Media Mining Digest 150 – 26 Sept 2014: 50 Years Australia Science Show, Academic Redshirting, Alginates, Battery Problem, Benghazi Book, Billionaires, Bob Dylan Story, Brain Health, Cancer Case Study, Cancer Treatment, Childhood Eating, Chip Production, Computational Thinking, Container Shipping, Data Management, Deep Wreck Diving, Driverless Cars, Drone Use Responsibilities, Eating Habits, Engineering Questions, Female Hysteria History, Hearing Aid Story, Husbands School, Hydrologist Interview, Internet Governance Forum, James Booker, Majority Rules in School Board, Medicare Fraud, Mental Illness Myths, Mercury in Medicine, Montreal Protocol, News Coverage Decline, Nutrition Science, Opium History, Outsider Successes, Pain Control, Partnership Formation, Political Testimony, Premed Example, Prostate Cancer, Rumors, Rural Poverty, Sound Engineer, Smartphone Stalking, Sound and Hearing, Spray-on Cake, Teacher Maker, Teachers with Guns, Teaching Science, Trauma Manual, Traumatic Brain Injury, TWIV Q and A, War of 1812, Vaccines History, Wireless Technology, Zionist Liberals

The following audio files come from a larger group of 195 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 56 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

50 Years Australia Science Show 54 mins (2 parts) – “In the early 1960s, science in Australia was taking off. Scientists were choosing to work in Australia rather than disappearing overseas. Macfarlane Burnett and Jack Eccles were awarded Nobel Prizes. But science was poorly covered in the media. To boost coverage, the ABC formed a dedicated team, the Science Unit. Today, in the first of two programs, as Sharon Carleton takes an amble through the archives, we hear some of those early voices, including Robin Hughes, who battled to become the first female reporter to go to Woomera, reporting on nuclear tests. (Part 2) Sharon Carleton continues her romp through the archives. We revisit some of the programs which have had significant lasting effects – Matt Peacock’s reports on asbestos and mesothelioma, Peter Hunt’s reports on forestry in northern NSW which led to changed policy and forests preserved. There was fun, deception uncovered and the occasional hoax.” At the links right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menus.

Academic Redshirting 47 mins – “More parents are “red-shirting” their children in kindergarten—holding them back for a year, hoping they’ll have an edge. Does it work? We look.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alginates 6 mins – “Like many others, I have regular occasions to be thankful for sodium alginate. When acid reflux strikes, this gelatinous substance works alongside conventional antacids by acting as a barrier to prevent stomach acid from making its way into the oesophagus. The acid form, alginic acid, is a polysaccharide – a long chain, carbohydrate polymer with a repeated formula of C6H8O6. Although it is also found in soil bacteria, as the name suggests, the main source is algae, specifically brown algae, which is a group that includes many of the seaweeds, like kelps, found in chilly northern seas. The alginate performs a similar role in the seaweed to cellulose in plants and to the cosmetics industry’s favourite additive, hyaluronic acid, in animals, providing a structural matrix to support cells.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Battery Problem 135 mins – “John and Ben discuss the past, present and future of energy generation, distribution, storage and consumption. We explore the future of conventional and alternative energy sources as well as the changing nature of the grid and our relationship to it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Benghazi Book 52 mins – “On September 11, 2012, terrorists attacked a U.S. State Department compound and a CIA building in Benghazi, Libya. Those events have been the subject of immense scrutiny and hearsay, with some saying they lay the grounds for impeaching President Obama. In a new book, the writer Mitchell Zuckoff tells the story of a team of security contractors who fought to repel the attackers in Benghazi. He joins us Tuesday to tell the story of what happened during those 13 hours of mystery and controversy.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Billionaires 47 mins – “Billionaires. We’ll look at the super super rich, and their global shaping of our world.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bob Dylan Story 48 mins – “A new take on the life and music of Bob Dylan, from way inside the Dylan story. “Another Side of Bob Dylan.’” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Health 26 mins – “Neuroscience expert Dr. Andrew Hill joins Dr. Drew for a conversation about brain health and how different actions will impact the development of the brain. They also discuss minimal cognitive impairment and how that term relates to some of the recent Donald Sterling controversy. As the show wraps up, they take listener phone calls on brain health.” At the link find thte title, “135: Dr. Andrew Hill ,” right-click the down-pointing arrow beside the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Case Study 71 mins – “Cancer is the number two cause of death in the US and can affect anyone at any age. Federico Viticci joins John to talk about the history of the disease, what it is, how we fight it and Federicos first-hand experience with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Research 64 mins – “Dr. Drew is joined by cancer expert Dr. Stephen Forman for a continued discussion about Prostate Cancer in honor of September being Prostate Cancer Research Month. They also take a few listener phone calls.” At the link find the title, “#139: Dr. Stephen Forman,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Treatment 51 mins – “It has been more than 40 years since President Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act. The law was designed to bolster efforts to find cures for cancer. While progress has certainly been made, nearly 600,000 Americans will die of cancer this year. Some recent advances in research have led a number of doctors to call for a rethinking of our entire approach to cancer. Maybe the goal should not be to destroy cancer cells but to change them. Or to figure out how to use the body’s immune system to fight the disease. Or, in certain cases, not treat the cancer at all. We explore new ideas about combating cancer.” (Three guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Childhood Eating 22 mins – “Children develop the ability to feed themselves well and become “good eaters” step-by-step throughout their growth and development. When adults feed children according to a stage-appropriate division of responsibility, this process brings more ease and less tension. At every stage, parents take leadership with feeding and let the child be self-directed with eating. Let’s begin the conversation about how this can work at your kitchen table!” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chip Production 60 mins – “In this episode we take a look at microchip production, with a special focus on waferscanners. To do this, we talked with Wilbert Albers of ASML, the leading waferscanner manufacturer in the world. In the episode, we talk about the overall chip production process (from silicon sand over wafer cutting to lithography and etching), and then we talk about the challenges of building high-precision, high-throughput waferscanners.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computational Thinking 43m – “This episode is a discussion with Jeannette Wing on Computational Thinking. Citing the website of Carnegie Mellon’s Center for Computational Thinking website, “computational thinking is a way of solving problems, designing systems, and understanding human behavior that draws on concepts fundamental to computer science.”. As a consequence of computing being more and more important for today’s science, “computational thinking has to be a fundamental part of the way people think and understand the world.”. Jeannette is a leader in this field, and we discuss various aspect of the topic in this show: what computational thinking is, examples of its importance in various fields of science and strategies about how it can be taught to pupils, students and scientists.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Container Shipping 255 mins – “This episode is a conversation about the world-wide container shipping infrastructure with Martin Clausen, the former general counsel of Maersk and Nicolas Guilbert from Ange Optimization. We discuss the history of containers, routing, some details about the ships and container terminals as well as a brief outlook on the future of the container shipping industry. In part two we take a deeper look at optimisation of container stowage on ships and network planning.”

Data Management 27 mins – “An amazing amount of stuff on the internet is free — Facebook, Twitter and Gmail. Of course, it’s not exactly free. We pay, with our data. And right now, we’re kind of stuck trading our data, for all this free software. Today on the show: two people who want to give you other options. These two people are trying to create services online that collect next to nothing — virtually no information, no data. A couple years ago, these people might have been dismissed as kooks. But one of them just raised $30 million.” At the link find the title, “Episode 568: Snoops, Hackers And Tin Foil Hats,”npr_348051174.mp3

Deep Wreck Diving 54 mins – “This episode is a conversation with John Chatterton about deep wreck diving. We cover some of the dangers and challenges, as well as the fascination of the sport. We also talk about the discovery of U 869, which was mainly John Chatterton’s achievement (as documented in the book Shadow Divers)” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Driverless Cars 119 mins – “This episode is about autonomous vehicles (aka self-driving cars). Our guest is Jonathan Sprinkle, assistant professor at the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Arizona. We talk about the topic mainly from the perspective of (software and systems) engineering, but also address legal and societal questions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Use Responsibilities 66 mins – “In 2012, U.S. drone strikes occurred most often in which nation? If you don’t know, you’re not alone. 27 percent of Americans reported they had no a clue and another 60 percent got it wrong. What should the media cover when it comes to drones and military robotics? And what responsibility do journalists have to focus in on the most pressing moral and legal questions when it comes to drone technologies? John Kaag — Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Massachusetts Lowell and co-author of the recent “Drone Warfare” — discusses how the American and international public think about drone warfare, and poses pressing ethical questions about drones in military and civilian use.” At the link right-click “MP3” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eating Habits 38 mins – “We got the chance to sit down with Debra Benfield to discuss nutrition and the concept of mindful and intuitive eating around healthy food choices. You’ll also get a look into some of our weird eating habits! Debra is a Master’s Level Nutritionist (M.Ed.), a (Registered Dietitian (R.D.) AND a Licensed Dietitian/ Nutritionist (L.D.N.) with over 25 years of experience. So as you can see, she definitely fits the mold of who we seek out to talk to on Smart People Podcast! Head over to Debra’s page, Body in Mind Nutrition to read up on what she has to offer!” At the link right-click “Download” nd select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Engineering Questions 104 mins – “We answer nine questions about the engineering profession, gathered from a quaint little website called Reddit, in this episode of The Engineering Commons. You may notice a common thread in our responses, as there is rarely a clear-cut solution, and the answer often depends on the situation!” Questions answered: Can an engineering job be hands-on? How important is it to work for a Fortune 500 company as a new grad? How many hours a week do engineers work? Which programming language is most useful to engineers? Where should a high-schooler interested in engineering look for information about the profession? How can one quickly construct a voltage regulator? Carmen mentions a well-known reference book about electronics, The Art of Electronics. Do engineers ever use calculus? At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Hysteria History 36 mins – “Welcome to Sawbones, where Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband Justin McElroy take you on a whimsical tour of the dumb ways in which we’ve tried to fix people. This week: We follow a wandering womb.” At the link right-click beside “Direct Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flooding in Kashmir 4 mins – “People living in India and Pakistan are no strangers to heavy rains. Each year, the monsoon season brings downpours. But today, the Kashmir region is dealing with one of the worst floods in a century. Over the past ten days, heavy rains have left more than 450 people dead and many are still missing. For author and journalist Basharat Peer, what’s happening there is very personal. He grew up in Kashmir and his parents still live there. As soon as he heard the news about the flood, he left New Delhi, where he lives today, to look for his parents. “My city was like an enormous trash can full of sad.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Additive Control 51 mins – “Americans get more than half of their daily meals from processed foods, many of which contain food additives. More than 9,000 additives, ranging from chemical preservatives to green-tea extract, are currently in the food supply. But consumer advocates warn that companies certify the safety many of these substances without FDA oversight. Several research studies indicate some additives may be linked to health problems, including allergies and intestinal disorders. Guest host Tom Gjelten of NPR and a panel of [4] guests discuss the oversight of food additives.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Hearing Aid Story 14 mins – “Science writer Kathleen Raven’s unexpected loss of hearing takes her on a journey with modern technology. Kathleen Raven writes for Reuters Health and blogs about sustainable agriculture for Scientific American. As an independent writer based in Atlanta, she regularly takes walking breaks in Piedmont Park with her dog, Sunshine. She recently completed two degrees at the University of Georgia: Conservation Ecology (MS) and Health & Medical Journalism (MA). She likes speaking in elementary German with her Dutch husband, Arjan.” At the link find the title, “Kathleen Raven: Hearing,”right-click “Media files 155254139-the-story-collider-kathleen-raven-hearing-1.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Husbands School 27 mins – “On Ivory Coast, men are going back to the classroom. It’s an innovative project dubbed the ‘school for husbands’ – and designed to save the lives of mothers and children.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Ivory Coast’s School for Husbands,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20140918-0330b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hydrologist Interview 24 mins – “Testing the Water (Start time 3:30) What exactly is in our water—the stuff we drink, shower in and use to wash our vegetables? This is a question lots of Coloradans have started to ask in the last few years as oil and gas operations have ramped up in the state. Several communities have become very concerned how nearby drilling operations might be adversely affecting the quality of their water supply… How much is energy development in Colorado affecting the water supply and how can we, that is Jane and Joe public, find out the vital statistics of our water quality? Co-host Jane Palmer discusses these questions with hydrologist Mark Williams from the University of Colorado. Williams is the co-founder of the Colorado Water and Energy Research Center (CWERC) and he has conducted projects around the state looking at the impacts of energy operations on both water and air quality. He has also developed a guide to help residents who live near oil and gas development test their water. The “how to” guide shows well owners how energy-related or other activities might affect their groundwater.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Governance Forum 17 mins – “This week, Lisa Gonzalez interviews me about my recent trip to the Internet Governance Forum in Istanbul, Turkey. The IGF is an opportunity for anyone concerned with Internet Governance on planet Earth to discuss the perceived problems and possible solutions. It uses a multi-stakeholder format, which means that governments, businesses, civil society, and academics are all able to come to the table… this means just about anyone who has the means to participate — including by doing so remotely — can do so. I went as part of a delegation with the Media Democracy Fund, along with six other grantees of theirs to get a better sense of how we can contribute and what we might learn from these international discussions. “ At the link right-click “…download this MP3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

James Booker 27 mins – “The legacy of jazz pianist James Booker. Classically trained in piano and a child prodigy, Booker toured with Ray Charles and Aretha Franklin and played on sessions with Fats Domino and Little Richard. But, gay at a time when homosexuality was a huge taboo and black in a divided America, Booker died alone, aged 43, after a life of drug and alcohol abuse.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Black Liberace,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20140917-0332a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Majority Rules in School Board 61 mins – “Before the war in the East Ramapo, New York school district, there was a truce. Local school officials made a deal with their Hasidic and ultra-Orthodox Jewish neighbors: we’ll leave you alone to teach your children in private yeshivas as you see fit as long as you allow our public school budget to pass. But the budget is funded by local property taxes, which everyone, including the local Hasidim, have to pay — even though their kids don’t attend the schools that their money is paying for. What followed was one of the most volatile local political battles we’ve ever encountered.” At the link you can listen. The download button use requires a $.99 payment, but a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Medicare Fraud 59 mins – “David Fahrenthold talked about his article for the Washington Post on Medicare fraud involving power wheelchairs, as well as other investigative reports he’s worked on involving federal government waste.” At the link you can watch and listen, but an audio download will cost $.99; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Mental Illness Myths 60 mins – “This week, we’re listening to “Mental Illness Myths,” a panel discussion about public perceptions of mental health at CONvergence 2014. Panelists Megan Press, Miri Mogilevsky, Julia Burke and Olivia James discuss misconceptions about diagnosis, treatment and symptoms, and the harm that stigma does to individuals affected by mental illness.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mercury in Medicine 31 mins – “Welcome to Sawbones, where Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband Justin McElroy take you on a whimsical tour of the dumb ways in which we’ve tried to fix people. This week: We put mercury on your chancre.” At the link right-click beside “Direct Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Montreal Protocol 30 mins – “Remember the seventies? Remember feathered hair, pull-tab soda cans, debates about the thinning ozone layer? Our guest this week on Sea Change Radio is Durwood Zaelke, a policy advocate and environmental crusader who started working four decades ago to advance policy that would help preserve the ozone layer. Zaelke is the founder and President of the Institute for Governance & Sustainable Development (IGSD) based in Washington, DC and Geneva. He’s a noted international environmental lawyer who received both an Ozone Protection Award and a Climate Protection Award in 2008 for his help in maximizing the climate benefits of the Montreal Protocol.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

News Coverage Decline 52 mins – “As resources dwindle for news organizations, among the first casualties of cost cutting are the beats that were once the core of journalism’s mission. This week, OTM looks at the great decline in beat reporting.“ At the link find the title, “Deadbeat,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nutrition Science 30 mins – “For our first podcast, we were extremely lucky to be able to speak with Harvard Professor, Dr. Walter Willett. Dr.Willett is an American physician and nutrition researcher. He is a Professor of Epidemiology, Nutrition and Medicine and the Chair of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard University. He has published over 1,000 scientific articles regarding various aspects of diet and disease and is the second most cited author in clinical medicine. In the public eye, Dr. Willett is perhaps best known for his 2001 book Eat, Drink and Be Healthy. Tune in to hear us discuss the downfall of the no-fat diet, the shift in the food pyramid and the truth about anti-oxidants.” At the link find the title, “Episode 1 – Dr. Walter Willett,” right-click “Media files Episode20120-20Dr20Willett.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opium History 31 mins – “Welcome to Sawbones, where Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband Justin McElroy take you on a whimsical tour of the dumb ways in which we’ve tried to fix people. This week: We give opium to a baby.” At the link right-click beside “Direct Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Outsider Successes 41 mins – “What does it mean to pursue something that everyone else think is nuts? And what does it take to succeed? That’s what this week’s episode is about. It’s called “Outsiders By Design.” …You’ll hear about three radical thinkers whose lives didn’t proceed in a perfectly straight line. In each case, their work was ridiculed or ignored — but ultimately, they triumphed.” At the link find the title, “Outsiders by Design,” right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Control 61 mins – “Dr. Drew speaks to New York Times reporter Barry Meier about his new e-book, A World of Hurt: Fixing Pain Medicine’s Biggest Mistake, and the consequences of using pills.” At the link find the title,“ At the link find the title, “#080: Barry Meier,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up window.

Partnership Formation 27 mins – “Alex Blumberg is starting a business, a podcasting business. He’s recording himself as he starts the company, and he’s making a podcast about starting his podcasting company. But starting a business can be lonely. Alex wants a partner to share in the stress and the risk. Potential investors say they’d prefer to bet on a team, too. Today on the show, Alex searches for a business partner. There have been Hewlett and Packard, Procter and Gamble, and Ben and Jerry. Now, there is Blumberg and …” At the link find the title, #569: How To Divide An Imaginary Pie,” right-click npr_349371797.mp3, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Testimony 13 mins – “Marine scientist Meredith has to navigate a whole new world when she’s called upon to testify in front of the Maine legislature in support of a crucial bill. Meredith White is a Postdoctoral Researcher at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in East Boothbay, Maine. Her research focuses on how Coastal Ocean Acidification affects marine organisms, from phytoplankton to commercially-important bivalves….” At the link find the title, “Meredith White: How To Write A Testimony,” right-click “Media files 167568468 the story-collider, Meredith-White-how-to-write-a-testimony.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up media.

Premed Example 44 mins – “For our episode today, I got the opportunity to interview Deandre, a 30-year old, nontraditional, first year medical student at Boston University who took the long road to medical school. Deandre shares with us his journey towards getting to med school which certainly had a number of detours. He attended several years in community college trying to figure out what he really wanted. Then he went to a four-year university and still not knowing what direction he was going to take. Until his professor talked some sense into him and that conversation was what ignited his passion for science as well as that passion for helping people through the gift of healing. Finally, Deandre shared his experience in getting multiple acceptances upon which he eventually narrowed it down to where he is now.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prostate Cancer 56 mins – “Prostate cancer expert Dr. Stuart Holden stops by the Dr. Drew Podcast to talk about the realities of the disease and what can be done to detect and treat it before it becomes life-threatening. They also look at Dr. Drew’s personal experience as well.” At the link find the title, “#138: Dr. Stuart Holden,” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow beside the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rumors 60 mins – “This week, we’re looking at the power of stories and innuendo to shape the public perception of science. We’ll speak to author Jon Lee about his book “An Epidemic of Rumors: How Stories Shape Our Perceptions of Disease.” And we’re joined by Dr. Paul A. Offit, Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases and the Director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, to get the scientific perspective of the safety and effectiveness of vaccinations.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rural Poverty 47 mins – ““Rich Hill,” a new documentary on growing up poor, now, in rural America. The dreams and the desperation.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex 38 mins – “We spend the majority of this episode talking about sex and the female orgasm. Ohhhh, so NOW you’re interested?? You pervert (just kidding!). Join us this episode as we speak with author, sex coach and therapist Nicole Daedone about her brand new book “Slow Sex: The Art and Craft of the Female Orgasm“. Nicole is the founder of OneTaste, a coed live-in commune and for-profit business dedicated to female orgasm, that promotes greater personal awareness and interpersonal connectivity through the practice of Orgasmic Meditation and Slow Sex. Nicole’s slow sex practice has been covered by The New York Times, New York Post, EnlightenNext, the Huffington Post, ABC News Nightline and more.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smartphone Stalking 9 mins – “We’ve looked a lot at privacy from the Big Brother standpoint: how the National Security Agency or corporate giants like Google track us online, say for political reasons or to make money from ads. But there’s another kind of privacy concern that is a lot more intimate. You could call it Little Brother, though it’s really more like husbands and wives, lovers and exes who secretly watch their partners — from a distance. They are cyberstalking — using digital tools that are a lot cheaper than hiring a private detective. NPR investigated these tools, also known as spyware, and spoke with domestic violence counselors and survivors around the country. We found that cyberstalking is now a standard part of domestic abuse in the U.S.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sound and Hearing 60 mins – “This week, we’re exploring the science of sound and hearing. We’ll talk to Trevor Cox, Professor of Acoustic Engineering at the University of Salford, about his book “Sonic Wonderland: A Scientific Odyssey of Sound.” And we’ll speak to Andrew Wise, Senior Research Fellow at Bionics Institute, about a gene therapy technique to enhance the function of cochlear implants.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spray-on Cake 3 mins – A short description about the development of a way to produce dough that can be sprayed from a can. At the link find the title, “Episode 415 – September 18 2014,” right-click “ Media files ScienceElements_Sept18_2014.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teacher Maker 64mins – “Elizabeth Green, author of the new book Building a Better Teacher: How Teaching Works (and How to Teach it to Anyone), talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the art of teaching and the history of various reforms, mostly failed, trying to improve teaching in America. Specific topics include the theoretical focus of undergraduate education programs and various techniques being used in charter schools and elsewhere to improve teaching performance.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teachers with Guns 52 mins – “Last week, a Utah teacher injured herself when her concealed handgun accidently fired. The incident renewed discussion across the state about whether or not teachers should be packing heat while on the job. Gun-rights advocates argue that everybody’s safer when instructors and administrators are armed. Those pushing for stricter gun controls contend firearms are an evident danger, and they say parents have a right to know which teachers are carrying. Thursday, we’ll hear from both sides in this heated debate.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teaching Science 29 mins – “Keith talks with William Robertson, aka “Dr. Skateboard.” Bill is the Associate Provost at the University of Texas at El Paso, and is an Associate Professor in the Teacher Education Department at UTEP. Bill trains teachers to teach science, and tells us why the way today’s students learn is different from just a generation ago because of technology. In his alter ego as “Dr. Skateboard,” Bill, an lifelong skateboarder, explains how he communicates the principles of math & science through sports such as skateboarding.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trauma Manual 9 mins – “Promotions: ATACC Trauma Textbook – A free trauma textbook that is simply amazing and the best example of FOAM brought to traditional media that I have ever seen–want it? I bet you do. I could have written an entire post on this book, but luckily someone did it for me: Tim Leeuwenburg on the ATACC Textbook Just want to download it? The Ibooks Version can be found at this link or go to the ATACC site for the PDF versions.” The textbook is a new illustrated 465 page, British publication. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Traumatic Brain Injury 6 mins- “Steven Galetta discusses his Review on how tests of visual function can be useful in the assessment of minor head injury and TBI.” At the link find the title, “Listen to The Lancet Neurology: September, 2014,” right-click “laneur_september.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

TWIV Q and A 113 mins – “The TWiVers discuss the growing Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, and an epidemic of respiratory disease in the US caused by enterovirus D68.” At the link right-click “TWIV 302” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccines History 47 mins – “Welcome to Sawbones, where Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband Justin McElroy take you on a whimsical tour of the dumb ways in which we’ve tried to fix people. This week: We save your kids.” At the link right-click beside “Direct Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War of 1812 54 mins – “In our continuing series about the War of 1812, host Paul Kennedy visits the battlefields at Washington (where the White House was famously torched) and Baltimore (which ultimately inspired the American national anthem, “The Star Spangled Banner”).” At the link find the title, “Oh Say, Can You See?”right-click “Download Oh Say, Can You See?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wireless Technology 58 mins – “On a marathon episode John critiques the Artemis pCell presentation, critiques a lengthy article about how pCell might work and finally walks through the key pieces to understanding if this is real life or is this just fantasy; and whether Steve Perlman is the right man to make this dream a reality.” At the link right-click “Download” from the pop-up menu.

Zionist Liberals 48 mins – “After a summer of deadly clashes between Gaza and Israel, we talk to Jews on the left and right about the future of liberal Zionism. Some say it’s over. “At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 200 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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Media Mining Digest 149 – 19 Sept 2014: Benghazi, Berkman Center, Border Management in America, Broadband in Maine, Campus Assaults, Cancer and Immune System, Capitalism Crisis, Child Abuse in England, Chiropractic Critique, Clean Energy Project, Climate and Religion, Deaf School, Diabetes Treatment, Digital Clone, Disability Care, Domestic Violence, Dr Drew, Ebola Spread, Education Decline in US, Experiments Online, Finances for Doctors, Flight Instrument Training, Gabby Giffords, Gender Violence, Genius Trait, Hand Axe, Health Innovation, Homeopathy Critique, Howard University President, Imperial America, Internet Era, Internet Immune System, Internet Lessons, Job Training, Ketogenic Diet, Lunch Lady Heroes, Medical Errors Medical Suicides, Mental Illness Inmates, Nihilism, Organ Transplants, Oscar Pistorius Trial, Scottish Independence, Senator Elizabeth Warren, Smoking Bans,Soccer Women, Stuttering,T axReform, Trimethylamine, Underground Park, Wise Choices, Women in Tech, World War One Legacy, Zoo Animals

The following audio files come from a larger group of 205 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 56 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Benghazi 47 mins – “Investigative reporter Mitch Zuckoff goes deep on Benghazi. What really happened. What it could mean” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Berkman Center 62 mins – “Learn more about the Berkman Center for Internet & Society — and its incredible network of researchers, activists, faculty, students, technologists, entrepreneurs, artists, policy makers, lawyers, and more — in an interactive conversation led by Faculty Chair Jonathan Zittrain. If you’re curious about connecting with our research, our community, or our events, or are just generally interested in digital technologies and their impact on society, find out more here!” At the link right-click “MP3” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Border Management in America 113 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute (MPI) panel discussion offers perspectives on border policy management from leading officials in the U.S., Canadian, and Mexican governments, and showcases MPI’s edited volume, Managing Borders in an Increasingly Borderless World. Book co-editors Randall Hansen of the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto and MPI President Demetrios Papademetriou, as well as Mexican Ambassador to the United States Eduardo Medina Mora, Canada Border Services Agency Executive Vice President Malcolm Brown, former Acting Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection David V. Aguilar, and Mexico’s former Undersecretary of Population, Migration, and Religious Affairs Gustavo Mohar, discuss continuing and evolving challenges in border management and security. The book covers these challenges—terrorism, organized crime, illegal migration, smuggling, trafficking, human rights, infrastructure, corruption, and economic and political factors—and offers an analysis of effective and ineffective policies and programs. The panelists discuss the challenges and successes their governments have had in pursuing better, more effective, and smarter border controls, and the deepening regional cooperation in this important policy area.” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download” again and select “Save Target As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Maine 16 mins – “By building a fiber line to allow some local businesses to get next-generation Internet access, Rockport became the first municipal fiber network in the state of Maine. Town Manager Richard Bates joins us for episode 115 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast.” At the link right-click “…download this MP3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Campus Assaults 52 mins – “A troubling statistic has been making a lot of headlines recently: 20% of college women are sexually assaulted in the US. So Monday, we’re asking if there is something inherent in the structure of college life that puts students at risk. Sociologist Elizabeth Armstrong says many students think they deserve a social experience that’s more about partying than academics, and competition for tuition dollars has universities providing them with what they want over what they need. She’ll join us to talk about what this means for women and men.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer and Immunity System  6 mins – “Cancer is one of the world’s biggest killers, and current treatments often have terrible side effects. So scientists have begun looking into ways to help the body’s own defences fight back. When we have a bacterial or viral infection, our immune systems go into overdrive to tackle the invader and protect our bodies. It’s also possible to harness this attack to combat cancer. At the British Science Festival, Ginny Smith talked to Louise and Vanessa, both PhD students at Birmingham University, to find out how…” At the link right-click “MP3” beside “Download as” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Capitalism Crisis 20 mins – “Nick Hanauer is a rich guy, an unrepentant capitalist — and he has something to say to his fellow plutocrats: Wake up! Growing inequality is about to push our societies into conditions resembling pre-revolutionary France. Hear his argument about why a dramatic increase in minimum wage could grow the middle class, deliver economic prosperity … and prevent a revolution.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Abuse in England 51 mins – “At least 1,400 children were sexually exploited in the northern English town of Rotherham by gangs of men who were predominantly of Pakistani origin between 1997 and 2013 according to an independent inquiry, by Professor Alexis Jay. How did police, press, politicians and professional agencies fail to deal with it?” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Girls Britain Betrayed,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chiropractic Critique 32mins – Dr Mark Crislip, an infectious disease doctor in Portland, Oregon who hosts the award-winning QuackCast podcast and an editor on the Science-Based Medicine.org website presents this critique of the chiropractic practice. At the link find the title, “Quackcast 149,” right-click the “Play” button beside it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clean Energy Project 30 mins – “…This week on Sea Change Radio, we hear from two participants from the 7th annual Clean Energy Summit which took place on September 4th in Las Vegas. First, we focus on southern Nevada as host Alex Wise discusses Las Vegas’ energy needs with Rose McKinney-James the chairperson of the Clean Energy Project. Then, we turn to the northern part of the state and hear from David Bobzien, a state assemblyman from Reno who talks about the efforts of the Conservation Lands Foundation as well as the recent announcement that Tesla Motors will be building a major electric vehicle battery plant in his part of the state.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate and Religion 23 mins – “…In the face of those who use religion to deny the worldwide crisis of climate change, climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe, an evangelical Christian, believes that her faith is compatible with science. This week she speaks to Bill about ending the gridlock between politics, science and faith in order to find solutions to the widespread threats associated with global warming.” At the link find the title, “Full Show: Climate Change — Faith and Fact,” right-click “Media files Moyers and Company_336_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deaf School 48 mins – “Disability Matters with David Carter from Highmark: Competitive employment and empowerment for people with disabilities is the emphasis of this show. Broadcast live and captioned in real-time for individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing, we discuss how people with disabilities can secure career opportunities, and how employers, organizations and individuals can support employment and empowerment of people with disabilities.” The American School for the Deaf in Connecticut is the focal point of this episode. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diabetes Treatment 29 mins – “Keith talks with Fraser Cameron, a Research Associate with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Southampton, United Kingdom. Fraser is a systems design engineer who is working on developing a system that can effectively and steadily control the blood glucose levels of individuals with Type I Diabetes.” At the link right-click beside “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Cloning 47 mins – “Martine Rothblatt is the highest paid female executive in America. Founder of Sirius Radio. She was once a man. Now she’s pushing digital mind clones for us all.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disability Care 55 mins – “On the 50th anniversary of L’Arche, the now-international organization Jean Vanier started, a celebration of a Canadian humanitarian and visionary.” At the link find the title, “How To Do Ordinary Things, Part 2,” right-click “Download How To Do Ordinary Things, Part 2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Domestic Violence 47 mins – “#WhyIStayed. We’re looking at women in and out of relationships of domestic violence.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dr Drew 66 mins – Leo Laporte interviews “Dr. Drew Pinsky is an American board-certified internist, addiction medicine specialist, and radio and television personality. He is best known for his work on the radio show Loveline, the TV show Celebrity Rehab, and the podcasts he cohosts with Adam Carolla.” During the interview they discuss drug abuse, prostate cancer and insurance administrative costs. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Spread 47 mins – “An urgent plea for more help to slow the epidemic of Ebola in West Africa. We look at the exploding challenge.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Decline in US 44 mins – “In this episode of Uncommon Knowledge, Hoover fellow Peter Robinson interviews Hoover senior fellows and members of Hoover’s Task Force on K–12 Education Paul Peterson and Rick Hanushek on education in the United States compared to the rest of the world. The authors of Education Prosperity: A Global View of American Schools, Peterson and Hanushek explain that the United States, in the latest international test, is now in thirty-second place, with only 32 percent of students scoring as proficient in math. Currently, Shanghai is at the top of the list of countries, with 75 percent of its students proficient in math. Nevertheless, Peterson and Hanushek offer an optimistic perspective on what could be done to improve America’s education system.” At the link find the title, “Uncommon Knowledge with Hoover fellows Rick Hanushek and Paul Peterson,” right-click “Media files 20140909.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Experiments Online 47 mins – “We’ll talk to the co-founder of dating site OkCupid about human nature, love and the future of big data. Every second of every day, the Internet is scooping up oceans of data about you and everyone else within its reach. We know that, and yet when we focus on it, we often freak out. Christian Rudder, a big thinker and co-founder of the big dating site OKCupid, says don’t panic, this is good. Of course, he would, running a dating site. But his claim is this: the aggregate data on human nature flooding onto the web is now teaching us more than we have ever known about who we really are.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Finances for Doctors 47 mins – “Can you tell me how a physician that makes $400,000 a year can be struggling financially? I can – with a 4 car payments, a boat, too big of a house, too many expensive vacations and so much more. This can happen to you too if you are not wise so listen in and find out a ton of great information! For this info-packed episode, we have Ryan Michler as our financial guru for today to lead us to a great deal of interesting discussion about how you, the premed, or medical student, can start preparing to get ahead of the pack with your finances. Ryan is an Investment Advisor/Financial Coach for Healthcare Professionals and runs the website and podcast WealthAnatomy.com.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flight Instrument Training 75 mins – “Victoria kicks us off with a discussion of getting her Instrument Flight Rating and keeping your rating. This leads into a discussion of best practices for training, and how to handle communicating with the tower and keeping track of information. We also discusses Automation Management and the danger of over-relying on automated systems. Carl brings up a situation where a friend of his flew an aircraft where she was the Captain and her sister was the Co-Pilot, which may be a first in aviation history. Very few people seem to know that there are female pilots in the airlines, and automatically assume that a man always does the flying.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gabby Giffords 19 mins – “On January 8, 2011, Congresswoman Gabby Giffords was shot in the head while meeting constituents in her home town of Tucson, Arizona. Her husband, the astronaut Mark Kelly, immediately flew to be by her side. In this emotional conversation with Pat Mitchell, the pair describe their lives both before and after the accident — and describe their views on responsible gun ownership.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Violence 14 mins – “This talk begins with a personal story of sexual violence that may be difficult to listen to. But that’s the point, says citizen journalist Meera Vijayann: Speaking out on tough, taboo topics is the spark for change. Vijayann uses digital media to speak honestly about her experience of gender violence in her home country of India — and calls on others to speak out too.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Video” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the MP4 file.

Genius Trait 19 mins – “Elizabeth Gilbert muses on the impossible things we expect from artists and geniuses — and shares the radical idea that, instead of the rare person “being” a genius, all of us “have” a genius. It’s a funny, personal and surprisingly moving talk.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Video” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the MP4 file.

Hand Axe 14 mins – “In the beginning, there was design. Before any other human discipline, even before the dawn of mankind its self, design was a practice passed down from generation to generation of early humans. Today, everything that has been designed–space ships, buildings, pyramids, weapons, clothing , artwork, everything–can be traced back to a single designed object. The first designed object: the Acheulean hand axe. The Acheulean hand axe does not look like an “axe.” There’s no handle, and no metal. It could be called the “Acheulean pointy hand rock,” because it is just a rock that has been chipped and shaped, usually into the form of a tear-drop.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Innovation 18 mins – “Rishi Manchanda has worked as a doctor in South Central Los Angeles for a decade, where he’s come to realize: His job isn’t just about treating a patient’s symptoms, but about getting to the root cause of what is making them ill—the “upstream” factors like a poor diet, a stressful job, a lack of fresh air. It’s a powerful call for doctors to pay attention to a patient’s life outside the exam room.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Video” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the MP4 file.

Homeopathy Critique 29 mins – Dr Mark Crislip, an infectious disease doctor in Portland, Oregon who hosts the award-winning QuackCast podcast and an editor on the Science-Based Medicine.org website presents this critique of homeopathy. At the link find the title, “Quackcast 150,” right-click the “Play” button beside it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Howard University President 59 mins – “Wayne A.I. Frederick talked about the challenges facing Howard University and other historically black colleges, as well as the state of higher education in the United States. Mr. Frederick also spoke about his career as a surgical oncologist and his upbringing in Trinidad and Tobago, including his fight with sickle cell anemia.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Wayne Frederick,” right-click “Media files 319784-1-MP3-STD_01.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Imperial America 55 mins – “On the anniversary of 9-11, IDEAS revisits an interview with academic Chalmers Johnson who suggested that failure in Iraq might mark the beginning of the end of the American Empire.” At the link find the title, “The Sorrows of Empire,” right-click “Download The Sorrows of Empire” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Era 28 mins – “Advances in technology have changed the way we work, the way we socialize, and the way we learn. But not everybody knows that. In his book the End of Absence, author Michael Harris reminds us that people born after 1985 will not have experienced adulthood without the internet, and children today will never know what life was like before facebook, twitter, and iPhones. On this episode, Michael Harris discusses the impact of the ‘end of absence’ and what constant connectedness means for the well being of future generations. He’ll also tell us how we can mitigate the effects of technology and preserve the benefits of periodic absence while still maintaining our social connections.” At the link right-click “Listen to episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Immune System 17 mins – “The beauty of hackers, says cybersecurity expert Keren Elazari, is that they force us to evolve and improve. Yes, some hackers are bad guys, but many are working to fight government corruption and advocate for our rights. By exposing vulnerabilities, they push the Internet to become stronger and healthier, wielding their power to create a better world. At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Lessons 32 mins – “Click investigates triumphs and pitfalls of the digital age at the dConstruct Conference.” Several comments by Cory Doctorow. At the link find the title, “DigitalP: 09 Sep 14: dConstruct: Living with the Network,” right-click “Media files digital 20140909-2032b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Training 19 mins –“For years now, the economy has been kind of stuck. The unemployment rate is getting better, but slowly. Household incomes have actually been falling. It’s easy to feel stuck. Today on the show, stories of two people trying to get unstuck.” At the link find the title, “#567: Getting Unstuck,” right-click npr_347524695.mp3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ketogenic Diet 102 mins – “On this episode of Latest in Paleo, Jimmy Moore and I discuss the ketogenic diet described in his new book, Keto Clarity, co-authored with Dr. Eric Westman. Jimmy tells the story of his public testimony regarding the American Dietary Guidelines, and he addresses some of my reservations regarding long-term ketosis. The After the Bell segment features Dr. Stephen Phinney.” At the link right-click “MP3 Audio” beside”Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Lunch Lady Heroes 5 mins – “Children’s book author Jarrett Krosoczka shares the origins of the Lunch Lady graphic novel series, in which undercover school heroes serve lunch…and justice! His new project, School Lunch Hero Day, reveals how cafeteria lunch staff provide more than food, and illustrates how powerful a thank you can be.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Errors 55 mins (2 parts) – “What happens after a medical error and is saying sorry really enough? Two mothers in two countries who both lost newborn children help us pull back the curtain on what happens after a medical mistake is made. Beth Daley Ullum tells the story of trying to save her unborn son who had a serious heart defect. She had to break through the medical culture of secrecy to find the best surgeons to perform a very delicate operation.” At the link find the titles, “White Coat – After the Error Part One [and Two],” right-click “Download White Coat – After the Error Part One” and Part Two” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Suicides 11 mins – “In this mini-episode, I talk a bit about an incredibly interesting and important article published recently in the New York Times regarding resident suicide and depression. The bottom line: If you feel like you need help, you’re not alone. Check this sobering article out here.” At the link find the title, “Episode 21: You’re Not Alone,” right-click “Resident_suicide.m4a” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Illness Inmates 27 mins – “Hilary Andersson investigates the more than one million mentally ill prisoners held in US jails and prisons, most of whom are incarcerated for relatively minor offences.” At the link find the title, “Docs: America’s New Bedlam,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140911-0330a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nihilism 42 mins – “Horror, fashion, and the end of the world … things get weird as we explore the undercurrents of thought that link nihilists, beard-stroking philosophers, Jay-Z, and True Detective….” There’s a blank area at the end of the podcast. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Organ Transplants 18 mins – “Rebecca Cooney discusses organ donation and distribution in the US with David Mulligan, chair of the Liver and Transplant Committee for United Network for Organ Sharing.” At the link find the title, “Listen to The Lancet: 12 September,” right-click “Media files 12september.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oscar Pistorius Trial 50 mins – “After becoming a Paralympics champion, Oscar Pistorius rose to fame as the first double amputee to compete in the Olympics. He became a hero to millions – until the fateful night when he shot dead his girlfriend, the model Reeva Steenkamp.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Trial of Oscar Pistorius,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140912-2105a.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scottish Independence 48 mins – “Scotland is about to vote on breaking away from the UK. Britain. We’ll look at the breakaway movement, in Scotland and beyond.” At the link right-click “Download this story” from the pop-up menu.

Senator Elizabeth Warren 25 mins – “In Oklahoma, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and her brothers grew up in “an America that invested in kids like us and helped build a future where we could flourish.” But, as she writes in her memoir, A Fighting Chance, “Today the game is rigged – rigged to work for those who have money and power… The optimism that defines us as a people has been beaten and bruised. It doesn’t have to be this way.” At the link find the title, “Full Show: Elizabeth Warren on Fighting Back Against Wall St. Giants,” right-click “Media files Moyers and Company_335_Podcast.mp3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smoking Bans 27 mins – “Ten years ago, Ireland became the first country in the world to ban smoking in the workplace. In the decade since, countries across the world have passed smoke-free laws of their own. Denis Murray looks at the impact of this type of anti-smoking legislation across Europe – and considers the future of tobacco.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Clearing the Air,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140910-0332a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soccer Women 27 mins – “Could women’s football provide a new, more sustainable model to the men’s game? Yvonne Macken hears from young women in Trinidad and Tobago, Iceland, Brazil, Japan, the UK, the USA and Africa.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Future of Women’s Football 9 Sept 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140909-0905a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stuttering 13 mins – “Megan Washington is one of Australia’s premier singer/songwriters. And, since childhood, she has had a stutter. In this bold and personal talk, she reveals how she copes with this speech impediment—from avoiding the letter combination “st” to tricking her brain by changing her words at the last minute to, yes, singing the things she has to say rather than speaking them.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tax Reform 46 mins (2 parts) –“…A recent report by Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph E. Stiglitz for the Roosevelt Institute suggests that paying our fair share of taxes and cracking down on corporate tax dodgers could be a cure for inequality and a faltering economy. In America right now inequality is too great, unemployment too high, public investments too meager, corporations too greedy and the tax code too biased toward the very rich… But the Nobel Laureate economist Joseph E. Stiglitz says it doesn’t have to be this way. He has a new plan for overhauling America’s current tax system, which he says contributes to making America the most unequal society of the advanced countries….” At the link find the titles “Encore: Joseph E. Stiglitz Calls for Fair Taxes for All,” and “Encore: How Tax Reform Can Save the Middle Class,” right-click “Play Now” for each and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menus.

Trimethylamine 5 mins – “…You may be familiar with the popular American television show Breaking Bad. In the show, the lead characters make the drug methamphetamine from phenylacetone and methylamine, an analogue of trimethylamine where two of the methyl groups are replaced by hydrogens. As methylamine is a controlled chemical in the US, several episodes revolved entirely around obtaining the hard-to-get reagent. Methylamine smells just as bad as trimethylamine, so in real life the police often discover labs making meth using the Breaking Bad method because of the tell-tale fishy smell!….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Underground Park 6 mins – “Dan Barasch and James Ramsey have a crazy plan — to create a park, filled with greenery, underneath New York City. The two are developing the Lowline, an underground greenspace the size of a football field. They’re building it in a trolley terminal abandoned in 1948, using technology that harvests sunlight above-ground and directs it down below. It’s a park that can thrive, even in winter.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Video” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the MP4 file.

Wise Choices 23 mins – “In an intimate talk, Barry Schwartz dives into the question “How do we do the right thing?” With help from collaborator Kenneth Sharpe, he shares stories that illustrate the difference between following the rules and truly choosing wisely.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Tech 30 mins – “When you picture what success looks like in Silicon Valley, you might think of a hoodie-clad guy fresh out of Stanford — or maybe an older, tie-wearing investor type. In recent months, we’ve seen tremendous coverage of the fact that women are too often peripheral in the tech scene. Talking heads write articles and books about it, and headlines report striking statistics. But how do you really solve the problem? Women like CEO Sheri Atwood and venture capitalist Eurie Kim say they’ve found ways to use their experiences as women to their advantage in the male-dominated tech world.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One Legacy 50 mins – “Turkey emerged from the First World War as a new republic, with a secular and modern identity, attempting to break from its Ottoman past. How has this influenced Turkey today? With historians Aksin Somel and Ahmet Kuyas, and novelist Elif Shafak.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The War That Changed The World: Istanbul – Modernity and Secularism,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140908-1228a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zoo Animals 17 mins – “Zoo animals are different than most possessions, because zoos follow a fundamental principle: You can’t sell or buy the animals. It’s unethical and illegal to put a price tag on an elephant’s head. Today on the show: What do you do in a world where you can’t use money?” At the link find the title, “#566: The Zoo Economy,” right-click “npr_346191939.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 200 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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Media Mining Digest 148 – 12 Sept 2014: 401(k) Plans, Acoustic History, Airbnb, America Defined, Ata Kak Musician, Bit Coin Impact, Book Prices in Europe, California Climate Change, Charlie Rangel, Chikungunya, Church of the Almighty God, Circuit Courts, Civil War Women, Climate Change and Human Rights, Coding Concepts, College Stories, Communications Breakdown, Computer Repair Concept, Deportation Dilemma, Desalinaiton, Design Trends, Diets, Dow Jones, Drug Policy, Electricity, Engineering MBA, Farm Animal Antibiotics, Immigrant Students, ISIS Social Media, Law Defined, Lawyers Wear Technology, London Immigrants, Maya Angelou on Facing Evil, Medical Military Program, Mentally Ill, Migrant Brain Drain, Migrant Labor Management, Migrant Minors, Migrant Schooling in Georgia State, Noise Pollution, Numbers, Ocean Sanctuaries, Phenol History, PSA Critique, Small Arms Statistics, Spanish Coal Miners, Steadfast, Syrian Refugees, Technology Trends, Trans Atlantic Flights, TWIV 300, War of 1812, Weather Forecasting, Wilderness Act

The following audio files come from a larger group of 272 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 56 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

401(k) Plans 18 mins – “The 401(k) is the backbone of most retirements, yet millions of people are investing in 401(k) plans with mediocre offerings. To help make the most of your retirement investment, Paul Merriman offers recommendations for more than 100 Top U.S. company plans and the U.S. Government TSP at his website In this podcast he explains why and how to use them.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Acoustic History 27 mins – “King George VI spoke to the world about the declaration of war on Germany in 1939. Listen to the story of how it was broadcast around the world 75 years ago.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Delivering the King’s Speech 2 Sept 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140902-0905a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Airbnb 56 mins – “At issue is the so-called sharing economy, a range of services that facilitate peer-to-peer transactions through the Internet. Companies like Airbnb, Uber, and Lyft have seen rapid growth and eye-popping valuations, but as they expand around the world, they are increasingly butting heads with government regulators….” At the link find the title, “Regulate This!,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Airbnb 59 mins – “Nathan Blecharczyk, co-founder and chief technology officer of Airbnb, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Airbnb, one of the earliest companies to use technology to allow individuals to share underused resources, and in the case of Airbnb, housing. Blecharczyk and Roberts discuss how a design conference and the Democratic National Convention got Airbnb started, how the company aligns incentives to overcome the trust problem of house-sharing, and the rise of technology and online social networks to make a new business model possible. Along the way, Blecharczyk gives his take on the role of luck vs. skill in entrepreneurial success and how Airbnb plans to expand its product offerings in the future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America Defined 120 mins – “Author and documentary director Dinesh D’Souza and activist and author Bill Ayers participated in a debate titled, “What’s so Great About America?” Following their opening remarks, they asked questions of each other for ten minutes arguing such topics as Israel, weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, the Second Amendment, and religious freedom. They then responded to questions from audience members and made closing statements.” At the link you can buy the file for $.99. An audio file is included in the blog archive.

Ata Kak Musician 27 mins – “Giving Africa’s obscure musical gems a new lease of life – meet the fans of rediscovered sounds. Among them is ethnomusicologist Brian Shimkovitz who’s trying to track down musician Ata Kak.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Ata Kak and the Crate Diggers 3 Sept 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140903-1253a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bit Coin Impact 31 mins – “Can a digitally encrypted currency uproot the world’s financial institutions. On this episode, Jimmy Homma talks about bit coins, its mysterious and tumultuous history, and what it means for us.” At the link right-click “Listen to episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Prices in Europe 16 mins – “As Hachette and Amazon continue to battle over e-book pricing, the case is sometimes made that “books are different” than cars or soap. In the US, of course, books are treated no differently than any other good when it comes to sales and marketing. Across Europe, though, many nations have laws that control pricing, restrict e-commerce, or otherwise protect publishers and authors from unchecked free market forces….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Climate Change 29 mins – “As Californians continue to look beseechingly to the skies for signs of any kind of rainfall, the effects of this drought are indeed far-reaching. The policies that emerge from this disastrously dry year may ultimately alter what foods we eat, where we build new homes and even what sports we play. Earlier this year, we heard from the President of the Pacific Institute, Peter Gleick, as he told us of the critical nature of this drought, even in its early stages. This week on Sea Change Radio, host Alex Wise speaks again to Dr. Gleick for an update and to get a glimpse into the future of what a permanently drier California might mean for us all.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charlie Rangel 60 mins – “Representatives Charles Rangel (D-NY) talked about his more than 40 years in the House, as well as his life before entering public office. … Rangel had recently won the Democratic party primary in his New York City district, but decided that if he were to win re-election in November 2014, it would be his last term in Congress. Representative Rangel was elected to the House in 1970, unseating Representative Adam Clayton Powell (D-NY).” At the link find the title,“Q&A: Rep. Charlie Rangel (D-NY),” right-click “Media files program.357454.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chikungunya 10 mins – “In 2008, we noted that the global reemergence of dengue fever threatened U.S. residents. An outbreak of locally acquired dengue subsequently occurred in Florida, and the risk of U.S. dengue outbreaks will probably continue indefinitely. We now face a new threat posed by the unrelated chikungunya virus, which causes a disease clinically similar to dengue in a similar epidemiologic pattern, which is transmitted by the same mosquito vectors, and for which we also lack vaccines and specific treatments….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Church of the Almighty God 27 mins – “The BBC’s China Editor investigates an elusive cult at the centre of a grisly murder that has shocked the nation.” At the link find the title, “ Docs: Chasing China’s Doomsday Cult – 14 Aug 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140814-0330a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Circuit Courts 59 mins – “Robert Katzmann, chief judge of the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals, discusses his book [Judging Statutes], on his views about how federal judges should interpret laws passed by Congress and his belief in deciphering the intent of the law.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Robert KatzmannSunday, August 31, 2014,” right-click “Media files program.362316.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil War Women 46 mins – “True stories of daring women during the Civil War. Best-selling author Karen Abbott shares their exploits in a new book: “Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change and Human Rights 129 mins – “This MPI event, in partnership with the International Organization for Migration (IOM), discusses the critical issue of climate-related displacement in the Asia-Pacific region, explored in depth in the joint MPI and IOM brief Human Rights, Climate Change, Environmental Degradation and Migration: A New Paradigm. Climate change and environmental degradation are predicted to displace millions of people in the coming years, either directly or indirectly. While today’s international legal framework provides a degree of protection to those displaced by environmental factors and climatic events, there is no global consensus on a definition for such a group. In the absence of this, gaps in the legal system, and in implementation, how can recognition of the vulnerability of environmental migrants be facilitated and their protection ensured? This discussion explores how to protect climate change-induced migrants, particularly in the highly vulnerable Asia-Pacific region.” At the link click “download,” then right-click “Download” in the next window, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coding Concepts 38 mins – “ Join Father Robert Ballecer and Shannon Morse on Coding 101, a weekly instructional, project-oriented programming show with appeal for beginning to intermediate programmers. Using a combination of classroom-style teaching, guest programmers, and special interest segments, Coding 101 will offer beginner, intermediate and “applied” programming topics within several interchangeable modules. Learn programming languages such as Java, C++, Visual Basic, and more!” This episode is a review that emphasizes concepts. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Stories 60 mins – “Students all over are starting college this month, and some of them still have a nagging question: what, exactly, got me in? An admissions officer tells us the most wrongheaded things applicants try. And Michael Lewis has the incredible story of how a stolen library book got one man — Emir Kamenica — into his dream school.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Breakdown 51 mins – “A revolution in technology has connected us online more than ever before: Nearly 60 percent of Americans now have a Facebook account. Digital connections have replaced informal interaction with neighbors and acquaintances. And a quarter of Americans say they have no best friend to confide in. Some caution the decline in face-to-face interactions has led to polarization and congressional gridlock, while others argue that digital connections provide invaluable connections with far-flung family and friends. Diane and [3] guests discuss how virtual relationships affect real life connections and building community.” At the link you can only listen, but a copy of the audio file is included in the archive blog.

Computer Repair Concept  68 mins – “Jeff Halash from TechNutPC.com Talks To Computer Technician Services.” about a repair system of use to small business operators. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deportation Dilemma 84 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute panel discussion examines the U.S. deportation system with analysis on migrant apprehensions, removals, returns, and criminal prosecutions, and launches the report, The Deportation Dilemma: Reconciling Tough and Humane Enforcement. Report authors Doris Meissner, MPI Director of the U.S. Immigration Policy Program, and Marc Rosenblum, MPI Deputy Director of the U.S. Immigration Policy Program, as well as commentators David V. Aguilar and Hiroshi Motomura and moderator Muzaffar Chishti, discuss the findings of the report, including the main drivers of deportation policy and how the system has changed over the past two decades….” At the link click “download,” then right-click “Download” in the next window, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Desalination 56 mins – “For California, 2013 was the driest calendar year ever recorded across virtually the entire state. On January 17, 2014, Governor Jerry Brown proclaimed the drought to be a State of Emergency, directed state officials to take all necessary actions to assist the hardest hit communities, and called for all Californians to pitch in to reduce water use by 20 percent. While CA agencies and experts have clearly identified those actions best suited to provide relief, some observers wonder whether the long-term answer to California’s drought lies in the ocean through the promotion of seawater desalination. On today’s episode, we’ll explore an overview of the science and policy related to seawater desalination and demonstrates why this option is generally the least promising option for drought relief.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Design Trends 51 mins – “Innovation Hub is all about design – and redesign. Sasha Frere-Jones, pop critic for The New Yorker, talks about how technology has made it easier than ever to produce music…and why the results can be surprising. Then we have a discussion about the maker movement with Chris Anderson, author of Makers: The New Industrial Revolution, and Limor Fried, an electrical engineer and owner of electronics hobbyist company AdaFruit. Plus, John Maeda, design partner at Kleiner Perkins and former president of RISD, explores the merging of design and technology and scientist Sean Davies explains how good bacteria may help us reshape our bodies.” At the link find the title, “9.6.14 – The Whole Design Show,” right-click “IHUB-090614-FullShow.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diet of Fat   52 mins – “Since the 1950s, a war has been waged in America against an accused dietary culprit: fat. Avoid fat, we were told, and you’ll live longer and healthier. However, as the investigative journalist Nina Teicholz discovered, there isn’t solid evidence of the benefits of a low-fat diet nor of the dangers of fat. In a new book, Teicholz reviews the science and history of the war on fat and she joins us Thursday to explain how America’s nutrition was derailed by personal ambition, bad science, and politics. Nina Teicholz has written for GourmetThe New YorkerThe Economist, and The New York Times. Her new book is called The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat & Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diet on What 47 mins – “The constant train of diet advice and counter-study proof in the medical and nutrition fields can seem overwhelming at times. Often, you might wonder if the food you’re eating today was a better idea last week than it is this week. Our hour today on a new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine suggesting low-carb diets lead to greater weight loss than low fat meals. “The low-carb group lost an average of 7.7 pounds more than the low-fat group,” our guest and study co-author Dr. Lydia Bazzano told us today.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dow Jones 4 mins – “…The Dow is up. The Dow is down. Chances are that part of you rises and falls a little right along with it. That’s okay — very few fluctuations in life are so comfortingly black and white — I mean — red. The Dow Jones Industrial Average has been around since 1896, and the first thing to know is that it’s two names, not one: Charles Henry Dow and Edward Davis Jones….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Policy 30 mins – “Keith talks with Carl Hart, Associate Professor of Psychology at Columbia University, and author of “High Price: A Neuroscientist’s Journey of Self-Discovery that Challenges Everything You Know About Drugs and Society.” And, indeed, Hart’s views on drug use challenge much of what were are brought up to believe – that drugs are bad. Are drugs really as destructive as we think? Hart believes that most people who use hard drugs like cocaine and heroin are not addicts or drug abusers, but instead know how to use those drugs responsibly…within limits. Hart, who believes in the decriminalization of drugs, does not discount, however, the destructive nature of these drugs for some users. http://www.drcarlhart.com/.” At the link right-click beside “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electricity 4 mins – “…America “discovered” electricity in the 1880s. An 1889 volume of Scribners Magazine makes that very clear. The telegraph had been around for decades by then. Otherwise, our electric world was just coming to life. Commercial telephones, less than a decade old, were still feeling their way. Electric lighting systems were brand new — arc lamps, and then light bulbs….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineering MBA 75 mins – “Michael Lachman, who started his career as an aerospace engineer, leads us through the pros and cons of following up an engineering degree with an MBA.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Animal Antibiotics 5 mins – “The emergence of diseases resistanct to antibiotics is a growing and alarming global problem, but a new court decision means that American agriculture may keep contributing to the spread of resistance….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right side of the sound bar and selecting “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Students 63 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute (MPI) webinar discusses the report Immigrant Parents and Early Childhood Programs: Addressing Barriers of Literacy, Culture, and Systems Knowledge from MPI’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy (NCIIP). Presenters include report authors NCIIP Director Margie McHugh and NCIIP Policy Analyst and Program Coordinator Maki Park, as well as Miriam Calderon, Senior Partner for School Readiness Consulting and former Senior Policy Advisor for Early Learning with the White House’s Domestic Policy Council, and Eliza Leighton, Director of Promise Neighborhood Langley Park Program with CASA de Maryland. The report seeks to better understand the experiences and challenges faced by early childhood programs and immigrant and refugee parents as they connect with one another by identifying the unique needs of newcomer parents and recommendations for addressing them. MPI partnered with leading organizations in California, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, and Washington state to conduct field work for the study, which spans the range of early childhood parent skill, engagement, and leadership programs. The webinar includes a preview of new state-level sociodemographic data on foreign-born parents of young children compiled by MPI. Presenters discuss the top-line data and findings from the report, barriers facing immigrant parents, and challenges and opportunities facing policymakers in this arena.” At the link click “download,” then right-click “Download” in the next window, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Social Media 47 mins – “…ISIS has rampaged across the desert, taking turf, claiming a “caliphate,” slaughtering. It has also rampaged across social media. Using the platforms that lifted pro-democracy forces in Egypt’s Tahrir Square, this time to raise a reign of terror. This hour On Point: the ISIS onslaught, and the use of social media in its bloody grab for power.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Law Defined 65 mins – “Barry Weingast, professor of political science at Stanford University and senior fellow at Stanford’s Hoover Institution, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the nature of law. Weingast takes issue with some of the standard views of law, and proposes a better way to understand law. The two discuss the fundamental principles of law, how it can emerge in a decentralized way to resolve disputes over property and other commercial and social interactions. Examples include Iceland, Ancient Greece, and California during the gold rush. Also considered are how laws coordinate expectations and the way that social pressure can be used to enforce law in a decentralized fashion.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lawyers Wear Technology 26 mins – “Wearable technology like the smartwatch is the next in a long line of new technological advancements that are embraced by some, but viewed skeptically by most lawyers. Judges already discourage smart phones in court and many clients worry about a decrease in information security. But if used properly, a smartwatch can actually increase the productivity, availability, and even safety of any lawyer’s practice with fewer disruptions. What are the best practices for using wearable technology to benefit your practice?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

London Immigrants 27 mins – “Presenter Nihal Arthanayake visits UK immigration lawyer Harjap Singh Bhangal who gives advice to migrants seeking visas to work and live in Britain.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: A Day in the Life of an Immigration Lawyer 12 Aug 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140812-0806a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maya Angelou on Facing Evil 23 mins – “In this second of two programs celebrating the life and work of the late Maya Angelou, Bill Moyers revisits a 1988 documentary in which he and Angelou attended a conference on “Facing Evil,” held in the Hill Country of central Texas. Evil was a topic about which Angelou, the victim of childhood rape and virulent racism, had a lot to say….” At the link find the title, “Full Show: Maya Angelou on Facing Evil,” right-click “Media files Moyers and Company_332 Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Military Program 42 mins – “For our episode today, we are joined by Dr. Chad Hendrickson, a practicing Dermatologist and a former Army Medical Officer. Dr. Hendrickson shares with us his journey through medical school [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences], the decisions and choices he made which brought him there, and the amazing experiences that he had gone through during his years of service. If you are thinking of taking the same route, he gives us insights on what you need to expect and prepare as well as the great training opportunities in store for you.

Mentally Ill 51 mins – “When Liza Long heard about the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School two years ago, her first thought was: What if my son does that someday? Her 13-year-old son had just been hospitalized in a mental facility for violent behavior. Two days after Adam Lanza killed his mother, 20 children, six teachers, and then himself, Long posted an emotional response on her blog titled: “I am Adam Lanza’s mother.” Her article went viral. Her essay became a rallying cry for better access to treatment for mentally-ill children. Guest host Tom Gjelten talks with Liza Long about her new book on raising a son with a mental illness.” At the link you can only listen, but a copy of the audio file is included in the archive blog.

Migrant Brain Drain 74 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute (MPI) webinar focuses on data compiled by MPI on brain waste among foreign-trained nurses, engineers, and teachers, and updates on three state-level initiatives—in Illinois, Washington, and Massachusetts—that are working to analyze and address challenges faced by immigrants and refugees with degrees and training in these fields. Dr. Jeanne Batalova presents MPI’s data on brain waste at the national and state levels and representatives from the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, OneAmerica, and the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition discuss their analysis and efforts on these issues. The discussion is moderated by Margie McHugh, Director of MPI’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy.” At the link click “download,” then right-click “Download” in the next window, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Labor Management 163 mins (2 parts) – “This Migration Policy Institute Europe event, organized with the Bertelsmann Stiftung, entitled “Effective Labour Migration Management: Creating Checks and Balances while Searching for Talent” brought together experts, policymakers, and social partners involved in the management of labor migration to discuss the various options available to policymakers when trying to design an ‘optimally balanced’ labor migration policy….” At the link click “download,” then right-click “Download” in the next window, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part 2.

Migrant Minors 66 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute (MPI) telebriefing discusses factors behind the recent surge in flows of unaccompanied children from Mexico and Central America to the United States as well as short- and longer-term policy options for improving how the U.S. immigration system interacts with this population with distinct needs. Speakers include Doris Meissner, Director of MPI’s U.S. Immigration Policy Program, and Marc Rosenblum, Deputy Director of the U.S. Immigration Policy Program. The call previews a policy brief on unaccompanied minors that MPI will release in July.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Schooling in Georgia State 79 mins – “…Georgia has experienced one of the fastest rates of growth from immigration in the United States over the past two decades, and today one in five Georgia youth is foreign born or is the child of parents who are immigrants or refugees. The educational outcomes of the state’s first- and second- generation young adults (ages 16-26) are cause for concern, however. Many are English Language Learners (ELLs), and they lag considerably behind their nonimmigrant peers in terms of high school graduation, college access, and postsecondary degree completion. They often face extra hurdles as they seek to develop academic English-language skills, complete high school course requirements, navigate the transition to college and careers, and finance postsecondary education—often while juggling work and family responsibilities. Educators in districts such as Gwinnett County—which enrolls one-fifth of the state’s ELL students—are on the front lines of efforts to address these challenges.” At the link click “download,” then right-click “Download” in the next window, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Noise Pollution 51 mins – “Noise is defined as unwanted sound. And we encounter it almost every day, no matter where we live. Cars and taxis honking on city streets. Jet planes taking off from the nation’s runways. Tractors and combines on farms. Air conditioners, generators, factories. Of course, people have varied reactions to the sounds they hear. What’s annoying to one person might be barely noticeable to another. But a growing body of research shows we have reason to be concerned. Excessive noise is putting millions of Americans at risk, not just for hearing loss but for heart attacks and strokes. For this month’s Environmental Outlook, a discussion on the dangers of noise pollution.” (3 guests) At the link you can only listen, but a copy of the audio file is included in the archive blog.

Numbers 4 mins – “…What do the following words have in common: natural, imaginary, real, irrational, and transcendental. If you guessed “states of mind,” you’re probably not alone. But the better answer is they’re types of numbers. We take numbers for granted. One, two, three. These are the natural, or whole numbers. What could be simpler? Fractions are no trouble. Half a cup of sugar, a quarter teaspoon of salt. These’re called rational numbers because they can be written as the ratio of two whole numbers. But many numbers aren’t rational. We call them irrational….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Sanctuaries 5 mins – “In 2006, filmmaker Jean-Michel Cousteau, son of the explorer Jacques Cousteau, screened his documentary, Voyage to Kure, about the waters northwest of Hawaii. The theater was the White House and his audience was President George W. Bush. Bush was apparently moved by the images of rare sea turtles, sharks and coral, so moved in fact that within months he used his executive authority to protect a patch of ocean, called Papahānaumokuākea. It’s an area almost the size of Montana and, at the time, was the world’s largest fully protected marine reserve. “It’s an area like a national park, it’s an area that’s closed off to commercial extraction and fishing,” said Matt Rand, who directs the Global Ocean Legacy Project with the Pew Charitable Trusts. “And it’s an opportunity for that area to recover and become a healthy ecosystem.” In the past decade, Rand’s group has helped the US and other governments protect almost a million square miles of ocean. The United Kingdom currently manages the world’s largest fully protected marine reserve in the Indian Ocean, around the Chagos Islands, an area roughly the size of France. Earlier this summer, the Obama administration announced that it would create the largest reserve yet — in US waters in the south Pacific….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phenol History 6 mins – “Nowadays the whole business of personal hygiene is a gentle affair, a pleasant pampering with soothing creams and dermatologically tested soap substitutes. But go back a hundred years or so and keeping yourself clean and germ free was a rough, harsh world, typified by one hardboiled term. Carbolic. Phenol, the proper name of carbolic acid, is one of the simplest aromatic compounds – a benzene ring with a single hydrogen replaced by a hydroxyl group – yet it has proved of continuing value as new uses have been found for it, resulting in modern production levels in the millions of tonnes per year….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PSA Critique 29 mins – “Hello. I am Dr. Gerald Chodak for Medscape. This week, I want to talk about an interview between Dr. Eric Topol and Dr. Richard Ablin that was published on Medscape. Dr. Ablin is credited with helping to discover the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) protein that ultimately led to the PSA test. He has recently written a book called The Great Prostate Hoax, [1] in which he raises several concerns about what has occurred as a result of routine PSA screening. Dr. Ablin believes that the PSA test never should have been approved for screening, because the data were inadequate to demonstrate whether it was truly helping people. He is also concerned that although men are now given a choice about whether they want to be screened for prostate cancer, it is based on 2 studies that both have flaws, so the information being used is less than ideal….” At the link you can read and listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in the blog archive.

Small Arms Statistics 9 mins – “Around 875 million firearms are in circulation worldwide, with three-quarters of these in civilian hands, according to Small Arms Survey estimates. These widely-cited calculations are the result of an ongoing programme on inventories and stockpiles—started over a decade ago—to gather comprehensive data on the distribution of small arms and light weapons around the world. The programme has developed an ever larger pool of information that was initially scarce and unsystematic, but now can provide increasingly accurate and up-to-date knowledge of small arms and light weapon holdings. In this podcast, Senior Consultant Aaron Karp and Researcher Hannah Dönges discuss the challenges, achievements, and future directions of this initiative.” At the link find the title, “Step by Step: Researching the global distribution of small arms,” right-click “Media files SAS-Podcast-24-Step-by-Step-Researching-the-global-distribution-of-small-arms.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spanish Coal Miners 27 mins – “Natalio Cosoy meets the miners of northern Spain who sing to their patron saint, Santa Bárbara Bendita, in the hope that she will watch over them in the uncertain times ahead.” At the link find the title, “Docs: A Song for Spanish Miners – 4 September 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140904-0330a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Steadfast 19 mins – “Around 2005, a Seattle neighborhood called Ballard started to see unprecedented growth. Condominiums and apartment buildings were sprouting up all over the community which had once been mostly single family homes and small businesses. Around this time, developers offered a woman named Edith Macefield $750,000 dollars for her small house, which was appraised at around $120,000. They wanted to build a shopping mall on the block where Macefield had lived for the last 50 years. Macefield turned down the money. Developers went forward with the shopping mall anyway. The mall enveloped her house on three sides. The architects designed the building in such a way that if Mrs. Macefield ever decided to move, they could easily incorporate the space where her had been into the building. The developers eventually increased their offer to one million dollars, plus they offered to find her a similar home somewhere else, and pay for a home health-care work for Macefield who was elderly and in poor health. Again, Edit Macefield turned them down….” At the link are related photos and you can right-click “Download,” then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Syrian Refugees 104 mins – “This MPI panel discussion, in partnership with the Middle East Institute and the Center for Middle Eastern Strategic Studies (ORSAM), examines the status of Syrian refugees abroad and the effect of the ongoing Syrian crisis on Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, and Iraq. Panelists Oytun Orhan, ORSAM Project Coordinator and Researcher, Peri-Khan Aqrawi-Whitcomb, Middle East Research Institute Junior Research Fellow, Faysal Itani, Resident Fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East, and Saban Kardas, ORSAM President discuss the experiences of each country as outlined in ORSAM’s report. The project team visited each country and after six months of boots-on-the-ground research, found that women and children account for more than 75 percent of the refugees, making education in particular a devastating issue for the next generation of Syrians. In addition, Syrian emigrants settle not only in camps but also in cities, raising prices and lowering wages all along the Syrian borders….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Trends 52 mins – “ENCORE Hi ho, hi ho … it’s out with work we go! As you relax this holiday weekend, step into our labor-atory and imagine a world with no work allowed. Soft robots help us with tasks at home and at the office, while driverless cars allow us to catch ZZZZs in the front seat. Plus, the Internet of Everything interconnects all your devices, from your toaster to your roaster to … you. So there’s no need to ever get off the couch. But is a machine-ruled world a true utopia? And, the invention that got us into our 24/7 rat race: Edison’s electric light.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “ Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans Atlantic Flights 50 mins – “Air traffic controllers have guided trans-Atlantic flights since 1919. As Creative archaeologist Christine Finn discovers, datalink – effectively text messaging – is increasingly being used, so that voice communication is on the wane.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Atlantic Crossing 30 Aug 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140830-0905a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

TWIV 300 93 mins – “Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler. Recording together for the first time, the TWiV team celebrates their 300th podcast at the American Society for Microbiology headquarters in Washington, DC, where Vincent speaks with Dickson, Alan, Rich, and Kathy about their careers in science.” At the link right-click “TWIV 300” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War of 1812 52 mins – “Two hundred years ago, the United States was engulfed in a war that had seen Washington, D.C. attacked and burned, and the nation’s independence seriously threatened. Today, few people remember who we were even fighting in that conflict — the War of 1812 — much less what we were fighting for. But despite its forgotten status, the War of 1812 was hugely influential in shaping the nation we live in today.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Weather Forecasting 47 mins – “We look at what’s at stake for the future of weather forecasting when our aging weather satellites die.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wilderness Act 31 mins – “Today is the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Wilderness Act of 1964. The act drew protective lines around millions of acres and their wildlife. To mark the anniversary, humans and nature from two angles today. One, that my guest Ruth DeFries calls the Big Rachet – the human pattern of pushing nature to its limits, paying a price, then recovering – even more dominant – with human ingenuity. Will we do that this time? Then nature writer Jordan Fisher Smith joins us to look at the health of our wilderness itself. This hour On Point: nature and the wild in a time of planetary climate change.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 200 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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Media Mining Digest 147 – 5 Sept 2014: Affordable Housing, Alternative Medicine Critique, Alzheimer’s Story, American Wine, Anglo Saxon Ale Experiment, Antioxidant Science, Behind the Throne, Black Culture Stories, Blindness Onset, Childhood Nutrition, Conservation Movement, Coursera Co-founder, Diagnostic Exuberance, Disability Issues, Doctor Kills Dad, Doctor Then Patient, DolphinTalk, Drones for Air and Water, Ebola Response, Energy and Environment,Ferguson Controversy, First Synthetic Cell, Food Foraging, Foreign Fighters, Fraternities, Fraud Examiners, Global Post President, Guatamala City Addiction, Ice Bucket Challenge, Immortality, Internet Regulation, Local Food, Margaret Fuller, Medical Dr Changes, Minimum Wage, Mistakes Were Made, Nairobi Kenya Water, Native American News, Neural Coding, Office Work, Podcast Loudness,Police Militarization, Ponzi Schemes, Racial Eruptions, Regulation Impact, Rwanda Tweeters, Science and Policy, Seafood Support, Six-Year-Old Views, Solar Costs, Solar Power Solutions, Stazi, Steven Hawking, Teacher Creation, Terrorist Recruits, Torture’s Value, Vietnam War, Wage History, Windows 8 Discussion,Work after Retirement, Work Future, World War One, Yoga Master Iyengar

The following audio files come from a larger group of 226 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 65 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Affordable Housing 51 mins – “Depending on where you live, the U.S. housing market is looking up. Regions with strong local economies are improving. But most markets are still weak. And a growing number of Americans cannot afford to live where they work. Millions of low-and middle-income families struggle to pay increasing rents with stagnating wages. And an estimated one in six homeowners are still underwater on their mortgages. Advocates are pushing for innovative solutions to what they call an affordable housing crisis. But many are concerned about the fairness of some outcomes. Diane and her guests discuss the challenges of finding affordable housing in the U.S.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Alternative Medicine Critique 15 mins – “Doctor Brian Goldman explains why two prominent US scientists want to pull the plug on research into alternative medicine.” At the link find the title, “ White Coat Mini Podcast – Alternative Medicine,” right-click on “Download White Coat Mini Podcast – Alternative Medicine” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer’s Story 51 mins – “Alzheimer’s disease affects a reported 36 million people worldwide. But Meryl Comer had never heard of it when her husband was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s at age 58. The award-winning journalist gave up her television career to take care of him at home — for nearly two decades. In a new book, she details her life as a caregiver: the struggle to get a diagnosis, the emotional and financial hardships and the limitations of long-term facilities. She says public conversation about the disease should be about earlier diagnosis, so our brain span can match our lifespan. Diane talks with Meryl Comer about her husband’s battle with Alzheimer’s.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

American Wine 47 mins – “Drought in California, earthquake in Napa. We look at broken bottles and the health of the American wine industry.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Anglo Saxon Ale Experiment 16 mins – Members of the British History Podcast describe their efforts to produce ale following instructions used 1500 years ago. At the link find the title, “Anglo Saxon Ale Experiment,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antioxidant Science 19 mins – “Foods high in antioxidants are believed to fight oxidative stress. But what is oxidative stress? Two scientists from a recent NYAS conference break it down and discuss whether antioxidants have superpowers. “ At the link find the title, “Antioxidant Science,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Behind the Throne 54 mins – “Biographers Jung Chang and Kristie Miller talk about the machinations of women who work ‘behind the throne': the Empress Dowager Cixi, who was in effect the ruler of China for decades; and Edith Wilson, wife of U.S President Woodrow Wilson. “ At the link find the title, “Behind the Throne,” right-click “Download Behind the Throne” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Culture Stories 53 mins – “Listen to an ALL-NEW Snap, “The Reunion.” Amazing stories about getting back together. Storytelling, with a beat.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar.

Blindness Onset 21 mins – “Alyson Bunn,an Eye Clinic Liaison Officer with Surrey Association for Visually Impaired people explains a new hospital passport initiative to help hospital staff better understand the needs of sight or hearing impaired people. Also, Peter White talks to cookery author Elaine Bastable about her recipe book and how she is learning to adjust to partial sight due to Age Related Macular Disease. “ At the link for a limited time find the title, “InTouch 26 Aug 14: Hospital passport – Elaine Bastable,” right-click “Download 9MB” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childhood Nutrition 37 mins – “One hundred and sixty five million children in low- and middle-income countries never reach their full developmental, educational, and economic potential as a result of exposure to poverty, malnutrition, poor health, and unstimulating home environments. Interventions that promote good nutrition make a difference: studies show nutritional interventions can improve both growth and child development. Psychosocial-stimulation interventions can also improve child development. Integrating nutritional interventions into child-development programs could thus be an effective way to promote both, but there is little information on integrated interventions. On April 3–4, 2013, researchers from around the world met at the New York Academy of Sciences for Every Child’s Potential: Integrating Nutrition, Health, and Psychosocial Interventions to Promote Early Childhood Development, a conference presented by the Sackler Institute for Nutrition Science in partnership with the Global Child Development Group. The meeting focused on how to integrate nutritional and other types of interventions into programs for early childhood development.” At the link go to the page bottom, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Numerous other resources are here.

Conservation Movement 52 mins – “Many in the West (and everywhere really) are worried about the future of wildlife and environment as we grow and alter the landscape. Recently, a dissenting voice has emerged in the conservation movement asking whether the strategies of the past are outdated. Today, we’re live in Montana, at the University of Utah’s Taft-Nicholson Center for Environmental Humanities. We’ll talk about what’s working and not working in conservation today, and what better paths there may be for moving forward.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coursera Co-founder 63 mins – “Daphne Koller of Coursera talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about online educational website Coursera and the future of education both online and via bricks-and-mortar. Koller, co-founder of Coursera with Andrew Ng, explains how Coursera partners with universities, how they try to create community and interaction, and the likely impact of widespread digital education on universities and those who want to learn. The conversation includes a discussion of why Koller left a chaired position in computer science at Stanford University to run a for-profit start-up in a crowded field.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diagnostic Exuberance 20 mins – “The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) has far reaching influence beyond that of psychiatric diagnosis. Excessive diagnosis of psychiatric disorders due to changes in the DSM may be causing more harm than good. On this episode, Dr. Allen Frances discussed saving normal.” At the link right-click “Listen to episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disability Matters 56 mins – “Joyce welcomes Mark Perriello, president and CEO of the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), the world’s largest cross-disability membership organization. As we approach the anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) on July 26, 1990, Mark will reflect on the progress we have made since the legislation became law and share his perspective on the work that needs to be done to further the rights of all people with disabilities.” At the link right-click “Download MP3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doctor Kills Dad 65 mins – “Dr. Benjamin Gilmer (left) gets a job at a rural clinic. He finds out he’s replaced someone — also named Dr. Gilmer (picture) — who went to prison after killing his own father. But the more Benjamin’s patients talk about the other Dr. Gilmer, the more confused he becomes. Everyone loved the old Dr. Gilmer. So Benjamin starts digging around, trying to understand how a good man can seemingly turn bad….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doctor Then Patient 28 mins – “Dr. Nikhil Joshi, 28, was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma last year. He reveals how becoming a cancer patient has made him a better doctor.” At the link find the title, L”abour Day Podcast – Journey to the Other Side of the Gurney,” right-click “Download Labour Day Podcast – Journey to the Other Side of the Gurney,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dolphin Talk 46 mins – “It’s hard to start a conversation with a stranger—especially when that stranger is, well, different. He doesn’t share your customs, celebrate your holidays, watch your TV shows, or even speak your language. Plus he has a blowhole. In this episode, we try to make contact with some of the strangest strangers on our little planet: dolphins. Producer Lynn Levy eavesdrops on some human-dolphin conversations, from a studio apartment in the Virgin Islands to a research vessel in the Bermuda Triangle.” At the link find the title, “Hello,” right-click “stream m3u” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Drones for Air and Water 31 mins – “See like a fish by changing vitamins by Ian Woolf, Ian Lyons talks about flying quadcopters, Dominic talks about DIY underwater remotely operated vehicles for exploration and education, at the Sydney Mini Maker Faire, Hosted and produced by Ian Woolf.” Some practical advice on getting started with drones. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Response 16 mins – “David Heymann, professor of infectious disease epidemiology, and head and senior fellow, at the Chatham House Centre on Global Health Security was sent to investigate the first outbreaks of Ebola in 1976. In this podcast he gives a longer term perspective on the disease, and talks about the importance and challenges of introducing novel treatments. For more information on ebola virus disease, including working in a front line clinic, visit bmj.com/ebola” At the link find the title, “Ebola virus disease, a long terms perspective,” right-click “media files 163986371-bmjgroup-ebola-virus-disease-a-long-terms-perspective.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy and Environment 20 mins – “The Global Environment and Energy Correspondent for The Economist takes an up-close look at global warming, the auto industry, and government.” At the link find the Feb 15, 2008 title, “Fueling the Car of the Future: Vijay Vaitheeswaran,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ferguson Controversy 51 mins – “In St. Louis, Missouri, thousands of people gathered Aug. 25 for the funeral service for Michael Brown. He was fatally shot by a police officer earlier this month. His death is being investigated by a St. Louis grand jury and also by the Justice Department. Police use of deadly force is, unfortunately, not uncommon, but some say the killing of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, and police reaction to subsequent protests may lead to a far broader examination of police policy, community relations, politics and race. Join us to discuss the new questions following the death of Michael Brown.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

First Synthetic Cell 64 mins – “Craig Venter announced the creation of what he describes as the first synthetic life form. In a paper published in Science, a team of 24 researchers led by Daniel Gibson outline the steps they took to synthesise the 1.08 million base pair genome of the bacterium Mycoplasma mycoides. They effectively constructed the genome from four bottles of chemicals, one for each of the four nucleotides that make up DNA. This synthetic DNA was then “booted up” in a cell to create the first cell controlled completely by an artificially created genome. The genome contains blueprints, in which are encoded the names of the researchers, a website address, contact email and quotes from James Joyce, Richard Feynman and a biography of Robert Oppenheimer.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Foraging 21 mins – “Join a New York naturalist as he leads a spring food foraging tour in Central Park. Learn the history, science, and folklore behind foraging for your own food.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foreign Fighters 47 mins – “Britons, Europeans and Americans are joining the ranks of ISIS. We’ll look at what’s pulling them in.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fraternities 51 mins – “Lifelong friendships, a sense of community, professional opportunity: these are among the reasons that more than 9 million college students belong to a Greek organization. But fraternities in particular have come under increased scrutiny in recent years. Since 2005, the U.S. has seen more than 60 fraternity-related deaths, and institutions across the country have grappled with issues of violent hazing and sexual assault. Many people insist the coverage of these issues paints an unfair portrait of Greek life and the integral role it can play in the development of well-rounded adults. A conversation about the role of fraternities and sororities in the college experience today and the case for their future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Fraud Examiners 57 mins – “This week’s Fraud Talk episode will feature the Fraud of the Week as well as a special guest, Jim Ratley, President of the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE), who will discuss their Report to the Nations as well as other interesting fraud trends they are seeing in today’s business environment.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GlobalPost President 25 mins – “The American journalist, James Foley, reported for the Boston-based GlobalPost, an online network of freelance journalists, before he was kidnapped in 2012 and ultimately murdered by terrorists earlier this month. Last summer (2013), CCC’s Chris Kenneally interviewed Phil Balboni, president, CEO, and founder of GlobalPost, about the start-up’s efforts to prove that professional journalism does indeed have a place in a digital, mobile world….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guatamala City Addiction 27 mins – “Pentecostal churches in Guatemala run many of the country’s compulsory drug rehabilitation centres. But just how safe and effective are they? Linda Pressly reports.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Guatemala’s Addicts Behind Bars – 28 Aug 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140828-0330a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ice Bucket Challenge 47 mins – “The Ice Bucket Challenge: ALS, viral fundraising and how we give in the age of social media”. At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immortality 52 mins – “There may be but two certainties in life—death and taxes—but of those two, death is most frightening. Humans hate the fact of death, and so we constantly tell ourselves stories to avoid its inevitability. According to the philosopher Stephen Cave, these stories about a god, a nation, a family, or an art help us manage the terror of our own demise. They’ve also fueled the expansion of civilization for eons. Wednesday, Cave joins us to explain how our unique and implacable yearning for immortality makes us human.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Regulation 32 mins – “The online universe doesn’t have nearly as many rules, or rulemakers, as the real world.” At the link find the title, “Who Runs the Internet? (Rebroadcast),” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As from the pop-u menu.

Local Food 45 mins – “Locavorism is all the rage these days, but does science back it up? Is local food more nutritious? Can it improve our environment? And does it even taste better? This June, we invited a panel of experts from the New York area to find out.” At the link find the title, “The Science of Local Food,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Margaret Fuller 52 mins – “Even if you’ve never heard of Margaret Fuller, you know the people of her circle. She was Thoreau’s first editor, Horace Greeley made her a front-page columnist, and she was an intimate of Emerson. Fuller was an exceptional writer and a ground-breaking advocate for gender equality, but her untimely death in 1850 led to a legacy of scandal and tragedy that overshadowed her remarkable work. Monday, Pulitzer-prize winning biographer Megan Marshall joins us to talk about the life and passions of Margaret Fuller. Megan Marshall has written for The New Yorker, The New York Times Book Review, The Atlantic and Slate. She’s the author of The Peabody Sisters and most recently Margaret Fuller: A New American Life. Margaret Fuller wrote the groundbreaking Woman in the Nineteenth Century.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Dr Changes 16 mins – “The Canadian Medical Association’s annual meeting is under way in Ottawa. Doctors are fretting about their future in which almost everywhere you look, someone other than a doctor is doing things that used to be their job.” At the link find the title, “White Coat Mini Podcast – Doctor Angst at the CMA Annual Meeting,” right-click “Download White Coat Mini Podcast – Doctor Angst at the CMA Annual Meeting” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minimum Wage 30 mins – “Economists these days are confirming what many already know – the gap between the haves and have-nots is widening. In the face of soaring productivity over the last several decades, today’s average American workers earn about the same as they did in 1970 when adjusted for inflation. So what happens to sustainability in the face of this trend? Our guest this week on Sea Change Radio is David Rolf, president of the Service Employees International Union, or SEIU 775. Rolf and host Alex Wise talk about the interconnections between economic and environmental health and ponder how a movement to improve wages and work conditions can also support efforts to protect the earth.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minimum Wage Change 4 mins – “The Westfield Valley Fair Mall straddles two cities. One side of the mall is in Santa Clara, but walk a few feet down the mall, and you’re in San Jose. In 2012, San Jose voters agreed to raise the city’s minimum wage from $8 to $10 an hour. Philip Sandigo manages a shoe store on the $8-an-hour side. When San Jose raised the minimum wage, he lost about half his staff. The boundary line between the city of San Jose and the city of Santa Clara runs through the Westfield Valley Fair Mall. The boundary line between the city of San Jose and the city of Santa Clara runs through the Westfield Valley Fair Mall. They went to the stores on the side of the mall that paid $2 an hour more.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mistakes Were Made 18 mins – “The world is full of people talking about how right they are. Today on the show, we try something different: we talk to smart, thoughtful people about times they got things really, really wrong.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nairobi Kenya Water 5 mins – “Every spare nook in Caren Gekonge’s home in Kibera is filled with bright yellow jerry cans and large black drums of water. She hauls all this water home in a wheelbarrow, making sure to stock extra. There’s often water shortages here. “What I have can take me for two weeks,” she says. The city of Nairobi does not provide running water to people squatting in the slums, so they rely on what’s known as the water cartel. The cartel sells water at around 6 cents for a 20 liter jerry can — much more than wealthy Nairobians pay who have running water. These poor slum dwellers often spend around 20 percent of their budget on clean water. “It was very expensive buying from there,” says Caren. Caren would eventually develop a model that would get around having to buy dirty water….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Native American News 27 mins – “TV made in the USA by tribal people, for tribal people covering everything from whaling rituals to canoe journeys and watched, at its height, by 50 million people.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Native American News 26 August 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140826-0905a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neural Coding 28 mins – “On this episode, we speak with neuroscientist Dr. Sliman Bensmaia. He tells us about his research on touch — how our hands feel, how our brains process this information, and how this research is being used to design better prostheses.” At this link right-click “Listen to the episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Office Work 52 mins – “Writer Nikil Saval has written a book that uncovers a fascinating history in the most banal place: the office. Whether it’s the “dismal little cell” of Scrooge’s counting-house or the tricked-out, sprawling campuses of Google, Saval says the office holds the promise of respectability, utopian possibility and upward mobility. It can also be a place of soul-crushing tedium and conformity. Saval joins us to explain where the office comes from, why it’s the way it is, and how it could be better. Nikil Saval is an editor of the magazine n+1. His new and first book is called Cubed: A Secret History of the Workplace…” At the link right-click “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcast Loudness 66 mins – “Loudness normalization of your audio is a “simple” process for measuring and processing for the perceived level of your audio. Perceived levels are how the human ear interprets levels. In recent years, new standards for measuring perceived level have arisen out of a lot of research and engineering. Georg Holzmann and I discuss the history of measuring loudness and these new standards more in depth in part one of this interview… In part two of our talk, Georg and I take a look at loudness normalization as provided by his service available at Auphonic.com. We also talk about how a podcaster can start to begin measuring and performing loudness normalization in their own audio editing system….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Links As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Militarization 52 mins – “Investigative journalist Radley Balko says that American police forces have become more like armies than keepers of the peace. He traces it back to the creation of SWAT teams in the 60s, which led to increased use of military tactics and weapons. These days, there are some 50,000 raids each year as part of “wars” declared on drugs and crime. Balko joins Doug to talk about how law enforcement has changed throughout history and what militarized police forces mean for citizens.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ponzi Schemes 57 mins – “This week our episode will focus on Ponzi Schemes with our special guest, Jordan Maglich, counsel to the SEC appointed receivers in the Arthur Nadel Ponzi case in Florida. Jordan is also the creator of the PonziTracker database. We will be discussing Nadel case as well as how to recognize a Ponzi Scheme as well as dealing with the aftermath.” Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racial Eruptions 55 mins – “Clarence Page talked about developments in Ferguson, Missouri, following the police shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown, and how events related back to the recommendations and findings of previous government-commissioned reports on civil unrest and riots.” At the link you can listen, but a download costs $.99; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Regulation Impact 25 mins – “In this episode, Patrick McLaughlin joins Mike Leland to discuss his new project, RegData, and how it can help measure the impact of regulations, like occupational licensing and those Uber and Lyft are confronting, in states.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rwanda Tweeters 13 mins – “Steve Terrill is a journalist who works in Rwanda. Or at least he worked in Rwanda, until he accidentally got the office of Rwanda’s president Paul Kagame to implicate itself in a long-running online harassment campaign. Alex talks to Steve about inadvertently exposing the Rwandan government’s most prolific troll, and being banned from the country as a result.” At the link right-click “stream m3u” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science and Policy 52 mins – “Mixing Science and Policy: Joanne Carney, David Goldston, Michael Stebbins; Three experts in science and policy discuss their thoughts on the best way for scientists to communicate with governments, and vice versa, in the effort to create a more open and productive national dialogue on science.” (At the NY Academy of Sciences) At the link right-click ‘Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seafood Support 25 mins – “Sustainable Seafood: (start time 5:10) This is the fourth feature interview in The Ocean Is Us series, which explores how we in land-locked states are connected to the oceans and what’s at stake. Today we discuss sustainable seafood, which to some critics is an oxymoron, given that some 90% of large fish already have been wiped from the sea. To discuss prospects for feeding 9.6 billion people by mid-century, the developments in wild-caught fisheries and aquaculture, and the role of retailers and consumers, we have two guests. John Hocevar is a marine biologist who directs the Oceans Campaign at Greenpeace. Carrie Brownstein develops standards to guide seafood purchasing for the Whole Foods markets throughout the United States, Canada, and the U.K.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Six-Year-Old Views 17 mins – “Dan and his 6 year old son Cash discuss antenna breaks in the upcoming iPhone 6 housing, iPad as a gaming platform, the technology of podcasting and live streaming, the limits of Magneto’s powers, Adventure Time, deadly amoebas, visiting Four Corners, Bigfoot, rodeos, a crystal tooth, and more.” At the link find the title, “29: Four Places at Once,” right-click “Media files specials-029.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Costs 34 mins – ““Utility regulation and rates is a contact sport,” says Karl Rabago, and that makes the implementation of a new “value of solar” policy complex. Will distributed solar grow better with a transparent, value-based contract price? How does it differ from net metering? Is Minnesota’s law a precedent to follow? Prepare yourself for a deep dive in this extended interview with Karl Rabago, former Vice President at Austin Energy and soon-to-be Executive Director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center at the Pace Law School in White Plains, NY. This podcast was recorded via Skype on May 1, 2014.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Power Solutions 78 mins – “On TWiE, with John Farrell of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, it’s all about energy democracy! We discuss New York state’s new plan for distributed generation–it’s really impressive!–Minnesota’s new value of solar tariff, ways communities can wrestle control from monopoly investor owned utilities, and much more!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stazi 20 mins – “Tour the deep dark world of the East German state security agency known as Stasi. Uniquely powerful at spying on its citizens, until the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 the Stasi masterminded a system of surveillance and psychological pressure that kept the country under control for decades. Hubertus Knabe studies the Stasi — and was spied on by them. He shares stunning details from the fall of a surveillance state, and shows how easy it was for neighbor to turn on neighbor.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Steven Hawking 18 mins – “…Stephen Hawking could well be the most famous living scientist. His book sales certainly point to this, with A Brief History of Time (first published in 1988) selling more than 10 million copies in twenty years. It was on the London Sunday Times best-seller list for more than four years, and has topped that paper’s all time best seller list. It was translated into 35 languages by 2001. We hear Stephen Hawking in discussion with Robyn Williams in 1990. John Bell reads an article written by Stephen Hawking about A Brief History of Time. And the late David Crighton assesses Stephen Hawking’s greatness as a scientist.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teacher Creation 52 mins – “Think about that one teacher who had the biggest impact on your education. What skills or qualities did that person have that other teachers didn’t? What would it mean for America’s future if we could impart the expertise of all those best teachers to every other classroom instructor? In a new book, the journalist Elizabeth Green sets out to define a concrete set of best practices any teacher can learn and apply in the classroom. Green joins us Tuesday to make her case for building a better teacher. Elizabeth Green is the co-founder of Chalkbeat, an education news network. Her new book is called Building a Better Teacher: How Teaching Works (And How to Teach It to Everyone)” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorist Recruits 48 mins – “Its Islam over everything.” So read the Twitter bio of Douglas McAuthur McCain—or, as he reportedly called himself, “Duale Khalid”—the San Diego man who is apparently the first American to be killed while fighting for ISIS… And how can we explain the dozens of other Americans who have also gone off to fight as jihadists in Syria, for ISIS and other militant groups? According to University of Maryland psychologist and terrorism expert Arie Kruglanski, who has studied scores of militant extremists, part of the clue may lie in that Twitter tagline of McCain’s…This episode also features a discussion of a new Pew report showing that social media may actually discourage the expression of some opinions (rather than enabling them)… ” At the link find the title, “Arie Kruglanski – The Science of What Makes a Terrorist,” right-click “Media files 165239451-inquiringminds 49 arie kruglanski, the science of what makes a terrorist.mp3”

Torture’s Value 54 mins – “We’ve known for a long time that torture doesn’t work as a way to extract hidden information, but we still do it. A documentary by Philip Coulter based on an interview with Harvard professor Elaine Scarry. “ At the link find the title, “Unspeakable Acts,” right-click “Download Unspeakable Acts” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam War  27mins – “Did President Johnson take the US to war with Vietnam on a lie, or was he misled? DD Guttenplan explores what happened in the Gulf of Tonkin in August 1964.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: War, Lies and Audiotape 23 August 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140823-0905a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wage History 55 mins – “In his 2014 State of the Union address, President Obama called on Congress to increase the federal minimum wage to $10.10. And last month, he signed an executive order putting it into effect for federal contract workers. With legislation on the table in Congress and increases being debated in many states, this episode looks to the origins of the minimum wage, and explores how we’ve thought about fair pay over time.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Windows 8 Discussion 96 mins – In Podnutz Daily #390 Corey Fruitman from InstantHousecall.com talks about tips and tricks for Windows 8. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Work after Retirement 51 mins – “In recent years, budget battles in Washington have featured dire warnings about an older American workforce. We’ve heard that a wave of aging baby boomers would bankrupt Social Security and Medicare, and threaten American economic prosperity. But author Chris Farrell argues these doomsayers have it wrong: advances in medical care mean people are living longer and healthier lives and want to continue working instead of retiring. And many of these older workers are starting new businesses that are boosting economic growth. The ‘unretirement’ trend and what it means for the American workplace and society.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.
Work Future 34 mins – “How are jobs – and workers – changing? Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee discuss which robots we should fear, and which we shouldn’t. New York Times columnist Tom Friedman weighs in on the future of work. Plus, we may be heading for a 32-hour work week, and find out why money doesn’t make us as happy as we think.” At the link find the title, “8.30.14 – Work, Interrupted – The Whole Labor Day Special,” right-click “IHUB-083014-FullShow.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One 54 mins – “Margaret MacMillan is one of the world’s leading scholars on World War One. She talks with Paul Kennedy about the origins of the war and what we’ve learned — and failed to learn — from it.” At the link find the title, “Margaret MacMillan and World War One,” right-click “Download Margaret MacMillan and World War One,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One 55 mins – “World War I was sometimes called “the war to end all wars.” But a hundred years after the fighting began, it’s become a war that’s often forgotten in American history, or viewed as a prelude to WWII. In this episode, we explore some of the ways the conflict affected Americans far beyond the battlefields of Europe — from debates about the meaning of free speech, to the fight over how the war would be remembered.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yoga Master Iyengar 47 mins – “The legacy of Indian yoga master, B.K.S Iyengar, and his influence on yoga in the Western world.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

==============================================================                                                                     ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , added to weekly, and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is there too,  and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 180 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 146 – 29 August 2014: Alzheimer’s Prospects, Audience Hacking, Autism and Vaccines, Beef Production, Camels in US, College Majors, Conservation Tech, Digestion, Disease Processes, Education System, Engineer Mentors, Fat and Sugar, Fat Discussion, Fats and Carbs, Feeding the Planet, Ferguson Missouri, Fracking Issues, Fractals, French Fries, Grapes of Wrath, Grass to Bread, Gut Biome, Hacking IKEA, Jaguars, Makeshift Economy, Meat Eating, Medicare Part D, Micronutrients, Milk and Cheese, Monarch Butterflies, News Literacy, Nutrition Issues, Nutrition Science, Pickles and Ketchup, Problem Identification, Protein Sources, Resveratrol, Salt Seasoning, Sugar Overview, Unseen, Xanadu Project

The following audio files come from a larger group of 219 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 44 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Alzheimer’s Prospects 60 mins mins – “Alzheimer’s Disease is a growing health and economic concern worldwide, prompting innovative efforts to better understand the disease and translate that understanding into effective interventions… Visit the Academy’s Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia Initiative for more info.” At the link find the title, “Alzheimer’s Disease: Prospects for a Cure,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Audience Hacking 15 mins – “This is a repurposed episode originally published at the Podcast Reporter podcast show, in which we interview Jonny Andrews of AudienceHacker.com. The interview took place at the first annual Podcast Movement conference.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism and Vaccines 57 mins – “Episode 25 of Books and Ideas is an interview with Dr. Paul A. Offit, author of “Autism’s False Prophets: Bad Science, Risky Medicine, and the Search for a Cure.” The scientific evidence shows no connection between vaccines and autism yet opponents of vaccination continue to encourage parents to refuse to vaccinate their children against potentially life threatening diseases. In this episode we consider the evidence for vaccine safety and examine the factors that fuel the on-going controversy. Children are already dying from preventable diseases like measles and hemophilis influenza (Hib) meningitis, so it is vital that parents be informed about the unnecessary risks faced by unvaccinated children.” At the link right-click next to “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beef Production 30 mins – “How did the hamburger become a staple American food? A Thought for Food considers the science and history of the key ingredient, beef.” At the link find the title, “Meet the meat,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Camels in US 4 mins – “…In another program, I talk about Dromedary camels that the US Army imported into Texas in 1856. Those, it turned out, were only part of more widespread move to bring camels to America — or perhaps I should say bring back. Camels originated in the west, migrated to Asia some four million years ago; then they finally died out here only 10,000 years ago — probably hunted to extinction. Llamas, Alpacas and Vicunas are actually forms of camels….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clouds 29 mins – “In a rebroadcast from October 3, 2010, Keith & Russ talk with Sarah Brooks, Associate Professor in Texas A&M’s Department of Atmospheric Science. Sarah explains the basics of cloud formation and cloud seeding. She also discusses how pollution can inadvertently affect cloud formation, and ultimately, weather. And Sarah & Russ engage in a brief, but lively, debate on whether clouds and water vapor contribute to climate change.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Majors 17 mins – “Sure, some college degrees lead to higher paying jobs than others. But what’s shocking — at least, it was shocking to us — is just how big the gap can be. The most lucrative majors typically lead to jobs with salaries over $100,000 a year. The least lucrative lead to salaries of around $30,000. On today’s show, we run the numbers. We talk to people who majored in the most- and least-lucrative subjects. And we hear from an economist who says, when it comes to income, choosing a major is more important than choosing a college.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conservation Tech 51 mins – “New technologies are now giving conservationists abilities that would have been unimaginable just a few years ago. Using remote sensors, satellite mapping and drones, scientists and activists can now monitor deforestation and endangered wildlife in real time. And a new Wiki-leaks-style website is being used to target the kingpins of wildlife smuggling. But like many technologies, these new tools have risks. Tracking devices in the hand of poachers, for example, could prove devastating to endangered elephants. Join Diane and a panel of [3] guests for a discussion on how technology is transforming conservation efforts worldwide.”At the link you can only listen, not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Digestion 23 min – “How do we know what’s really good for us in an age of information overload? The first installment in our new podcast series on nutrition follows the journey of food from the table through the digestive tract to begin to get to the bottom of that big question.” At the link find the title, “My dinner with my dinner,” right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disease Processes 52 mins (two parts) – This two-part program is an overview of the disease process. “…In this first section, the panel considers the evolution of viruses, the spillover of pathogens from animals to humans, and some cultural practices that increase the rate of this phenomenon. The discussion is moderated by award-winning author David Quammen. The panelists are Dr. Ian Lipkin, Captain Daniel B. Jernigan, and author Maryn McKenna. In the [second] section, the panelists discuss factors involved in preventing outbreaks from reaching pandemic scales. The SARS virus and SARS-like virus that appeared earlier… in Saudi Arabia provide interesting case studies for considering containment policy.” At the links (Part 1; Part2) you can listen, not download; however, a copy of each is included in the blog archive.

Education System 51 mins – “As kids head back to school, it’s time to look at the future of education and what people are doing to solve today’s biggest problems. Sal Khan discusses how he’s reinventing education with more than just online videos. Author Amanda Ripley tackles the increasing fear of many American parents that their kids are falling behind. Psychologist Dave Anderegg gives us his remedy for the problem: stop stigmatizing nerdiness. Plus, we learn about the founder of Montessori Method, and much more.” At the link find the title, “8.23.14 – Schooling the System – The Whole Education Special,” right-click “IHUB-082314-FullShow.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineer Mentors 83 mins – “Electrical engineer Meagan Pollock explains how engineers can be more effective role models. We also learn about promoting equity in the workplace, discover how digital movie projection technology is used to improve medical care, and consider whether or not software engineers deal with entropy….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fat and Sugar 26 mins – “Though fat and sugar are often seen as the bad guys in the world of nutrients, the truth is our body needs them to survive. Begin to explore those most maligned compounds in the third edition of our nutrition series.” At the link find the title, “Fire in Your Belly,” right-click “Download” from the pop-up menu.

Fat Discussion 30 mins – “Trans fat, saturated fat, hydrogenated oil—such terms are plastered on food labels across the country. But what do any of them really mean? Find out all about fat in this episode of our nutrition series.” At the link find the title, “A Fat Lot of Good,” right-click on “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fats and Carbs 88 mins – “The Egg Nutrition Center is hosting this webinar, entitled Carbohydrate and Saturated Fat: Emerging Research and New Schools of Thought to discuss the body of scientific research behind low carb diets in the treatment of dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome; discuss diagnostic tools that are used to evaluation cardiometabolic risk and how these markers are effected by diet; debate both sides of the saturated fat story; recognize common myths associated with heart health, and discuss evidence-based nutrition counseling and communication.” At the link you can only watch the video – no download, but the visual aids are helpful. An audio copy is included with the blog archive. Confusing terms used during the webinar include MUFA’s and PUFA’s.

Feeding the Planet 44 mins – “Author Alan Weisman considers the meaning and means of achieving a sustainable future in this excerpted coverage of a talk he presented at the Academy.” At the link find the title, “Can We Feed the Planet?” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ferguson Missouri 47 mins – “A deep read on Ferguson, Missouri and what we’re seeing about race, class, hope and fear in America.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking Issues 51 mins – “Each year an estimated 35,000 oil and natural gas wells are processed using hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. More than 15 million people live within a mile of a well that’s been drilled since 2000. The explosive growth in this industry has left scientists struggling to keep up, but research is beginning to mount related to how fracking is affecting the earth. A recent study connected fracking to increased earthquakes in Oklahoma and Stanford scientists are raising new concerns about contaminated drinking water. Please join us to discuss what we know about the environmental effects of fracking.”At the link you can only listen, not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Fracking Review 30 mins – “Even the most casual followers of energy policy have become aware of the controversy surrounding the massive expansion of fracking in this country over the past decade…This week on Sea Change Radio, host Alex Wise speaks with Neela Banerjee, a journalist who covers energy and environmental policy for the Los Angeles Times, to get an update on the latest developments in natural gas exploration. She talks about the fight to keep drinking water safe around the 77,000 natural gas wells throughout the country, and the controversy surrounding the use of unpermitted diesel fuel in the fracking process.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fractals 31 mins – “Art, Science, Math and Culture: In this podcast, art historian Nina Samuel, biologists Brian Enquist and James Brown, and ethnomathematician Ron Eglash discuss the prevalence and power of fractals from the perspectives of their various disciplines.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

French Fries 22 mins -“In this installment of A Thought for Food’s consideration of the cheeseburger, we analyze the king of side dishes, the French fry.” At the link find the title, “Best Thing Ever,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grapes of Wrath 27 mins – “The classic novel, a parable of America’s Great Depression, as applied to the US today. Mark Mardell considers John Steinbeck’s novel The Grapes of Wrath.” At the link find the title, “ DocArchive: Grapes of Wrath Revisited,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140819-0905a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grass to Bread 37 mins – “The second installment of A Thought for Food’s systematic analysis of America’s sandwich, the cheeseburger, looks at bread—one of the strangest and most interesting products humanity has ever invented.” Mention is made of a seminal book by the Sinclairs about the history of agriculture. At the link find the title, “Going to seed,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gut Biome 37 mins – “The genome of the bacteria that colonize our bodies vastly dwarfs our human genome! How will this new finding change how we understand our health? Dr. Martin Blaser, Director of the Human Microbiome Program at the NYU School of Medicine; Dr. Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello, Associate Professor of Medicine at New York University Medical Center; and Dr. Lawrence Brandt, Professor of Medicine and Surgery at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine discuss the consequences of our co-evolution with bacteria and debate the implications for medical research. Christine Gorman, Senior Editor for Health and Medicine at Scientific American, moderates.” At the link find the title, “Hats Off to Bacteria,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hacking IKEA 20 mins – “Because IKEA products are available in so many countries and use metric measurements, a worldwide “hackerati” has been able to thrive. You see hacks posted from Australia, Russia, Israel and Dubai. Someone even posted a hack of a French country house library in an actual French country house. He used 60 Billy and Benno bookcases….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jaguars 51 mins – “Jaguars are the world’s third-largest wild cat – after tigers and lions. They have distinctive black rosettes on their fur and can weigh up to 250 pounds. Jaguars have been eradicated from 40 percent of their historic range. Today they live along a corridor from Argentina to Mexico. Their future is threatened by illegal hunting, deforestation and a loss of prey. One of the world’s leading big cat experts is responsible for creating a jaguar preserve in Central America, the first of its kind. In a new book, he shares why he’s committed to giving a voice to jaguars and how they helped him find his own voice.” At the link you can only listen, not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Makeshift Economy 46 mins – “We’ll look at workers trying to live and make a living in the age of TaskRabbit and computer-driven work schedules.” At the link right-click on “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meat Eating 30 mins – “The final installment of our step-by-step analysis of the cheeseburger culminates in a question that’s both very simple and tremendously complex—should we eat meat?” At the link find the title, “Eating Animals,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Micronutrients 25 mins – “Scurvy was once the scourge of the seven seas, but it turned out to have a simple solution: Vitamin C. In the second installment of our nutrition series, learn all about the power of vitamins, minerals, and other micronutrients.” At the link find the title, “Tiny Amounts,” right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Milk and Cheese 23 mins – “For the third installment of our dissection of the humble cheeseburger, A Thought for Food considers a Paleolithic super food that’s still popular worldwide—cheese.” At the link find the title, “Bad Milk Gone Good,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monarch Butterflies 47 mins – “This year’s monarch butterfly migration is the smallest ever recorded. We’ll ask why. It’s a big story. Plus: how climate change is creating new hybridized species.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

News Literacy 51 mins – “Americans are getting their news from more places than ever before. Besides traditional sources, we are turning to social media, email and even late-night TV to find out what’s happening in the world. And we are increasingly able to target news based on our interests and ideology. Some journalists worry the sheer volume of all that information is affecting our news literacy. They say we need to think critically about our daily media diet and ask more questions about who is producing and sourcing the news we consume and why. Diane and her [4] guests discuss how to sort fact from fiction in the digital age.” At the link you can only listen, not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Nutrition Issues 23 mins – “Nutrition is notoriously tricky to get a handle on, with conflicting reports and unsubstantiated fads all over the place. So why can’t science get to the bottom of what’s right—and right for you? For one, it has a lot to do with things called biomarkers.” At the link find the title, “How Do We Know What We Know?,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nutrition Science 70 mins (3 parts) – In Part 1 of 19 mins “Nutrition science can help make the world a healthier, happier place, but how do researchers know where to start? In Part 2 of 29 mins “Scientists, health professionals, and food industry representatives discuss the process of putting the Research Agenda for Nutrition Science into action.” In part 3 of 22 mins “Scientists, health professionals, and food industry representatives discuss the importance of addressing global nutrition needs from a multidisciplinary perspective.” At the link find the three titles, “A Research Agenda for Nutrition Science: Activating the Agenda,” “A Research Agenda for Nutrition Science: Mobilizing the Community,” and “A Research Agenda for Nutrition Science: Why and How?” right-click their “Downloads” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pickles and Ketchup 29 mins – “The fourth installment of our systematic breakdown of a cheeseburger deals with ketchup and pickles, two attempts to give vegetables the power to defy time.” At the link find the title, “Veg Everlasting,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Problem Identification 31mins – “When you’re dealing with complex systems, failure is going to happen; it’s a given. What we do after that failure, however, strongly influences whether or not that failure will happen again. The traditional response to failure is to seek out the person responsible and punish them accordingly — should they be fired? Retrained? Moved to a different position where they can’t cause such havoc again? John Allspaw, SVP of technical operations at Etsy and co-chair of the O’Reilly Velocity Conference, argues that this “human error” approach is the equivalent of cutting off your nose to spite your face. He explains in a blog post that at Etsy, their approach it to “view mistakes, errors, slips, lapses, etc., with a perspective of learning.” To that end, Etsy practices “blameless postmortems” that focus more on the narrative of how something happened rather than who was behind it, and that remove punishment as an outcome of an investigation….” At the link right-click on the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Protein Sources 34 mins – “ Experts discuss innovations in food science and programming that are aimed at sustainably producing adequate protein for the global population. Population growth and changes in dietary practices globally have led to a tremendous rise in the demand for animal-source foods. While consuming the required amount of protein is fundamental to human health, supplying protein to meet increasing worldwide needs can lead to environmental and health problems. This podcast is brought to you by the Sackler Institute for Nutrition Science.” At the link find the title, “The Problem with Protein,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Resverotrol 45 mins – “A few years ago, Resveratrol—a compound found in red wine and dark chocolate, among other foods—made a splash in the news as an anti-aging wonder and was soon after seized upon by marketers. But the truth is that research is still in its early stages. Dr. Joseph Baur leads us through the science behind the hype.” At the link find the title, “Getting Behind the Resveratrol Hype,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salt Seasoning 30 mins – “Salt is one of the most important and versatile ingredients in foods around the world. We like it, we need it, but are we getting too much of it these days? Get the big picture on this unique compound in episode six of our nutrition series.” At the link find the title, “Rock Steady,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sugar Overview 39 mins – “The battle of wills to resist the last cupcake isn’t the only one being waged over sugar. In fact, sugar—or fructose to be more precise—is one of the most hotly contested subjects in the world of nutrition. Find out why in the fifth edition of our nutrition series.” At the link find the title, “Sugar in the morning,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Unseen 28 mins – “The prolific British science writer Philip Ball discusses his latest book Invisible: The Dangerous Allure of the Unseen: This week on the podcast the Guardian’s Pascal Wyse meets science writer Philip Ball to delve into the role of the unseen in the evolution of science and culture. Throughout history, the world of the unseen has been fertile ground for both the ignorant and the enlightened. Ball’s book Invisible: The Dangerous Allure of the Unseen is an exhaustive exploration of invisibility, from Plato’s ideas about the “ether”, via dark energy and matter to “invisibility cloaks” made from nano-materials.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Xanadu Project 49 mins – “Ted Nelson is a pioneer of information technology, philosopher, and sociologist. He is the founder of Project Xanadu and coined the terms “hypertext” and “hypermedia.’” More details are in this Wired article and wiki about Nelson. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

==============================================================                                                                     ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , added to weekly, and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is there too,  and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 180 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 145 – 22 August 2014: Afghanistan Water, Air Transport Auxilliary, Biofuel from Watewater, Black Smoke Jumpers, Blind Exercise, Body Language, Brain Initiative – Connecting Dots, Broadband Management, Building Relationships, Cancer Research, Car Trends, Creative Collaboration, Detroit Water, Disease Spillover, Drones, Ebola, Edmond Morris, Ex-con Makes Good, Experiments Online, Fireflies, Food Waste Solutions, Fracking Is Bad, Hundred Dollar Bills, Iranian Wins Fields Medal, Ketogenic Diet, Law, LinkedIn, Lock Picking, Medical Trends with Craig Venter, Medicare Funding, Migraine Miracle, Muppet Show, Navigation trends, Nicholas Negroponte, Nixon Tapes, Open Access Journals, Organize Like a Chef, Pandora, PSA Controversy, Ralph Nader, Reggae and Jamaica, Regulations, Retirement Investing, Robin Williams, Robotics Overview, Save a Million, Scorched Earth Commerce, Scottish Independence, Slot Machine Design, Social Media Impact, Somalia President, Sonar Linux, Sounds of Sport, University of the People, Visible Microphone, Voting Rights, Warrior Cops, Wastewater Useage

The following audio files come from a larger group of 209 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 61 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Afghanistan Water 50 mins – “The Helmand valley dam complex, is the biggest engineering project in Afghanistan. How has it withstood the Soviet invasion and the conflict that began in 2001? “ At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Damming Afghanistan: Lost Stories from Helmand ‘” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140812-1051a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Air Transport Auxiliary 4 mins – “Lettice Curtis was just one of a whole group of British WW-II heroes. We choose her, simply as an exemplar. She was born in Devon, in 1915; but was a very 21st-century woman. She studied math at Oxford. She also captained the women’s tennis and fencing teams there. She took up flying in 1937 and did aerial ordnance survey work for two years. Then war: Curtis was among the first women to join the Air Transport Auxiliary – the ATA. We read volumes about combat pilots. But each of their planes had to be shipped from plants or depots, then moved about to be armed, modified, repaired. The ATA moved a third of a million airplanes – 130 different types – around the country, or flew them in from outside – all while England was under attack.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biofuel from Wastewater 30 mins – “When life gives you lemons they say to make lemonade. And what if life gives you sewage released into an enclosed bay, what can you make? Certainly not lemonade, right? Our guest today on Sea Change Radio is NASA scientist and UC Santa Cruz professor, Jonathan Trent. He has figured out how to use algae to turn wastewater pollution into biofuel. This ambitious project, called Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (or OMEGA) not only places algae where it can consume waste and excrete oils for fuel, it also creates spaces for low-impact aquaculture, captures CO2, and cleans pollutants out of bays.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Smoke Jumpers 4 mins – “Ask anyone about black Americans in WW-II, and you hear about the Tuskegee Airmen, those courageous fighter pilots who guarded American bombers so well, late in the war. The story of another unit of black soldiers is far less well known because they functioned in secrecy. Their story began in 1944, when the Army agreed to form the 555th Airborne Battalion, a unit of black paratroopers….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Exercise 20 mins – “Peter White is joined by opera singer Denise Leigh and Cindy Godfrey Mckay to offer advice and share their experiences of dieting and losing weight. They tackle some of the problems connected to controlling your weight without sight and offer advice to listener Matthew Johnson. “ At the link, for a few weeks only, find the title, “InTouch 12 Aug 14: Weight Control,” right-click “Download 9MB” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Body Language 53 mins – “Joe is quite literally a human lie detector. Having spent over 25 years as a counterintelligence officer with the FBI, Joe has mastered the art of reading non-verbal communication in order to catch spies, convict felons, and thwart terrorist attacks. In this episode we will learn what to look for in a liar, which body parts “give away the secret”, and how you can use your body language to get people to like you, hire you, and trust you. Joe is the author of What Every BODY is Saying: An Ex-FBI Agent’s Guide to Speed-Reading People.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Initiative – Connecting Dots 84 mins – “The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative is part of a new Presidential focus aimed at revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain… Long desired by researchers seeking new ways to treat, cure, and even prevent brain disorders, this picture will fill major gaps in our current knowledge and provide unprecedented opportunities for exploring exactly how the brain enables the human body to record, process, utilize, store, and retrieve vast quantities of information, all at the speed of thought.” [from the NIH site] At the link you can download the video file in several formats by right-clicking the version and selecting “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. A copy of the audio part is included in the blog archive, but illustrations in the video should be seen, too.

Broadband Management 21 mins – “Hunter Newby is back for his second appearance on Community Broadband Bits to discuss his thoughts on carrier neutral approaches to spur our economy with more investment in better networks. We just talked with Hunter in episode 104 on carrier neutral approaches to middle mile networks. Now we discuss these types of approaches within communities – how to spur more competition without the owner of the infrastructure actually offering services directly. This has been a challenge historically, but we continue to see signs that this approach can be viable in the future. Hunter Newby is the CEO and founder of Allied Fiber.” At the link right-click “…download this MP3 directly…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Building Relationships 56 mins – “On Marketing Mavericks we talk to C-Suite host Jeffrey Hayzlett, Findly CEO Jeff Russakow, Nimble CEO Jon Ferrara, and The BeanCast host Bob Knorpp about Comcast’s PR crisis that keeps getting bigger, cultivating a relationship with your customers, and building a personal brand.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Research 5 mins – “Cancer care is rapidly changing, if we think about where it was some years ago as it was really beautifully archived in a book by Sid Mukherjee, MD, The Emperor of All Maladies, and to where we can go in the future. Just launched recently, for example, was MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Moon Shots program in cancer care. The Moon Shots program is perhaps, because of genomics, digitizing the genome of the tumor, comparing it with the genome-native germ line. This gives us an opportunity we never had before.So what is the cancer clinic of the future going to look like, because it’s just starting to get developed today?” At the link find the title, “Topol on the Cancer Clinic of the Future,” right-click “780424.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Trends 51 mins – “New car sales in the U.S. are at their highest level in eight years, but technology is changing Americans’ relationship with automobiles. Diane and her [3] guests discuss the latest trends in driving and car-buying.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Creative Collaboration 12 mins – “Is the stereotypical lone genius just a myth? There would be no Beatles without Lennon and McCartney, no Google without Page and Brin, no Apple without Jobs and Wozniak.” At the link find the title, “For Creativity, Two is Better Than One,” right-click “IHUB-081614-B.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Detroit Water 19 mins – “Thousands of people in Detroit haven’t paid their water bills. Even some businesses have skipped payment. Today on the show, how a bankrupt city is dealing with the most basic of problems — how to get people to pay their bills.” At the link find the title, “#559: Detroit’s Water Bill,” right-click “npr_339000392.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disease Spillover 51 mins – “Two Americans contracted Ebola while working in Liberia, and while experts say the chances of a US outbreak are very small, it’s got a lot of people thinking about the deadly virus. Ebola is a “spillover” a disease that originated in animals and moved to humans. It’s the kind of disease science writer David Quammen traveled the world studying. Doug spoke with him a few years ago, and Friday, we’re rebroadcasting that conversation. It’s about the science, history and human impact of “Spillover.’” At the link right-click “Listen and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Regulation 4 mins – “It’s getting easier for the average civilian to own drones. The word may bring to mind million-dollar jets that carry bombs, but a drone is any aircraft that doesn’t have passengers or a pilot onboard. Some look like sophisticated remote-control helicopters and model airplanes. They’re available online and in stores, some for less than $100. But whether and where owners are allowed to fly those drones falls in a legal gray area….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola 115 mins – “Hosts Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler…present an all-ebolavirus episode, tackling virology, epidemiology, and approaches to prevention and cure that are in the pipeline.” They also address the issue of hazards of research and make favorable mention of a novel, Fever, about Typhoid Mary.  At the link right-click “TWIV 297″ beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Reactions 27 mins – “ Claudia Hammond questions the effectiveness of both national and international responses to West Africa’s Ebola outbreak.” At the link find the title, “HealthC: Ebola Who’s to blame?,” right-click “Media files healthc_20140813-2034a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Treatment 51 mins – “Nearly a thousand people have died from Ebola since the latest outbreak of the virus began. Last week the World Health Organization declared an international public health emergency. Two Americans who contracted Ebola while working in Africa were flown back to the U.S. under tight security and given an experimental drug. Their health improved. But doctors do not yet know if the drug – called ZMapp – had any effect. The treatment of two white Americans when hundreds of Africans are fighting for their lives has spurred intense debate. Diane and [3] guests give an update on the epidemic and discuss the ethics of experimental drugs to treat Ebola.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Edmund Morris 59 mins – “Edmund Morris talked about his book, This Living Hand: And Other Essays, his forthcoming book on Thomas Edison and his career as a biographer of presidents and other notable historical figures. He also spoke about his experiences at White House get togethers with historians and presidents, his influences, and his approach to writing and choosing his subjects. Mr. Morris was born and educated in South Africa. In addition to This Living Hand, he has written books on Theodore Roosevelt, Ronald Reagan, and Beethoven.” Download costs$.99, but a copy of the audio file is in the blog archive.

Ex-con Makes Good 12 mins- “In 1991, Shaka Senghor shot and killed a man. He was, he says, “a drug dealer with a quick temper and a semi-automatic pistol.” Jailed for second degree murder, that could very well have been the end of the story. But it wasn’t. Instead, it was the beginning of a years-long journey to redemption, one with humbling and sobering lessons for us all.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Experiments Online 15 mins – “This week, dating site OK Cupid put up a blog post describing experiments it conducted on its users. In one experiment, the site told users who were bad matches for one another that they were actually good matches, and vice versa. Alex and PJ talk to OK Cupid President and co-founder Christian Rudder about the ubiquity of online user experimentation and his defense of potentially sending OK Cupid’s users on bad dates.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fireflies 14 mins – “Biologist Sara Lewis has spent the past 20 years getting to the bottom of the magic and wonder of fireflies. In this charming talk, she tells us how and why the beetles produce their silent sparks, what happens when two fireflies have sex, and why one group of females is known as the firefly vampire.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Waste Solutions 17 mins – “Designer Josh Treuhaft discusses the issue of food waste and his creative approach to combating the problem.” At the link find thet title, “Fighting Food Waste with Creativity,” right-click “Media files FightingFoodWaste.MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking Is Bad 60 mins – “…On the show this week we talked to Cornell University engineering professor Anthony Ingraffea about the science behind fracking—and had him explain why, nowadays, the scientific argument against fracking is more extensive. It involves not simply groundwater contamination, but also earthquake generation and the accidental emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas.” [Methane gas release associated with fracking and natural gas exceeds any carbon offset compared with other fossil fuels.] At the link click “Download,” then “OK” on the pop-up menu to save the file.

Hundred Dollar Bills 17 mins – “The 100 dollar bill is the most popular product from the Federal Reserve. Eighty percent of all U.S. cash is in the form of 100 dollar bills, but you rarely see them. About twenty years ago, the Fed counted up all the hundreds it knew about — money in bank vaults and cash registers — and it found it had no idea where most of the hundred dollar bills had gone. And so they went on a mission to find them. Today on the show, where in the world are all the 100 dollar bills? What is Benjamin Franklin being used for? And if we don’t know where they all are, should the U.S. keep making them?” At the link find the title, “#560: Hunting For The Hundreds,” right-click “npr_340217911.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iranian Wins Fields Medal 5 mins – “Iranian woman Maryam Mirzakhani is the first woman to win the Fields Medal, known as the Nobel Prize of mathematics, in recognition of her contributions to the understanding of the symmetry of curved surfaces. The Prize was established in 1936. Maryam Mirzakhani, a professor of mathematics at Stanford University in California.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ketogenic Diet 102 mins – “On this episode of Latest in Paleo, Jimmy Moore and I discuss the ketogenic diet described in his new book, Keto Clarity, co-authored with Dr. Eric Westman. Jimmy tells the story of his public testimony regarding the American Dietary Guidelines, and he addresses some of my reservations regarding long-term ketosis. The After the Bell segment [30 mins] features Dr. Stephen Phinney.” At the link right-click “MP3 audio” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Law 65 mins – “Barry Weingast, professor of political science at Stanford University and senior fellow at Stanford’s Hoover Institution, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the nature of law. Weingast takes issue with some of the standard views of law, and proposes a better way to understand law. The two discuss the fundamental principles of law, how it can emerge in a decentralized way to resolve disputes over property and other commercial and social interactions. Examples include Iceland, Ancient Greece, and California during the gold rush. Also considered are how laws coordinate expectations and the way that social pressure can be used to enforce law in a decentralized fashion.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

LinkedIn 44 mins – In the first half of the program (20 mins) “Sarah & guest host Tonya Hall chat with Chuck Hester, host of LinkedConversations and social media marketing manager,….” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lock Picking 29 mins – The ThisWeekInTech Coding 101 operators cover several topics discovered at the annual computer security conference, including “Lock Picking: * Both Snubs and Padre are fans of the Lockpicking tools from ToooL (The Open Organization of Lockpickers). You can buy the tools, practice locks and support equipment from ToooL, and feel good about supporting a grassroots organization dedicated to teaching the next generation about physical security.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow.

Medical Trends with Craig Venter 22 mins – “…I’m Dr. Eric Topol, Editor-in-Chief of Medscape. I’m really thrilled to have with me Dr. Craig Venter [founder and CEO of the J. Craig Venter Institute and Synthetic Genomics Inc.]. We’re going to be discussing genomics in medicine and all sorts of things….” At the link you can watch the interview, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the blog archive.

Medicare Funding 14 mins – “Charles Blahous discusses Medicare with Larry Kudlow on the John Batchelor Show. At the link right-click “Download the MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migraine Miracle 24 mins – “…(starts at 14:28) One of the most painful conditions to suffer through is a migraine headache… Dr. Turknett used to get 60 migraines a year – on average, that’s over one a week… For Turknett, his whole life changed dramatically when he made a basic lifestyle change that he believes many neurologists and migraine sufferers overlook. In his own case, his change meant that the number of migraines he suffers these days has gone from around 60 headaches a year, down to only two or three…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muppet Show 12 mins – “Jim Henson breathed new life into puppeteering by embracing technology and offering up a few of his own inventions.” At the link find the title, “Muppets, Money, and Jim Henson,” right-click “IHUB-081614-D.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Navigation Trends 51 mins – “Remember how we used to plan road trips? Get out the atlas, find the highways, roads and rural routes that would get us from Point A to Point B. And what happened if we got lost? Pull over to the side of the road and ask for directions. While reading maps is a skill some of us love and others of us loathe there is no doubt today it’s being replaced by digital technology. Google Maps in our cars and on our phones not only makes it easier than ever to get around. It also allows us to find a restaurant at the last minute or avoid a traffic jam. This has some wondering: is it still possible to be lost? Diane and her [4] guests discuss the art of getting lost.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Nicholas Negroponte 20 mins – “MIT Media Lab founder Nicholas Negroponte takes you on a journey through the last 30 years of tech. The consummate predictor highlights interfaces and innovations he foresaw in the 1970s and 1980s that were scoffed at then but are ubiquitous today. And he leaves you with one last (absurd? brilliant?) prediction for the coming 30 years.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nixon Tapes 58 mins – “John Dean talked about his book, The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It, in which he looks at the Watergate scandal through the lens of audio recordings of President NIxon. He spoke with Bob Woodward of the Washington Post.” Download costs$.99, but a copy of the audio file is in the blog archive.

Open Access Journals 31 mins – “Today, 85% of scientific articles are not published in open access journals. This means that unless you are part of an institution that subscribes to the journal you’re interested in, you’ll have to pay for the research studies you want to read. Our guests today, Dr. Patrick Brown and Dr. Michael Eisen, are part of a movement to promote free access to scientific literature. The two professors are co-founders of the Public Library of Science, which is a collection of open access journals. On this episode, we’ll talk about the state of the publishing system, the shift towards open access, and the story of PLoS.”  At the link right-click “Listen to episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Organize Like a Chef 7 mins – “…Perhaps the principles of culinary organization can be extended to help even those of us who aren’t top chefs. The system that makes kitchens go is called mise-en-place, or, literally, “put in place.” It’s a French phrase that means to gather and arrange the ingredients and tools needed for cooking….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pandora 29 mins – “Chris Harrison, vice president for business practices for Pandora, talked about the Internet music service and legislation pertaining to music licensing. The company had appealed to Congress to update copyright laws that affect radio, the Internet, musicians, songwriters, publishers, and record labels.” Download costs$.99, but a copy of the audio file is in the blog archive.

PSA Controversy 28 mins – “In this edition of Medscape One-on-One, host and Medscape Editor-in-Chief Eric J. Topol, MD, interviews Richard J. Ablin, PhD, DSc (Hon), who first discovered prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in 1970. At the time, Dr. Ablin and colleagues were trying to identify an antigen that was specific to prostate cancer. What Dr. Ablin identified instead was that PSA was present not only in malignant prostates but also in benign prostates. He did agree, however, that elevated levels of PSA might be useful in predicting a recurrence of prostate cancer in men who were thought to be in remission. It was much to Dr. Ablin’s dismay that more than 2 decades later, in the mid-1990s, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of PSA not only to test for recurrence of cancer, but also as a possible predictor of cancer. Since then, Dr. Ablin maintains, the United States spends billions each year administering a preventive prostate cancer screening test to men, using PSA, that produces false positives in the majority of cases. In his interview with Dr. Topol, Dr. Ablin explains why physicians and patients should proceed with caution when using PSA as a marker for preventive screening.”[transcript link here] At the link find the title, “PSA Discoverer Says Antigen Test Is Misused, Unreliable,” right-click “828854.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ralph Nader 60 mins – “Ralph Nader talked about his book, Unstoppable: The Emerging Left-Right Alliance to Dismantle the Corporate State, in which he calls for an alliance between progressives, conservatives, and libertarians to take on issues like corporate bailouts, Pentagon spending, and civil liberties. During this event held at the Cato Institute, commentary was provided by Daniel McCarthy, editor of The American Conservative, and Tim Carney, columnist for the Washington Examiner.” Download costs$.99, but a copy of the audio file is in the blog archive.

Reggae and Jamaica 54 mins (2 parts) – “How Rastafari turned from an ostracised religious sect into a global phenomenon – and its role in replacing the shackles of colonial rule with a forgotten African identity. Rastafari’s global impact after the explosion of Jamaica’s Roots Reggae scene in the 1970s. Does this spiritual and cultural movement still have relevance today?” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Roots Reggae and Rebellion Part One ,” and DocArchive: Roots Reggae and Rebellion Part Two,” then right-click “Media files docarchive 20140813-1042a.mp3 “ for Part 1 and “Media files docarchive 0140820-0905a.mp3 “ for Part 2 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Regulations 25 mins – “In this episode, Patrick McLaughlin joins Mike Leland to discuss his new project, RegData, and how it can help measure the impact of regulations, like occupational licensing and those Uber and Lyft are confronting, in states” At the link right-click “Download the MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Retirement Investing 48 mins – “Ken Roberts’ Bulls and Bears – A Radio Interview with Paul Merriman: Paul discusses a wide range of investment topics, why and how investors fail and succeed and offers his sound investing advice. We recommend you skip through the radio show ads and enjoy Paul’s interview.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robin Williams 47 mins – “Social media blew up last night with the news of Robin Williams’ death, by apparent suicide at his California home. There was sorrow, gratitude, memories of manic joy and genius, great lines tweeted by the thousand. Robin Williams meant a lot to people. For his brilliant, frenetic comedy. For dramatic roles that generations now quote for life advice. For an honesty that spared nothing but somehow felt like love. We knew he had demons. He told us. We didn’t want them to win. This hour On Point: Remembering the great Robin Williams.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robotics Overview 51 mins – “A special theme hour – starring a computer competing against a comedian for laughs, the Army’s recruitment chatbot, and Google crushing on robots.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Save a Million 17 mins -“Of all the U.S. currency in the world, nearly 80 percent is in $100 bills. That’s about a trillion dollars. Some people want to get rid of the bill altogether. Ken Rogoff, an economist at Harvard University, says the $100 bill helps criminals: “Think about countries like Mexico, Colombia, where they’re really at war with the drug money, where the United States is not only buying the drugs but it’s providing this resource that very much helps the drug dealers.” Richard Stratton is a former drug smuggler who benefited from the $100 bill. In one deal, Stratton brought 15,000 pounds of hashish into the U.S. But the $50 million deal left Stratton with a problem: He had to get all that cash out of the country and into his bank accounts in the Cayman Islands. Hundreds made the job easier….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scorched Earth Commerce 4 mins – “Hudson’s Bay Company is the oldest corporation in North America. But this fur empire didn’t get that way by being warm and fuzzy with the employees or their four-legged quarry. In 1819 the company was exploring the vast volcanic tablelands of what is now SW Idaho. They sent three of their trappers into the headwaters of a large river. The three were Sandwich Islanders—native Hawaiians. They vanished and were never seen again….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scottish Independence 51 mins “The stakes for next month’s Scottish independence referendum are high. If Scotland’s four million voters decide to leave the United Kingdom, it would dissolve a 300-year-old political union. It would also put the country in uncharted economic, political and strategic waters. Those in favor of independence say Scotland’s right to self rule is long overdue and that autonomy is key to a thriving economy and better social policies. Many voting “no” say Scotland is more secure within the U.K. but want greater financial and legal authority for the Scottish parliament. Diane and her [4] guests discuss what’s at stake in the Scottish vote for independence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Slot Machine Design 14 mins – “The gambling industry has made serious money by manipulating the science of human behavior, according to Natasha Dow Schull, a cultural anthropologist at MIT.” At the link find the title, “Gambling’s Innovations,” right-click “IHUB-081614-A.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Impact 51 mins – “A revolution in technology has connected us online more than ever before: Nearly 60 percent of Americans now have a Facebook account. Digital connections have replaced informal interaction with neighbors and acquaintances. And a quarter of Americans say they have no best friend to confide in. Some caution the decline in face-to-face interactions has led to polarization and congressional gridlock, while others argue that digital connections provide invaluable connections with far-flung family and friends. Diane and [3] guests discuss how virtual relationships affect real life connections and building community. “ At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Somalia President 83 mins – “Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud talked about the challenges facing democracy in his nation. President Mohamud said he would not call groups like al-Shabaab and the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), also known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), jihadists or Islamists, but instead extremists, comparing them to the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and the World War II kamikaze pilots of Japan.” Download costs$.99, but a copy of the audio file is in the blog archive.

Sonar Linux 35 mins – “Jonathan Nadeau announces and discusses the release of Sonar 2014.1 on our podcast. Sonar has moved from being based off of Ubuntu to now being based off of Manjaro Linux and this is the first release using Manjaro as it’s base. Toward the end of the interview, Jonathan mentions a new Sonar flavor. Raspberry! Now Sonar will always have the latest and greatest in assistive technology for it’s users. Sonar uses Gnome as it’s default desktop but we will be releasing a Mate version in a few. weeks. Sonar has been working very close with the Mate team and they had done a lot of work to assure the accessibility of the Mate desktop. They hope to have a Mate release in a few weeks.” At the link find the title, “Going Linux #252 • Sonar Gnu/Linux,” right-click “ Media files glp252.mp3“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sounds of Sport 62 mins – “Way back in October 2011 (see episode #38, true believers!), we broadcast a short excerpt of a radio documentary produced by Peregrine Andrews about faking the sounds of sports on TV broadcasts. It was one of our most popular and provocative programs ever, primarily because people were shocked that any aspect of a sporting event might be faked. Since then, I’ve received several requests from the audience asking where they can hear the full-length documentary. Well today, my friends, you are in luck.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

University of the People 11 mins “At the online University of the People, anyone with a high school diploma can take classes toward a degree in business administration or computer science — without standard tuition fees (though exams cost money). Founder Shai Reshef hopes that higher education is changing “from being a privilege for the few to a basic right, affordable and accessible for all.’” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Visible Microphone 29 mins – The first seven minutes covers the description of sound reconstructed from video vibrations by Ian Woolf. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Rights 51 mins – “Section Five of the Voting Rights Act required states with a history of discrimination to get ‘pre-clearance’ from the government before changing voting laws. Last year, the Supreme Court struck down key provisions of the Act, including Section Five. Since then, 22 states have passed laws restricting voting rights. Some are requiring photo IDs or proof of citizenship. Others are cutting back on early voting days or eliminating polling places. And last week, a federal judge rejected a challenge to North Carolina’s new voting laws, widely considered the most restrictive in the nation. An update on voting rights around the country and calls for congressional action.” [4 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Warrior Cops 50 mins – “Investigative journalist Radley Balko [Rise of the Warrior Cop:…]says that American police forces have become more like armies than keepers of the peace. He traces it back to the creation of SWAT teams in the 60s, which led to increased use of military tactics and weapons. These days, there are some 50,000 raids each year as part of “wars” declared on drugs and crime. Balko joins Doug to talk about how law enforcement has changed throughout history and what militarized police forces mean for citizens.” At the link right-click “Listen and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wastewater Usage 24 mins – “Endocrine Disruptors and Drinking Water (starts at 3:12) Today we continue our series called The Ocean is Us, which explores our vital connection to the oceans. Alan Vajda, an environmental endocrinologist at the University of Colorado Denver, talks with How On Earth’s Susan Moran about a rare success story: why fish in Boulder Creek are acting and looking more sexually normal. We also explore broader water-quality issues in Colorado and beyond, and the implications for human health. For more information on studies conducted by CU and USGS scientists on endocrine disruptors related to Boulder Creek, South Platte River and elsewhere, visit BASIN….” At the link right-click “Download” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3600 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , added to weekly, and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is there too,  and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 180 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

 

 

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Media Mining Digest 144 – 15 August 2014: Afghanistan Saur Revolution, Amazon Glacier, Animal CSI, Argentine Grandmothers, Bats in Australia, Blind WWI Vets, Broadband and State Law, Building Things, Bundy Range War, Chickengunya, Colorectal Cancer Screening, Columbia’s Lost Children, Coral Reefs, Corporate Inversions, Crimea, Drought in California, Earned Income Tax, Ebola Hearing, Finding Our Way, Foldscope, Genius Grants, Hacking Happiness, Hepititus E,Innovation Process, Job Loss Moves, LinkedIn, Market Basket Demonstrations, McDonald Employees, Mentoring, Mexico Journalism, Neuromorphic Chips, Newburgh Sting, Online Education Debate, Online Learning Equality, Paris in WWII, Part-time Work Trends, Password Research, Police State U.S.A., Programming Vocation, Prostate Screening, Rare Earths, Renaissance Engineer, Slavery Impact, Solar Outshines Coal, Supreme Court Panel, Tipping, Water History in the U.S., Watergate Legacy, World Trade Center Bldg 7

The following audio files come from a larger group of 243 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 49 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Afghanistan Saur Revolution – 1978  20 mins – “David Loyn investigates how a lost document is helping Afghanistan come to terms with its painful past. A war crimes trial in the Netherlands has unearthed a list of 5,000 prisoners detained, tortured and killed by the radical communist regime that ran the country in 1978-79 – a “death list” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Afghanistan’s Death Lists,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20140806-1436a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazon Glacier  38 mins – Talk about this runs from 11 to 23 mins of this elpisode of KnowHow: “Amazon Glacier is one of the services sold within the “Amazon Web Services” family. It’s not like some of the other cloud-storage services (like Dropbox, OneDrive) because it’s NOT designed to be a fast and easy way to sync your files with multiple devices and the cloud. Amazon Glacier is designed to be ARCHIVE storage in the cloud. It’s SLOW; It’s NOT web accessible; It’s NOT designed for syncing across multiple devices; It’s NOT designed for continuous downloads. What is DOES offer is: — a TREMENDOUS amount of online storage for LITERALLY a penny a Gigabyte….” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow.

Animal CSI 5 mins – “At the International Mail Facility at New York’s John F. Kennedy airport, an inspector for this US Fish and Wildlife Service opens a box that’s been flagged as suspicious, reaches inside and pulls out a zebra skin rug….The telltale pattern of the stripes shows that it was a common Burchell’s zebra, rather than a protected species, such as the Hartmann’s zebra. For trickier ID questions though, the inspectors often pack up suspicious samples of animals or plant material and ship them across the country to a facility in the hills of southern Oregon — the Fish and Wildlife Service’s Forensics Lab. It’s basically a CSI unit for wildlife crime. And it’s the only one in the world.” At the link right-click the down-pointing pointing arrow at the right end of the pop-up menu.

Argentina Grandmothers 5 mins – “In 1984, geneticist Dr. Mary-Claire King began working with the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo, an organization that searches for the hundreds of babies stolen by Argentina’s military dictatorship during the country’s “Dirty War.’” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bats in Australia 62 mins – “Vincent visits the Australian Animal Health Laboratory in Geelong, Australia and speaks with Linfa about his work on bats and bat viruses.” At the link right-click “WIV 297 beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind WWI Vets – 20 mins “Dr Fred Reid joins Peter White to reflect on changes to blind and partially-sighted people’s lives since the start of World War I. Tom Walker talks to Blind Veterans UK archivist Robert Baker about the history of the charity and to ex-serviceman Joe Cousineau on how the charity has helped to rehabilitate him.” At the link, for a limited time, find the title, “Changes to blind people’s lives since WWI; Blind Veterans,” right-click “Download 9MB” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband and State Law 25 mins – “Given the exciting development of the FCC opening comment on petitions from Wilson, NC and Chattanooga, TN to restore local authority to their states, Lisa and I decided to take over this week’s podcast of Community Broadband Bits. We talk about the petitions, some background, and interview Will Aycock from Wilson’s Greenlight Gigabit Network and Danna Bailey from Chattanooga’s EPB Fiber network. We finish with some instructions on how you can comment on the record. The Coalition for Local Internet Choice also has commenting instructions and some sample comments.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Building Things 51 mins – “We’re looking at how to build something that lasts. First, those brightly colored blocks that we all played with — and some of us still do. Wharton professor David Robertson explains how Lego, the company, went wrong when they tried to innovate the same way as everyone else. Then, Daniel Brook, author of “A History of Future Cities,” describes the great cities of the past and what the super cities of the 21st century can learn from them. Plus, if today’s elementary school kids are going to be the engineers of tomorrow, they need better building blocks.” At the link find the title, “7.26.14 – The Whole building Show,” right-click “IHUB-072614-FullShow.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bundy Range War 52 mins – “Over the weekend, rancher Cliven Bundy told a political gathering in St. George that God instructed him to “disarm” federal law enforcement agents when they tried to confiscate his cattle in April. We’re talking with Bundy on Wednesday about his controversial actions and about how his Mormon faith and heritage inform his political views. The journalist Scott Carrier will also join us to examine where Bundy and his self-styled freedom-fighter compatriots fit on the spectrum of political dissent.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chikungunya 4 mins – “But the chikungunya virus can cause such extreme joint pain that you can’t even sit up for weeks. There’s no cure or vaccine. And now the disease has established a beachhead in the United States. This month, health authorities in Florida identified what they say are the first two cases of the nasty disease that were clearly acquired in the US. Chikungunya is transmitted by mosquitoes and has been slowly expanding around the tropics and subtropics from southern Africa over the past 50 years or so. It began knocking on the door of the US late last year when it caused a major outbreak in the Caribbean. Hundreds of cases have been spotted in the US but until this summer all of those had been contracted outside the country.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Colorectal Cancer Screening 25mins – ”Two related studies in the August issue of Gastroeneterology discuss factors that could affect colorectal cancer screening strategies, including age, sex, race, ethnicity, and whether or not repeat colonoscopy is advisable within ten years.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Columbia’s Lost Children 18 mins – “In Colombia’s Marxist guerrilla war, thousands of rebel fighters have been female. When they got pregnant, they were forced to have abortions or give their babies up. Now, many of these rebel mothers have demobilised and are desperate to find their children.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Colombia’s Lost Children,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140805-0400a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coral Reefs 51 mins – “A new report says most Caribbean coral reefs may disappear in the next 20 years. Climate change has long been thought to be the main offender in the alarming rate of coral degradation. But this latest study says over-fishing and pollution are the key culprits, killing off vital grazers like parrot fish and sea urchins. Some scientists say this is good news: there is a clear path to removing these local stressors, including tighter fishing regulations. But others warn that destructive coral bleaching due to rising water temperatures remains a major concern. For this month’s Environmental Outlook: the health and future of our coral reefs.” [4 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Corporate Inversions 51 mins – “A growing number of American companies are re-incorporating overseas for lower tax rates. But critics say it’s a loophole that ends up costing taxpayers. Join us for debate over IRS rules for U.S. companies.” [4 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Crimea  20 mins – “-As Ukrainian holidaymakers stay away from Crimea’s beaches following Russia’s annexation of the peninsula, Lucy Ash meets the Russians who are reclaiming their bit of paradise.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Crimea: Paradise Regained,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140807-0330a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drought in California 48 mins – “They are praying for rain in California. And facing drought. A drought emergency, Governor Jerry Brown declared last week. Worst in years. Winter weather so warm you’ve got a confused bear wandering through skiers on the slopes last week. So dry that farmers are thinning herds and letting fields go fallow. Wondering which crops to lose. Up in the Sierra Nevada, only 20 percent of the normal snow pack. Less to melt, less to drink. It’s just dry. This hour On Point: fire, food, climate and the drought emergency in California.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Earned Income Tax 19 mins – “In 2012, a federal program took about $60 billion from wealthier Americans and gave it to millions of working poor. This program — a massive redistribution of wealth — has been embraced by every president from Ronald Reagan to Barack Obama. On today’s show, we look at a huge, often overlooked, surprisingly interesting corner of the tax code: The Earned Income Tax Credit.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Hearing 148 mins – “Witnesses testified at a House Foreign Affairs subcommittee hearing on the threat of the ebola virus. Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said the ebola outbreak in West Africa could be stopped but would take time and meticulous attention to detail. Dr. Frieden also said he was confident there would be no large outbreak in the U.S. The subcommittee also heard from representatives of two missionary groups working in Africa, Ken Issacs of Samaritan’s Purse and Dr. Frank Glover of Serving in Mission (SIM).” At the link you can listen or purchase the podcast for $.99, but a copy is included in the blog archive.

Evolution and Sculpting 52 mins – “Tuesday, Utah Valley University geneticist and artist Daniel Fairbanks is our guest. Fairbanks has written extensively on how humans have evolved over time. But his most recent book also demonstrates why it matters. Fairbanks says that evolution has impacted our environment, our food production, and even our health. He joins Doug to talk about how understanding evolution can help us make better choices for our future. We’ll also talk about his work as a sculptor, and how art helps him explore science.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Finding Our Way 17 mins – “As humans have developed cities and built environments, we have also needed to develop ways to find our way through them. Signage goes back at least as far as the Roman Empire where they constructed “milestones” along their roadways. Today, signage and other queues to help you find your way come from the field of environmental graphic design, or “wayfinding.” Chances are that any signs in an airport, in a hospital, or on a freeway, were created by professional wayfinders.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foldscope 4 mins- “Origami may soon start saving lives. That’s the hope of Stanford professor Manu Prakash, who created Foldscope – a foldable paper microscope. He says it will help healthcare workers who need to quickly diagnose diseases like malaria. And it could be a low-cost, high-payoff tool for curious students around the world.” At the link find the title, “Your 1 Dollar Origami Microscope,” right-click “IHUB-0080914-E.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genius Grants 12 mins – “Lavishing money on cool projects isn’t just for billionaires – or millionaires – any more. We look at how the Awesome Foundation has grown so quickly by offering “micro-genius grants for flashes of micro-brilliance.” We’re joined by Christina Xu, chancellor of the Institute on Higher Awesome Studies.” At the link find the title, “Giving Money Away – Step Aside, Bill Gates,” right-click “IHUB-080914-D.mp3“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hacking Happiness 29 mins – “John Havens talked by video link from New York City about his book, Hacking H(app)iness: Why Your Personal Data Counts and How Tracking It Can Change the World. Topics included how personal data was being tracked, what data brokers do, and how individuals could take back control of some of this data.” At the link you can listen or purchase the podcast for $.99, but a copy is included in the blog archive.

Hepatitis E 12 mins – “Richard Tedder discusses the prevalence and transmission of hepatitis E in blood donors and recipients in south-east England.” At the link find the title, “Listen to The Lancet: 28 July,” right-click “Media files 25july.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Process 2 mins – “Sometimes little bets are the ones that really pay off. Author Peter Sims talks about how surprisingly small moves have helped launch everything from Facebook to Pixar to the comedy routines of Chris Rock.” At the link find the title, “Small Ideas, Big Payoffs ,” right-click “IHUB-080914-B.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Loss Moves 17 mins – “Life transitions, from expanding families to job losses and promotions, can be financially stressful. Host Michel Martin speaks with money coaches about what to do when you are facing big changes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

LinkedIn 70 mins – “Reid Hoffman, co-founder of professional networking site LinkedIn, and Ben Casnocha, former Chief-of-Staff of LinkedIn, talk to EconTalk host Russ Roberts about LinkedIn and their book The Alliance. Hoffman and Casnocha discuss the founding and vision of LinkedIn along with their ideas in The Alliance on how to improve employee/employer relations when turnover is high and loyalty on each side is low.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Market Basket Demonstrations 47 mins – “It’s not easy standing up as a worker-friendly company in America these days. Set yourself up as a Costco or Southwest Airlines with good benefits and wages and a long-term outlook, and the cost-cutting Wall Street crowd will be on your case in a hurry. Right now, workers at an American grocery chain called Market Basket are going to the mat for a CEO they think has their best interests at heart. Risking their jobs for a worker and community-oriented corporate culture that goes against the grain. This hour, On Point: a story of American workers saying “enough.’” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

McDonald Employees 47 mins – “Since the first strikes hit New York City, fast-food workers have been saying that the big corporations that dominate their industry were ultimately responsible for their working conditions. In other words, it wasn’t a coincidence that McDonald’s employees from Chicago to St. Louis, Philadelphia to Seattle have the same low wages and complain of the same unfair labor practices. Now, the general counsel at the National Labor Relations Board has ruled that McDonald’s can be held responsible as a “joint employer” of those workers across the country alongside its franchisees.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mentoring 13 mins -”Freeman Hrabowski, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, talks about the importance of mentoring in academia, especially in science, technology, engineering and math fields.” At the link find the title, “When Searching For Mentors, Look ‘Beyond Race’,” right-click “Media files 20140730 tmm_mentoring_matters.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexico Journalists 7 mins – “ We have often turned to Alfredo Corchado to keep us up-to-date on our southern neighbor. He’s lived and worked in Mexico for some 20 years now. He is the bureau chief for the Dallas Morning News and author of the memoir Midnight in Mexico. Recently though, he’s been spending time at the Guatemala-Mexico border following the journey of would-be immigrants. He joins us now from Mexico.” At the link find the title, “Mexican Journalist Hopes His Reporting Can ‘Bridge The Gap’,” right-click “Media files 20140731 tmm alfredos notebook.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuromorphic Chips 12 mins – “Bob Service discusses the future of neuromorphic chips, processors modeled on the brain’s architecture.” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Newburgh Sting 52 mins – “ In 2009, four men from a poor New York town were arrested for trying to bomb a pair of synagogues. In the months leading up to their apprehension, the men were befriended by Shahed Hussain, an F.B.I. informant. The attorneys for the “Newburgh Four” thought they had a clear-cut case of entrapment, but the men received lengthy prison sentences. A new film dissects their story and sheds light on the F.B.I.’s pattern of targeting Muslims in depressed communities and luring them into committing terrorist acts. Filmmaker David Heilbroner joins us Monday to discuss his film. It’s called The Newburgh Sting.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online Education Debate 51 mins – “Online degree programs are proliferating – and many cost a fraction of the price of a traditional, on-campus degree. Massive Open Online Courses, known as MOOCS, are also catching on in the U.S. and around the world. In a society that conducts more and more work and play online, these online offerings seem to represent a natural progression of the higher education experience. Proponents point out that “college by Internet” is flexible and economical, and allows students to review material as needed. But skeptics are concerned that taking courses online is a pale substitute for real-world exchanges with instructors and peers inside a classroom. Two teams recently faced off on the motion, “More Clicks, Fewer Bricks: The Lecture Hall is Obsolete,” in an Oxford-style debate for Intelligence Squared U.S.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online Learning Inequality 74 mins – “How are inequality regimes challenged, or sometimes perpetuated, in online environments? In this talk Tressie McMillan Cottom — blogger, PhD candidate in the Sociology Department at Emory University, and PhD Intern at the Microsoft Research Network’s Social Media Collective — discusses inequality in online learning, based on qualitative research with students taking courses online at for-profit institutions.”At the link right click “MP3” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paris in WWII 51 mins – “Seventy years ago, Paris was liberated from German occupation. Unlike other major European cities during World War II, “The City of Light” was spared mass devastation. This was part of Hitler’s plan — he wanted to preserve the beautiful Paris for his own. But if the physical damage to the city was minimal, a new book by European studies professor Ronald Rosbottom says four years of occupation left subtle scars. As he put it, they were ones that were difficult to evaluate and easier for history to ignore. “When Paris Went Dark” explores daily interaction between Parisians and Germans and looks at the kind of questions the occupation raised for the French about why they didn’t do more to prevent it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Part-time Work Trends 51 mins – “The number of people working part-time who would rather work full-time is almost double what it was seven years ago at 7 million people. Despite signs of economic recovery, many businesses say they are still struggling and depend on part-time workers, especially those who work on-call. New federal data show that almost half of all part-time workers under age thirty-two work unpredictable hours, leaving them with reduced paychecks and scrambling for child-care. A discussion [4 guests] about the latest trends in part-time work and the push for new laws that protect employees.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Password Research 18 mins – “Lorrie Faith Cranor studied thousands of real passwords to figure out the surprising, very common mistakes that users — and secured sites — make to compromise security. And how, you may ask, did she study thousands of real passwords without compromising the security of any users? That’s a story in itself. It’s secret data worth knowing, especially if your password is 123456 … “ At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police State U.S.A. 58 mins – “Cheryl Chumley talked about her book, Police State U.S.A.: How Orwell’s Nightmare is Becoming Our Reality, in which she argues that the government’s desire to monitor and control the public is greater now than ever before. She spoke with former White House Chief Information Officer Theresa Payton.” At the link you can listen or purchase the podcast for $.99, but a copy is included in the blog archive.

Programming Vocation 46 mins – Hosts Fr. Robert Ballecer, SJ and Shannon Morse interview Raphael Mudge, the founder of Strategic Cyber, LLC, and developer of Armitage and Cobalt Strike — tools for red teams and penetration testers. Mudge explains how he became a programmer, his work history, and compares formal versus informal training values. He recommends Joel Spolsky’sJoel on Software”. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow.

Prostate Screening 13 mins – “Professor Fritz Schröder discusses the latest research on prostate cancer screening.” At the link find the title, “Listen to The Lancet: 7 August,” right-click “Media files 07august.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rare Earths 29 mins – “In a rebroadcast from September 12, 2010, Keith & Russ talk with William J. Evans, Professor of Physical Sciences, Dept of Chemistry, University of California-Irvine. Bill introduces us to lanthanides and how they can lead to better fertilizers, synthetic rubber, and even better sutures for surgeons.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Renaissance Engineer 74 mins – “Our conversation with Dr. Janusz Kozinski, Founding Dean of the Lassonde School of Engineering, covers the trials and tribulations of starting a new engineering school, as well as the the attributes and mindset of a “renaissance engineer.” Additionally, we learn a little bit about the skill sets that will be expected of tomorrow’s engineering professional.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery Impact 57 mins – “Chris Tomlinson talked about his book, Tomlinson Hill: The Remarkable Story of Two Families who Share the Tomlinson Name – One White, One Black, in which he explores his family’s slave-owning history and the part of Texas that carries the family name, Tomlinson Hill. While researching his book, he found a history of two families, one white and one black. The author is the descendant of the Tomlinson Hill’s former slave owners, and former NFL running back LaDainian Tomlinson is a descendant of the hill’s former slaves. Mr. Tomlinson argued that the history of both families demonstrates how the legacy of slavery still affects American society. He spoke with Lavar Tomlinson, LaDainian’s younger brother and event coordinator at Tomlinson Touching Lives Foundation.” At the link you can listen or purchase the podcast for $.99, but a copy is included in the blog archive.

Solar Outshines Coals 4 mins – In Australia solar power produced at a home now costs less than producing it with coal, described between the 4 and 8 minute marks in this thirty-minute program. In a few years the same will be true for nuclear-produced power. Links to several articles that provide more details are at the bottom of the page, there. At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Panel 66 mins – “Constitutional law attorneys reviewed the 2013-14 Supreme Court term. Topics included campaign finance, cell phone searches, and presidential recess appointment powers. The American Constitution Society held its annual panel discussion at the National Press Club.” At the link you can listen or purchase the podcast for $.99, but a copy is included in the blog archive.

Tipping 38 mins – “As we all know, the practice of tipping can be awkward, random, and confusing. This episode tries to offer some clarity. At its center is Cornell professor Michael Lynn, who has written 51 academic papers on tipping.The practice of tipping is one of the most irrational, un-economic behaviors we engage in. It’s not in our economic best-interest to tip; essentially we do it because it’s a social norm — a nicety. In this episode of Freakonomics Radio, Stephen Dubner looks at why we tip, what kinds of things can nudge tips upward, and what’s wrong with tipping overall. Research shows that African American waiters make less in tips than people of other races, so tipping is a discriminatory practice. In the end, we wonder whether or not the practice of tipping should be eliminated altogether.” At the link find the title, “ Should Tipping be Banned? (Rebroadcast),” right-click “Play Now “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water History in the U.S. 52 mins – “The Western U.S. is in the grip of a punishing drought. Reservoir levels are dropping, and farmers are struggling to ensure water access for their crops and livestock. Consider California. Without water access, one of the nation’s largest states could lose up to $2.2 billion in revenue – and let’s not forget the strain on an already fragile climate. Some scientists even fear that Americans have reached “peak water” in the West.In this episode, we’re looking at how Americans have managed access to water throughout our history.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Watergate Legacy 18 mins – “Forty years on from President Nixon’€™s resignation we hear from Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, who broke the Watergate story. Did their reporting make Americans more mistrustful of government and ready to believe the worst of their leaders?” At the link find the title, “Special: The Watergate Legacy,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140806-1408a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Trade Center Bldg 7 29 mins – “Richard Gage talked about his group, Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth, which claimed that the World Trade Center was brought down by explosive demolition on September 11, 2001. The group was founded in 2006 and said its mission was to “expose the official lies and cover-up surrounding the events of September 11, 2001 in a way that inspires the people to overcome denial and understand the truth.” Mr. Gage spoke via video link from San Francisco, California.” At the link you can listen or purchase the podcast for $.99, but a copy is included in the blog archive.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3600 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , added to weekly, and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is there too,  and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 180 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.
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