courts and observers say it has national implications. Guest host Tom Gjelten and a panel of [4] experts discuss teacher tenure and the quality of a public school education.  At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Vertical Farming 67 mins – Hosts Dickson Despommier and Vincent Racaniello discuss how the vertical farm concept was developed and where it stands today nationally and internationally. Ten links are found at the web site for more details about topics they discuss.  At the link right-click “UrbAg5″ beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yeardle and the Ogallala Road 30 mins – “How much junk do you own? You’re probably not technically a “hoarder” but like most Americans, you may have way more stuff than you know what to do with – stuff that is no longer valuable to you, but that you don’t want to just throw away. This week on Sea Change Radio, we talk to Adam Werbach, the co-founder of Yerdle, an online sharing platform that allows people to trade things they no longer need or want in exchange for other people’s stuff that they do want, using a points-based economy. No currency changes hands, and no new materials are used to make more stuff. Then, host Alex Wise speaks to the author of The Ogallala Road, Julene Bair. Her touching new memoir is a personal account of how the ascendance of industrial farming in America has laid waste to the social fabric of the heartland.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

=============================================================                                                                     ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3600 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A complete folder of the actual podcasts is here and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is there, also,  and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Jan-Jun 2013 files in 18 zip segments (832 podcasts) can be downloaded hereand a list of those files here; Jul-Dec 2013 files in 13 zip segments (720 podcasts) downloaded here, and a list here;  Jan-Jun 2012 files in 8 segments (360 podcasts) and a list are here, and Jul-Dec here in 13 parts (593 podcasts).  For 2011 a list and 5 segments  (184 podcasts). For 2010 and earlier 64 podcasts are listed here and zipped  as Part 1 and Part 2. (Dead links in old episodes are due to updating; try a current episode.) Over 180 feeds used to prepare this weekly blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

 

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Media Mining Digest 136 – 20 June 2014: Antibiotics in Agriculture, Anti-Government Violence, Atul Gawande on Healthcare, Bank Robbing, Basotect, Becker Postmortem, Bleaching Water, Bone Growing, Brain Repair, Brazil, Bus Systems, Capitalism Declines, Center for Biological Imaging, Cesar Milan, Child Migrant Surge, Chinese Internet, Cigar Smoking, Cleanliness, Crimean Conflict and Energy, Critical Care Review, Drought Measures, Electrical Grid Upgrade, Essence Magaine, First World War, Foldscope, Fraking in America, Gun Cultures, Gun Violence Reduction, Haz Mat Rules, Inequality, Iraq Revolution, Juvenile Entrepreneurs, MRSA – The Basics, Museum Collections, Nanopatch, NSA Answers Snowden, Oklahoma City Obesity, Osteomyelitis, Pallet Business, Pancreatic Cancer, Paper Beats Plastic, Physician Compensation Survey, Platform Drilling, Political Party History, Postal System Reform, Putin and Russia, Radio Technology, Ruby Dee, Seafood Availability, Senior Sex in Korea, Sexual Violence, Shots Fired in Billings, Snowden on Privacy, Socratic Reason, Solar Car Concentrator, Supply Chain, Talking to Doctors, Tamiflu Press Conference, Teacher Tenure, Teachers Quit, Teaching Aids, Twitter Impact, Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Weight Loss Drugs, Wikipedia Bias

The following audio files come from a larger group of 260 for this week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts. A zip file of all 67 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Antibiotics in Agriculture 16 mins – “It’s been going on for almost 75 years. Farmers feed antibiotics to livestock thinking their animals will grow bigger faster. But do they? There have been few independent studies showing this actually happens. Meanwhile our liberal use of antibiotics is creating a fertile breeding ground for antibiotic resistance. The warnings are there. But we continue blindly, with little data on surveillance of use of antibiotics with the livestock industry in the US accused of operating secretively, quietly profiting out of sight. Meanwhile 170 Australians die each week of untreatable bacterial sepsis the result of antibacterial resistance. Isabella Pittaway reports.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anti-Government Violence 46 mins – “Gunfire in all kinds of places it shouldn’t be in America these days.  In a school in Oregon yesterday, two dead.  In a pizza parlor in Las Vegas Sunday.  Two policemen eating lunch.  Assassinated by a husband-wife anti-government duo who dropped a “Don’t Tread on Me” flag on their bodies, and went on shooting at Walmart.  That killing spree has the particular attention of police and more tracking anti-government groups and attacks around the country.  The rhetoric is white hot.  Adherents are heavily armed.  The attacks are startling.  This hour On Point:  policemen down, and the anti-government movement in America.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atul Gawande on Healthcare  48 mins – “We are well into Obamacare now, and still fighting over it.  Well into panic over healthcare costs, and still struggling to really bring them down.  Well-schooled in how we ought to eat, exercise, live – and still overweight and pushing up the diabetes numbers.  Celebrated surgeon, writer, thinker Dr. Atul Gawande is watching it all.  Thinking it through.  When he’s not in the OR, he’s at the keyboard, helping shape the American conversation on health and healthcare.  This hour, in a special edition of On Point:  On Point Live! – with Dr. Atul Gawande.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bank Robbing 19 mins – “William Black is a former bank regulator who’s seen firsthand how banking systems can be used to commit fraud — and how “liar’s loans” and other tricky tactics led to the 2008 US banking crisis that threatened the international economy. In this engaging talk, Black, now an academic, reveals the best way to rob a bank — from the inside.” At the link right-click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Basotect  9 mins – “Basotect is an intelligent foam which, thanks to its versatility, can be used in simple as well as technically demanding applications. It can be used for cleaning hard surfaces, as a sound absorber in sound studios or as thermal and sound insulation in the aerospace industry. The material that Basotect is made from is called melamine resin. That’s one of the hardest plastics there is. The researchers at BASF have managed to fabricate from this base material a foam that’s light and flexible even though the source material is extremely brittle.” At the link right-click “Download MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Becker Postmortem 63 mins – “Edward Lazear of Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Gary Becker’s innovative contributions to economics. The conversation opens with personal reminiscences by Lazear and Roberts. They then discuss Becker’s application of economic principles to social phenomena such as discrimination, crime, education and the family along with Becker’s overall approach to economic theory and measurement.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bleaching Water  3 mins – “Researchers question the use of 8 drops of bleach per gallon of water in disasters. Tests show less than that amount is needed. At the link find Episode 379 – June 12 2014, right-click “Media files ScienceElements_June12_2014.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bone Growing 15 mins – “What does it take to regrow bone in mass quantities? Typical bone regeneration — wherein bone is taken from a patient’s hip and grafted onto damaged bone elsewhere in the body — is limited and can cause great pain just a few years after operation. In an informative talk, Molly Stevens introduces a new stem cell application that harnesses bone’s innate ability to regenerate and produces vast quantities of bone tissue painlessly.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Repair 16 mins – “After a traumatic brain injury, it sometimes happens that the brain can repair itself, building new brain cells to replace damaged ones. But the repair doesn’t happen quickly enough to allow recovery from degenerative conditions like motor neuron disease (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease or ALS). Siddharthan Chandran walks through some new techniques using special stem cells that could allow the damaged brain to rebuild faster.” At the link you can only watch and download video (click “download,” then right-click “Download video.”); however, an audio copy is included in the blog archive.

Brazil 46 mins – “As the World Cup kicks off, Brazilians are on the streets in protest. We talk soccer, Brazil, and Brazil’s problems.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bus Systems 21 mins – “Transit service in low-density suburbs is usually provided with buses operating on local streets – rail transit on separate rights of way is too costly given modest ridership levels. But providing bus service in contemporary U.S. suburbs can be a challenge both to the bus operator and the travelers themselves. Secure paths for getting to and from bus stops may not exist, and protected bus stops may be rare. To encourage transit ridership, it is important to offer seamless transportation – safe, efficient, and fast connections between origin and destination, including getting to and from the bus stops. The hosts talk about the challenges of providing seamless bus infrastructure in suburban communities with Michael Bolton, Deputy Executive Director, of Pace, the Chicago metropolitan area’s suburban bus system.” At the link find the title, “Bus travel in the suburbs – the challenge of providing seamless transportation for riders,” right-click “Listen to this episode now“and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Capitalism Declines 56 mins – “Jeremy Rifkin talked about his book, The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism, in which he argues that capitalism is on its way out. Mr. Rifkin said it would be replaced with a global neural network created from the combined communications internet, energy internet, and logistics internet. He argued the increased production and distribution would effectively eliminate corporate profits. Mr. Rifkin spoke about his theory with the author of The Googlization of Everything, Siva Vaidhyanathan.” At the link you can purchase an audio copy for $.99, but a copy is also included in this blog’s archive.

Center for Biologic Imaging 28 mins – “Regenerative Medicine Today welcomes Simon Watkins, PhD and Donna Beer Stolz, PhD. Dr. Watkins is the Founder and Director of the Center for Biologic Imaging at the University of Pittsburgh, and Dr. Stolz is the Assistant Director at the Center. Drs. Watkins and Stolz discuss the many resources available at the Center for Biologic Imaging and the work that is done there.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cesar Milan 4 mins – “Before Cesar Millan became a TV personality, he was a homeless, undocumented immigrant from Mexico with a dream. He reveals how his career took off as part of NPR’s series, “My Big Break.’” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Sve Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Migrant Surge 46 mins – “The numbers of children surging over the southern US border now – unaccompanied, as young as six – is just staggering.  Forty thousand-plus since October.  Up 90 percent.  Still growing, flooding in.  Coming up from Central America, Mexico. Coming a thousand miles and more from Honduras.  Scared north by vicious gangs.  Terrorized along the way.  And now, piling up in US facilities not designed for an influx of kids.  This hour On Point: the new flood of child migrants at the US border – what’s sending them north, and what happens with them now.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Internet 8 mins – A special report from “The Economist” discusses how the internet works in China.  At the link find the title, “China and the internet,” right-click “Media files 20130404 china_internet.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cigar Smoking  50 mins – One issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine featured a discussion of “The Association of Pipe and Cigar Use With Cotinine Levels, Lung Function, and Airflow Obstruction: A Cross-sectional Study. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cleanliness 46 mins – “The signs say it all. Please shower before entering the pool. All employees must wash hands before returning to work. Or to go more Biblical: Cleaniness is next to Godliness. Clean is a social value. It’s the American way. But is there such a thing overworrying the clean thing? Or, is clean good, but are we going about it in the wrong way? Science is beginning to suggest possibly yes to both questions. While socially, more folks are skipping the soap, the shampoo, the deodorant, and everything that we tend to define as cleansing. And how popular are they after that? Or. are they onto something? This hour Up On Point: Hygiene hijinks. Rethinking clean.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crimean Conflict and Energy 7 mins – “Roughly one third of all Europe’s natural gas arrives via pipeline from Russia, and the current standoff in the Crimea has European leaders worried about the reliability of energy supplies. Energy analyst Joe Stanislaw from Deloitte LLP tells host Steve Curwood that energy insecurity may prompt some European countries to explore domestic fossil fuel extraction.” At the link right-click “Play this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Critical Care Horizons 5 mins – “It is with great delight we announce the launch of a new open access critical care journal. Critical Care Horizons is a fresh, original voice in the critical care literature, offering thought-provoking, cutting-edge commentary and opinion papers, plus state-of-the-art review articles. As a Journal, we see discussion, commentary, and the sharing of insight, experience and ideas, as central to progress in our speciality. We are free to publish with, free to read, opening authorship opportunity to all working with the critically ill. We are driven by a desire to improve the care we offer our patients, and operate without financial aim or incentive.” At the link, bottom of the page, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drought Measures 23 mins – “When the Federal Bureau of Reclamation finished construction of the giant Hoover Dam near Boulder City, NV in 1936, the country anticipated that this project, which had finally tamed the Colorado River, would ensure a reliable, long-term water supply for the river basin states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming. And for many decades it did so. But the Western states’ drought that has lasted the past 14 years is resulting in a near emergency situation because the water level has been falling in Lake Mead, the reservoir behind the Hoover Dam. The hosts talk with Dave Johnson, Deputy General Manager of Engineering and Operations for the Southern Nevada Water Authority about the situation and about the intake tunnel being drilled under Lake Mead to ensure Nevada continues to have access to its water source.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electrical Grid Upgrade 26 mins – “The electrical grid of the United States is an enormously impressive feat of engineering that is critical to the economic and social functioning of the nation. But the fact is, it is basically a century-old power grid, not simply inefficient but vulnerable to cascading breakdowns due to both natural and man-made events. The Smart Grid is a strategy for modernizing the electrical grid. It is an automated network that directs the movement of electric power using information and communications technology to collect data on electricity supply and demand to improve efficiency, reliability, and sustainability of electric power. The hosts discuss this important topic with one of the country’s leading experts on the smart electric power grid, Massoud Amin, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Minnesota. The Smart Grid – bringing utility electricity delivery into the 21st century.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. NOTE: This same site has a link to a great free reference called the Transportation Energy Data Book.

Essence Magazine 13 mins – “Back in 1969, faces of color doing any job in major media were few and far between. But that was the year an unlikely group of businessmen and salesmen decided to create a magazine specifically for black women: Essence…But the road to making Essence wasn’t as smooth as the magazine’s pages. In the new book The Man From Essence, magazine co-founder Edward Lewis and former executive editor Audrey Edwards tell many of those stories.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First World War 50 mins – “Historian Heather Jones tackles the familiar image of a war centered on a static front line in northern Europe, and looks at how World War One affected populations beyond the front line.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: World War One Saturday, June 14, 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140614-0806a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. A second podcast of 46 mins here examines the war from the The Soldiers Perspective in photographs — “The British army banned the use of personal cameras on Christmas Eve in 1914, but privates and officers carried on using them.” (Same download process).

Foldscope  9 mins  – “Perhaps you’ve punched out a paper doll or folded an origami swan? TED Fellow Manu Prakash and his team have created a microscope made of paper that’s just as easy to fold and use. A sparkling demo that shows how this invention could revolutionize healthcare in developing countries … and turn almost anything into a fun, hands-on science experiment.”  Another four-minute presentation is here and can be downloaded by right-clicking the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and selecting “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking in America 46 mins – “The meltdown in Iraq right now hardly makes the Middle East look like a calm energy source.  And the President’s big push for lower emissions at home will not be met by solar and wind alone.  Far from it.  This country is poised to go after a lot more domestic natural gas.  And for better or worse, that means a lot more fracking.  Call it mega-fracking.  Many Americans have not taken onboard just how mightily this industry is gearing up for further vast growth, from well-head to transport to processing and pipelines.  This hour On Point:  future projection – fracking in overdrive.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Cultures 11 mins – “Host Michel Martin looks at gun culture in the America and abroad, and asks two experts what the U.S. can learn from how other countries handle firearms.” At the link right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence Reduction 16 mins – “Science’s Meghan Sachdev interviews Jon Vernick and Rebecca Peters about the book “Reducing Gun Violence in America: Informing Policy with Evidence and Analysis“. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Haz Mat Rules 21 mins – “On July 6, 2013, a freight train carrying crude oil derailed and exploded in the downtown area of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, killing at least 42 residents. Subsequently, a special emergency meeting was held in Washington, D.C. by the Federal Railroad Administration’s Railroad Safety Advisory Committee, to discuss additional rail safety measures for hazardous materials transport. The agenda of the emergency meeting included a Safety Advisory issued jointly by the FRA and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, also known as PHMSA. Directed to railroads and shippers of hazardous materials, this Advisory included a number of recommended actions to help reduce transport risks. The hosts discuss this topic of safe transport of hazardous materials with PHMSA Administrator Cynthia Quarterman.” At the link find the title, “Safe transport of hazardous materials,” right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inequality in America 51 mins – “Most economists now agree that income inequality is at an historic high. And the gap between rich and poor is widening – squeezing the middle class as never before. Many worry about how the growing pay disparity is affecting the nation’s economic health. And some, including former labor secretary Robert Reich, argue the concentration of wealth among a very few is jeopardizing our democracy. Others say too much focus on inequality could lead to destructive public policy and hurt american competition. Economists Robert Reich and Douglas Holtz-Eakin offer ideas from across the political spectrum.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the file is included in the blog archive.

Iraq Revolution 51 mins – “President Barack Obama sends nearly 300 troops to boost security at the American embassy in Baghdad, as Al Qaeda-inspired insurgents continue to expand areas of control. We discuss the crisis in Iraq and the possibility of US-Iranian cooperation.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Juvenile Entrepreneurs  7 mins – “Maya Penn started her first company when she was 8 years old, and thinks deeply about how to be responsible both to her customers and to the planet. She shares her story — and some animations, and some designs, and some infectious energy — in this charming talk.” At the link right-click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MRSA-the Basics  11 mins -”The basis about Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcal Aureus.” presented by Dr Gill Porat, a practicing Colorado Hospitalist, Board Certified in Internal Medicine.   At the link click “Download,” right-click the next “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Museum Collections 30 mins – “In a rebroadcast from May 2, 2010, Keith & Russ talk with John Simmons, museum consultant with Museologica, a consulting company that assists museums with collections care and management.  He talks about the importance of collections in museums, and about the human need for collecting that dates back thousands of years, including John’s need to collect books.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nanopatch 14 mins  – “One hundred sixty years after the invention of the needle and syringe, we’re still using them to deliver vaccines; it’s time to evolve. Biomedical engineer Mark Kendall demos the Nanopatch, a one-centimeter-by-one-centimeter square vaccine that can be applied painlessly to the skin. He shows how this tiny piece of silicon can overcome four major shortcomings of the modern needle and syringe, at a fraction of the cost.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

NSA Answers Snowden 34 mins – “After a surprise appearance by Edward Snowden at TED2014, Chris Anderson said: “If the NSA wants to respond, please do.” And yes, they did. Appearing by video, NSA deputy director Richard Ledgett answers Anderson’s questions about the balance between security and protecting privacy.” At the link right-click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oklahoma City Obesity  15mins – “Oklahoma City is a midsized town that had a big problem: It was among the most obese towns in America. Mayor Mick Cornett realized that, to make his city a great place to work and live, it had to become healthier too. In this charming talk, he walks us through the interlocking changes that helped OKC drop a collective million pounds (450,000 kilos).” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Osteomyelitis 22 mins  – Ostomyelitis is an infection in a bone. Infections can reach a bone by traveling through the bloodstream or spreading from nearby tissue. Dr Gil Porat, a practicing Colorado Hospitalist, Board Certified in Internal Medicine, discusses what’s known about this problem, its causes and treatment.  At the link click “Download,” right-click the next “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pallet Business 18 mins – ” Certain things are just hard to improve on. The classic example: the mousetrap. Also: the paperclip. And, the super-size version: the pallet. In its way, the pallet is perfect. A few pieces of cheap lumber nailed together, without an extra nail or board. It keeps things a few inches off the floor and works with a forklift. Amazing. This perfect system of moving stuff around on pallets has been around for a long time. And for basically 50 years, no one really improved on it in this country. Until they did. Today on the show: yes you can build a better pallet.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pancreatic Cancer 26 mins – Dr Gil Porat, a practicing Colorado Hospitalist, Board Certified in Internal Medicine, discusses what’s known about pancreatic cancer, its symptoms, causes and treatment. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paper Beats Plastic 18 mins – “Most of us want to do the right thing when it comes to the environment. But things aren’t as simple as opting for the paper bag, says sustainability strategist Leyla Acaroglu. A bold call for us to let go of tightly-held green myths and think bigger in order to create systems and products that ease strain on the planet.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physician Compensation Survey 50 mins – “In this episode, Allison and Ryan talk about the 2014 Medscape Physician Compensation Report which came out last April of 2014. Whether you are premed, a medical student, or a resident, there is interesting data in this report that can be very helpful on your path.  You don’t necessarily have to use this information to make decisions or choices for you, but you can leverage this knowledge and use it as another data point as you go through medical school and in determining what you truly want to do.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Platform Drilling 4 mins – Oil lies beneath the surface of both land and sea. There’s a lot more sea than land, but drilling under a thick layer of water is tricky. The first time anyone tried it was through the shallow waters of an Ohio reservoir, in 1891. Five years later, small oil companies drilled wells from piers in Santa Barbara Channel. But, offshore drilling evolved fitfully ’til after WW-II. Then we took it up in earnest. First, fixed platforms sat on the sea bottom. The tallest of these eventually reached a depth of 1700 feet. Then compliant towers, and floating platforms anchored to the bottom with tensioned cables. They got even deeper….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Party History 52 mins – “Eric Cantor’s shock primary defeat has left the Republican establishment reeling, and breathed new life into the Tea Party movement within the party. It’s another reminder of the powerful role that party factions can play, and have often played in American history. Disagreements within parties have shifted the terms of debate, forced new agendas onto the political stage, even birthed new parties altogether. So in this episode, Peter, Ed, and Brian peer inside our political parties and explore some of the influential factions that have left a mark on the American political landscape – from the Radical Republicans after the Civil War, to the Dixiecrats after World War II. Plus, they look back to the early Republic and a time before the formation of party organizations, when “faction” was the only game in town.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Postal System Reform 44 mins – “Getting mail at the front door may soon be history – as Congress tries to save the Postal Service. We’ll look at the future of who delivers what and where and how in America.” At the link right-click ‘Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Putin and Russia  40 mins – Michael McFaul on Vladimir Putin and Russia. “Michael Anthony McFaul is the former United States Ambassador to Russia. He resigned in February 2014 for family reasons. Prior to his nomination to the ambassadorial position, McFaul worked for the U.S. National Security Council as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director of Russian and Eurasian Affairs. After his tenure as ambassador in Moscow, McFaul returned to Stanford University as a Professor of Political Science.” At the link find the title, “Michael McFaul on Vladimir Putin and Russia, right-click  “Media files 20140519.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radio Technology 62 mins – “Doug Rowe is an engineer at Minnesota Public Radio.  His title is one that we’ll see more often: Media Production Systems Manager. As radio stations, groups, and networks depend on digital media distribution, more engineers like Doug are needed; not only to keep everything working, but to develop the infrastructure for the workflows needed by talent and content creators.  Doug talks with Chris Tarr and me, helping us understand the new responsibilities involved at a highly-connected, digitally-delivered network operation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Ruby Dee 9 mins – “In remembrance of the life of actress and activist Ruby Dee, Tell Me More presents an encore broadcast of Michel Martin’s 2007 interview with the legendary actress and activist.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seafood Availability 51 mins – “There’s a very good chance that the fish you order at a restaurant or serve at home was not caught in U.S. waters. About 90 percent of the seafood we consume is imported and much of this is produced on seafood farms. Seafood pens in the ocean and sometimes on land are thought to be the key to developing a sustainable source of seafood, but they raise serious environmental challenges as well. For this month’s Environmental Outlook, we explore new efforts to meet the growing world demand for sustainable seafood.” (four guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Senior Sex in Korea 27 mins – “For some in South Korea, old age has meant making some tough choices. In a park in Seoul, Lucy Williamson finds an old profession getting some surprising new recruits.” At the link find the title, “Docs: South Korea: Sex in the Sunset Years – 12 June 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140612-0330a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Violence 15 mins – “Rachel Jewkes discusses priorities for the prevention of sexual violence.” “Rachel Jewkes is Unit Director of the Gender and Health Unit of the Medical Research Council, based in Pretoria, South Africa, and a member of the National Council Against Gender-Based Violence in South Africa. Jewkes studied Medicine, receiving a Masters in Community Medicine (MSc) and a Doctorate in Medicine (MD) from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, University of London. She is an Honorary Professor in the faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. Jewkes is the Secretary of the Sexual Violence Research Initiative and a regional member of the WHO Expert Advisory Panel on Injury and Violence Prevention and Control.” At the link find the title, “Listen to The Lancet: 10 June,” right-click “10june.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shots Fired Billings 13 mins – “A burglary suspect opened fire on officers of the Billings Police Department, resulting in a search and a showdown. Shots Fired article written by Dean Scoville and read by Dan Hazeltine.” At the link find the title, “Shots Fired: May 24, 2012 – Billings Montana,” right-click “files shots-fired-2012-05-24-billings-montana.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Snowden On Privacy 35 mins – “Appearing by telepresence robot, Edward Snowden speaks at TED2014 about surveillance and Internet freedom. The right to data privacy, he suggests, is not a partisan issue, but requires a fundamental rethink of the role of the internet in our lives — and the laws that protect it. “Your rights matter,” he says, “because you never know when you’re going to need them.” Chris Anderson interviews, with special guest Tim Berners-Lee.” At the link click “Download” and a video download is the only option; however, an audio version is in the blog archive.

Socratic Reason 15 mins – “Here’s a TED first: an animated Socratic dialog! In a time when irrationality seems to rule both politics and culture, has reasoned thinking finally lost its power? Watch as psychologist Steven Pinker is gradually, brilliantly persuaded by philosopher Rebecca Newberger Goldstein that reason is actually the key driver of human moral progress, even if its effect sometimes takes generations to unfold. The dialog was recorded live at TED, and animated, in incredible, often hilarious, detail by Cognitive.” At the link click “Download” and a video download is the only option; however, an audio version is in the blog archive.

Solar Car Concentrator 30mins – “If you own an electric vehicle and you have solar panels on your house, you can drive around powered entirely by renewable energy. But what can EV owners who don’t have solar on their homes do to make sure they’re as green as can be? Mike Tinskey and his colleagues at Ford Motor Co. are trying to tackle that problem head on. Ford’s promising new C-Max Solar Energi Concept car has solar panels built right into the roof.”

Supply Chain 18 mins – “Taming the unwieldy web of global supply chains; roundup of daily news with David Grimm.” At the link find the title, “Rethinking global supply chains and a news roundup (6 Jun 2014),” right-click “SciencePodcast_140606.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Talking to Doctors 19 mins – “Our sixth episode “Talking Back to Your Doctor,” opens with a question: Why do so many of us find it so hellishly hard to speak freely with our doctors? What is it about a white coat that makes even normally assertive people clam up?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tamiflu Press Conference 33mins – “Tamiflu (oseltamivir) is a neuraminidase inhibitor, developed by Roche, for the treatment of seasonal and pandemic influenza. Yet for the first time a comprehensive review of the data, by independent researchers, has shown that the claims for Tamiflu’s effectiveness have been overestimated, and that harms have been underreported. Here is the audio of a recent press conference where researchers and the BMJ’s editors describe the findings of that research, and the systematic regulatory failures those findings expose.” The six participants were: Fiona Godlee – BMJ editor in chief; Carl Heneghan – Director of Oxford University’s Centre for Evidence Based Medicine; Peter Doshi – Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research; Elizabeth Loder – The BMJ clinical epidemiology editor ; David Tovey – Editor in chief, Cochrane Library; Ben Goldacre – Founder of the AllTrials campaign. At the link (in a Chrome browser) right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teacher Tenure 9 mins – “A California judge ruled that the state’s teacher tenure laws are unconstitutional because they disproportionately affect poor and/or minority students. Education Week‘s Stephen Sawchuk explains.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teachers Quit 46 mins – “We put our children in their hands. That’s how much we trust school teachers.  But do we respect them? Do we give them the support they need, and the leeway to be the best teachers they can be? A surprisingly large numbers of teachers ultimately decide the answer is no, and they quit. Up to half give up within five years. The question is, why: how is it going so wrong for a profession that rests on at least a little idealism and a lot of passion. Because we do need them.  This hour On Point:  Three teachers, and why they walked away.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teaching Aids 30 mins – Two Texas teachers produce a regular podcast concerning educational aids from the tech world. Towards the end of Episode 110 they talk about Elements 4D, a free for iPads: you make six paper cubes from a pdf and each face on each cube is an element (so only 36 elements). I think you view them with an iPad loaded with the app and when, say, Na and Cl faces are placed together, the iPad gives a picture of salt. They also discuss some apps for quizzes in classes equipped with devices that allow for fast, collaborative results that students and teachers can see.  At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Twitter Impact 19 mins – “Remember Sharknado? There was a time when hammy, low-budget sci-fi movies flew under the radar – until they were lampooned on Mystery Science Theater 3,000. But that was before Twitter. Deb Roy, Twitter’s Chief Media Scientist, says the Sharknado phenomenon foreshadowed something big. “Because it just somehow hit a nerve amongst a group of people who were watching it on Twitter, it drove this conversation that spilled into timelines of people who had no idea this strange little movie was airing.” Roy believes that Twitter isn’t just a way for people to engage with the ideas of the day; it’s shaping the entire discussion…. ” At the link find the title, “Twitter Has Changed Us,” right-click “IHUB-061414-C.mp3″and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant 20 mins – “Unlike Germany, which is closing down all its nuclear facilities in response to the disaster in Fukushima, Japan, the U.S. will see completion of a new nuclear power plant in 2015 – the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Watts Bar 2 nuclear plant, located in east Tennessee. The hosts talk about the details of this plant, and about the outlook for nuclear power in general, with Gary Mauldin, General Manager of Project Assurance and Support Services for Watts Bar at the TVA.” At the link find the title, “Watts Bar 2 – a look at the TVA’s impressive new nuclear power plant,” right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Weight Loss Drugs 23 mins – “Drugs to encourage weight loss have a chequered past, with many of them having been withdrawn from the market due to increased morbidity and mortality. In this podcast Raj Padwal, associate professor of medicine at the University of Alberta, takes us through the remaining therapy Orlistat, and discusses the potential for two new therapies, Phentermine-ER topiramate, and Lorcaserin, which are being licensed in some countries.” At the click “Download” to download the podcast.

Wikipedia Bias 33 mins – “Shane Greenstein, Kellogg Chair in Information Technology at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management, discusses his recent paper, Collective Intelligence and Neutral Point of View: The Case of Wikipedia, coauthored by Harvard assistant professor Feng Zhu. Greenstein and Zhu’s paper takes a look at whether Linus’ Law applies to Wikipedia articles. Do Wikipedia articles have a slant or bias? If so, how can we measure it? And, do articles become less biased over time, as more contributors become involved? Greenstein explains his findings.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

=============================================================                                                                     ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of over 3100 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A complete folder of the actual podcasts is here and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here and can alsob e downloaded as a zip file or individually. Jan-Jun 2013 files in 18 zip segments (832 podcasts) can be downloaded hereand a list of those files here; Jul-Dec 2013 files in 13 zip segments (720 podcasts) downloaded here, and a list here;  Jan-Jun 2012 files in 8 segments (360 podcasts) and a list are here, and Jul-Dec here in 13 parts (593 podcasts).  For 2011 a list and 5 segments  (184 podcasts). For 2010 and earlier 64 podcasts are listed here and zipped  as Part 1 and Part 2. (Dead links in old episodes are due to updating; try a current episode.) Over 180 feeds used to prepare this weekly blog are harvested with Feedreader3. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

 

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Media Mining Digest 135 – 13 June 2014: 23andMe, Alaska Earthquake Lessons, Alcohol Withdrawal, Anaphylactic Shock, Anger Management, Behavioral Economics, Berling tunnel, Bill Nye Interview, Bitcoin and Privacy,Blind Spots, Brazil Concerns, Business Startups, Carbon Tax, Coca Paste in Uruguay, Data Breaches, Dr Lundberg and JAMA, Eyeglasses Online, Factor 5 Clotting, Flying Clubs, Fracking in England, GMO In Italy, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, Heliobactor Pylori, Hungarian Intolerance, Indian Women, Influenza, Iodine.com, Lab Supplies, Liver Damage from Drugs, M and M Sizes, Magazine Covers, Malcom-X Interview, Medical Ethics, Net Neutrality, Parallel Universes, Scary Tech

The following audio files come from a larger group of 226 for this week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts. A zip file of all 41 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

23andMe  23 mins – “In this segment of Medscape One-on-One, Editor-in-Chief Eric J. Topol, MD, talks with Anne E. Wojcicki, co-founder and CEO of 23andMe, about her desire to shake up the practice of medicine by using patients’ genetic data to enhance preventive care and disease treatment. Although the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ordered 23andMe to stop marketing its $99 genetic screening “tests to consumers last November, Ms. Wojcicki, a Yale-educated biologist, says her company is pressing on with its mission, having already genetically screened some 650,000 people, including Dr. Topol.” At the link find the title, “23andMe CEO on Her Mission to Shake Up Preventive Care,” right-click “Media files 824289.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alaska Earthquake Lessons 35 mins ” Today marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake. To commemorate the quake, we’re posting this extended version of the interview we broadcast on March 25, 2014, with Dr. Mike West, the Alaska State Seismologist and Director of the Alaska Earthquake Center. How On Earth host Beth Bartel talked with Dr. West about his recent paper, “Why the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake Matters 50 Years Later,” published in Seismological Research Letters.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcohol Withdrawal  26 mins – Dr Gil Porat, a practicing Colorado Hospitalist, Board Certified in Internal Medicine, discusses acute alcohol withdrawal, its causes and treatment. At the link click “Download,” right-click the next “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anaphylactic Shock  26 mins – Dr Gil Porat, a practicing Colorado Hospitalist, Board Certified in Internal Medicine, discusses acute alcohol withdrawal, its causes and treatment. At the link click “Download,” right-click the next “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anger Management 20 mins – Dr Gil Porat, a practicing Colorado Hospitalist, Board Certified in Internal Medicine, discusses anger management in the health care setting, its causes and coping mechanisms. At the link click “Download,” right-click the next “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Behavioral Economics  40 mins – How Regulations Can Create Problems: An Examination of Misdirected “Nudge”. At the link right-click “Download the MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Berlin Tunnel 22 mins – “… this isn’t a story about the design of the Berlin Wall. This is a story about one design to get through it—or really, underneath it. Ralph Kabisch, then a 20-something-year-old university student, was there…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bill Nye Interview 28 mins – This is form 2008: “…The baby steps are important. The hardest thing for everyone to understand about the environment is that every single thing you do affects everybody in the whole world. And the reason, nominally, is that we only have one atmosphere. We can only breath from one source of air – we all share the air. So this is a fundamental idea that’s hard to get; it just doesn’t seem possible. I throw out this magazine and instead of recycling it, yeah – you’re lowering the quality of life of everyone on earth…..” At the link right-click (here or there) “Direct download: nstalol14.mp3” at the page bottom and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin and Privacy 101 mins – “Host: Evan Brown – Russia and the “Bloggers’ Law”, transparency and the death penalty, living with Bitcoin and more! Guests: Jeff Garzik and Jonathan Peters. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Spots 19 mins – “Mahzarin Banaji, Harvard psychologist and author of “Blindspot: The Hidden Biases of Good People,” shares research into why we all have biases, what we can do to counteract them, and why businesses want to level the playing field.” At the link find the title, “Think You’re Not Biased? Think Again.” right-click “Media files IHUB-060714-D.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazil Concerns 46 mins – “As the World Cup kicks off, Brazilians are on the streets in protest. We talk soccer, Brazil, and Brazil’s problems.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Business Startups 23 mins – “…As you will hear in this audio episode, IMITATION of business models, content creation, revenue streams and advertising practices will not guarantee automatic success with your services, products or offerings. While imitation is a good start for aspiring entrepreneurs to hone their skills and create the distinctive competitive advantage for the value that they provide to their customers, a couple of other factors must weigh in as questions:…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Tax 18 mins – “On today’s show, we talk to a couple economists about a very simple idea that could solve the climate-change problem: tax carbon emissions. A carbon tax could be paired with cuts in the income tax. And it would drive down emissions without picking winners or losers, and without creating complicated regulations.” At the link find the title, “#472: The One-Page Plan To Fix Global Warming ,” right-click “Media files npr 318878055.mp3″

Coca Paste in Uruguay 27 mins – “Thousands of Uruguayans are hooked on a highly addictive cocaine derivative – ‘pasta base’. Will the legalisation of marijuana impact this problematic drug abuse? Linda Pressly reports.” At th link find the title, “Docs: Uruguay’s Radical Drugs Policy – 06 ,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140306-0030a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Breaches  25 mins – “The first thing guest Alan Goldberg highlighted was the colossal cost of data breaches. He explained that the minimum cost is $100,000 and it has the potential to amount to millions. In this edition of Digital Detectives, your hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek invite Goldberg to discuss the usual reasons for a breach, likely consequences, prevention, and more. Goldberg is a solo practitioner in McLean, Virginia. A past President of the American Health Lawyers Association, he teaches Health Law and Health and Information Technology as an adjunct professor at American University, Washington College of Law, and George Mason University School of Law.” At the link find the title, “Data Breaches in the Healthcare Industry: Lessons for Law Firms,” right-click “Media files Data Breaches in the Healthcare Industry Lessons for Law Firms.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dr Lundberg and JAMA  22 mins – “In this episode of Medscape One-on-One, George Lundberg, MD, sits down with Medscape Editor-in-Chief Eric Topol, MD, to reflect on a career that has taken him from the practice of medicine to producing medical content for the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and online publications, including Medscape. Additionally, Dr. Lundberg discusses his southern roots and whether medical societies are friend or foe, and he offers a prediction on where medicine will go in the future.” At the link find the title, “Lundberg at 80: Reflections on His Career and the JAMA Firing,” right-click “Media files 821436.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eyeglasses Online 12 mins – “There’s a lot more to glasses than meets the eye. Dave Gilboa, the co-CEO of Warby Parker, talks about shaking up the industry, creating a new business model, and saving customers money.” At the link find the titl, “The Rogue Company: Warby Parker Upends the World of Glasses,” right-click “Media files
IHUB-060714-B.mp3? and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Factor 5 Clotting 27 mins (2 prts) – Dr Gil Porat, a practicing Colorado Hospitalist, Board Certified in Internal Medicine, discusses factor 5 clotting, its causes and treatment. It is “… a protein of the coagulation system, rarely referred to as proaccelerin or labile factor. In contrast to most other coagulation factors, it is not enzymatically active but functions as a cofactor. Deficiency leads to predisposition for hemorrhage, while some mutations (most notably factor V Leiden) predispose for thrombosis.” At the link click “Download,” right-click the next “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get Part one. Do the same thing here, Part 2 , for part two.

Flying Clubs 34 mins – “One of the best ways to decrease the cost of flying and increase your time in the air is to join a flying club. Recently I spoke with Todd Castro, former President of The Blue Sky Aviation Association, one of the most successful flying clubs in the United States. Todd shared many aspects of starting and running a flying club” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking in England 4 mins – “Along with a litany of other proposals, the Queen announced that Cameron’s government will offer a bill to “enhance the United Kingdom’s energy independence and security by opening up access to shale and geothermal sites.” It sounds simple enough, but behind that “opening up access to shale” language is an effort by the government to change the laws about drilling for gas under people’s homes. “The prime minister is going to open up half the country to fracking companies,” says Greenpeace spokesman Lawrence Carter. “So ahead of that, he’s going to strip homeowners of their right to object to drilling underneath their property.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the right-side of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO in Italy 5 mins – “Neatly ploughed, furrowed fields sit at the base of the Italian Alps. This fertile plain, called Magredi, is part nature reserve, part farm country and, lately, part pain-in-the-neck for the Italian government. Thanks to one feisty farmer. “This stuff, with the same light, water and fertilizer, produces 10 times more than the other kind,” says farmer Giorgio Fidenato. “So, what more could you want?!” The blonde and brawny farmer is a kind of crusader for GMO corn. Trudging along in his tractor, he may look like any other farmer in the region, except that he’s the only one spreading smuggled, Monsanto GMO corn seeds. Fidenato dreams of a country where every cow and every child is raised on GMOs….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guillain-Barre Syndrome  23 mins – Dr Gil Porat, a practicing Colorado Hospitalist, Board Certified in Internal Medicine, discusses what’s known about this syndrome, its causes and treatment. “Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a disorder in which the body’s immune system attacks part of the peripheral nervous system. The first symptoms of this disorder include varying degrees of weakness or tingling sensations in the legs. In many instances the symmetrical weakness and abnormal sensations spread to the arms and upper body.” At the link click “Download,” right-click the next “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Helicobacter Pylori 22 mins – “Two articles on bmj.com look at helicobacter pylori; a systematic review and meta-analysis examines if eradication treatment reduces rates of gastric cancer, and an uncertainties article asks who we should be testing and treating for the infection. Two of the authors of those articles, Alex Ford from the Leeds Gastroenterology Institute, and Paul Moayyedi from the Gastroenterology Division of McMaster University, join us to discuss the bacterium.” At the link click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hungarian Intolerance 27 mins – “Hungarian conductor – Ivan Fischer – is holding up a mirror to Hungarian society and has written an opera to expose growing intolerance. Lucy Ash reports.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Hungary’s Crusading Conductor – 13,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140313-0030a.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Women 27 mins – “Rupa Jha meets fellow Indian women who choose to be, or are forced to be, single. She comes face-to-face with a story of coercion, prejudice and neglect that is both shocking and moving. It is also a story about the reactionary attitudes, narrow-mindedness and sometimes outright misogyny that obstruct such women’s choices.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Freedom to be Single,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140308-0932b.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Influenza 54 mins (4 parts) – Dr Gil Porat, a practicing Colorado Hospitalist, Board Certified in Internal Medicine, defines influenza, discusses how it is diagnosed, its complications and treatment.  At the link click “Download,” right-click the next “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4.

Iodine.com 51 mins – “This week, Innovation Hub explores the senses and how they can work for us – or fool us. Guests include BJ Fogg, head of Stanford University’s Persuasive Technology Lab; Thomas Goetz, co-founder of Iodine, a healthcare startup; Julia Child’s biographer Alex Prud’homme; and Harpoon Brewery co-founder Dan Kenary.” At the link find the title, “4.12.14 Full Show – Senses,” right-click “Media files IHUB-041214-FullShow.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lab Supplies 14 mins – “Why do lab supplies cost so much? How much waste does scientific research generate? Is there a way to make science more efficient? In this episode we interview Tom Ruginis, founder and Chief Happiness Officer at HappiLabs — a company that aims to improve the happiness of scientists and the quality of their research.” At the link in the “individual files” section right-click “11.6MB” under “VBR MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liver Damage from Drugs 16 mins – Dr Gil Porat, a practicing Colorado Hospitalist, Board Certified in Internal Medicine, discusses acute liver injury from drugs (other than acetaminophen) and related issues. At the link click “Download,” right-click the next “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

M and M Sizes 13 mins – “The other day we noticed something strange: a pack of Milk Chocolate M&M’s weighs 1.69 ounces, but a pack of Peanut Butter M&M’s weigh a tiny tiny bit less, 1.63 ounces. The two packs are same price, but you get slightly less of the Peanut Butter M&Ms! 0.06 ounces less! It turns out there is a whole weird world living down there at the third decimal place. When you pull on that little thread, lots of things start to unravel. After today’s show, you will never pop a piece of candy in your mouth and think about it the same way again.” At the link find the title, “#544: The M&M Anomaly,” right-click “Media files npr_319563434.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Magazine Covers 20 mins – “You know the saying: you can’t judge a book by its cover. With magazines, it’s pretty much the opposite. The cover of a magazine is the unified identity for a whole host of ideas, authors, and designers who have created the eclectic array of stories and articles and materials within each issue. And, some would argue, this identity extends to the reader as well. So if, say, you’re seen with an issue of Vogue, you’re don’t just own that copy–you become a Vogue reader.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malcom-X Interview 41 mins – “Nation of Islam leader Malcolm X was interviewed by sociology graduate student Herman Blake and professor John Leggett [in1963]. Malcolm X argued against racial integration and discussed the right for African Americans to use violence to defend themselves against violent attacks by whites. He also discussed the nature of Islam. This program was courtesy of the Media Resources Center Collection at the University of California, Berkeley. [and C-Span].” At the link you can listen, only; however, a copy of the audio track is included in the archives for this blog.

Medical Ethics 619 temp 3 mins – “Hello and welcome. I am Dr. George Lundberg, and this is At Large at Medscape. Are you an ethical physician? Based on statistics, chances are that you, the reader, are not a member of the American Medical Association (AMA). No matter. You are still subject to the Code of Medical Ethics of our AMA, long promulgated via its Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs. From the time of its origin in [1847], creating a code of ethics has been a central function of the AMA. Chew on these meaty morsels and test yourself honestly….” At the link find the title, “Are You an Ethical Physician? Take This Quiz,” right-click “Media files 824342.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Net Neutrality 20 mins – “With all of the recent media discussions around network neutrality, reclassification, and “Title II,” we decided to spend this week talking with Matt Wood, Policy Director for Free Press to simplify some key issues. For all the hub-bub around reclassification and dramatic claims that it represents some kind of fundamental policy shift, the truth is actually less exciting. Internet access via DSL was previously regulated under Title II of the Communications Act (as Verizon well knows and has used to its advantage). And again regulating Internet access as Title II still allows for various forms of innovation and even paid prioritization if done in a “reasonable” manner. Matt and I discuss how Internet access came to changed from Title II to Title I last decade and the implications of moving it back now. Free Press also runs the popular SaveTheInternet.com.” At the link right-click (there or here) “…download this Mp3 file directly from here,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parallel Universes 26 mins – “Parallel Universes – extended interview with Brian Greene This is an extended version of the interview we broadcast on February 26, 2013, featuring Professor Brian Greene discussing the concepts of Parallel Universes. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scary Tech 27 mins – ” Find out what the experts in computer security saw at ABA TECHSHOW 2013 – things like attendees with no passcode on their tablets or smartphones and people connecting to insecure networks which monitored their data traffic (through a scary device called a Pineapple). Digital Detectives hosts Sharon Nelson, Esq. and John Simek, president and vice president of Sensei Enterprises, Inc., welcome Ben Schorr of Roland Schorr to talk about the best ways to secure your home and office devices Ben Schorr has been a technical consultant for businesses for two decades. ” At the link find the title, “Scary Tech: Lessons from ABA TECHSHOW 2013,” right-click “Media files DGD_ScaryTech.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Symbols of Access   17 mins – “There is a beauty to a universal standard. The idea that people across the world can agree that when they interact with one specific thing, everyone will be on the same page– regardless of language or culture or geographic locale. If you’re in Belgrade or Shanghai or São Paulo, you can look at a sign and know instantly, without speaking a word of the local language, that this floor is slippery. That the emergency exit is over there. That that substance is poisonous, and you should not eat it. The group behind those internationally recognized logos is called the International Organization for Standardization. One of the most recognizable ISO symbols in the International Symbol of Access. You might not know it by that name, but you’ve seen it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of over 3100 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A complete folder of the actual podcasts is here and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here and can alsob e downloaded as a zip file or individually. Jan-Jun 2013 files in 18 zip segments (832 podcasts) can be downloaded hereand a list of those files here; Jul-Dec 2013 files in 13 zip segments (720 podcasts) downloaded here, and a list here;  Jan-Jun 2012 files in 8 segments (360 podcasts) and a list are here, and Jul-Dec here in 13 parts (593 podcasts).  For 2011 a list and 5 segments  (184 podcasts). For 2010 and earlier 64 podcasts are listed here and zipped  as Part 1 and Part 2. (Dead links in old episodes are due to updating; try a current episode.) Over 180 feeds used to prepare this weekly blog are harvested with Feedreader3. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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Media Mining Digest 134 – 6 June 2014: Afghanistan Reconstruction, Airspace Ownership, Apple and Google, Arab Revolutions, Bank Robbing, Blind Listener Questions, Broadband in Maryland, Clara Barton, College Education Value, Columbia Hippos, Conservative v. Liberal Origins, Crowdfunding for Entrepreneurs, Democracy and Technology, Education Practices, Facial Idenfication Database, Gay Marriages, Golems, Human Rights, Khe Sahn – Vietnam, Marriage Equality, Materials Have Tails, Maya Angelou, Measles and Polio Research, Mental Threats, Meta-analysis Issues, Misogyny and Murder, Missing Service Personnel, Movie Monsters, Neuroscience, Obstacles and Performance, Patent Reform, Power Grid, PreMedLife.com, Protein Supply, Right to Try Drugs, Savings Startups, Social Media, Socrates, Software Standards, Sustainable Growth, Triclosan, TV Gamma Setting, Wine for Teeth, Women Entrepreneur

The following audio files come from a larger group of 165 for this week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts. A zip file of all 44 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Afghanistan Reconstruction 59 mins – “John Sopko talked about his role as Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) and discussed how American taxpayer dollars were spent on reconstruction in Afghanistan. Over $103 billion had been spent on reconstruction projects in Afghanistan since 2001. He spoke about work his office had done documenting construction of buildings and generators, defective planes, and missing ships, all of which were authorized and paid for without ever being used. He also talked about corruption within Afghanistan’s government and banks as it relates to waste, fraud, and abuse of money targeted for reconstruction projects. Mr. Sopko expressed his concerns with a lack of accountability and proper oversight at the departments of State and Defense, and argued that this prohibits them from effectively managing the Afghanistan budget. He also expressed the need for national security to be seen as a non-partisan issue when dealing with the lives of American soldiers.” At the link you can see the video, but not download anything; however, an audio copy is included in the zip collection noted in the blog introduction.

Airspace Ownership 16 mins – “Tons of entrepreneurs have come up with clever ways to make money using little drones: farmers, who want to spot aphids on their soybean plants; ranchers trying to find lost cows; crews wanting to film shiny cars cruising on windy roads. There’s just this one little problem – according to the Federal Aviation Administration – all these people- they are breaking the law. Today on the show: drones are proliferating, but who owns the air? If you buy a house, you know you own the ground. But what about the space above it? Who exactly, owns that?” At the link find the title, “#541: Who Owns The Air? ” right-click “Media files npr_315468896.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apple and Google 29 mins – “Fred Vogelstein talked by remote video from San Francisco about his book, Dogfight: How Apple and Google Went to War and Started a Revolution, in which he traces the origins of two of the largest companies in the media and communications industry. He argued that the battles between these companies, which he termed the defining business battle of a generation, were ultimately over domination of distribution of content in the 21st century.” At the link you can see the video, but not download anything; however, an audio copy is included in the zip collection noted in the blog introduction.

Arab Revolutions 55 mins – “Dalia Othman on Post Arab Revolutions: What Social Media is Telling Us  - It is undeniable that social media played a role in recent revolutions across the Arab world. But it is harder to identify the relationships between different actors on and off social media, and the flow of information about the revolutions. In this talk Dalia Othman — Berkman Fellow and Visiting Scholar at MIT’s Center for Civic Media — discusses the initial findings of ongoing research being conducted on the Arab Blogosphere and Twitter maps from various countries in the region. It is undeniable that social media played a role in recent revolutions across the Arab world. But it is harder to identify the relationships between different actors on and off social media, and the flow of information about the revolutions.” At the link right-click “Download the MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bank Robbing 21 mins – “When I go into a bank, especially if I have to stand in line waiting to make a deposit, my mind wanders. And one of the first place it wanders to is: how I would rob the place. How could it be done? Most of the time, buildings are our friends. But it’s fun to recast the building as the enemy….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Listener Questions  19 mins – “Our experts answer three questions posed by listeners, Peter White meets a visually impaired rehab worker and how to teach your blind child to play.” At the link find the title, “Listeners’ questions; VI rehab worker; blind child’s play,” right-click (for a limited time) “Download 9MB” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blood Test Research 29 mins – ” In a rebroadcast from April 11, 2010, Keith & Russ talk with Mary Wirth, W. Brooks Fortune Distinguished Professor of Analytical Chemistry at Purdue University.  She talks about her research into finding the biomarkers which can exacerbate cancer, and how synthetic opals could assist that search.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Maryland 19 mins – “For our 100th episode, we are excited to share a conversation with Dr. Robert Wack, city council member and driving force behind a planned open access fiber network in Westminster, Maryland. Westminster has just decided that instead of a fiber pilot project, they are going to move ahead with the first phase of a larger deployment. Dr. Wack and I discuss how that came to be and how the network has already resulted in a commitment from an employer to move more jobs into the community. We finish our discussion with a personal anecdote about the benefits of expanding the reach of telehealth applications.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3 file…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clara Barton  58 mins – “Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office: Between 1861 and 1868, Clara Barton lived in a Washington, D.C., boarding house and employed as many as twelve clerks in her “Missing Soldiers Office.” In 1996 the General Services Administration was preparing the building for demolition when they discovered artifacts eventually proving that this was the lost office of the founder of the American Red Cross. Susan Rosenvold, superintendent and historian of the Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office gave a tour and talked about the life and work of humanitarian Clara Barton.” At the link you can see the video, but not download anything; however, an audio copy is included in the zip collection noted in the blog introduction.

College Education Value 51 mins – “Millions of new college graduates will be looking for work this summer. And the latest data indicate their degrees are worth the increasingly high cost of tuition, room and board. It finds that Americans with four-year college degrees last year earned 98 percent more an hour on average than those without a degree. Another recent report even suggests that not going to college will cost a young person about $500,000 over a lifetime. But many graduates are carrying significant debt loads which are becoming a drag on the U. S. economy. And some are taking jobs for which they feel overqualified. Diane and her [4] guests discuss the new data on whether college is worth the debt.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the zip collection noted in this episode’s introduction contains a copy of the audio file.

Columbia Hippos 5 mins – “Pablo Escobar, the former Colombian drug lord who was killed in 1993, had an affinity for exotic animals. In the early 1980s, he created a zoo alongside his swimming pools, race track and small airport on his estate known as Hacienda Nápoles. When Escobar was killed by the Colombian police, his estate was left deserted. Many of the animals were rounded up and moved to zoos, says Hernando Alvarez, a Colombian-born reporter for BBC Mundo. But not all of them. “Nobody wanted to get a hold of a couple hippos and the authorities thought not much of it. They have a good environment in this massive farm that used to belong to Pablo Escabar, so they left a couple there… Nowadays there are around 60 hippos in Colombia.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conservative v. Liberal Origins 69 mins – “Yuval Levin, author of The Great Debate: Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, and the Birth of Right and Left, talks to EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas of Burke and Paine and their influence on the evolution of political philosophy. Levin outlines the differing approaches of the two thinkers to liberty, authority, and how reform and change should take place. Other topics discussed include Hayek’s view of tradition, Cartesian rationalism, the moral high ground in politics, and how the “right and left” division of American politics finds its roots in the debates of these thinkers from the 1700s.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crowdfunding for Entrepreneurs 32 mins – “The dynamic success of crowdfunding has given Entrepreneurs and Startups a new method of raising capital. But it is not automatic. An entrepreneur does not publish a web site with the info and then receive the funds. It can be a full-time endeavor, with tough challenges found in a true marketing campaign. But what does it take to have a successful campaign?  This is the audio recording of the presentation given by Hall Martin, Director  of the Texas Entrepreneur Network. The topic is crowdfunding and what it means to the Entrepreneur.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy and Technology  57 mins – “I am thrilled to post Show #209, April 15, Dutch politician and former European Parliament member Lousewies van der Laan on promoting democracy and technology. I met Lousewies at a conference on innovating justice at The Hague in 2012. Lousewies is a leading voice on democracy and human rights in the EU, and I was delighted to have her on the show to discuss a wide range of issues involving the operation of democracies in 2014. From the rise of the far right to the role of the public in policymaking….” At the link find the title, “Show # 209 — Lousewies van der Laan on liberal and e-democracy — posted,” right-click “Media files 20140415-Levine-209-vanderLaan.mp3″ and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Practices 19 mins – “Education in America is kind of a patchwork quilt – you’ve got different states doing different things, and towns have different amounts of money to spend on schools. And practically every parent and every student have – often conflicting – ideas about how to create successful, competitive graduates: More computer science. Less homework. More reading. Less memorization. More engaging extracurriculars. Shorter summer vacations. Longer days. Somehow, all those ideas aren’t adding up to much – and there’s increasing worry that US students are falling far behind other countries when it comes to their academic performance.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the right side of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facial Identification Database 20 mins – “On February 12th of 2008, the FBI announced that it had hired Lockheed Martin to build its Next Generation Identification system (NGI) to deploy multimodal matching to biometric data of US citizens. Today, NGI’s database contains several types of unique identifiers including fingerprints, iris prints, and facial recognition. On this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview Jennifer Lynch from the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Together they discuss false identifications, mandatory background checks, and the First Amendment right to be anonymous. Tune in to learn more about EFF’s FOIA request and how the FBI is using the data of the innocent to look for guilty parties.” At the link find the title, “The FBI’s Massive Facial Recognition Database: Privacy Implications,” right-click “Media files DGD Final FBI Facial Database.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gay Marriages 40 mins – “Suzanna Walters – Gay rights. Recent years have ushered in a whole new meaning to the idea. Many believe that with gay marriage becoming legal and more gay role models we are becoming much more tolerant. But what about the idea that they need to be tolerated in the first place? Do any of us…” At the link right-click at the bottom of the page “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Golems 4 mins – “It’s a dark night in Prague in the year 1580. Rabbi Judah Loew ben Bezalel kneels by the banks of the river Vlatava to conjure a man out of mud. The rabbi is a wonder worker and a mystic. They say he once impressed the emperor Rudolph by magically turning stones into roses. Now, he calls on his powers at a time of trouble. The Jewish community of Prague is in peril. They face threats of expulsion and violence, but who will come to their aid? Standing under the Charles Bridge, the rabbi draws a human figure on the ground. He circles it, reciting the secret names of God. At last, the figure stirs and rises from the earth. A powerful giant towers above the rabbi. He has created a golem….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Rights 54 mins – “Germaine Greer is perhaps the most provocative feminist thinker in the world. In the final lecture from the series, Fragile Freedoms: the Global Struggle for Human Rights, Germaine Greer explores women and human rights.” At the link find the title, “Fragile Freedoms – Germaine Greer,” right-click (here or there) “Download Fragile Freedoms – Germaine Greer” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Khe Sanh, Vietnam  47 mins – “As controversial as America’s wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have often been, when American soldiers came home from those wars, they’ve been widely met with respect and thanks.  For the now-aging veterans of the Vietnam War, it was different.  Even when they came home from terrible and terrifying battles.  The Vietnam War battle at Khe Sanh was great and terrible.  A big, remote base nearly overrun.  Months of terrible fighting.  Hundreds of American dead.  A brutally ambiguous end.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marriage Equality 58 mins – “Jo Becker talked about her book, Forcing the Spring: Inside the Fight for Marriage Equality, in which she takes readers through the latter stages of what some call the new civil rights movement, beginning with the first attempts to stop California’s Proposition 8 and culminating in the Supreme Court decision to strike down DOMA. She spoke with Suzanne Goldberg, director of Columbia Law School’s Center for Gender and Sexuality Law.” At the link you can see the video, but not download anything; however, an audio copy is included in the zip collection noted in the blog introduction.

Materials Have Tails 16 mins – “From the Stone Age to the silicon age — we’ve always been defined by our stuff. And that’s not a bad thing — except when we start drowning in it, says materials scientist Mark Miodownik, author of “Stuff Matters.” At the link find the title, “Drowing in Stuff,” right-click “Media files IHUB-053114-C.mp3,” and select “Sae Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maya Angelou 51 mins – “Maya Angelou, celebrated author and poet, died Wednesday. She was 86. Angelou achieved fame with her 1969 memoir, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” about growing up poor and black in the South. Her autobiographical writing, which eventually filled seven volumes, established her as a leading voice for women and African Americans. In a statement yesterday, president Obama called Angelou, “One of the brightest lights of our time — a brilliant writer, a fierce friend and a truly phenomenal woman.” She appeared on this show three times over the years. Today, we’ll play a rebroadcast of our 2013 conversation about her book, “Mom & Me & Mom.’” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the zip collection noted in this episode’s introduction contains a copy of the audio file.

Measles and Polio Research 94 mins – “Hosts Vincent Racaniello and Alan Dove meet up with  Julie Pfeiffer and Paul Duprex at the General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology in Boston, to talk about their work on the pathogenesis of poliovirus and measles virus.” At the link right-click “Download TWIV 286″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Threats 11 mins – “Wall Street Journal columnist Jeff Yang talks about the manifesto of Santa Barbara shooter Elliot Rodger, and what it suggests about American life today…. Jeff Yang’s article “What A Close Reading Of The Isla Vista Shooter’s Horrific Manifesto, ‘My Twisted World,’ Says About His Values — And Ours” was written specifically for Quartz (qz.com) and did not appear in The Wall Street Journal.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meta-analysis Issues 30 mins – Infectious Specialist Mark A. Crislip discusses problems with the use of meta-analysis and organizations, such as the Cochrane Review, that use them. At the link right-click “Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Misogyny and Murder 46 mins – “What’s in a killer’s heart? We know in the case of last Friday’s Santa Barbara massacre. Because the killer wrote about it at length. He despised women. His unrequited desire turned into a furious hatred. And a plan to kill. A plan he carried out. An overwhelming response followed. A Twitter flood – the #yesallwomen hashtag – women sharing their own stories. Concerns that hatred, entitlement, towards women is woven widely into our culture. Not creating killers necessarily, but haters. Is this true? Where’s the line? And what’s to be done?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Missing Service Personnel 51 mins – “On Sept. 1, 1943, a B-24 bomber disappeared over the Pacific archipelago of Palau. The 11 soldiers on the plane became part of the 73,000 the government declared missing in action following the end of World War II. For the families of the men on that plane, it seemed the mystery of what happened to their loved ones would never be resolved. That is until 1993, when an eccentric amateur explorer, on his first visit to Palau, made finding the plane and the soldiers his life’s mission. Author Wil Hylton joins Diane to discuss his new book, ‘ Vanished: The Search for the Missing Men of World War II.’ ” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the zip collection noted in this episode’s introduction contains a copy of the audio file.

Movie Monsters   53 mins – “Thursday, we’re talking about the monsters of the silver screen. They’ve been an integral part of films since their earliest days, but as our anxieties have changed throughout the decades, so have our monsters. Historian W. Scott Poole observes that we were once satisfied to watch a group of co-eds try to escape a slathering, predatory beast or slasher fiend. But in the post-9/11 world, “monsters have to burn the world to the ground.” Poole will join us to dissect our fascination with cinema’s monstrosities.” At the link right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuroscience  43 mins – “I have spent the last 7 1/2 years sharing and promoting neuroscience and while it has been encouraging to see the field grow in popularity, there has also been a disturbing trend toward increased hype. One goal of the Brain Science Podcast is to provide accurate information that helps the average listener enjoy the science and avoid pseudoscience. BSP 109 was inspired by several excellent books that have documented the hazards of what some writers are calling “neuromania” or neurocentrism, which is the tendency to see the brain as the only path to understanding.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obstacles and Performance  39 mins – “Joe De Sena – CEO and co-founder of the Spartan Race and author of Spartan Up!: A Take-No-Prisoners Guide to Overcoming Obstacles and Achieving Peak Performance in Life. Joe is a legend in endurance and adventure racing. He completed the 135-mile Badwater Ultra-marathon, raced the 140.6 miles of Lake Placid Ironman, and finished a 100-mile trail run…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patent Reform  57 mins – “So let’s start with Show #208, April 8, my interview with four-time guest (thanks Mark!) Prof. Mark Lemley of Stanford Law School on this term’s United States Supreme Court intellectual property cases — and there are a banner number. This term’s cases have addressed some of the most vexing issues in patent law generally, ranging from claim construction to abstract ideas. We discussed the primary cases, as well as current legislative efforts to address patent trolls/non-practicing entities/patent assertion entities.” At the link find the title, “Show #208 — Prof. Mark Lemley on the US Supreme Court’s current patent cases — posted,” right-click “Media files
20140408-Levine-208-Lemley.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Power Grid 11 mins – “What will the power grid look like 50 years from now? More importantly, what do we want it to look like, and how will we supply reliable, affordable, and sustainable electricity to a global population that may reach 10 billion by midcentury? IEEE Spectrum considered those important questions as part of its recent special report “The Future We Deserve.” Clark Gellings is one of the world’s leading experts on the electricity system. He’s a Fellow of the Electric Power Research Institute in Palo Alto, California, and also a Life Fellow of the IEEE. During the course of his 46-year career, his ideas, his writing, and his testimony have really helped propel the electricity industry toward greater energy efficiency, more widespread adoption of the smart grid, and more integration of renewable energy and other clean technologies.” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PreMedLife.com 33 mins – “This podcast is a special one that we have been working towards for the last year. PreMedLife Magazine has been in publication since 2010, and releases new issues every two months to over 40,000 digital subscribers as well as print editions to a growing list of undergraduate colleges. Their mission syncs up very much with ours, at the Medical School Headquarters, and our partnership moving forward will help our audiences learn from each other. Tasheema Prince, the founder of PreMedLife Magazine began her undergraduate career as a premed, but prior to graduating, found a different passion – medical writing. She talks about her decision to leave the premed world behind and enter the land of publishing. While she worked after college, she had the idea of helping premeds with her newly found love of writing and publishing. Thinking back to her premed days, and the help that she was looking for, Tasheema founded PreMedLife Magazine to help premeds on their paths.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Protein Supply 33 mins – “Protein is one of the most important nutrients in our diet, but providing an adequate and equitable supply of it to people around the world remains a vexing problem.” At the link find the title, “The Problem with Protein,” right-click “Media files ProblemwithProtein.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Right to Try Drugs 51 mins – “Lawmakers in three states have passed so-called “Right-to-Try” laws, which give terminally ill patients access to experimental drugs without FDA approval. Diane and [5] guests discuss the growing demand for these laws and whether they jeopardize patient safety.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the zip collection noted in this episode’s introduction contains a copy of the audio file.

Savings Startups 12 mins – “More than10 years ago, Rich Buck and Paul Merriman wrote a popular article titled, “Superior Diversification on a Shoestring Budget.”  It is amazing how far the industry has come since the article was released. It focused on how to build a broadly diversified Vanguard portfolio following Paul’s Vanguard Aggressive Portfolio using 9 different funds. To complete the process took 9 years of patient investing. With commission-free ETFs at Vanguard and Schwab, and low minimums with Schwab index funds, most young investors can now build the entire portfolio in one year.  In this podcast Paul discusses how to work with Vanguard and Schwab as well as some of the important differences between funds and ETFs. See Paul’s mutual fund recommendations and ETF recommendations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media 65 mins – “Online, interface designs fashion people’s appearance, shape their communication and influence their behavior. Can we see another’s face or do we know each other only by name? Do our words disappear forever once they leave the screen or are they permanently archived, amassing a history of our views and reactions? Are we aware of how public or private our surroundings are? In this talk Judith Donath — Berkman Faculty Fellow and former director of the MIT Media Lab’s Sociable Media Group — discusses some of these questions and more from her new book “The Social Machine.’” At the link right-click “Download the MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Socrates 52 mins – “Wednesday, the acclaimed British historian Bettany Hughes is joining us to talk about one of history’s most fascinating characters, Socrates. You know much of the story: Socrates was a brilliant, disheveled figure of 5th century Athens who wandered around the city barefoot asking random people the most important questions about life. Hughes says Socrates is relevant for us now in a materialistic society because he’s asking “what is the right way to live?’ ” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Software Standards 63 mins – “Jack Ganssle shared his wisdom on being a good embedded software engineer (hint: it takes discipline). Jack’s website is filled with great essays and new videos. He’s also written the Art of Designing Embedded Systems and The Embedded Systems Dictionary (with Michael Barr). We covered a lot of ground, here are some of the highlights: Spark language; Capers Jones on high quality software and associated statistics; Joel on Software test for good teams; LDRA unit test tool
James Grenning’s Test Driven Development for Embedded C.” At the link find the title, “53: Being a grownup engineer,” right-click “Media files embedded-53.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainable Growth 54 mins – “It’s widely acknowledged that unfettered economic growth is impossible. Yet our reliance on fossil fuels and a growth-based economy seem intractable. Is the notion of “green growth” the answer?” At the link find the title, “Green Growth: Can Profits Help the Planet?” right-click “Download Green Growth: Can Profits Help the Planet?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Triclosan Ban 3 mins – “Study links liquid soap ingredient to increased risk of breast cancer.” At the link find the title, “Episode 375 – June 04 2014,” right-click “Media files
ScienceElements_June4_2014.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up media.

TV Gamma Setting 65 mins – In “All About Gamma” host Scott Wilkinson chats with  Joel Silverr about gamma’s affect on picture quality. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wine Protects Teeth 3 mins – “Red wine could help prevent cavities.” At the link find the title, “Episode 372 – May 28 2014,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements May28_2014.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women Entrepreneur 59 mins – “Heidi Roizen, operating partner at Draper Fisher Jurvetson, shares personal and professional truths learned from her career as an entrepreneur, investor, and educator. Among other topics, Roizen examines the need for resiliency, the importance of valuing relationships over transactions, and why ethics should never be compromised.” At the link hover over “Download,” right-click “Download MP3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

=============================================================                                                                     ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of over 3100 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A complete folder of the actual podcasts is here and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here and can alsob e downloaded as a zip file or individually. Jan-Jun 2013 files in 18 zip segments (832 podcasts) can be downloaded hereand a list of those files here; Jul-Dec 2013 files in 13 zip segments (720 podcasts) downloaded here, and a list here;  Jan-Jun 2012 files in 8 segments (360 podcasts) and a list are here, and Jul-Dec here in 13 parts (593 podcasts).  For 2011 a list and 5 segments  (184 podcasts). For 2010 and earlier 64 podcasts are listed here and zipped  as Part 1 and Part 2. (Dead links in old episodes are due to updating; try a current episode.) Over 180 feeds used to prepare this weekly blog are harvested with Feedreader3. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 133 – 30 May 2014: Aviation Training at Embry-Riddle and Polk State, Beowulf, Capital Punishment, Chinese Cyber Attack, Chronic Pain Control, Citizen Science, Cow Tunnels, Democratic Revolution, Digital Medicine, Doctor Notes Access, Drone Podcast, E-cigarettes Hearing, Farming in America, Health Food History, Home Theater, Libya, MERS, Mexican Apples, New York Port, Penny Dies, Podcasting from a Suitcase, Prone Breathing, Putin, Reading Changes, Tachycardia Therapies, Telecommunications Act, VA Hospital Waits, Women in Aviation

The following audio files come from a larger group of 160 for this week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts. A zip file of all 30 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Aviation Training at Embry Riddle 59 mins – “Max and Court welcome Dr. Tim Brady, Dean of the College of Aviation at the Embry Riddle Daytona Beach campus as they discuss ERAU’s new aviation PhD program.  You can learn more about the first aviation PhD program at http://aviationphd.erau.edu/.” The interview starts at the 33 minute mark and lasts 16 minutes. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aviation Training at Polk State  76 mins – “This episode features an interview with Eric Crump, Aerospace Director at Polk State University, on the innovations taking place in aviation training.”That segment starts around the 9 minute mark and ends 70 minutes later. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beowulf  54 mins – “For more than 1,000 years, the story of Beowulf and the monster Grendel has been part of English lore and literature. The work inspired J.R.R. Tolkien’s novels, it’s been the basis of movies, and it’s even captured the imagination of artists in Utah. This week, Meat & Potato Theatre Company opens a staged adaption and there’s a new translation from a Beowulf enthusiast here in Salt Lake City. So we’re taking the opportunity to talk about the saga: where it came from and why it’s still read today.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Capital Punishment  52 mins – “A recent botched prisoner execution in Oklahoma has poured new fuel on the fiery debate surrounding capital punishment in America. For some people, the pain of the punishment should approach that of the crime. For others, the death penalty is a reprehensible and frequently mishandled State endorsement of killing. …we’ll hear from both sides of the debate, and ask this question: If America is going to execute criminals, could we be going about it a better way?” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Chinese Cyber Attack 51 mins – “The U.S. files criminal charges accusing Chinese military officials of stealing American trade secrets. Guest host Tom Gjelten and a panel of [5] experts discuss new efforts to fight international cyber espionage, an issue that costs US companies billions of dollars a year and threatens national security.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the zip collection noted in this episode’s introduction contains a copy of the audio file.

Chronic Pain Drug 16mins – “…Millions of people with chronic pain are at risk for addiction or overdose when treated with opioid medications. At the same time, many people with addiction also have chronic pain. Approaches to managing these clinical situations effectively should be a significant focus of research funding, a subject for education in medical and dental schools, and a topic for training in accredited residency programs. A new specialty fellowship in chronic pain and addiction could be developed to foster expertise for consultation to both clinicians and policymakers. …Enter Zohydro. …Zohydro is a high-potency opioid agonist sold in capsule form, without features to deter crushing and injecting….” Turmoil between regulators, politicians and medical experts following its introduction has increased, but may expedite pain control means and procedures. At the link right-click “Download” under the speaker’s photo and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Citizen Science 54 mins – “…Professional scientists all over the world are engaging with non-professionals to collect and analyze scientific data, producing results which are being reviewed and published, adding to our knowledge of the world and beyond. In this panel discussion from the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago, we hear from an astronomer, a neuroscientist, an ornithologist and a computer scientist about the challenge of working with members of the public. There are hundreds of projects underway in all sorts of areas. At the bottom of this page are links to lists and actual projects.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cow Tunnels 23 mins – “Writer Nicola Twilley first heard about cow tunnels in a book called Raising Steaks by Betsy Fussell. Fussell writes, “Traffic was so heavy in the 1870s that a ‘Cow Tunnel’ was built beneath Twelfth Avenue to serve as an underground passage. It’s rumored to be there still, awaiting designation as a landmark site.” Just that little mention. Nothing else. Thus began Nicola Twilley’s quest to figure out whether the cow tunnels ever actually existed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democratic Revolution 51 mins – “When it comes to democracy, the West has always come out on top. From the creation of the nation-state, to the idea of liberal democracy, to the development of welfare programs, Western Europe and the United States have led the way. But today, democracy is in trouble and two top editors at The Economists argue in a new book that the West is at risk of being left behind unless there’s a re-invention of the state. The authors say the U.S., in particular, is failing badly at the task of government reform. But they point to nations in some surprising places that are giving it a lot of thought—like the tiny country of Singapore. Editor- in-chief of The Economist, John Micklethwait, and management editor of The Economist, Adrian Wooldridge, discuss their new book “The Fourth Revolution” with guest host Tom Gjelten.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the zip collection noted in this episode’s introduction contains a copy of the audio file.

Digital Medicine 4 mins – Dr Mark Crispin, an infectious disease specialist, remarks about the digitization of medical information and how he has used it to replace the traditional book and paper sources. At the link find the title, “A Gobbet o’ Pus 583. More Global Warming?” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Doctor Notes Access 51 mins – “By law, most patients have the right to access their medical records. But obtaining them can be time-consuming and expensive. A growing number of health advocates are pushing to give patients easy electronic access to physicians’ notes. They argue this improves patient care by aiding communication and reducing misunderstandings. About a dozen medical systems, including the Mayo Clinic and Kaiser Permanente Northwest, allow patients easy access to these records. But some doctors worry this could cause greater confusion and harm. In the next hour, Diane and a panel of [4] guests discuss the pros and cons of making physicians’ notes easily accessible to patients.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the zip collection noted in this episode’s introduction contains a copy of the audio file.

Drone Podcast 33 mins – “UAS regulation proposals from CASA in Australia and from a listener in the U.S., a “Ten best drones” list, NASA testing sense and avoid with a Predator, and bright job prospects for those with UAS skills.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

E-cigarettes 85 mins – “Witnesses testified at a Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee hearing on the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) proposal to assert authority over electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and other non-regulated tobacco products. The proposal included prohibiting the sale of e-cigarettes to minors, and requiring FDA approval and a health warning label for new tobacco products. Mitch Zeller, director of the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Tobacco Products said e-cigarettes had the potential to do harm and good, but more studies were needed. Tim McAfee, director of the Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) Office on Smoking and Health, also testified.”  At the link you can listen/watch, but an audio download costs $.99; however, a copy of the audio file is in the blog archive.

Farming in America  90 mins – “Hosts: Dickson Despommier and Vincent Racaniello continue their brief history of farming with a discussion of farming after the Dust Bowl.” Look at the links for current drought conditions in the U.S. At the link right-click “Download UrbAg3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Food History 58 mins – “Until recently, the link between a high fat diet and heart disease was one of the touchstones of modern medicine. But new research has thrown that connection into question, just as numerous studies over the years have brought new advice about health and diet to the fore. So in this episode, the Guys take the long view on nutritional advice and explore some of the more surprising ways that past generations have defined “health food.”…” At the link right-click the tiny down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Home Theater 66 mins – Host Scott Wilkinson chats with guests Barb Gonzalez and Mark Henninger about Amazon Fire TV, net neutrality, QPlay, and more. QPlay only works with Apple products. Also of interest is CanIStreamIt “…a free service created by Urban Pixels that allows you to search across the most popular streaming, rental, and purchase services to find where a movie is available. If the movie you’re looking for is not available, just sign-up, set a reminder and voila we will shoot you an email when your chosen service makes the movie available. It’s simple and fast.”  At the link right-click “Audio beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Libya 59 mins – “Ambassador Deborah Jones talked about the growing violence in Libya, and the political transition since the fall of Moammar Gaddafi. Ambassador Jones succeeded Ambassador Christopher Stevens, who was killed along with three other Americans in the September 11, 2012, attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi. She explained political challenges facing the country but stressed that Libya, not the U.S. was responsible for its future.” At the link you can listen/watch, but an audio download costs $.99; however, a copy of the audio file is in the blog archive.

MERS  46 mins – “MERS is not a global pandemic.  But it could become one.  We learn that an American flew out of Saudi Arabia with it, and suddenly it’s catching in Indiana.  It hasn’t spread like SARS did, but its death rate is much higher.  1 in 3 so far.  Probably came from camels.  Maybe Egyptian tomb bats.  But global travel can and will take it everywhere.  Especially from a country that draws millions to Mecca and then back home.  Fundamentalist Saudi Arabia is taking heat for not being helpful enough, transparent enough.  How does the world armor up against a new mobile threat?  This hour On Point:  the challenge of tackling MERS.” At the link right-click “download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexican Apples 5 mins – “After 50 years in the apple business, Vicente Robles from the Mexican state of Chihuahua is cutting down most of his orchards. The trees are still productive, but no longer profitable. This year, Mexican growers produced a record harvest. “We were very happy,” said Robles. “The harvest was coming well after two years of not having one.”But their bumper crop came after a year of record imports of American apples. By the time the Mexican growers were ready to sell their fruit, markets were already filled with apples from up north. Chihuahua grower Isaí Gómez trucked his apples to wholesale markets in different cities. He found no takers.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New York Port  4 mins – “England has London. France has Paris. And in the eyes of the world, the U.S. has New York. But what brought the Big Apple to such glittery prominence on the world stage? As any realtor will tell you, there were three main reasons: location, location, and location. New York is situated in a large, natural harbor on the east coast. Within the harbor are miles and miles of protected coastline. For most of history the only economical way to ship goods over long distances was on the water. New York was connected via the Hudson River to upstate New York, and from there to the nation’s interior via the Erie Canal. In short, the city was perfectly situated as a gateway for goods flowing between Europe and much of the U.S…” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Penny Dies 19 mins – Today on the show: The penny. And the strange spot it occupies in our economy. It’s worth almost nothing, but not quite. We have three stories on the penny. First, we go on an expedition through the streets of Manhattan to find something, anything, we can buy for one cent. Next, we talk to a guy who’s betting on the government killing the penny. And finally, we visit a place where people dream of how pennies could change everything: the internet.” At the link find the title, “#539: What’s A Penny Worth?” right-click “Media files npr_313358317.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcasting from a Suitcase 45 mins – “In his episode we concentrate on podcasting when you’re away from the studio. Not field recordings like sound-seeing tours, but podcasting when you are away from home, traveling, maybe staying with friends or in a hotel. In other words, podcasting from a suitcase. Guests Carl Valeri and Len Costa are two of the four hosts from the Stuck Mic AvCast. With a cast of pilots, this podcast often sees several of them away from home, usually in a hotel. We cover a wide range of topics, including: The challange of coordinating recording sessions with the travel schedules of the hosts; Recording episodes and having lots of backup using Screenflow on the Mac and also Call Recorder [Mac also].”

Prone Breathing  23 mins – “Proning is one of the only evidence-based techniques to affect the mortality of ARDS [acute respiratory distress patient] patients. I’ve been wanting to do an episode on proning for a while. Serendipitously, Joseph Tonna recently published a piece on the topic in the ACEP Critical Care Section Newsletter [American College of Emergency Care Physicians]. Dr. Tonna is a fellow in Anesthesia Critical Care at the University of Washington. He recently did a rotation on a refractory ARDs unit (read about all of his experiences below[at the link]) and learned the way they prone. We discuss it on the podcast today.” (Some good video examples at the link.) At the link close to the page bottom right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Putin 40 mins  – Michael McFaul on Vladimir Putin and Russia. “McFaul is the former United States Ambassador to Russia. He resigned in February 2014 for family reasons. Prior to his nomination to the ambassadorial position, McFaul worked for the U.S. National Security Council as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director of Russian and Eurasian Affairs. After his tenure as ambassador in Moscow, McFaul returned to Stanford University as a Professor of Political Science.” At the link find the title, “Michael McFaul on Vladimir Putin and Russia,” right-click “Media files 20140519.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reading Changes 54 mins – “The future of reading in the internet age: How screen reading may affect the way we read books. A mobile app that offers bite-sized, subscription-based books. A look at “social reading” apps. And, Margaret Atwood talks about robotics in work and life.” At the link find “251: Robotics in work and life. Bite-sized subscription books….” right-click “Media files spark_20140511_61129.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tachycardia Treatments 24 mins – Dr Susan B Torrey presents a discussion of tachycardias and their treatment. Reference is made to visual aids, but only an audio version is available.  At the link right-click “Susan Torrey: Terrifying Tachycardias and Their Therapies,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Telecommunication Act Revision 30 mins – “Former Representatives Rich Boucher (D-VA) and Jack Fields (R-TX) talked about the 1996 Telecommunications Act and congressional efforts to rewrite it. Both men were instrumental in writing the legislation.” At the link you can listen/watch, but an audio download costs $.99; however, a copy of the audio file is in the blog archive.

VA Hospital Waits 51 mins – “At a news conference yesterday, President Barack Obama strongly defended the Department of Veterans Affairs. The agency is beset by widening allegations of falsified records and treatment delays for veterans. The president also defended V.A. Secretary Eric Shinseki, saying “nobody cares more about our veterans.” But the president stressed that if the allegations prove to be true, those responsible will be held accountable. Many veterans advocates, Republican lawmakers and even some Democrats expressed disappointment with the president’s comments for not offering concrete solutions; others renewed their calls for General Shinseki to resign. Guest host Tom Gjelten and [3]  guests discuss the V.A. under fire.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the zip collection noted in this episode’s introduction contains a copy of the audio file.

VA Hospital Waits 11 mins – “The Department of Veterans Affairs is under scrutiny after reports say it makes patients wait too long to see doctors. NPR correspondent Quil Lawrence discusses what happened and the possible fallout.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Aviation  74 mins – “We’re joined by guest Elizabeth Clark, Executive Director for Women in Corporate Aviation and the current President of the Memphis Belles Chapter of Women in Aviation International. Liz is an experienced pilot currently flying for FedEx Express Corporate Aviation where she’s a Captain on both the Challenger 601 and Learjet 45 aircraft.” She speaks for most of the first hour. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

=============================================================                                                                     ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of over 3100 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. Jan-Jun 2013 files in 18 zip segments (832 podcasts) can be downloaded hereand a list of those files here; Jul-Dec 2013 files in 13 zip segments (720 podcasts) downloaded here, and a list here;  Jan-Jun 2012 files in 8 segments (360 podcasts) and a list are here, and Jul-Dec here in 13 parts (593 podcasts).  For 2011 a list and 5 segments  (184 podcasts). For 2010 and earlier 64 podcasts are listed here and zipped  as Part 1 and Part 2. (Dead links in old episodes are due to updating; try a current episode.) Over 180 feeds used to prepare this weekly blog are harvested with Feedreader3. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment