Media Mining Digest 154 – 24 Oct 2014: Aereo Court Decision, Affordable Care Impact, Animal and Plant Signaling, Big Data and Government, Blue Collar Job Changes, Blue eyed Boy, Bombay Symphony, Books-Cars-Drones-Lights-Slavery, Broadband Issues, Campus Assaults Prevention, Cataloging the World, Chinese in Yosemite, Christopher Columbus, Climate Warming, Controlling Our Actions, Country Music, Creativity, Cuban Embargo, Dan Rather, Defense of Europe, Delusional Disorders, Deportation Trends, Disability Matters, Drinking Water, Ebola By Nurses, Ferguson Protests, Fondue, Fusion, Grief Impact, Grimm Brothers Stories, Hair Licensing, Heart Attacks, Hummingbird Robotics, Invisibles, ISIS Recruiting, Job Search, Lawyers’ Future, Learning Process, Libya Failure, Living Planet Index, Magic, Mata hari and Edith Cavell, Mirror Neutrons, Nanoparticles in Plants, Nobel Prizes 2014, North Korea, Open Access Literature, Pedophile’s Brain, Right to Know, Self-Regulated Classroom, Slow Hunches, Stem Cells for Eyes,Tesla in Norway, Texas Politics, Thiel on Innovation and Universities, Visiting Hour Tragedy, Women Programmers

The following audio files come from a larger group of 191 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 62 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Aereo Court Decision 58 mins – “I’m pleased to post Show # 220, August 6, my interview with James Grimmelmann of the University of Maryland School of Law and David Post of Temple University School of Law, on the recent US Supreme Court decision in ABC, Inc. v. Aereo and Facebook’s emotional manipulation study. David and James are both repeat guests on Hearsay Culture, but have never been on together. We focused on two issues: (a) the Aereo amicus brief authored by David and James on behalf of law professors, and the impact of the Aereo decision on copyright law and how new content delivery systems may or may not run afoul of copyright law, and (b) the impact of Facebook’s secretive 2014 behavioral study in which it manipulated the content delivered to users’ newsfeeds, particularly James’ extensive analysis of the problems associated with the study.” At the link right-click the highlighted “Show # 220, August 6” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Affordable Care Impact 13 mins – “Casey B. Mulligan Discusses the Affordable Care Act on the John Batchelor Show.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal and Plant Signaling 18 mins – “Sure you have a big brain; it’s the hallmark of Homo sapiens. But that doesn’t mean that you’ve cornered the market on intelligence. Admittedly, it’s difficult to say, since the very definition of the term is elusive. Depending on what we mean by intelligence, a certain aquatic mammal is not as smart as we thought (hint: rhymes with “caulpin”) … and your rhododendron may be a photosynthesizing Einstein.” At the link right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Data and Government 58 mins – “I’m pleased to post Show # 218, July 23, my interview with Julia Lane of the American Institutes for Research and Prof. Victoria Stodden of the iSchool at Illinois, co-editors of Privacy, Big Data, and the Public Good: Frameworks for Engagement. Julia and Victoria, along with their co-editors Stefan Bender and Helen Nissenbaum (who were not on this show), have collected an impressive array of scholars to study the creation and use of “big data” — massive data sets — by government. Covering not only policy but the economics and statistics considerations of application of big data to decision-making, Julia and Victoria put together a wonderful resource on the challenges and opportunities of big data on a going-forward basis….” At the link right-click the highlighted “# 218, July 23” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blue Collar Job Changes 46 mins – “The new blue collar jobs. We’ll look at where they are and what it will take to get one.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blue Eyed Boy 59 mins – “Bob Timberg talked about his book, Blue Eyed Boy, in which he recounts his experiences in Vietnam and subsequent career in journalism. In 1967, Mr. Timberg was a Marine just 13 days away from coming home from Vietnam when his vehicle struck a North Vietnamese landmine and his life changed forever. He suffered third degree burns over much of his face and body. In the interview, he talks about the impact of the experience on his life, the 35 surgeries he had, his thoughts on the war, and how he physically and emotionally rebuilt himself and his career following this accident.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Bob Timberg,” right-click “Media files program.364366.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bombay Symphony 28 mins – “India is falling in love with Western classical music. In his home-city Mumbai, Zareer Masani encounters the country’s first national ensemble, the Symphony Orchestra of India. He visits Furtado’s, the city’s oldest music shop, which sells hundreds of pianos a year, and discovers that thousands of children learn a Western instrument. Yet, Zareer finds that this is not the total success it seems.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: A Bombay Symphony,” right-click ”Media files docarchive_20141015-0332a.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Books-Cars-Drones-Lights-Slavery 37 mins – “Techcon: how radio thrives in a digital and visual age; Digitalised slave narratives from Jamaica and USA; smart street lights in Copenhagen; Digital art on The Space.” At the link find the title, “DigitalP: 14 Oct 14: Techcon;slave narratives;street lights;Digital art,” right-click “Media files digitalp_20141014-2030a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Issues 16 mins – “Lisa Gonzalez and I have been wading though all kinds of crazy talk since the cities of Wilson and Chattanooga filed petitions with the FCC to strike down state laws that prevent them from offering Internet access to their neighbors. In our first episode of Crazy Talk since way back in episode 72, we deal with claims that municipal networks often fail, whether the FCC has authority to restore local authority, and whether the state barriers in question are actually barriers at all.” At the link right-click “…download this MP3…” and select “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Campus Assaults Prevention 51 mins – “University of Utah President David Pershing joins us to continue our conversation about sexual assault on college campuses. We’ll ask him how he’s thinking about the issue as both leader of Utah’s largest public university and as a father. We’ll then talk to journalist Robin Wilson and Westminster College’s General Counsel Melissa Flores to discuss how it is that universities became responsible for handling assault cases and what new federal regulations mean for the way institutions protect their students.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cataloging the World 57 mins – “…I’m pleased to post Show # 217, July 16, my interview with Alex Wright, author of Cataloging the World: Paul Otlet and the Birth of the Information Age. Alex, who was previously on the show back in 2008 discussing his terrific book Glut, has written a fascinating biography of the heretofore forgotten information utopian named Paul Otlet. Otlet’s vision for a catalog of all of the world’s information is both inspiring and admirable, given his efforts spanned the first half of the twentieth century. In our interview, we discussed Otlet and his relevance to today’s issues involving information access, filtering and systems. As before, I greatly enjoyed our discussion and Alex’s work.” At the link right-click the highlighted “Show # 217, July 16” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese in Yosemite 4 mins – “No one really hears about Yosemite National Park’s immigrant history. Or at least Yenyen Chan hadn’t. A park ranger at the famed national park, she grew up in Los Angeles with her Chinese parents. When she landed the job at Yosemite, she realized how little she knew about the park’s immigrant past. So she dug in and stories spilled out about the critical role Chinese workers played in shaping Yosemite during the late 1800s and early 1900s. “Some of the hardest work that had to be accomplished was getting roads up these high, steep mountains, then blasting through rocks. Back then [they were] using hand tools and shovels and picks, and not the modern equipment that we have today,” Chan said.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. The photo at the link is high resolution and can be enlarged several orders to see more details.

Christopher Columbus 25 mins – “Christopher Columbus redux: He loved god, worshipped gold and craved glory. And in 1492, Columbus set sail in the name of all three. Somewhere between the explorer hero of American schoolbooks and the murderous mariner of history’s dark side, there’s a complex tale of outsized ambition, ruthless subjugation and questionable honor.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming 60 mins – “Bojana Bajzelj of Cambridge finds raising food for 9 billion will take all our carbon emissions. Benjamin Blonder tells us how the current plant world was shaped by the last big meteorite hit. Eelco Rohling: sea level rose 5 meters (16 ft) in the last big warming melt.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Controlling Our Actions 3 mins – “Some people with mental illness report being influenced by alien control. In courts, people sometimes try to disclaim responsibility for their actions. Sense of agency refers to the way we feel in control of our actions. Vince Polito is investigating how and why these changes in sense of agency occur. He has developed ways of studying different examples in a unified way, and developed a new theory of the common causes and effects of agency change. We hear Vince Polito’s Famelab presentation in Perth earlier this year.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Country Music 49 mins – “Country singer Doug Seegers was homeless for years in New York and Nashville. He’s out with a new album and will break your heart.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity 53 mins – “Tina Seelig, Professor of the Practice in Stanford’s School of Engineering, describes how imagination leads to entrepreneurship, charting the course from rough ideas to polished ventures. Introducing a new framework called the “Inventure Cycle,” Seelig captures the attitudes and actions necessary to foster innovation and bring breakthrough ideas to the world.” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download MP3 Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Embargo 57 mins – “The US embargo against Cuba is 54 years old next week and there are new calls –and maybe new reasons – to end it. We’ll hear the fresh debate.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dan Rather 52 mins – “Earlier this week, veteran news man Dan Rather was a guest at the Economic Development Corporation of Utah’s annual meeting. He sat down with Doug to talk about his influences, his more than 40 years of broadcasting and the state of journalism today. Friday, we’re broadcasting the conversation. Really, it’s Rather telling great stories – from his days at a small-town Texas radio station to covering JFK’s assassination and reporting from war zones and the White House.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Defense of Europe 39 mins – The past British Secretary State for Defense, Liam Fox, discusses the current role of NATO and defense status of Europe. At the link find the title, “Uncommon Knowledge with Liam Fox,” right-click “Media files 20141010.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop of defense.

Delusional Disorders 60 mins – “A bank robber on an undercover mission. A teenage girl with the powers of a tiger. A vigilante seeking vengeance in Ciudad Juarez. All have secret identities. But not all of them chose those identities for themselves.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deportation Trends 88 mins – “This panel discussion marks the release of the newMigration Policy Institute (MPI) report, Deportation and Discretion: Reviewing the Record and Options for Change. The report and discussion provide a detailed description of formal removals from the United States, including the previous immigration and criminal records of deportees, as well as their country of origin, gender, length of residence in the United States, and other demographic characteristics. Marc Rosenblum, Deputy Director of MPI’s U.S. Immigration Policy Program and lead author of the report, answers key questions about immigration enforcement: who is being removed, where are noncitizens being apprehended, how are they being removed, and how are DHS’s current enforcement priorities reflected in enforcement outcomes. Other issues covered in the discussion include MPI’s insights more broadly from the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) removals dataset, obtained via a Freedom of Information Act request by The New York Times, as well as the work done by the Government Accountability Office in this area. This event offers a unique opportunity to review the past decade-plus of deportations and determine what lessons can be learned for future policy and possible administrative action” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disability Matters 55 mins – “Joyce welcomes Fred Maahs, chair of the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), to the show. The American Association of People with Disabilities is the nation’s largest cross-disability membership organization that promotes equal opportunity, economic power, independent living, and political participation for people with disabilities. During the show, he will share his story of how he became a member of the disability community, what it means to be chair of AAPD, and most importantly, the 2015 AAPD Gala in Washington, DC.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drinking Water 5 mins – “Millennials are spending — and giving away their cash — a lot differently than previous generations, and that’s changing the game for giving, and for the charities that depend on it. Scott Harrison’s group, Charity: Water, is a prime example…. Harrison volunteered to spend the next two years in West Africa. What he found when he first got to Liberia was a drinking water crisis. He watched 7-year-olds drink regularly from chocolate-colored swamps — water, he says, that he wouldn’t let his dog drink. Most childhood diseases in the developing countries he visited could be traced to unsafe drinking water, so everything changed for Harrison. He got inspired to start raising money for clean water when he returned to the states, but his friends were wary. “They all said, ‘I don’t trust charities. I don’t give. I believe these charities are just these black holes. I don’t even know how much money would actually go to the people who I’m trying to help,’ ” Harrison recalls. So his one cause became two: He started Charity: Water to dig wells to bring clean drinking water to the nearly 800 million people without access to it around the globe. But he also wanted to set an example with the way the organization did its work….” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola By Nurses 44 mins – “Wondering about Ebola and how it might affect you as a nurse? Well me, too! Join me and nurses Brittney Wilson and Joan Ekstrom Spitrey as we talk about the implications of the Ebola crisis for nurses. If that’s what you’re looking for, you found it. It’s the Nursing Show.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ferguson Protests 51 mins – “It’s been two months since a white police officer fatally shot Michael Brown, an unarmed, African-American teenager in Ferguson, Missouri. A grand jury is considering whether to bring charges against officer Darren Wilson. And last week, an off-duty police officer fatally shot a black teenager in the Shaw neighborhood of Saint Louis. This past weekend, thousands of protestors staged the largest and most organized demonstrations yet. They are calling for a change in police tactics and racial equity nationwide. Voter registrations are up in Saint Louis, but so far, the movement hasn’t led to national policy changes. An update on the civil rights protests in Ferguson, Missouri, and their political implications.” [Five guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Fondue 16 mins – “The popularity of fondue wasn’t an accident. It was planned by a cartel of Swiss cheese makers, which ruled the Swiss economy for 80 years. On today’s show: Swiss cheese. A story about what happens when well-meaning folks decide that the rules of economics don’t apply to them. And got the world to eat gobs of melted fat.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fusion P-2 207 mins – “This episode is about ITER, the international project to build an experimental fusion plant in southern France. While on vacation in that area, I had the opportunity to visit the site and talk to Richard Pitts about many aspects of the project. We focus mostly on the physics and the engineering challenges, but also address some of the organizational aspects of this huge scientific project. Note that this episode is essentially a continuation of omega tau 022 – Nuclear Fusion at MPI für Plasmaphysik; I recommend to listen to this episode first, if you haven’t done so yet.” (omega tau 022 is retitled here as Fusion P1;100 mins ) At the link find the title, “157 – Fusion at ITER,” right-click “Media files omegatau-157-fusionAtITER.mp3” and right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grief Impact 6 mins – “Certain specialised cells which fight off rapidly dividing bacteria such as pneumonia are compromised during periods of grief. Anna Phillips is investigating whether bereaved people are at a greater risk of infection. She has determined that bereaved people have a poorer response to vaccines. Fewer antibodies are produced. Some ways of boosting response at all times, are continuing social contact and exercise.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grimm Brothers Stories 54 mins – “RadioWest and Plan-B Theatre return our radio drama series to the Halloween season with this year’s Radio Hour Episode 9: Grimm. Playwright Matthew Ivan Bennett has adapted three beloved Grimm Brother stories to their original, dark tellings: Little Snow-White, Rapunzel, and The Juniper Tree.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hair Licensing 13 mins – “A few years ago, Jestina Clayton started a hair braiding business in her home in Centerville, Utah. The business let her stay home with her kids, and in good months, she made enough to pay for groceries. She even put an ad on a local website. Then one day she got an email from a stranger who had seen the ad. “It is illegal in the state of Utah to do any form of extensions without a valid cosmetology license,” the e-mail read. “Please delete your ad, or you will be reported.” To get a license, Jestina would have to spend more than a year in cosmetology school. Tuition would cost $16,000 dollars or more. On today’s show: Why it’s illegal to braid hair without a license in Utah. And why that rule — and hundreds of others like it in states all around the country — are a disaster for the U.S. economy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Attacks 100 mins – “Heart attack: it is the never-miss diagnosis. Accordingly, we virtually never miss. Is the victory Pyrrhic? This month, with an eye on how we got here, and what matters most (hint: it’s not the doctor), we seek coronary absolution.” At the link right-click “SMART Troponins.m4a” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hummingbird Robotics 34 mins – “As founder of BirdBrain Technologies and maker of the Hummingbird Robotics Kit, Tom Lauwers has been busy infusing robotics into classrooms of all types. In fact, Tom hails from the Carnegie Mellon Robotics Institute’s CREATE lab (you might remember the CREATE lab when we talked about robots with Illah Nourbakhsh) where he focused on the process of designing hardware and software to support learners and educational environments. A few years later, Tom’s Hummingbird has been successful in helping teachers enrich their curricula with creativity using robotics. Listen to the show to learn how you too can foster a culture of creativity in your classroom with the Hummingbird Robotics Kit.” At the link find and click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Invisibles 56 mins – “I’m pleased to post Show # 219, July 30 my interview with David Zweig, author of Invisibles: The Power of Anonymous Work in an Age of Relentless Self-Promotion. David has written a fascinating account of individuals who achieve professional success and satisfaction without engaging in the personal publicity efforts that are the hallmark of modern communications and socialization. While he is not opposed to social media, his critical take on its powers of distortion and limitations are worthy of deep consideration, which he admirably tackles in his book. In our conversation, we delved into the characteristics of his “invisibles” and what social media has — and has not — done for our humanity. I greatly enjoyed the discussion!” At the link right-click the highlighted “Show # 219” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Recruiting 56 mins – “A young American, arrested at O’Hare airport, allegedly on his way to join ISIS. Who is drawn to this? And why?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Search 141 mins – “Shaun Meehan joins Chris to talk about sugar rockets, pet robots, living in Antarctica for 2 years, huge lasers, tiny components and launching electronics into space. Shaun has two large industrial robots named FRED and Lefty… FRED was won in an online auction and transported from Connecticut to Coloardo… Shaun grew up in Fort Collins (north), near Colorado State University. His neighbors were professors there. He built his own kitchen timer rocket launcher and also cooked up the rocket fuel in the kitchen… In high school he worked at the lasers workshop at CSU. He was making optics mounts, vacuum chambers and more on the CNC mill…Another neighbor traded Shaun yardwork for a superconductor… After the lab, Shaun applied to be general assistant at South Pole. A friend gave hints on how to get into the program such as working at Tractor Supply Company (TSC) on heavy equipment and doing a deep snow survival course. He got into the program to be an assistant and flew down to the McMurdo Station on the coast… Once on site, he was an iron worker, helping build new buildings… One benefit of the job was getting to pick the brains of scientists stationed there… When Shaun went back to school he got dropped into a lab working on high power RF and laser work… A friend passing through town told Shaun he had just left a startup in SF. He applied and was hooked and then dropped his research program. He was the 3rd electrical engineer at Planet Labs, formerly Cosmogia…The Goal of Planet Labs: image the entire earth once per day. ..The benefit of regular captures is you can watch timelapse of data. This is useful for tracking agriculture, natural disasters and a lot more…Thanks to Shaun for sharing his crazy experiences and his work on satellites. Read more about Planet Labs or check out some of Shaun’s blog posts about robots over at Logic Low.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lawyers Future 16 mins – “Automation is reshaping all sorts of white-collar jobs that we once thought were safe. And for many lawyers, the question is: are we next? …We have tremendous demand for legal help…and yet very little availability of affordable legal help for the vast majority of Americans,” says Gillian Hadfield, a professor of law and economics at USC. Hadfield thinks law is ripe for a technological jump-start. “Lawyers are the ones that should be living within the context of ‘what is it that people really need?’” …It’s because the rules are so outdated, though, that Hadfield believes things could change – and change quickly. In other countries, both availability and affordability are being addressed. In Canada, for example, people can now stop by WalMart to get legal advice. In Britain, one supermarket chain offers legal advice alongside potato chips. Before long, Americans too may be able to get affordable legal advice next to the grocery deli counter.” At the link find the title, “Your Future Lawyer,” right-click “IHUB-101814-A.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Learning Process 53 mins – “Learn or Die. That is the message this week! In order to stay competitive in today’s fast paced environment, you must continue to learn and grow. Those that refuse to do so will find that their jobs and skills have been replaced by a cheaper and more efficient technology. So how do you become a better and faster learner? How do you stay ahead of the curve? These are the questions we discuss this week as we talk with author and professor, Edward Hess.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Libya Failure 27 mins – “Tim Whewell is one of the few foreign reporters who’ve made it to Tobruk, last toehold of Libya’s elected authorities – holding out against a growing jihadi menace.” At the link find the title, “ DocArchive: Libya: Last Stand Against Jihad?” right-click “Media files docarchive_20141016-0330a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Living Planet Index 60 mins – “WWF report: 52% of wildlife lost since 1970. Cost of climate change forum with Treasury Secretaries Robert Rubin and Jack Lew. Update on climate march and results. Plus climate poetry and new song by Neil Young. The report is called the “Living Planet Report 2014″. It was published by the World Wide Fund for Nature, the new name for the World Wildlife Fund. The 180 page report features a new way to count the species most like us, those with backbones. That includes mammals of course, but also reptiles, birds, amphibians, and fish. The new method is called “The Living Planet Index”.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Magic 54 mins – “It’s an ALL-NEW Snap! Ladies and Gentlemen, sit right back and watch us pull a rabbit out of our hat. From PRX and NPR, we proudly present “Presto!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mata Hari and Edith Cavell 54 mins – “Two independent women find themselves in front of firing squads during WW1. Nurse Edith Cavell is heralded as a heroine and a saint. Exotic dancer and courtesan Mata Hari becomes a symbol of evil and the enemy within.” At the link find the title, “The Vixen and the Virgin – Women, Espionage and Propaganda in WW1,” right-click “Download The Vixen and the Virgin…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mirror Neutrons 55 mins – “Ever since their chance discovery back in 1992 mirror neurons have captured the imagination of both scientists and nonscientists, but their actual role remains mostly speculative. In The Myth of Mirror Neurons: The Real Neuroscience of Communication and Cognition Dr. Gregory Hickok (UC-Irvine) explains why the most popular theory is probably wrong. He also provides a fascinating account of how science is really done and the sobering lesson that scientists can fall prey to the same cognitive biases (and tendencies toward laziness) that plague all humans. I first discussed the discovery of mirror neurons back in BSP 35 when I featured Mirrors in the brain: How our minds share actions, emotions, and experience (2008) by Giacomo Rizzolatti and Corrado Sinigaglia. At that time what I found most fascinating was that since mirror neurons fire both when a subject (usually a monkey) performs an action and when a similar action is observed, this proves that single neurons are not necessarily purely motor or purely sensory. This surprising discovery seems to have been overshadowed n the rush to use mirror neurons to explain everything from autism to language evolution.” At the link right-click “FREE: Audio mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nanoparticles in Plants 30 mins – “Keith & Russ welcome Hiram Castillo-Michel, a UTEP [University of Texas as El Paso] alum who is currently working at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. Hiram is using the synchrotron to examine metal nanoparticles that are being taken up by plants and is analyzing how those nanoparticles affect the plants’ functions.

Nobel Prizes 2014 5 mins – “The Nobel Prizes for Medicine or Physiology, Physics and Chemistry have been announced. Katie Silver reports.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. The price concerning microscopy is detailed at this link or this link

North Korea  51 mins – “North Korea is arguably the most secretive country in the world today. Few foreign journalists enter its borders. When they do, they seldom see beyond what the government shows them. Frustrated by official reporting trips, Korean-American journalist Suki Kim decided to go undercover. In 2011, she posed as a teacher at a missionary school. During her months in the classroom, she was charmed by her students and overwhelmed by the regime’s totalitarian control. Suki Kim shares her story in a new book, Without You, There Is No Us: My Time with the Sons of North Korea’s Elite.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Open Access Literature 54 mins – “Frankfurt is the birthplace of book fairs, and of sturm und drang – or at least, it is the birthplace of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, born in Frankfurt in 1749. Goethe embodied German Romanticism, which enobled sturm und drang – storm and stress – as the iron-hard forge of human character. In 2014, sturm und drang continues to build character in the men and women of scholarly and scientific publishing around the globe. We live in an age of changing business models and realigning roles. As governments and funders mandate open access to published research, we can feel the ground shift beneath our feet, and we wonder, “Who holds the power?” Around the time Goethe began to write, a revolution began brewing in Boston, the home base of Copyright Clearance Center. To debate and to deliberate, the citizens of New England gathered in town meetings, just as they continue to do today. For this Frankfurt Book Fair Town Meeting, CCC’s panel gathered to debate and deliberate this question: Open Access—Who Holds The Power?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pedophile’s Brain 14 mins – “Recent theories suggest the brains of paedophiles encountered some sort of problem during development. It leads to children being seen as sexual targets rather than as vulnerable and requiring care. ‘Gold star’ paedophiles acknowledge their attraction but don’t want to act out on it. Some seek help. Amy Lykins has worked as a clinical psychologist and now lectures at the University of New England in Armidale NSW. She describes current thought regarding the brains of paedophiles.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Right to Know 58 mins – “I’m very excited to post Show # 221, August 13, my interview with Prof. Frederick Schauer, David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia, and formerly of Harvard’s Kennedy School, on the “right to know.” I heard Fred discuss this issue at a panel that I moderated on the philosophy of information at Duke Law School earlier this year, and was unsurprisingly blown away by his insights on the issues at stake and questions to be answered in “right to know” analysis. This seemingly simple question has become surprisingly complex in the world of multidirectional communication by institutions and individuals on interconnected networks (like the “Inter-net”). I was thrilled to have Fred on the show, and the discussion was fascinating. I hope that you enjoy it.” At the link right-click the highlighted “Show # 221, August 13” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self-Regulated Classroom 54 mins – “What I.Q. was to the 20th century, self-regulation will be to the 21st. That’s the prediction of psychologist and philosopher, Dr. Stuart Shanker. For decades he’s been teaching kids how to self-regulate, so tantrums, meltdowns and lack of focus diminish.” (One approach is to use earphones to reduce noise exposure.) At the link find the title, “Neuron Therapy,” right-click “Download Neuron Therapy” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slow Hunches 52 mins – “On the show this week we talk to Steven Johnson, author of the new book How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World. In it, Johnson argues that seemingly mundane scientific breakthroughs have changed our world in profound ways—impacting everything from life expectancy to women’s fashion. We also welcome guest host Cynthia Graber who talks about a recent article she wrote for Nova on the “Diseaseome”; and Indre wonders if you are, in fact, smarter than a kindergartner.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stem Cells for Eyes 9 mins – “Robert Lanza discusses two-year follow-up findings of human embryonic stem-cell transplantation in the potential treatment of Stargardt’s Macular dystrophy and age-related macular degeneration.” At the link find the title, “Listen to The Lancet: 16 October,” right-click “Media files 16october.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tesla in Norway 37 mins – “Until recently, tiny Norway (population 5 million) has been the second largest market for Teslas (after the U.S.). Earlier this year, Tesla’s Model S became the best-selling car in the country ever for a one-month period. Not bad for a luxury electric vehicle whose base price in Norway is over $100,000. What’s behind this Tesla boom?” (A key element is a sovereign wealth fund.) At the link find the title, “How Can Tiny Norway Afford to Buy So Many Teslas?” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Texas Politics  108 mins (2 parts) – “Everything’s bigger in Texas and that goes for the personalities who run for election there. While the Republican party is dominant, Democrats believe that they can change the reddest of the red states blue in the coming years. Can the Democratic Party make big gains in the mid-term elections?” In Part 2: “Texas is crucial in the race for national power. Gary O’Donoghue travels to the Lone Star State to find out about the challenges the Republicans face on divisive issues like immigration and shifts in social attitudes – and what this could mean for the party and Texas.” At the link for Part 1 find the title, “DocArchive: The Politics of the Lone Star State,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20141014-0332a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. For Part 2: “DocArchive: The Politics of the Lone Star State – Part 2,” and “Media files docarchive 20141021-0332a.mp3”

Thiel on Innovation 16 mins – “The last half century has been a time of unprecedented invention and technological change. But recently we’ve mostly been benefiting from changes that are more virtual than physical. Peter Thiel made his fortune as a co-founder of PayPal — but now he says that we need to focus a bit less on the online world and a little more on the world around us. “I would like us to go back to the 1950s or 60s understanding of technology as encompassing both atoms and bits. And the hope is that we’re going to have progress in both in the decades ahead,” says Thiel, author of Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future. The question of whether we’ll continue to get breakthrough technologies depends on many factors. But our current education system just isn’t preparing the kinds of future innovators we need, believes Thiel, a long-time critic of American education. Thiel, who is well-known for offering a fellowship that gives 20-25 students $100,000 to drop out of college and pursue their own projects, says too many are entering — and leaving — universities without much thought or purpose.” At the link find the title, “Peter Thiel Looks for the Next Big Thing,” right-click “IHUB-101814-B.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thiel on Universities 5 mins – “What’s it like getting $100,000 to drop out of school and pursue your own project? “I think it’s becoming a little bit more normal for folks to leave school. Perhaps not permanently, but at least for a couple of years to pursue whatever they’re passionate about,” says Laura Deming, a partner at The Longevity Fund – a venture capital firm that invests in companies focused on extending life. She’s a recipient of the Thiel Fellowship, a fund started by PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel to get young, smart people to leave school and pursue a project they’re passionate about… Although she benefited from her fellowship, Deming cautions that dropping out isn’t for everyone. “Passion is one thing, but pure competency, being good at what you do, that’s very different. That’s difficult to find in undergrad.” Meet the newest Thiel fellows: Ari Weinstein, Noor Siddiqui and all the rest.” At the link find the title, “Life as a Thiel Fellow,” right-click “IHUB-101814-D.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Visiting Hours Tragedy  54 mins (2 parts) – “On this edition of White Coat, Black Art: a personal reflection on hospital visitors and the role they play in the lives of patients and the people who look after them.” The following episode discussed subsequent feedback: “ Our show this week on hospital visitors got such a huge response we’re devoting this week’s minipodcast to your thoughts and stories on 24/7 hospital vistors.” At the link find the titles “WCBA – Visiting Hours Podcast” and “White Coat Mini Podcast – Visiting Hours React,” right-click accompanying “Download WCBA – Visiting Hours Podcast” and “Download White Coat Mini Podcast – Visiting Hours React” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menus.

Women Programmers 17 mins – “Mark Zuckerberg. Bill Gates. Steve Jobs. Most of the big names in technology are men. But a lot of computing pioneers, the ones who programmed the first digital computers, were women. And for decades, the number of women in computer science was growing. But in 1984, something changed. The number of women in computer science flattened, and then plunged.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 4200 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 21+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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Media Mining Digest 153 – 17 Oct 2014: Abortion History, Aging and Dying, Authors As Team Players, Automated Aircraft, Automation and Employment, Brain’s GPS, Bronx City Alliance, Child Displacements, College Unbound, Creating in the Moment, Danish Sperm Donations, Debt Collection, Differences Between Us, Disability Rights Network, Drone Law, Ebola Discussion, Ebola Preparedness, Energy Future, Fiber Taps, Fracking in China, Good Countries, Green Energy Future, Gut Microbiome, Hospital Credentialing, Islamic Extremism, Leadership Ideas,Lost Innocence P1, Mayors Discussus America, Melanoma Advances, Mental Focus, Military Mental Illness, Misconceptions, MS Discussion, Mt Tambora Eruption, Oil Price Decline, Physical Exams, Pinball Machines, Prince’s Music, Restoring America, Shell Shock Bug,Solar Study, Sotomayor Impact, Text Book Costs, The Force Is Strong, Truckers, War Powers Act, Web Typography Book, Women in Public, Young Worker Attitude

The following audio files come from a larger group of 186 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 52 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Abortion History 51mins – “One in three American women will terminate a pregnancy by age 45. Yet, few issues remain as contentious as abortion. Even those who support it qualify their position by saying it’s “a bad thing” or “an agonizing decision.” In a new book, feminist writer Katha Pollitt argues it doesn’t have to be this way. “Pro: Reclaiming Abortion Rights,” is an impassioned attempt to re-frame the debate. She claims that abortion opponents have gained ground in part because the “pro-choice” movement has failed to make its case. She calls abortion a “moral right” and a “social good,” saying it should be seen as a normal part of a woman’s reproductive life…Related Item – Pro: Reclaiming Abortion Rights” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Aging and Dying 51 mins – “Modern medicine has advanced dramatically in the past century: Average life expectancy has increased from the mid-40s to the mid-70s today. But as medicine has advanced and people are living longer, children are more likely to live far away from aging parents. Nursing homes and assisted living facilities are popular destinations, but often focus on safety and routines at the expense of quality of life and human interaction. Harvard physician and author Atul Gawande argues that making mortality a medical experience is failing society. And he says end-of-life treatments often end up shortening lives instead of extending them. A Harvard doctor on a smarter approach to aging and dying.” His related book, “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End”. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Authors As Team Players 14 mins – “Novelists and others who have made the trip to Hollywood know too well the challenge – they must accommodate their imaginations to the exciting yet confining realities of a studio back lot. In 2014, writers have app developers and not movie moguls to wrestle with, yet the problem is the same: How is an author to remain true to her tale? From Melbourne, Australia, fantasy novelist J.J. Gadd reminds CCC’s Chris Kenneally that content collaboration has a long and rich history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Automated Aircraft 120 mins – The crash of Air France Flight 447 that killed hundreds is discussed, in depth, in Vanity Fair which focuses on pilot skills being affected by automation. Episodes One and Eleven of The Airline Pilot Guy – the 120 mins — include segments that discuss the flight and related automation issue from the pilot side. The topic link is to the Vanity Fair article. At links “One” and “Eleven” right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menus

Automation and Employment 69 mins – “David Autor of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the future of work and the role that automation and smart machines might play in the workforce. Autor stresses the importance of Michael Polanyi’s insight that many of the things we know and understand cannot be easily written down or communicated. Those kinds of tacit knowledge will be difficult for smart machines to access and use. In addition, Autor argues that fundamentally, the gains from machine productivity will accrue to humans. The conversation closes with a discussion of the distributional implications of a world with a vastly larger role for smart machines.” Reference is also made to Moravec’s Paradox and both are instructive. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-menu.

Brain’s GPS 55 mins – “…Ian Sample and Nicola Davis meet the winners of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, and John O’Keefe from University College London. Their work spanned four decades and revealed the existence of the nerve cells in the brain that build up a map of the space around us and track our progress as we move around.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bronx City Alliance 28 mins – “By inviting the public to enjoy the Bronx River, the Bronx River Alliance is creating sustainability enthusiasts and improving the local ecosystem for both humans and wildlife.” At the link find the title, “Bronx River Alliance: Restoring Nature in the City,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Displacements 59 mins – “Stories about the surge in unaccompanied minors crossing the U.S.-Mexico border filled news pages this summer. It’s often been referred to as an immigration “crisis.” But American history is replete with stories of children leaving their families to start new lives in America. On this week’s episode, BackStory delves into some of these, including first-hand accounts of European children sent to America during World War Two, and of New York orphans who were put on trains out West a generation earlier. And the American History Guys consider the complexities of “humanitarian” efforts to save children from communism during the Cold War, as well as from their own Native American culture.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right-end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Unbound 15 mins – “College majors may artificially divide students, instead of fostering a real world, interdisciplinary approach. Jeff Selingo, author of “College (Un)Bound,” says we should scrap the major.” At the link find the title, “Banishing the College Major,” right-click “IHUB-101114-A.mp3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creating in the Moment 13 mins – ““Remember before the internet?” asks Joi Ito. “Remember when people used to try to predict the future?” In this engaging talk, the head of the MIT Media Lab skips the future predictions and instead shares a new approach to creating in the moment: building quickly and improving constantly, without waiting for permission or for proof that you have the right idea. This kind of bottom-up innovation is seen in the most fascinating, futuristic projects emerging today, and it starts, he says, with being open and alert to what’s going on around you right now. Don’t be a futurist, he suggests: be a now-ist.” At the click “Download” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Danish Sperm Donations 27 mins – “In recent years, sperm has been shipped out of Denmark at an astonishing rate, producing thousands of babies worldwide – many in the UK. In 2006, the UK was not importing any Danish sperm, but by 2010 Denmark was supplying around a third of our total imports. Why are Danish donors in such demand? Kate Brian investigates.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The New Vikings,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20141008-0332a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Debt Collection 18 mins – “Today’s show is the story of a guy who tried to make something of himself by getting into a rough business: debt collection. It’s also the story of the low-level, semi-legal debt-collection economy that sprung up in Buffalo, New York. And, in a small way, it’s the story of the last 20 or so years in global finance, a time when the world went wild for debt. For more on Buffalo and the debt underworld, see the book Bad Paper and related articles in the New Yorker and the New York Times Magazine.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Differences Between Us 51 mins – “We make split second decisions about others – someone is male or female, black or white, us or them. But sometimes the degrees of separation are incredibly few. A mere handful of genes determine skin color, for example. Find out why race is almost non-existent from a biological perspective, and how the snippet of DNA that is the Y chromosome came to separate male from female. Plus, why we’re wired to categorize. And, a groundbreaking court case proposes to erase the dividing line between species: lawyers argue to grant personhood status to our chimpanzee cousins.” At the link right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disability Rights Network 54 mins – “Joyce welcomes Christine M. Griffin, executive director of the Disability Law Center Inc. (DLC), of Massachusetts. The DLC is a private, non-profit organization responsible for providing protection and advocacy for the rights of Massachusetts residents with disabilities. Ms. Griffin will discuss the services of the DLC in depth, and also talk about her background as a life-long advocate for people with disabilities.”(and the Disability Rights Network) At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Law 115 mins – “Hollywood and drone regulation [first 30 minutes], the FCC tries to ban “Redskins”, can social network Ello overtake Facebook? And more!” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow beside “Audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Discussion 93 mins – In episode 305 of This Week in Virology “Vincent, Alan, and Kathy continue their coverage of the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, with a discussion of case fatality ratio, reproductive index, a conspiracy theory, and spread of the virus to the United States.” At the link right-click “Download TWIV 305” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Preparedness 47 mins – “Ebola reports every day now, from West Africa and well beyond. The Spanish nurse in trouble. An American cameraman being treated in Nebraska. The first case that walked into an American hospital, Thomas Duncan, dead today, in that hospital in Dallas. Is America ready for Ebola? The CDC says we’ll stop it in its tracks. But 80 percent of American nurses surveyed last week said their hospitals have not taught them about it. This hour On Point: America and Ebola. Are we ready?

Energy Future 59 mins – “For years we have relied on fossil fuels to produce the light, heat and energy we need to live and work. But these supplies are diminishing, and polluting our environment. So can renewable resources step into the breach and produce enough energy to power the world? In this special Naked Scientists show, live from the Cambridge Science Centre, we talk to some of the researchers trying to do just that, as well as conducting some energy-related experiments of our own…” At the link right-click “Download the mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fiber Taps 63 mins – This mix of topics includes “The semi-DIY computer named “Kano”, Fiber Tapping, Hybrid HD vs SSD, basic Linux terminal commands, and aircraft basics.” The six-minute fiber tap segment starts at 12:00. The thirteen minute segment on Linux starts at 35:00. Both includes visual aids that are helpful. The segment on disks is also useful. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking in China 58 mins (2 parts) – “Last week on Sea Change Radio, we learned about the new shale gas boom in China. This week, in the second part of my discussion with Jaeah Lee and James West of Mother Jones, we examine the larger questions that surround this shift in Chinese energy policy. Can natural gas be a bridge fuel as the industrial giant weans itself off coal? Will there be enough water to extract China’s significant shale deposits? Will shale gas exploration further divide urban and rural China, or could it help to close the country’s income gap?” At the link (Part 1) right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part 2.

Good Countries 18 mins – “It’s an unexpected side effect of globalization: problems that once would have stayed local—say, a bank lending out too much money—now have consequences worldwide. But still, countries operate independently, as if alone on the planet. Policy advisor Simon Anholt has dreamed up an unusual scale to get governments thinking outwardly: The Good Country Index. In a riveting and funny talk, he answers the question, “Which country does the most good?” The answer may surprise you (especially if you live in the US or China).” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Energy Future 12 mins – “Driving a Prius may help psychologically, but to really be effective, renewable energy solutions need to happen on a national level. Dan Nocera, a leader in clean energy research, talks about big-picture solutions.” At the link find the title, “The Real Future of Green Energy,“ right-click “HUB-101114-Bmp3“” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gut Microbiome 38 mins – “…This week’s show looks at the vast community of microbes living inside us – the microbiome. As a new public study examines the effects of diet and lifestyle on these microbial hitchhikers, we consider new research that links childhood obesity to antibiotics. In the studio with Guardian science editor Ian Sample are Professor Nick Finer, a consultant endocrinologist from University College Hospital in London, and Nicola Davis, commissioning editor of Observer Tech Monthly. Joining us down the line from Barcelona is Tim Spector, professor of genetic epidemiology at King’s College London. The team also tackles other stories in the news this week, including the origin of the HIV pandemic; the UK’s plans for a space weather forecasting centre; and lab-grown penises for men with congenital abnormalities, or who have undergone surgery or suffered traumatic injury.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hospital Credentialing 16 mins – Dr Gil Porat discusses his experience with the hospital group responsible for selecting, hiring, background-checking, controlling and discharging the physicians it employs and allows access to its facilities. Dr Porat is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine with a Focused Practice in Hospital Medicine. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islamic Extremism 27 mins – “Linda Pressly travels to Kosovo and meets the sister of ISIS’ first suicide-bomber from the Balkans. How could Europe’s most pro-American state have fostered such extremism?” At the link find the title, K”Docs: Kosovo’s Jihadis – 9 Oct 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20141009-0330a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leadership Ideas 55 mins – “Author and leadership educator Liz Wiseman shares why cultivating a “rookie mindset” is an advantage in a rapidly changing world. Wiseman presents insights from her books, Rookie Smarts and Multipliers, including frameworks and techniques for how entrepreneurs, leaders and employees can embrace a life of constant learning and build a passion for multiplying the genius of those around them.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download MP3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leadership Ideas 58 mins – “Chris Roebuck – Everyone, everywhere is under pressure to work harder. Many of us work to survive and get paid. Bored and trapped, performance is low, family relationships suffer and organizational performance deteriorates. To deliver real success, people must be inspired to be their best. Whether you’re an individual leader, a boss, a manager, an HR professional or a CEO, you must know how to transform both your own and your employees’ performances. So I guess it’s a good thing that this week we are interviewing the guy who wrote the book (literally) on leadership.”

Lost Innocence P1 55 mins – “A rebroadcast of the highly-acclaimed award-winning CBC Radio series commemorating the outbreak of World War II. In this hour we hear the remarkable testimony of courageous children who fought against the Nazis in occupied Europe.” At the link find the title, “Lost Innocence, Part 1 – Little Fighters: Children in the Resistance,” right-click “Download Lost Innocence, Part1 -…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mayors Discuss America 47 mins – “We talk with mayors from across the country on going local to find the future. Plus: Jack Beatty on Boston’s own Mayor Menino.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Melanoma Advances 6 mins – “It has been another great conference for melanoma advances. We have heard exciting new data. The conference had to open an extra plenary session just dedicated to melanoma. I will talk about the three presentations in that plenary session, which was very well attended and well regarded. The first study is a phase 3 randomized trial[1] of nivolumab vs investigator’s choice of chemotherapy in patients who had previously received and progressed on ipilimumab. The findings were presented by Dr Jeffery Weber from the Moffitt Cancer Center.”At the link you can listen and read the results, but not download the audio file; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Mental Focus 69mins – “We talk first to microbiologist Siouxsie Wiles about the Ebola virus—what the risks really are, and why many people might be overreacting. [Then at the 25 min mark] …we talk to cognitive psychologist, neuroscientist, musician, and writer Daniel Levitin about his new book The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload..” At the link find the title,”55 Daniel Levitin – The Organized Mind,” right-click “Media files 171461281-inquiringminds-55-daniel-levitin-the-organized-mind.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Mental Illness 51 mins – “Suicides in the military have skyrocketed since the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The military’s suicide rate jumped more than 80 percent between 2002 and 2009. One military family is trying to change that. The Grahams lost two sons: one in combat in Iraq and one to suicide. But the Grahams were astonished by the different reactions their deaths received from the Army. The one killed in combat was lauded as a hero, while the other’s death was met with silence. In a new book, Yochi Dreazen, the managing editor of Foreign Policy, shows how this family channeled their grief into working to transform the military’s approach to soldiers with mental illness. Related Links – Yochi Dreazen: Stop Pretending Drone Warfare Is Casualty-Free for America; Yochi Dreazen: Suicide Mission” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Misconceptions 19 mins – “How much do you know about the world? Hans Rosling, with his famous charts of global population, health and income data (and an extra-extra-long pointer), demonstrates that you have a high statistical chance of being quite wrong about what you think you know. Play along with his audience quiz — then, from Hans’ son Ola, learn 4 ways to quickly get less ignorant.” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MS Discussion 25 mins – “With Nice announcing its latest guidelines on drugs and clinical care, the Guardian’s health editor is joined by an expert panel to discuss the implications for those who suffer from MS. Sarah is joined in studio by Professor Mark Baker, director of the centre for clinical practice at Nice, Dr Paul Cooper, chair of the MS guidelines committee, Dr Nick Rijke, executive director of policy and research at the MS Society, and Amy Bowen, director of service development at the MS Trust.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mt Tambora Eruption 35 mins – “If you think Mount Pinatubo or Krakatoa was the largest recorded volcanic eruption, then you’re missing an important event in global history. Almost 200 years ago in 1815, the eruption of Mount Tambora precipitated three years of dramatic global events that are only now being traced to the eruption. On this episode, Dr. Gillen D’Arcy Wood discussed the famines, epidemics, and extreme weather that characterized the early 19th century and how it all started with the periodic rumblings of a little island’s long dormant volcano.” At the link right-click “Listen to episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Price Decline 46 mins – “Despite the Middle East crisis and Russian tensions, world oil prices are plummeting. We’ll look at why and what it means for rising clean energy.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physical Exams 35 mins – “In today’s episode, Ryan is joined by the lovely Allison who is celebrating her birthday today, as they get touchy-feely, talking about physical exams. In their search to figure out the topic for this week, Allison came across a great, beautiful piece featured on The New York Times written by Dr. Danielle Ofri, an associate professor at New York University. The most recent article she wrote, The Physical Exam as a Refuge, raises a number of great points that speak not only to physicians but to medical students as well. In this episode, the powerful duo will try to dissect these points for the listeners as well as share their insights so students will walk away with better understanding about this topic. So how do you view your physical exams going from medical student to doctor?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pinball Machines 15 mins – “Everyone has tried it at some point. The authorities started turning a blind eye years ago, but it wasn’t officially legalized until the summer of 2014. Finally, after more than 80 years of illegitimacy, the City of Oakland has legalized…pinball machines. Pinball’s design history can help explain why it was illegal for so long. The game used to be a bit more like billiards–you’d shoot the ball onto the play field with a pool stick. In the 1860s, the pool cue turned into a spring-loaded plunger, that you’d pull and release to launch the ball. The game was made small, to fit on top of a counter at a bar or drugstore, and it looked like a simple wooden box, with no electricity, flashy art, or bright colors….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prince’s Music 49 mins – “Musical icon Prince is back. With two new albums. We look at the life and music of the Purple One.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Restoring America 23mins – “Reporter Bob Herbert on his new book, Losing Our Way, an intimate and heartrending portrait of America in economic despair.” At the link find the title, “Full Show: Restoring an America That Has Lost Its Way,” right-click “Media files Moyers_and_Company_340_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shell Shock Bug 78 mins – At twenty-three minutes starts a 55 min discussion of the Shell Shock Bug. Some of the visual aids are helpful towards the end. The beginning part: “Windows 10 on the way, AMD making a 64bit ARM Processor, Verizon decides to not throttle customers, Incapsula reports 1 Billion attacks in four days,…” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Study 29 mins – “Keith travels to Sunspot, New Mexico, to visit with Steven Kyle, the retired director of the National Solar Observatory. Kyle talks about the amazing discoveries made by the NSO during his directorship. Kyle also explains how solar activity does and does NOT impact on our climate. Learn more about the NSO at http://www.nso.edu/.” At the link right-click the Play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” and from the pop-up menu.

Sotomayor Impact 47 mins – “…The nine justices of the high court can change your life with the twitch of an eyebrow. Right in the middle of those nine, Justice Sonia Sotomayor. Sharp. Spirited. Up from a Bronx tenement. The first Latina Supreme court justice. Sotomayor has shared her own life in print. Now Supreme Court correspondent Joan Biskupic picks up where the Justice left off. The rest of the story – personal and professional….” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Text Book Costs 15 mins – “Prices of new textbooks have been going up like crazy. Faster than clothing, food, cars, and even healthcare. Listeners have been asking for years why textbooks are getting so expensive. On today’s show, we actually find an answer. College textbooks are expensive. You probably already know this. A new biology or economics book can cost $300. And prices have been soaring, doubling over the past decade, growing faster than the price of housing, cars, even healthcare. But, surprisingly, the amount students actually spend on textbooks has not been rising. In fact the best data we could find on this shows students have been spending a bit less over time.” At the link find the title, “# 573: Why Textbook Prices Keep Climbing,” right-click “npr_353579292.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

The Force Is Strong 47 mins – “A long time ago in a galaxy called George Lucas, “Star Wars” was born. We look at how “Star Wars” conquered the cultural universe.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Truckers 55 mins – “IDEAS host Paul Kennedy continues to report on a coast-to-coast study about how travelling affects almost everything else in our lives, with a look at the lives of several truckers from Prince Edward Island.” At the link find the title, “On The Move with Truckers ,” right-click “Down On The Move with Truckers” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Powers Act 48 mins – “…When Thomas Jefferson went after the Barbary pirates, he at least asked for a declaration of war from Congress. With Barack Obama going after ISIS, never mind that. He just cites an “authority” going back to 2001 against Al Qaeda. ISIS and Al Qaeda are not the same. They’re rivals. Should the president formally go to Congress for a declaration of war on the Islamic State? Some hot voices are saying yes, it’s right there in the Constitution. And others no, we’re past that. Are we? Should we be? When we’re talking a campaign of years? This hour, On Point: ISIS, the President and War Powers.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Web Typography Book 31 mins – “Jason Santa Maria of Vox Media & A Book Apart discusses his new book, On Web Typography, with host Jeffrey Zeldman. The two designers discuss writing on trains, placing objects and playing with type, the new web designer, designing the Typekit logo, editorial design and Vox Media, three years and two editors, heavenly italics, type classification systems, Dieter Rams and “touch-ability,” design as strategy, hitting it with the pretty stick, and more.” At the link right-click “MP3 Audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Public 55 mins – “Public spaces have a huge impact on millions of women around the world. Megan Williams explores how the conception and design of public space profoundly affects the lives of women.” At the link find the title, “Claiming Space,” right-click “Download Claiming Space” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Young Worker Attitude 13 mins – “A new generation of workers has a new generation of values – which can mean walking away from raises and promotions.” At the link find the title, “What the New Workforce Wants From Jobs,” right-click “IHUB-101114-C.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 4200 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 21+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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Media Mining Digest 152 – 10 Oct 2014: Aid Program Comparisons, ALEC Impact, Antibiotics, Apple Cider, Application Building, Architectural Innovation, Aristotle, Automation Concerns, Baldness, Bees-Bird-Pesticides, Biodiversity, Bloodletting, Broadband in Minnesota, Carbon Shock, Climate Challenge, Climate Science in School, CO2 Satellite, CPR Device, Crazy Mail, Danish Hotdogs, Digital Revolution,Disabled College Students, Disaster Fund Raising, Drug Abuse, Ebola Issues,Economics Philosopy, Engineer Education Upgrade, Facebook Tutorial, Female Genital Cutting, Fertility Research, Financial System Control, Hallucinogenic Therapy, Higher Education History, Ideas, Identities Online, Indian WomenScientists, InnovationHistory, ISIS Attack on Kobani, Laino America, Leprosy, Lizard Thinking, Machiavelli, Marshmallo Test, Microbiology Research, Microfluidics, Mooshimeter, O’Hare Snow Removal,Perovskite Solar Cell, Plastic Microsphere Pollution, Podcast Network, Podcast Startup, Police Shootings, Queuing, Theory, Radiation Therapy, Renewable Power Trend, Single Parenthood, Smarphone Security, Solar Cell Upgrade, Tobacco, Transgender Stories, Ultrasound Use In Emergency Room, Urine, Zodiac Killer

The following audio files come from a larger group of 188 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 63 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Aid Program Comparisons 43 mins – “A team of economists has been running the numbers on the U.N.’s development goals. They have a different view of how those billions of dollars should be spent.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ALEC Impact 51mins – “In recent weeks, a number of corporations have decided to end their membership in ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council. Many have attributed their departure to ALEC’s position on climate change issues. The organization, which drafts model state-level legislation, maintains it takes no position on climate. But ALEC policies on energy and the environment have drawn criticism. And many remain concerned that the organization represents a troubling trend of big money in politics. But others point to ALEC’s usefulness as a tool for getting legislation through to states, given Washington’s ongoing gridlock. A conversation about ALEC: how it works, who’s behind it, and why some worry about its role in shaping American politics.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the program is included in the blog archive.

Antibiotics 14 mins – “Drug-resistant bacteria and fewer new antibiotics could set us up for a return to the Dark Ages, when minor infections were fatal.” At the link find the title, “Life After Antibiotics,” right-click “IHUB-100414-A.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apple Cider 47 mins – “All about hard cider. It’s all over these days. And sweet, fresh apple cider, too. We’ll look at the history and comeback.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Application Building 51 mins – “We’re Building an App! We want to create a Tasks app that can take pictures of things we want to remember, tag location data to specific tasks, allow us to share OR KEEP PRIVATE that task list, and do it all across all of our devices. The first thing we want to do when we’re developing an app is to break down its functions….” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the blue down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Architectural Innovation 18 mins – “Straight lines form the core of our built environment. Building in straight lines makes predicting costs and calculating structural loads easier, since building materials come in linear units. Straight lines might be logical, predictable, and efficient, but they are also completely “godless”—at least according to Austrian artist and designer Tausendsassa Friedensreich Regentag Dunkelbunt Hundertwasser (which translates to “Multi-Talented Peace-Filled Rainy Day Dark-Colored Hundred Waters” in German). Hundertwasser made a name for himself, so to speak, with his psychedelic, whimsical paintings and his public speaking engagements that he would sometimes deliver completely naked….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aristotle 47 mins – “How Aristotle invented science. The great ancient Greek, and life on Earth.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Automation Concerns 46 mins – “Nicholas Carr says automation, all over, is turning us into zombies. Out of touch with the world. He’s with us.” At the link right-click “Listen to this story” and select “Save this link as” from the pop-up menu.

Baldness 34 mins – “Welcome to Sawbones, where Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband Justin McElroy take you on a whimsical tour of the dumb ways in which we’ve tried to fix people. This week: We fix that cueball of yours.” At the link right-click “Sawbones18Baldness.mp3” beside “Direct download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bees-Bird-Pesticides 24 mins – “We look into the controversy over Neonicotinoid pesticides and their impact on pollinators and other wildlife. One of the biggest news stories in science this past summer was about the birds and the bees … and the pesticides. Studies flooded into the academic journals all summer long, with new findings about the effects of neonicotinoids, or neonics. They’re the most common class of insecticide in the world, used on crops all over the planet. And those studies raised alarming questions about the impact of neonicotinoids on both the birds and the bees. We sent freelance science writer, and Quirks contributor, Alanna Mitchell, to investigate.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biodiversity 25 mins – “Vincent Horn and Buddhist Geeks (4:42): On October 16th the Buddhist Geek Conference comes to boulder. Founder Vincent Horn speaks to us about how mindfulness, compassion and contemplative practice can be integrated into the technical world. Future Earth(12:58): On our second feature, CSU Professor Dennis Ojima talks to Susan Moran about the Future Earth Initiative. A lofty project which aims to connect scientists, policy makers and the business sector to design activities to tackle global environmental change at local and regional levels.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Bloodletting 30 mins – “Welcome to Sawbones, where Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband Justin McElroy take you on a whimsical tour of the dumb ways in which we’ve tried to fix people. This week: We put a leech on you and Justin loses a finger.” At the link right-click “Sawbones3Bloodletting.mp3” beside “Direct download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Minnesota 19 mins – “Calls for “dig once” policies have resonated for years. The general idea is that we can more fiber and conduit in the ground at lower prices if we coordinate to include them in various projects that already disturb the ground. In the south Twin Cities metro in Minnesota, Dakota County has been tweaking its dig once approach for more than a decade. This week, Network Collaboration Engineer David Asp and .Net Systems Analyst Rosalee McCready join us to discuss their approach to maximizing all opportunities to get fiber and conduit in the ground. They work in a county that ranges from rural farms in the south to urban cities in the north, offering lessons for any local government.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3…” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Shock 28 mins – “We hear a lot about putting a price on carbon but what does it really mean? This week’s guest on Sea Change Radio, Mark Schapiro, an investigative journalist and the author of Carbon Shock, helps us understand the bustling carbon market that already exists and explains the carbon taxes that all of us are already paying – whether we know it or not. Listen now as Schapiro and host Alex Wise explore the fundamental question of who should bear the burden of an overheated planet that has resulted from the burning of cheap fossil fuels over the past century and a half.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Challenge 19 mins – “…recent negotiations have not produced much in the way of significant commitments by the major producers – the US, China, India and Russia, and global emissions continue to rise. Dr. Mark Jaccard specializes in sustainable energy and climate policy in the School of Environmental Management at Simon Fraser University. He thinks chances of a major international agreement to control emissions in the near term are not great. On the other hand, he suggests that there are some very promising initiatives happening at the local and regional level, some within Canada, that demonstrate that regulation, appropriate economic policies, and sustainable technologies can have an impact on emissions. He suggests that this has removed some of the familiar excuses for inaction, including the notion that emissions reductions are not practical and will have dire economic consequences.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Science in School 27 mins -“ Season eight of of Lab Out Loud starts with our thoughts turning towards climate science. As Programs and Policy Director for the National Center for Science Education, Mark McCaffrey boasts an impressive resume in climate and environmental science. Mark helped lead the development of the Climate Literacy & Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) and has testified before the House Subcommittee on Research about climate and environmental education. As the author of the recently published book “Climate Smart & Energy Wise” (Corwin Press), Mark argues how humanity’s greatest challenge is missing from American science classrooms. Listen to Lab Out Loud to learn about Mark’s work and how all educators might infuse climate science into their classes.” At the link right-click “Download” by the sound bar and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CO2 Satellite 8 mins – “Earlier this summer, NASA successfully launched the Orbiting Carbon Observatory, or OCO-2 satellite. The satellite is designed to build a much more detailed picture of where CO2 is emitted – both from natural and man-made sources – and absorbed. While ground-based monitoring of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere has great precision, it doesn’t tell us much about where CO2 is coming from, and especially going to. We know oceans and forests take up large amounts of CO2, but there are vast gaps in our knowledge of just where this is taking place on a regional scale. According to Dr. David Crisp, the Science Team Leader for OCO-2 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, the satellite will be able to build a detailed global map of CO2 sources and sinks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CPR Device 4 mins – “J.D. Dhein speaks to Peggy Russo about the CPR RsQAssist Device. A device to help deliver pre-AED chest compressions. It delivers directions and improves your ability to deliver effective compressions.” A battery is incorporated, lasts ten years, and sounds an alarm when it gets weak. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu, but the video there is more useful. The device costs $80 or with a wall cabinet, $122.

Crazy Mail 20 mins – “As an editor at Scientific American John Rennie delighted in the weird correspondence they received, but then one letter crossed a line. John Rennie is a science writer, editor, and lecturer based in New York. Viewers of The Weather Channel know him as the host of the original series Hacking The Planet and co-host of the hit special The Truth About Twisters. He is also the editorial director of science for McGraw-Hill Education, overseeing its highly respected AccessScience online reference and the McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science & Technology. Rennie served as editor in chief of Scientific American (including the monthly magazine, Scientific American Mind, ScientificAmerican.com and other publications) between 1994 and 2009.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download” then select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Danish Hotdogs 27 mins – “ Neal Razzell goes to work with Copenhagen’s hot dog vendors who tell how the humble sausage is a barometer for changing attitudes to class, identity and immigration.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Man Bites Dog in Denmark – 02 Oct 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20141002-0330a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Revolution 11 mins – A brief discussion about the disruptive impact of digital trends on labor. Reference is made to a report which can only be obtained by subscribing to “The Economist” for $160/yr. At the link note the reverse order of time and find the title, “Special report: The world economy,” towards the bottom of the page, right-click “Media files 20141001_sr_author.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled College Students 56 mins – “Joyce welcomes Gayle Oliver-Plath, President /Founder of CareerEco, Timothy Luzader, Director Purdue University Center for Career Opportunities and Annie Kollar, Recruiter Bender Consulting Services, Inc. to the show. Discussed on the show will be career opportunities for students with disabilities and Bender’s Virtual Career Fair on November 13, 2014.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Fund Raising 15 mins – “Medical workers in Monrovia, Liberia, put on their protective suits before treating Ebola patients. Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images The response to the 2010 earthquake in Haiti was massive: Billions of dollars in donations poured in. “It had everything,” says Joel Charny, who works with InterAction, a group that coordinates disaster relief. “It had this element of being an act of God in one of the poorest countries on the planet that’s very close to the United States. … And the global public just mobilized tremendously.” People haven’t responded to the Ebola outbreak in the same way; it just hasn’t led to that kind of philanthropic response….” At the link find the title, “#571: Why Raising Money For Ebola Is Hard,” right-click “npr_351851565.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Abuse 60 mins – “This week we’re looking at the science and policy of treating drug addiction. We’re joined by psychology professor and researcher Carl Hart to talk about his book “High Price: A Neuroscientist’s Journey of Self-Discovery That Challenges Everything You Know About Drugs and Society.” And we’ll speak to Donald MacPherson, Director of the Canadian Drug Policy Coalition, about harm reduction strategies to reduce the negative consequences of drug use.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Issues, Etc 98 mins – “The TWiV [This Week In Virology] team consults an epidemiologist to forecast the future scope of the Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa. This episode of TWiV is brought to you by the Department of Microbiology at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Composed of over 20 virology labs, all centralized in one building in the heart of New York City, this department is a perfect fit for anyone with an interest in pursuing virus research. The Department is presently looking to recruit any prospective graduate students to apply to our program by the December 1st deadline. Interested postdocs are also encouraged to contact faculty of interest. For more information about the Department, please visit www.mssm.edu/MIC.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 304” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economics Philosophy 69 mins – “Martha Nussbaum of the University of Chicago and author of Creating Capabilities talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about an alternative to GDP for measuring economic performance at the national level. She is a proponent of the capabilities approach that emphasizes how easily individuals can acquire skills and use them, as well as the capability to live long and enjoy life. Nussbaum argues that government policy should focus on creating capabilities rather than allowing them to emerge through individual choices and civil society..” At the ink right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineer Education Upgrade 80 mins – “In a lively discussion of how to best prepare today’s engineering students for tomorrow’s engineering challenges, we talk with Dave Goldberg and Catherine Whitney about their new book, A Whole New Engineer.” The link provides reference documents in addition to the podcast. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the audio file.

Facebook Tutorial 69 mins – “Robert Scoble shows Leo Laporte how to make Facebook’s News Feed work better for you.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Genital Cutting 43 mins – “Across Africa, some 92 million women and girls have undergone female genital cutting. It comes with serious health risks like bleeding, infections, and even death. Women’s rights activist Molly Melching says it’s understandable to be outraged, but you can’t simply tell people to abandon a deeply embedded cultural practice. Melching is founder of a non-profit called Tostan, which doesn’t “fight” FCG, but educates a community about what’s happening to their girls. Melching is in Utah, and joins Doug to discuss the crucial role of empathy in effecting change.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fertility Research 18 mins – “Discussion of a Series on fertility preservation, Listen to The Lancet: 03 October and an interview with Glenda Gray, new President of South Africa’s Medical Research Council.” At the link find the title, “Listen to The Lancet: 03 October,” right-click “Media files 03october.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial System Control 51 mins – “Martin Wolf’s column in the Financial Times has been called “required reading for the international financial elite.” The former World Bank economist has a new book about the global financial crisis. Wolf criticizes the policies that caused it as well the responses to it. He calls for abandoning the orthodox thinking that led policymakers to completely miss the signs of the oncoming meltdown. He talks with Diane about why the global financial system remains so fragile and what can be done to strengthen it.” At the link you can only listen, but a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Hallucinogenic Therapy 51 mins – “Millions of Americans suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, including hundreds of thousands of veterans. Yet standard drug and therapy treatments have mixed success rates. Some cases of PTSD are considered untreatable. But researchers are seeing dramatic results from therapy that uses psychedelic drugs to treat PTSD, depression and addiction. Therapy involving substances like Psilocybin and MDMA, better known as ecstasy, show 80 percent success rates years after treatment. Diane and a panel of [4] guests discuss new research on drugs that have long been considered dangerous and illicit.” At the link you can only listen, but a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Higher Education History 57 mins – “Last year, President Obama proposed sweeping changes to the way government helps to finance students’ higher education, and an unprecedented system of collegiate rankings – all in the name of greater access and better value for the “consumer.” But others object to a consumerist mentality in the realm of higher education, and the application of “business” models to its institutions. So in this episode of BackStory, Peter, Ed, and Brian take on the history of higher ed – exploring earlier battles over the nature and purpose of the collegiate enterprise, and what they mean today.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ideas 55 mins – “ideacity is a three-day gathering of minds held each June in Toronto, produced and presented by Moses Znaimer. In this episode: humanity shares a complex world with other species. Speakers ponder how we can see ourselves as part of that larger context” At the link find the title, “Moses Znaimer’s ideacity Conference – Beyond Ourselves,” right-click “Download Moses Znaimer’s ideacity Conference – Beyond Ourselves” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Identities Online 72 mins – “Do you have a name? More than one? Does it matter to you who knows it? As digital systems become more integrated into our lives, these questions are becoming very important. We’re in the midst of a literal identity crisis where your identity is quickly becoming, rather than something you define, a social construct that is granted to you. aestetix, after being suspended twice by Google Plus for violating their “Real Names” policy, helped found NymRights, which has consulted on President Obama’s National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC). In this talk he guides an exploration of the philosophy of names and identity, the digital systems we’ve created over the past decades, and the challenges that arise when the systems come into conflict with individual safety and freedom.” At the link right-click “MP3” beside “Download the…” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Women Scientists 30 mins – “Two days ago, India celebrated the success of its first Mars mission. Since then, the country and the world have been celebrating something else: the role of the women behind this mission.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save ink As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation History 20 mins – “If you don’t think sewers are as impressive as iPads, think again. Author Steven Johnson explores some innovations with unintended consequences.” At the link find the title, “Unexpected Innovations That Shape Our World,” right-click “IHUB-100414-B.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS attack on Kobani 47 mins – “ISIS and the battle for control of the Syrian town of Kobani. The Kurds have it. ISIS wants it. The US is bombing. We’ll look at the lessons of the battle for Kobani.” At the link right-click “Download to this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Latino America 46 mins – “Latino America. It is very large and growing very fast. How will it move the country?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leprosy 34 mins – “Welcome to Sawbones, where Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband Justin McElroy take you on a whimsical tour of the dumb ways in which we’ve tried to fix people. This week: We get biblical on leprosy.” At the link right-click “Sawbones28Leprosy.mp3” beside “Direct download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lizard Thinking 54 mins – “University of British Columbia student David Moscrop argues that modern democracy just isn’t built right for our brains, and that it dooms us into dumb thinking. He’s got an idea for fixing that.” At the link find the title, “Ideas from the Trenches – Too Dumb for Democracy,” right-click “Download Ideas from the Trenches – Too Dumb for Democracy” from the pop-up menu.

Machiavelli 55 mins – “Niccolo Machiavelli’s name is synonymous with treachery. His book, The Prince, has inspired political leaders around the world. Yet some scholars believe that it’s a brilliant satire. Nicola Luksic explores the case for both sides.” At the link find the title, “Machiavelli: The Prince of Paradox,” right-click “Download Machiavelli: The Prince of Paradox” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marshmallow Test 51 mins – “In the late 1960s, Walter Mischel conducted a series of experiments with preschoolers at a Stanford University nursery school. Popularly known as “The Marshmallow Test,” 4 and 5-year-olds were presented with a difficult choice: they could eat one treat immediately or wait several minutes longer to be rewarded with two. Years later, Mischel followed up with children in his original study and discovered a surprising link: The kids who had waited for two treats had higher SAT scores, greater workplace success and a lower body mass index later in life. A leading expert on self-control discusses his famous “Marshmallow Test,” the nature of willpower and implications for public policy.“ At the link you can only listen, but a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Microbiology Research 51 mins – “Host: Michele Swanson speaks with Guests: Thomas Brock, Timothy Donohue, Katrina Forest, and Richard Gourse. members of the Department of Bacteriology at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, on the occasion of its designation as a Milestones in Microbiology site, where they discuss how the department has advanced the science and teaching of microbiology.” At the link right-click “TWiM #88” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microfluidics 20 mins – “Keith talks with Shuichi Takayama, a Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Macromolecular Science & Engineering at the University of Michigan. Shuichi studies microfluidics, which is a way of manipulating small volumes of fluids in useful ways. Microfluidics can save research dollars, emulate cell function, and find the fastest, healthiest sperm that will produce healthier embryos. Shuichi has a talent for metaphor – find out how baking a cake and tiny ants washing their hands fit in to how he describes his research!” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mooshimeter 85 mins – “Eric VanWyk, cofounder of the Mooshimeter and adjunct professor at Olin College of Engineering stops by to talk (sociopathic) compliance testing, manufacturing, crowd funding, LEGO and more!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

O’Hare Snow Removal 24 mins – “In the Midwestern United States, the winter of 2013-2014 was one of the most severe in recorded weather history. In Chicago, every type of transportation was affected by waves of Arctic cold and 80 inches of snowfall. At O’Hare International Airport, in suburban Chicago, the challenge of removing snow and ice from 14 miles of runways, 45 miles of taxiways, and 20 million square feet of gate areas during this period of extreme weather was immense – this for the second busiest airport in the U.S., handling more than 194,000 flight operations for the first 3 months of 2014. Yet O’Hare did such a good job that it won a top aviation industry award for excellence in snow and ice control – the coveted Balchen/Post Award issued annually by the Northeast Chapter of the American Association of Airport Executives – O’Hare was this year’s winner in the large commercial airports category. Professor Schofer discusses the snow removal challenges at O’Hare Airport and how they are met with George Lyman, Managing Deputy Commissioner, Chicago Department of Aviation, Airport Airfield Operations and Vehicle Services Sections.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Perovskite Solar Cell 4 mins – “Hydrogen is regarded as an excellent candidate future fuel on the grounds that it is relatively easy to store and it burns cleanly to produce only heat and water. But present methods of production involve fossil fuels and are energy intensive, offsetting any benefits of the hydrogen. Instead, scientists would like to use electricity from renewable sources to split water into hydrogen and oxygen, with solar power being one obvious choice. Unfortunately, current silicon-based cells cannot produce a sufficiently high output voltage individually, meaning that several of them need to be linked together in series. But, this week, a new generation of solar cells has been unveiled. They’re made from a lead-based material called Perovskite, which is more up to the job, as science writer Mark Peplow explains…” At the link right-cock “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plastic Microsphere Pollution 9 mins – “Microplastic beads have been found in St. Lawrence River sediments for the first time. Microplastic pollution had been a problem in the oceans for many years. This can be plastic broken down into tiny fragments over time, or it can be in the form of microbeads, which are tiny, often colourful, pellets of plastic used in many cosmetics and household cleaners. They are commonly found floating in the surface water, and can number in the thousands per litre. But recently, Dr. Anthony Ricciardi, an Associate Professor and Invasive Species Biologist at McGill University in Montreal, was shocked to find them in the sediment at the bottom of the St. Lawrence River, in similar quantities as those found in oceans. The beads sink to the bottom as they acquire micro-organisms, which absorb toxins, such as PCBs. Further research is required to determine if the harmful microbeads will make their way into the food chain.” At the link right “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcast Network 45 mins – “For 15 years, the journalist Alex Blumberg enjoyed a pretty respectable career in public radio. He was an executive producer on This American Life, and he co-hosted NPR’s Planet Money podcast. Given that success, why did he quit his day job, ditch public radio, and go it alone as a business entrepreneur? Don’t worry, Blumberg hasn’t gone too far afield. His new pursuit: it’s a podcast company. He joins us Tuesday to explain his career change and to share his story of getting a startup off the ground. Alex Blumberg served as an executive producer of This American Life since 1999. He co-hosted NPR’s Planet Money podcast. His new podcast is about the challenges of starting a for-profit podcast. It’s called StartUp.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcast Startup 27 mins – “A series about what happens when someone who knows nothing about business starts one. With Alex Blumberg from This American Life & Planet Money.” At the link find the title, “ #4 Startups are a Risky Business,” right-click “Media files 169954282-hearstartup-4-startups-are-a-risky-business.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Police Shootings 47 mins – “Police shootings, cop culture, body cameras. And the big debate over how to protect the public and the police.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Queuing Theory 4 mins – “It’s happened to all of us. We call with a question about a bill or to get help with a new purchase, and we’re shunted to a world of unfamiliar music and a voice that intermittently tells us: “All operators are busy. Please stay on the line and your call will be answered by the next available agent.” Why can’t companies simply hire enough people to answer our questions? In 1908 a young man by the name of Agner Erlang was faced with a similar question. A student of mathematics, Erlang was persuaded to join the Copenhagen Telephone Company as head of its newly established technical laboratory. The lab faced an important question: how many switchboards and operators should the phone company provide? ” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 2972” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radiation Therapy 37 mins – “Welcome to Sawbones, where Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband Justin McElroy take you on a whimsical tour of the dumb ways in which we’ve tried to fix people. This week: We’re radioactive.” At the link right-click “Sawbones13Radium.mp3” beside “Direct download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Renewable Power Trend 12 mins – “Reports that China will stop importing brown coal from Australia didn’t surprise Peter Newman. He says figures from Bloomberg New Energy Finance show that investment in fossil fuel infrastructure such as coal fired power stations peaked in 2008. Emerging economies are now choosing renewable energy, with China showing the way and setting the agenda. New coal fired power stations are banned in the European Union and the US. The World Bank won’t finance them. China is closing coal fired stations around Beijing because the air quality is so bad. Peter Newman says the green economy is taking off faster than expected and new investments in coal will likely become stranded assets. It means the much hoped for 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 now looks possible.

Single Parenthood 51 mins – “Over half of all births to young adults in the United States now occur outside of marriage, and many of those are unplanned. Too often, the result is increased poverty for many children. Some argue for a return to traditional marriage. Others say we need more social support for unmarried parents. Family policy expert Isabel Sawhill offers a third option which involves what she calls childbearing by design, not by default. Diane and her [3] guests discuss the impact of family structure on child well-being.” At the link you can only listen, but a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Smartphone Security 51 mins – “Tech giants Apple and Google recently announced that operating systems for their newest phones will be encrypted with a complex code. The move would make photos, videos and personal contacts accessible only by the owner of the phone. Privacy advocates hailed the decision as a welcome response to what they say is massive data collection by intelligence agencies. But law enforcement officials warn smartphone encryption will hinder criminal investigations and jeopardize public safety. And a Swedish company could gain control over the nation’s phone routing system. Diane and [4[ guests discuss new concerns over phones, intelligence gathering and national security.” At the link you can only listen, but a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Solar Cell Upgrade 4 mins – “Hydrogen is regarded as an excellent candidate future fuel on the grounds that it is relatively easy to store and it burns cleanly to produce only heat and water. But present methods of production involve fossil fuels and are energy intensive, offsetting any benefits of the hydrogen. Instead, scientists would like to use electricity from renewable sources to split water into hydrogen and oxygen, with solar power being one obvious choice. Unfortunately, current silicon-based cells cannot produce a sufficiently high output voltage individually, meaning that several of them need to be linked together in series. But, this week, a new generation of solar cells has been unveiled. They’re made from a lead-based material called Perovskite, which is more up to the job, as science writer Mark Peplow explains…” At the link right-click “Download” and elect “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Tobacco 34 mins – “Welcome to Sawbones, where Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband Justin McElroy take you on a whimsical tour of the dumb ways in which we’ve tried to fix people. This week: We take a big drag off of wellness.” At the link right-click “Sawbones14Tobacco.mp3” beside “Direct download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender Stories 50 mins – “It’s estimated that there are nearly 1.5 million people in the U.S. who identify themselves as transgender. That’s more than a million people with families, communities and stories we are only just starting to hear from. When someone transitions, the impact of that decision ripples beyond them to the people often closest to them: their families. In this hour of radio, we tell stories of trans people and their families at many different moments of life, from childhood to adulthood to elders, as parents, as spouses and as kids, themselves.” At the link find the title, “Trans Families,” right-click “Media files TransFamilies_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ultrasound Use in Emergency Room 28 mins – “Episode 22 is a response to an article on KevinMD from April 2014, “Forget Ultrasound, Do a Proper History and Physical Instead.” In this article, written by a radiologist, Dr. Saurabh Jha (@roguerad – follow him. I do, very interesting thoughts and perspective), the argument is made that POC US [Point Of Care Ultra Sound] is being done indiscriminately, instead of a good H/P. Amongst other things, the article concludes that POC US is bad for patients, costing taxpayer money and leading to over testing and over diagnosis. POC US has been similarly accused recently in regards to leading to over testing (see this thought provoking post from EM Nerd). Dr. Jha’s article was originally written in response to this article from NEJM, which sang praises for POC US, but did have some mischaracterizations. Admittedly, we may have overall overreacted a bit to this article as can be seen in the comments (the title alone is inflammatory, but frankly KevinMD often is recently). Dr. Jha made the following clarification in the comment section: “I’m advocating against indiscriminate use of ultrasound, as routine, as a substitute or extension of H & P (see NEJM article), not against selective use of imaging within clinical context.” At the link find the title, “Episode 22: Do an H/P, But Don’t Forget US,” right-click “US_or_physical_exam.m4a” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urine 35 mins – “Welcome to Sawbones, where Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband Justin McElroy take you on a whimsical tour of the dumb ways in which we’ve tried to fix people. This week: We keep your pee pee in a cup.” At the link right-click “Sawbones12Urine.mp3” beside Direct download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zodiac Killer 56 mins – A story, or perhaps two, about a man who may be the son of the unidentified Zodiac Killer. At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right-end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 4200 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 21+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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Media Mining Digest 151 – 3 Oct 2014: 3D Printing, Aging Passionately, Antibiotic Resistance, Artificial Sweeteners, Astronomy, Augmentation, Autism Study, Bank Regulation, Bob Newhart Interview, Brain Trauma Treatment, CAD and CAM, Chess of Interest, Climate Activist, Climate and Capitalism, Climate Politics, Compernicus Complex, Data Breach Report, Data Gathering, Digital Journalism, Doctor-Patient Interaction, Dying in America, Fungi – Good and Bad, Genetic Genius, Google Story, Government CTO, Gun Seizures, Health Care for Third World, Human Age, Indian Prime Minister, Innovation Economics, Insect Eating, Invasion Biology, ISIS Controversy, Legal Injustices, Linux Assistive Tech, Little Miss Cornshucks, Midwifery in Canada, Migrant DACA and DREAM, Neuroscience for Kids, Overdiagnosing, Palliative vs Assisted Death, Parasites, Parkinson’s Patient, Police History, Press Freedom, Primitive Technology, Prison Reform, Rape and Alcohol On Campus, Richard Branson, Ride Sharing, Robin Williams Interview, Seeing Eye App for Apple, Sex Warfare, Smells, Tea Party, Technologist Innovator, Tennessee Williams, Texting Hazard, Traumatic Memory Control,

The following audio files come from a larger group of 241 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 58 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

3D Printing 54 mins – “This week, are we on the verge of being able to print a new kidney or liver? And will every home soon have a machine in it to make medicines so we don’t need to head off to the chemist for a dose of antibiotics? This is the world of 3D printing and we’ll show you what it promises to deliver… Plus, in the news, is fracking contaminating underground water or is it just leaky pipes? And a new breakthrough therapy for multiple sclerosis…” At the link right-click “Download as MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Passionately 10 mins – “Author Isabel Allende is 71. Yes, she has a few wrinkles—but she has incredible perspective too. In this candid talk, meant for viewers of all ages, she talks about her fears as she gets older and shares how she plans to keep on living passionately.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotic Resistance 7 mins – “Susan Jaffe with discussion about the US President’s Scientific panel report on antibiotic resistance.” At the link find the title, “Listen to The Lancet: 19 September,” right-click “19september.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Sweeteners 41 mins – “It seems we are finally making headway in the fight against obesity. The Centers for Disease Control announced this week that rates of diabetes in the U.S. may be leveling off. Researchers credit the good news in part to a plateau in obesity rates. In other news, the top three soda makers pledged to cut beverage calories in the American diet by one-fifth over the next decade. But consumers turning to diet soda to decrease those calories should consider this: A new study in the journal “Nature” suggests artificial sweeteners may interfere with the way our bodies process sugar. Diane and her [5] guests discuss the latest news in the fight against obesity.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Astronomy 18 mins – “Big Data is everywhere — even the skies. In an informative talk, astronomer Andrew Connolly shows how large amounts of data are being collected about our universe, recording it in its ever-changing moods. Just how do scientists capture so many images at scale? It starts with a giant telescope …” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. The visual aids are impressive, so you may want the video version, too.

Augmentation 54 mins – “ideacity is a three-day gathering of minds held each June in Toronto, produced and presented by Moses Znaimer. In this episode: Humans love tools, and speakers explore new devices for doing things — maybe even leaving the earth.” The main segment presents mind control of hardware based on a Canadian product called Muse from InteraXon.ca ($299). At the link find the title, “Moses Znaimer’s ideacity Conference – Augmenting Ourselves,” right-click “Download Moses Znaimer’s ideacity Conference – Augmenting Ourselves” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Study 44 mins – “Ron and Cornelia Suskind had two healthy young sons, promising careers, and a brand new home when their youngest son Owen started to disappear. 3 months later a specialist sat Ron and Cornelia down and said the word that changed everything for them: Autism. In this episode, the Suskind family finds an unlikely way to access their silent son’s world. We set off to figure out what their story can tell us about Autism, a disorder with a wide spectrum of symptoms and severity. Along the way, we speak to specialists, therapists, and advocates including Simon Baron-Cohen, Barry and Raun Kaufmann, Dave Royko, Geraldine Dawson, Temple Grandin, and Gil Tippy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bank Regulation 59 mins – “536: The Secret Recordings of Carmen Segarra: An unprecedented look inside one of the most powerful, secretive institutions in the country. The NY Federal Reserve is supposed to monitor big banks. But when Carmen Segarra was hired, what she witnessed inside the Fed was so alarming that she got a tiny recorder and started secretly taping.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast. The web site also has the link to the mentioned confidential report of 27 pages.

Bob Newhart Interview 115 mins – “Bob Newhart is an American institution thanks to his incredibly funny and popular television shows. But the way Marc sees it, Bob Newhart is one of the most important stand-up comedians ever. Marc talks with the legend about the comedy albums that turned Bob into an overnight sensation and changed the game for American comedy….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Trauma Treatment 21mins – “Mental trauma is a growing issue in society, yet current treatments may not be addressing the issue. On this episode, Dr. Bessel van der Kolk discussed new methods for healing mental trauma.” At the link right-click “Listen to Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CAD and CAM 114 mins – “This week’s show (#278, if you’re keeping score) covers a lot of ground, and the silliness is certainly in full swing! In the NEWS department, Horizon has some new offerings and I got my OX CNC up and running … We conclude our CNC discussion this week with possible solutions for CAD design applications, as well as CAM programs. We wrap things up with Tim (IFLYOS) King discussing his adventures at the Heli Extravaganza he attended last weekend.” The CAD-CAM portion runs from 25 – 65 mins. At the link right-click “TCC_278.mp3” beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chess of Interest 48 mins – “A young grandmaster just did the impossible at a top chess tournament. No one paid attention. Does chess still matter?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Activist 25 mins – “As world leaders converge for the UN’s global summit on climate and thousands gather in New York for the People’s Climate March, Bill talks to 18-year-old Oregonian Kelsey Juliana, who is walking across America to draw attention to global warming. Kelsey Juliana comes by her activism naturally – her parents met in the 1990’s while fighting the logging industry’s destruction of old growth forests and she attended her first protest when she was two months old. Now just out of high school, she’s co-plaintiff in a major lawsuit being spearheaded by Our Children’s Trust that could force the state of Oregon to take a more aggressive stance against the carbon emissions warming the earth and destroying the environment. She’s walking across America as part of the Great March for Climate Action, due to arrive in Washington, DC, on November 1.” At the link find the title, “Climate Change: The Next Generation,” right-click “Media files Moyers_and_Company_337_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate and Capitalism 47 mins – “Three hundred thousand in the streets of New York yesterday, shouting for change on the deteriorating global climate. More marches in more than 100 cities around the world. And more thousands flooding Wall Street this morning, saying no more business as usual. Steps so far aren’t cutting it. My guest today, Naomi Klein, says there’s a reason for that. We’re in a system, she says, that drives us toward global warming. A system called capitalism. It’s time to rein it in, she says. It’s the conservative nightmare. And a new rallying cry.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Politics 62 mins – “[Starts at 15 mins.]On the show this week we talk to author and social activist Naomi Klein about her new book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate. In it, Klein argues that we are past the time when incremental change can get us to where we need to be to properly address the challenge of climate change—we’re in a situation, she says, where no non-radical choices are left. This episode also features a discussion on new research that suggests gut bacteria could be affecting our minds, and a study that examines the cross-species influence of a babies’ cries.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Copernicus Complex 58 mins – “Caleb Scharf talked about his book The Copernicus Complex: Our Cosmic Significance in a Universe of Planets and Probabilities, in which he talks about the possible beginnings of life on earth and argues that earth and humanity are unique in the universe.” At the link find the title, “After Words: Caleb Scharf,” right-click “Media files program.362433.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Breach Report 28 mins – “Wade Baker, author of a yearly report from Verizon on worldwide data breaches, talks about the dimensions and types of data breaches and recommendations for reducing their frequency. Recent breaches include Home Depot, Target and JP Morgan Chase. “ At the link find the title, “The Communicators: Wade Baker,” right-click “Media files program.366185.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Gathering 52 mins – “You may not by aware of it, but you are being tracked. Nearly every move you make on the Internet results in data that is gathered not just by governments, but by marketers, retailers, and just about any company looking for a financial edge. They harvest your information with near impunity. The journalist Adam Tanner has surveyed the world of personal data and investigated the companies mining it for profit. He joins us Thursday to explore how big data could result in the end of privacy as we know it….Adam Tanner is a fellow at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University and was previously a Nieman fellow there. Tanner has worked for Reuters News Agency as Balkans bureau chief and San Francisco bureau chief. His new book is called What Stays in Vegas: The World of Personal Data—Lifeblood of Big Business—and the End of Privacy as We Know It.“ At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Journalism 10 mins – “The growing use of tablets and mobiles by younger people is creating new challenges and pressures on broadcasters, and making space for new organisations to enter the news business. Rajan Datar discusses the future of independent journalism and the implications for existing broadcasters with Marius Dragomir, the author of a major report on digital media from the Open Society Foundation, and professor Stewart Purvis of City University.” At the link for a short time find the title, “News in a Digital World,” right-click “Download 5MB” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doctor-Patient Interaction 17 mins – “In April 2006 one of the largest hospitals in the Netherlands hit the national headlines with the exposure of “scandalously” poor results for cardiac surgery. Melvin Samsom, CEO of the hospital, explains how the high death rates galvanised quality improvement and innovative change, transforming it into a model for patient participation.” At the ink right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dying in America 48 mins – “A bipartisan report says medical care at the end of life needs a big overhaul. One bioethicist says, “After 75, no major interventions. Let me go.’” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fungi – Good and Bad 66 mins – In This Week In Parasitism 77 hosts Vincent Racaniello and Dickson Despommier discuss the exchange of messenger RNAs between a parasitic plant and its hosts. At the right-click TWIP #77” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Genius 54 mins – “2014 Friesen Prize Winner Lap-Chee Tsui talks with IDEAS host Paul Kennedy about how a boy who remembers raising tadpoles in Hong Kong became the scientist who ultimately isolated and identified the gene that causes cystic fibrosis.” At the link find the title, “Genetic Genius,” right-click “Download Genetic Genius” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Google Story 41 mins – “When Google founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page were looking for someone to run their fledgling Internet start-up, they chose Eric Schmidt. The Bell Labs alum took the reins at Google just as the company faced a major battle with Microsoft. Under Schmidt’s leadership, Google established itself as the dominant Internet search engine and a global technology giant with more than $55 billion in annual revenues. Known for its “Don’t be Evil” corporate motto, the Mountain View, Calif., company is consistently ranked as the best place to work in the United States. A conversation with Google’s executive chairman, Eric Schmidt, on fostering innovation, managing millenials and how the company is responding to privacy concerns by consumers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Government CTO 5 mins – “If you’re looking to push government out of its funk, try technology. According to Aneesh Chopra, America’s first Chief Technology Officer, young techies are coming up with ingenious solutions to government problems in their spare time.” At the link find the title, “How Tech Helps Government,” right-click “IHUB-092714-B.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Seizures 6 mins – “Contrary to the impression given by Hollywood’s depictions, most firearms seized from drug traffickers and gang members in the United States are handguns, not automatic rifles or sub-machine guns. In this podcast, senior researcher Matt Schroeder highlights and explains key findings from his analysis of more than 140,000 records on firearms seized from criminals in eight US cities. These findings were released this summer as a chapter in Small Arms Survey 2014: Women and Guns.” At the link find the title, “Instruments of Crime: Illicit weapons in the United States” right-click “Media files SAS-Podcast-25-Instruments-of-crime-illicit-weapons-in-the-US.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care for Third World 54 mins – “Healthcare professionals worldwide often have extensive non-clinical skills in management, public health, policy, or other fields which are not officially recognized through a degree. In this talk, Rebecca Weintraub, MD — Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School and Faculty Director of the Global Health Delivery Project at Harvard University — introduces the concept of digital badges for healthcare professionals, a means for demonstrating skills and experience to potential new employers, grant-giving organizations, and others. Like other well-known badge and certification systems — such as Fair Trade and organic standards for food, or LEED certification for buildings — digital badges can improve the quality of health services, and help others to recognize the skills of healthcare professionals. But how should such a system be implemented?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Age 52 mins – “As the writer Diane Ackerman tells it, homo sapiens is a force of nature nearly unprecedented in Earth’s 4.5-billion years. Like an asteroid blast, humans altered some of the planet’s fundamental processes in a geological blink of an eye. In her latest book, Ackerman takes stock of the changes wrought in the Anthropocene or “human age,” from the stamp of our settlements viewable from space, to the redistribution of life-forms, to ocean acidification. She joins us Monday to take stock of the world shaped by us… Her new book is called The Human Age: The World Shaped by Us.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Prime Minister 39 mins – “This week, on a special edition of GPS, Fareed interviews two of the world’s most powerful men. Can India become the next China? And will the world’s largest democracy ever be strategic allies with the world’s first democracy? Fareed will ask India’s new prime minister, Narendra Modi, in a global exclusive interview. Then, on the eve of the 10th annual meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative, Fareed asks former President Bill Clinton his thoughts…. “ At the link find the title, “Crisis.GPS September 21st,” click it and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Innovative Economics 14 mins – “America is in danger of losing its innovative edge and sliding into economic malaise. Clayton Christensen, author of “The Innovator’s Dilemma,” says that business leaders may be too scared to save us from the downturn.” At the link find the title, “Clayton Christensen: Our Innovation Slump,” right-click “IHUB-092714-D.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Insect Eating 60 mins – “This week, we’re looking at the environmental impact of foods we eat, and others that we should. We’ll speak to Daniella Martin, host of the insect cooking/travel show “Girl Meets Bug,” about her book “Edible: An Adventure into the World of Eating Insects and the Last Great Hope to Save the Planet.” And we’ll talk about the environmental effects of salmon farming with Peter Bridson, Aquaculture Research Manager for the Seafood Watch program at the Monterey Bay Aquarium.” At the ink right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Invasion Biology  54 mins – “Millions of YouTube viewers have seen the jumping silver carp. It’s just the newest in a long line of “celebrity alien invaders”. Barbara Nichol examines the phenomenon of invasive species: a story as much about human nature as about nature.” At the link find the title, “Bioinvasion: Attack of the Alien Species!” right-click “Download Bioinvasion: Attack of the Alien Species!” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Controversy 25 mins – “As Congress skipped town and avoided a vote on war, President Obama announced this week that the US was taking the lead in bombing jihadists in Iraq and Syria, opening what is being widely interpreted as another long and costly American military campaign in the Middle East. This week, Bill discusses the latest on the conflict with Jonathan Landay, a veteran national security reporter for McClatchy Newspapers and Matthew Hoh, a former Marine and foreign service officer in Afghanistan. “As much as President Obama wishes we weren’t the world’s policemen, perhaps we are,” Landay tells Moyers. “And there’s no escaping that curse.” Hoh, who resigned in protest from his post in Afghanistan over US strategic policy there, adds: “Is this really our model for the Middle East that we are going to bomb countries, continuously, take part in civil wars, sometimes supporting one side, maybe supporting the other, with no means or no real desire or effort to achieve a peace?” At the link find the title, “ Full Show: America’s New War in the Middle East,” right-click “Media files Moyers_and_Company_338_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Legal Injustices 54 mins – “ideacity is a three-day gathering of minds held each June in Toronto, produced and presented by Moses Znaimer. In this episode: speakers ponder how we can start to really understand other people, other cultures and ways of thought.” Topics include the Innocence Project, Mandela, Sharansky and lust! At the link find the title, “Moses Znaimer’s ideacity – Remaking Ourselves,” right-click “Download Moses Znaimer’s ideacity – Remaking Ourselves” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linux Assistive Tech 133 mins (2 parts) – “(Part 1-#255, 65m)Topic: The state of accessibility in Linux. “There are 1 billion people in the world with some type of disability. 360 million of these people are blind and have low vision. 90% of these people live in developing countries. How are they accessing technology you and I take for granted everyday? The problem is they’re not. There is proprietary software for accessible technology but it is extremely expensive and out of reach of the people that need to use it in order to access a computer. Did you know that 80% of blind people in the United States are unemployed? That’s why this is very important.” “(Part 2 -#256, 27m) In today’s episode, an introduction to assistive technology for desktop computers. Assistive technology is known by several names: Accessible technology, adaptive technology, rehabilitative devices, accessible computing, assistive devices, and more. Whatever it’s called, it’s designed to provide assistance to people with disabilities and impairments to help them improve or maintain the capabilities that their condition is preventing.” At the link and episodes 255 and 256, right-click “mp3” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Little Miss Cornshucks 27 mins – “In the late 1930’s a young Mildred Cummings from Dayton, Ohio is barefoot, standing in the spotlight on stage, wearing that same old shabby dress and a broken straw hat. This is Little Miss Cornshucks and she has the audience in the palm of her hand, a unique act and larger than life personality. By the 1940’s she made top-billing at nightclubs across America, performing heartbreaking ballads. But who remembers her now? At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Lost Legacy of Little Miss Cornshucks,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20140924-0332a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Midwifery in Canada 28 mins – “A check up on midwifery in Canada. We visit Toronto’s new birth centre where more than 400 babies are expected to be born this year, and then Brian goes to Newfoundland find out why it’s taken 30 years for midwives there to get licensed. “ At the link find the title, “Haves and Have Nots: Midwifery in Canada,” right-click “Download Haves and Have Nots: Midwifery in Canada” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant DACA and DREAM 61 mins – “With postsecondary degrees proving to be beyond the reach of many low-income immigrant youth, and a vastly under-resourced adult education system the weakest link in the U.S. educational pipeline, a lack of educational attainment and opportunities stands to block hundreds of thousands of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) youth from obtaining immigration protections for which they would otherwise qualify. This Migration Policy Institute (MPI) webinar discusses the findings of the report Diploma, Please: Promoting Educational Attainment for DACA- and Potential DREAM Act-Eligible Youth, from MPI’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy. The discussion covers the education challenges facing DACA youth, targeted programs designed to address them, and recommendations for overcoming the education-success obstacles that key subgroups of DACA-DREAM youth face. The report highlights some of the promising programs, emerging models, and policy contexts in states such as California, Texas, New York, Illinois, Georgia, and Washington State.” At the link left click “Download,” then right-click the second “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuroscience for Kids 16 mins – “High school student Grace Greenwald shares her passion for neuroscience by connecting her peers with leading researchers in the field to inspire future innovators. At the age of 15, Grace came up against a lack of resources to help high school students explore the field of neuroscience. Undaunted, she designed her own neuroscience curriculum and founded The Synapse Project, a virtual learning platform that connects professionals in brain research to high school students, especially young women, offering the next generation of neuroscientists a head start through mentorship, classes, and lab experience.” At the link find the title, “The Synapse Project: Inspiring the Future of Neuroscience,” right-click “Media files synapseproject.MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Overdiagnosing 15 mins – “ Jocalyn Clarke, executive editor at icdd,b, argues the solutions proposed to improve global health are too focused on the medical, and fail to tackle the underlying socioeconomic factors which will undermine those efforts. Read her full analysis of the situation.” At the link find the title, “Are we overmedicalising global health?” right-click “Media files 169434890-bmjgroup-are-we-overmedicalising-global.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Palliative vs Assisted Death 13 mins – “Will more access to palliative care curb support for assisted suicide in Canada?” At the link find the title, “White Coat Mini Podcast – Palliative Care vs Assisted Death,” right-click “Download White Coat Mini Podcast – Palliative Care vs Assisted Death” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parasites 55 mins – “In this episode we talk to fellow podcasters Vincent Racaniello and Dickson Despommier about viruses, bacteria and other parasites. Among other topics we discuss what each kind of parasite is made of an how they interact with the human organism (in good and bad ways).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parkinson’s Patient 28 mins – “The long and personal journey of Dr. Phil Hebert from family physician to patient with Parkinson’s disease. He tells why he kept the diagnosis a secret for so long and what finally convinced him he had to quit practising medicine. “ At the link find the title, “WCBA – Dr. Phil Hebert and Parkinson’s Disease,” right-click “Download WCBA – Dr. Phil Hebert and Parkinson’s Disease” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police History 52 mins – “For many Americans, the storyline that played out on August 9 in Ferguson, Mo. — when an unarmed black teenager was fatally shot by a white police officer — is not a new one. But the sustained protests that followed, in which Ferguson police used military equipment for crowd control, have generated a new round of questioning about the role of local police in their communities. So on this episode, we’re looking at the history of policing in America, and how the police departments we’re familiar with today began to take shape. And we’ll consider what happens when the police don’t protect those they serve.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Press Freedom 72 mins – “James Risen and other journalism advocates spoke at a press conference on freedom of the press and Obama administration efforts to compel New York Times reporter James Risen to disclose a confidential source. Mr. Risen was subpoenaed in 2008 to testify at the trial of a former Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) officer accused of leaking information on Iran’s nuclear program. Mr. Risen refused to name a source for information about a CIA operation in Iran that appeared in his book, State of War. Journalists and journalism advocacy groups have supported a petition to the Justice Department to cancel the subpoena. National Press Club president Myron Belkind also spoke about the arrest of journalists covering protests in response to the police shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri” At the link you can watch and listen, but an audio download costs $.99; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Primitive Technology 21 mins – “New evidence reveals the complicated history of stone tool use 400,000 – 200,000 years ago.” At the link find the title, “The spread of an ancient technology and a daily news roundup (26 September 2014),” right-click “Media files SciencePodcast_140926.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Reform 11 mins – “In the United States, the agencies that govern prisons are often called ‘Department of Corrections.’ And yet, their focus is on containing and controlling inmates. Dan Pacholke, Deputy Secretary for the Washington State Department of Corrections, shares a different vision: of prisons that provide humane living conditions as well as opportunities for meaningful work and learning.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rape and Alcohol On Campus 52 mins – “Wednesday, we continue our examination of the problem of sexual assault on America’s college campuses. Alcohol is at the heart of that problem. According to researchers, students who are either the victims of rape or the assailants are more often than not drunk. But, for lots of reasons, schools avoid directly discussing alcohol and rape in the same breath. We’ll talk about what colleges and universities should be doing to prevent rape and where the blame lay when an assault does occur. GUESTS: Robin Wilson is a senior writer at the Chronicle of Higher Education; Holly Mullen is the executive director of the Rape Recovery Center in Salt Lake City; Kathleen Bogle is an assistant professor of sociology and criminology at LaSalle University.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Richard Branson 41 mins – “Billionaire entrepreneur Sir Richard Branson has never taken the traditional route. At 16, he dropped out of school to start “Student” magazine, marking the start of a lifetime spent building companies from scratch. Virgin Records, his first major venture, grew to become the world’s biggest independent record label. Today, Branson is worth $5 billion, and is as well-known for his publicity stunts and risk-taking as for his business success. One of his latest ventures may be the boldest yet: with plans to make commercial space flight a reality with Virgin Galactic, he says it’s time we stop looking at our iPhones and turn our gaze skyward. In his latest book, he reflects on more than 40 years of leadership and the risks that built the Virgin empire. Richard Branson on his unconventional life in business.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Ride Sharing 20 mins – “Nobody hitchhikes anymore. Back in the 1980s getting a ride with a stranger became decidedly un-trendy. Rugged individualism was in and ridesharing was out. But now, with the advent of social media and mobile platforms, ridesharing is making a come-back. This week’s guests on Sea Change Radio are Paul Minett, the founder of the Ridesharing Institute in Auckland, NZ and Mark Svenvold, a journalist and Professor at Seton Hall University who recently profiled Minett’s work on ridesharing for Orion Magazine. Dubbed by some as the Johnny Appleseed of the new ridesharing, Minett points out that if everybody carpooled one day a week we could see as much as a 20 percent reduction in traffic volumes. The corresponding reduction in traffic jams and carbon emissions would also be pretty great. Catch a ride with us now, across the planet, to hear what it will take to put ridesharing back in vogue.” At the ink right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robin Williams Interview 62 mins – “Robin Williams passed away on August 11, 2014. This is Marc’s conversation with Robin from April 26, 2010, as well as Marc’s reflections about the great comedian and actor.” At the ink right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seeing Eye App for Apple 2 mins – “A new app may provide invaluable aid to the blind. Charlie Turner reports.” From Dow Jones MarketWatch. The app is called KNFB. At the link you can only listen, but a copy of the file is in the blog archive.
Sex Warfare 47 mins – “The news is full of beheadings, but ISIS fighters are now infamous for a campaign of sexual violence. We’ll look at the Islamic State’s war on women.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smells 44 mins – “If you asked people which of their senses they most feared losing, they’d probably say sight or hearing. But what about the ability to smell? This episode of Distillations examines what is perhaps our most underrated sense, and ponders what life would be like without it. Producer Mariel Carr hit the streets of South Philadelphia to understand how a pervasive odor troubled neighborhood residents in the summer of 2014. Then reporter Jocelyn Frank tells us the story of Mario Rivas, a man who has lived his whole life without a sense of smell, and the great lengths he went to gain one. Then, we talk to two smell experts, Pamela Dalton, a psychologist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, and David Barnes, a professor of the history of medicine and public health at the University of Pennsylvania. Our guests discuss the connection between smelling, odors, and emotions, as well as the history of odors, germs, and public health crises.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tea Party 59 mins – “Jenny Beth Martin discusses her book, [Tea Party Patriots: The Second American Revolution], how she helped found the organization, and the work it is doing on a grassroots level around the country.” At the find the title, “Q&A: Jenny Beth Martin.,” right-click “Media files program.364368.MP3-STD.mp3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technologist Innovator 29 mins – “Keith & Russ welcome Kenneth McLeod from the Department of Bioengineering at Binghamton University, where he is also the Entrepreneur in Residence and the Director of the Clinical Science & Engineering Research Center. Kenneth shares how his fascination with ideas spurred his career as an engineer and ultimately, an entrepreneur. Kenneth has successfully helped launch 12 companies that produce innovative products. He also explains why the process of trial & error is essential in eventual success.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tennessee Williams 47 mins – “Great American playwright Tennessee Williams’ battle for art and sanity – a big new biography brings his story alive.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Texting Hazard 41 mins – “Eight years ago, a 19-year-old college student in Utah was driving in the Rocky Mountains. His car jumped a divider and hit another car, causing an accident that killed two scientists on their way to work. The driver said he had no idea what happened, but phone records showed he was texting. The case was one of the first texting-while-driving accidents and helped spark state laws and a national awareness campaign. A New York Times journalist, who won a Pulitzer prize for his reporting on the use of cell phones while driving, is out with a new book about the accident. Matt Richtel argues texting while driving could be as dangerous as drunk driving, but may prove even harder to curb.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Traumatic Memory Control 54 mins – “Some neuroscientists believe they are on the verge of being able to delete memories. It could mean a cure for people who suffer from PTSD.” “But at what cost to the individual and at what cost to society?” At the link find the title “Hit Delete,” right-click “Download Hit Delete” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 4200 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 21+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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Media Mining Digest 150 – 26 Sept 2014: 50 Years Australia Science Show, Academic Redshirting, Alginates, Battery Problem, Benghazi Book, Billionaires, Bob Dylan Story, Brain Health, Cancer Case Study, Cancer Treatment, Childhood Eating, Chip Production, Computational Thinking, Container Shipping, Data Management, Deep Wreck Diving, Driverless Cars, Drone Use Responsibilities, Eating Habits, Engineering Questions, Female Hysteria History, Hearing Aid Story, Husbands School, Hydrologist Interview, Internet Governance Forum, James Booker, Majority Rules in School Board, Medicare Fraud, Mental Illness Myths, Mercury in Medicine, Montreal Protocol, News Coverage Decline, Nutrition Science, Opium History, Outsider Successes, Pain Control, Partnership Formation, Political Testimony, Premed Example, Prostate Cancer, Rumors, Rural Poverty, Sound Engineer, Smartphone Stalking, Sound and Hearing, Spray-on Cake, Teacher Maker, Teachers with Guns, Teaching Science, Trauma Manual, Traumatic Brain Injury, TWIV Q and A, War of 1812, Vaccines History, Wireless Technology, Zionist Liberals

The following audio files come from a larger group of 195 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 56 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

50 Years Australia Science Show 54 mins (2 parts) – “In the early 1960s, science in Australia was taking off. Scientists were choosing to work in Australia rather than disappearing overseas. Macfarlane Burnett and Jack Eccles were awarded Nobel Prizes. But science was poorly covered in the media. To boost coverage, the ABC formed a dedicated team, the Science Unit. Today, in the first of two programs, as Sharon Carleton takes an amble through the archives, we hear some of those early voices, including Robin Hughes, who battled to become the first female reporter to go to Woomera, reporting on nuclear tests. (Part 2) Sharon Carleton continues her romp through the archives. We revisit some of the programs which have had significant lasting effects – Matt Peacock’s reports on asbestos and mesothelioma, Peter Hunt’s reports on forestry in northern NSW which led to changed policy and forests preserved. There was fun, deception uncovered and the occasional hoax.” At the links right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menus.

Academic Redshirting 47 mins – “More parents are “red-shirting” their children in kindergarten—holding them back for a year, hoping they’ll have an edge. Does it work? We look.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alginates 6 mins – “Like many others, I have regular occasions to be thankful for sodium alginate. When acid reflux strikes, this gelatinous substance works alongside conventional antacids by acting as a barrier to prevent stomach acid from making its way into the oesophagus. The acid form, alginic acid, is a polysaccharide – a long chain, carbohydrate polymer with a repeated formula of C6H8O6. Although it is also found in soil bacteria, as the name suggests, the main source is algae, specifically brown algae, which is a group that includes many of the seaweeds, like kelps, found in chilly northern seas. The alginate performs a similar role in the seaweed to cellulose in plants and to the cosmetics industry’s favourite additive, hyaluronic acid, in animals, providing a structural matrix to support cells.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Battery Problem 135 mins – “John and Ben discuss the past, present and future of energy generation, distribution, storage and consumption. We explore the future of conventional and alternative energy sources as well as the changing nature of the grid and our relationship to it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Benghazi Book 52 mins – “On September 11, 2012, terrorists attacked a U.S. State Department compound and a CIA building in Benghazi, Libya. Those events have been the subject of immense scrutiny and hearsay, with some saying they lay the grounds for impeaching President Obama. In a new book, the writer Mitchell Zuckoff tells the story of a team of security contractors who fought to repel the attackers in Benghazi. He joins us Tuesday to tell the story of what happened during those 13 hours of mystery and controversy.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Billionaires 47 mins – “Billionaires. We’ll look at the super super rich, and their global shaping of our world.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bob Dylan Story 48 mins – “A new take on the life and music of Bob Dylan, from way inside the Dylan story. “Another Side of Bob Dylan.’” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Health 26 mins – “Neuroscience expert Dr. Andrew Hill joins Dr. Drew for a conversation about brain health and how different actions will impact the development of the brain. They also discuss minimal cognitive impairment and how that term relates to some of the recent Donald Sterling controversy. As the show wraps up, they take listener phone calls on brain health.” At the link find thte title, “135: Dr. Andrew Hill ,” right-click the down-pointing arrow beside the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Case Study 71 mins – “Cancer is the number two cause of death in the US and can affect anyone at any age. Federico Viticci joins John to talk about the history of the disease, what it is, how we fight it and Federicos first-hand experience with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Research 64 mins – “Dr. Drew is joined by cancer expert Dr. Stephen Forman for a continued discussion about Prostate Cancer in honor of September being Prostate Cancer Research Month. They also take a few listener phone calls.” At the link find the title, “#139: Dr. Stephen Forman,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Treatment 51 mins – “It has been more than 40 years since President Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act. The law was designed to bolster efforts to find cures for cancer. While progress has certainly been made, nearly 600,000 Americans will die of cancer this year. Some recent advances in research have led a number of doctors to call for a rethinking of our entire approach to cancer. Maybe the goal should not be to destroy cancer cells but to change them. Or to figure out how to use the body’s immune system to fight the disease. Or, in certain cases, not treat the cancer at all. We explore new ideas about combating cancer.” (Three guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Childhood Eating 22 mins – “Children develop the ability to feed themselves well and become “good eaters” step-by-step throughout their growth and development. When adults feed children according to a stage-appropriate division of responsibility, this process brings more ease and less tension. At every stage, parents take leadership with feeding and let the child be self-directed with eating. Let’s begin the conversation about how this can work at your kitchen table!” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chip Production 60 mins – “In this episode we take a look at microchip production, with a special focus on waferscanners. To do this, we talked with Wilbert Albers of ASML, the leading waferscanner manufacturer in the world. In the episode, we talk about the overall chip production process (from silicon sand over wafer cutting to lithography and etching), and then we talk about the challenges of building high-precision, high-throughput waferscanners.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computational Thinking 43m – “This episode is a discussion with Jeannette Wing on Computational Thinking. Citing the website of Carnegie Mellon’s Center for Computational Thinking website, “computational thinking is a way of solving problems, designing systems, and understanding human behavior that draws on concepts fundamental to computer science.”. As a consequence of computing being more and more important for today’s science, “computational thinking has to be a fundamental part of the way people think and understand the world.”. Jeannette is a leader in this field, and we discuss various aspect of the topic in this show: what computational thinking is, examples of its importance in various fields of science and strategies about how it can be taught to pupils, students and scientists.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Container Shipping 255 mins – “This episode is a conversation about the world-wide container shipping infrastructure with Martin Clausen, the former general counsel of Maersk and Nicolas Guilbert from Ange Optimization. We discuss the history of containers, routing, some details about the ships and container terminals as well as a brief outlook on the future of the container shipping industry. In part two we take a deeper look at optimisation of container stowage on ships and network planning.”

Data Management 27 mins – “An amazing amount of stuff on the internet is free — Facebook, Twitter and Gmail. Of course, it’s not exactly free. We pay, with our data. And right now, we’re kind of stuck trading our data, for all this free software. Today on the show: two people who want to give you other options. These two people are trying to create services online that collect next to nothing — virtually no information, no data. A couple years ago, these people might have been dismissed as kooks. But one of them just raised $30 million.” At the link find the title, “Episode 568: Snoops, Hackers And Tin Foil Hats,”npr_348051174.mp3

Deep Wreck Diving 54 mins – “This episode is a conversation with John Chatterton about deep wreck diving. We cover some of the dangers and challenges, as well as the fascination of the sport. We also talk about the discovery of U 869, which was mainly John Chatterton’s achievement (as documented in the book Shadow Divers)” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Driverless Cars 119 mins – “This episode is about autonomous vehicles (aka self-driving cars). Our guest is Jonathan Sprinkle, assistant professor at the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Arizona. We talk about the topic mainly from the perspective of (software and systems) engineering, but also address legal and societal questions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Use Responsibilities 66 mins – “In 2012, U.S. drone strikes occurred most often in which nation? If you don’t know, you’re not alone. 27 percent of Americans reported they had no a clue and another 60 percent got it wrong. What should the media cover when it comes to drones and military robotics? And what responsibility do journalists have to focus in on the most pressing moral and legal questions when it comes to drone technologies? John Kaag — Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Massachusetts Lowell and co-author of the recent “Drone Warfare” — discusses how the American and international public think about drone warfare, and poses pressing ethical questions about drones in military and civilian use.” At the link right-click “MP3” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eating Habits 38 mins – “We got the chance to sit down with Debra Benfield to discuss nutrition and the concept of mindful and intuitive eating around healthy food choices. You’ll also get a look into some of our weird eating habits! Debra is a Master’s Level Nutritionist (M.Ed.), a (Registered Dietitian (R.D.) AND a Licensed Dietitian/ Nutritionist (L.D.N.) with over 25 years of experience. So as you can see, she definitely fits the mold of who we seek out to talk to on Smart People Podcast! Head over to Debra’s page, Body in Mind Nutrition to read up on what she has to offer!” At the link right-click “Download” nd select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Engineering Questions 104 mins – “We answer nine questions about the engineering profession, gathered from a quaint little website called Reddit, in this episode of The Engineering Commons. You may notice a common thread in our responses, as there is rarely a clear-cut solution, and the answer often depends on the situation!” Questions answered: Can an engineering job be hands-on? How important is it to work for a Fortune 500 company as a new grad? How many hours a week do engineers work? Which programming language is most useful to engineers? Where should a high-schooler interested in engineering look for information about the profession? How can one quickly construct a voltage regulator? Carmen mentions a well-known reference book about electronics, The Art of Electronics. Do engineers ever use calculus? At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Hysteria History 36 mins – “Welcome to Sawbones, where Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband Justin McElroy take you on a whimsical tour of the dumb ways in which we’ve tried to fix people. This week: We follow a wandering womb.” At the link right-click beside “Direct Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flooding in Kashmir 4 mins – “People living in India and Pakistan are no strangers to heavy rains. Each year, the monsoon season brings downpours. But today, the Kashmir region is dealing with one of the worst floods in a century. Over the past ten days, heavy rains have left more than 450 people dead and many are still missing. For author and journalist Basharat Peer, what’s happening there is very personal. He grew up in Kashmir and his parents still live there. As soon as he heard the news about the flood, he left New Delhi, where he lives today, to look for his parents. “My city was like an enormous trash can full of sad.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Additive Control 51 mins – “Americans get more than half of their daily meals from processed foods, many of which contain food additives. More than 9,000 additives, ranging from chemical preservatives to green-tea extract, are currently in the food supply. But consumer advocates warn that companies certify the safety many of these substances without FDA oversight. Several research studies indicate some additives may be linked to health problems, including allergies and intestinal disorders. Guest host Tom Gjelten of NPR and a panel of [4] guests discuss the oversight of food additives.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Hearing Aid Story 14 mins – “Science writer Kathleen Raven’s unexpected loss of hearing takes her on a journey with modern technology. Kathleen Raven writes for Reuters Health and blogs about sustainable agriculture for Scientific American. As an independent writer based in Atlanta, she regularly takes walking breaks in Piedmont Park with her dog, Sunshine. She recently completed two degrees at the University of Georgia: Conservation Ecology (MS) and Health & Medical Journalism (MA). She likes speaking in elementary German with her Dutch husband, Arjan.” At the link find the title, “Kathleen Raven: Hearing,”right-click “Media files 155254139-the-story-collider-kathleen-raven-hearing-1.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Husbands School 27 mins – “On Ivory Coast, men are going back to the classroom. It’s an innovative project dubbed the ‘school for husbands’ – and designed to save the lives of mothers and children.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Ivory Coast’s School for Husbands,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20140918-0330b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hydrologist Interview 24 mins – “Testing the Water (Start time 3:30) What exactly is in our water—the stuff we drink, shower in and use to wash our vegetables? This is a question lots of Coloradans have started to ask in the last few years as oil and gas operations have ramped up in the state. Several communities have become very concerned how nearby drilling operations might be adversely affecting the quality of their water supply… How much is energy development in Colorado affecting the water supply and how can we, that is Jane and Joe public, find out the vital statistics of our water quality? Co-host Jane Palmer discusses these questions with hydrologist Mark Williams from the University of Colorado. Williams is the co-founder of the Colorado Water and Energy Research Center (CWERC) and he has conducted projects around the state looking at the impacts of energy operations on both water and air quality. He has also developed a guide to help residents who live near oil and gas development test their water. The “how to” guide shows well owners how energy-related or other activities might affect their groundwater.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Governance Forum 17 mins – “This week, Lisa Gonzalez interviews me about my recent trip to the Internet Governance Forum in Istanbul, Turkey. The IGF is an opportunity for anyone concerned with Internet Governance on planet Earth to discuss the perceived problems and possible solutions. It uses a multi-stakeholder format, which means that governments, businesses, civil society, and academics are all able to come to the table… this means just about anyone who has the means to participate — including by doing so remotely — can do so. I went as part of a delegation with the Media Democracy Fund, along with six other grantees of theirs to get a better sense of how we can contribute and what we might learn from these international discussions. “ At the link right-click “…download this MP3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

James Booker 27 mins – “The legacy of jazz pianist James Booker. Classically trained in piano and a child prodigy, Booker toured with Ray Charles and Aretha Franklin and played on sessions with Fats Domino and Little Richard. But, gay at a time when homosexuality was a huge taboo and black in a divided America, Booker died alone, aged 43, after a life of drug and alcohol abuse.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Black Liberace,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20140917-0332a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Majority Rules in School Board 61 mins – “Before the war in the East Ramapo, New York school district, there was a truce. Local school officials made a deal with their Hasidic and ultra-Orthodox Jewish neighbors: we’ll leave you alone to teach your children in private yeshivas as you see fit as long as you allow our public school budget to pass. But the budget is funded by local property taxes, which everyone, including the local Hasidim, have to pay — even though their kids don’t attend the schools that their money is paying for. What followed was one of the most volatile local political battles we’ve ever encountered.” At the link you can listen. The download button use requires a $.99 payment, but a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Medicare Fraud 59 mins – “David Fahrenthold talked about his article for the Washington Post on Medicare fraud involving power wheelchairs, as well as other investigative reports he’s worked on involving federal government waste.” At the link you can watch and listen, but an audio download will cost $.99; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Mental Illness Myths 60 mins – “This week, we’re listening to “Mental Illness Myths,” a panel discussion about public perceptions of mental health at CONvergence 2014. Panelists Megan Press, Miri Mogilevsky, Julia Burke and Olivia James discuss misconceptions about diagnosis, treatment and symptoms, and the harm that stigma does to individuals affected by mental illness.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mercury in Medicine 31 mins – “Welcome to Sawbones, where Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband Justin McElroy take you on a whimsical tour of the dumb ways in which we’ve tried to fix people. This week: We put mercury on your chancre.” At the link right-click beside “Direct Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Montreal Protocol 30 mins – “Remember the seventies? Remember feathered hair, pull-tab soda cans, debates about the thinning ozone layer? Our guest this week on Sea Change Radio is Durwood Zaelke, a policy advocate and environmental crusader who started working four decades ago to advance policy that would help preserve the ozone layer. Zaelke is the founder and President of the Institute for Governance & Sustainable Development (IGSD) based in Washington, DC and Geneva. He’s a noted international environmental lawyer who received both an Ozone Protection Award and a Climate Protection Award in 2008 for his help in maximizing the climate benefits of the Montreal Protocol.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

News Coverage Decline 52 mins – “As resources dwindle for news organizations, among the first casualties of cost cutting are the beats that were once the core of journalism’s mission. This week, OTM looks at the great decline in beat reporting.“ At the link find the title, “Deadbeat,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nutrition Science 30 mins – “For our first podcast, we were extremely lucky to be able to speak with Harvard Professor, Dr. Walter Willett. Dr.Willett is an American physician and nutrition researcher. He is a Professor of Epidemiology, Nutrition and Medicine and the Chair of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard University. He has published over 1,000 scientific articles regarding various aspects of diet and disease and is the second most cited author in clinical medicine. In the public eye, Dr. Willett is perhaps best known for his 2001 book Eat, Drink and Be Healthy. Tune in to hear us discuss the downfall of the no-fat diet, the shift in the food pyramid and the truth about anti-oxidants.” At the link find the title, “Episode 1 – Dr. Walter Willett,” right-click “Media files Episode20120-20Dr20Willett.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opium History 31 mins – “Welcome to Sawbones, where Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband Justin McElroy take you on a whimsical tour of the dumb ways in which we’ve tried to fix people. This week: We give opium to a baby.” At the link right-click beside “Direct Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Outsider Successes 41 mins – “What does it mean to pursue something that everyone else think is nuts? And what does it take to succeed? That’s what this week’s episode is about. It’s called “Outsiders By Design.” …You’ll hear about three radical thinkers whose lives didn’t proceed in a perfectly straight line. In each case, their work was ridiculed or ignored — but ultimately, they triumphed.” At the link find the title, “Outsiders by Design,” right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Control 61 mins – “Dr. Drew speaks to New York Times reporter Barry Meier about his new e-book, A World of Hurt: Fixing Pain Medicine’s Biggest Mistake, and the consequences of using pills.” At the link find the title,“ At the link find the title, “#080: Barry Meier,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up window.

Partnership Formation 27 mins – “Alex Blumberg is starting a business, a podcasting business. He’s recording himself as he starts the company, and he’s making a podcast about starting his podcasting company. But starting a business can be lonely. Alex wants a partner to share in the stress and the risk. Potential investors say they’d prefer to bet on a team, too. Today on the show, Alex searches for a business partner. There have been Hewlett and Packard, Procter and Gamble, and Ben and Jerry. Now, there is Blumberg and …” At the link find the title, #569: How To Divide An Imaginary Pie,” right-click npr_349371797.mp3, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Testimony 13 mins – “Marine scientist Meredith has to navigate a whole new world when she’s called upon to testify in front of the Maine legislature in support of a crucial bill. Meredith White is a Postdoctoral Researcher at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in East Boothbay, Maine. Her research focuses on how Coastal Ocean Acidification affects marine organisms, from phytoplankton to commercially-important bivalves….” At the link find the title, “Meredith White: How To Write A Testimony,” right-click “Media files 167568468 the story-collider, Meredith-White-how-to-write-a-testimony.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up media.

Premed Example 44 mins – “For our episode today, I got the opportunity to interview Deandre, a 30-year old, nontraditional, first year medical student at Boston University who took the long road to medical school. Deandre shares with us his journey towards getting to med school which certainly had a number of detours. He attended several years in community college trying to figure out what he really wanted. Then he went to a four-year university and still not knowing what direction he was going to take. Until his professor talked some sense into him and that conversation was what ignited his passion for science as well as that passion for helping people through the gift of healing. Finally, Deandre shared his experience in getting multiple acceptances upon which he eventually narrowed it down to where he is now.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prostate Cancer 56 mins – “Prostate cancer expert Dr. Stuart Holden stops by the Dr. Drew Podcast to talk about the realities of the disease and what can be done to detect and treat it before it becomes life-threatening. They also look at Dr. Drew’s personal experience as well.” At the link find the title, “#138: Dr. Stuart Holden,” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow beside the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rumors 60 mins – “This week, we’re looking at the power of stories and innuendo to shape the public perception of science. We’ll speak to author Jon Lee about his book “An Epidemic of Rumors: How Stories Shape Our Perceptions of Disease.” And we’re joined by Dr. Paul A. Offit, Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases and the Director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, to get the scientific perspective of the safety and effectiveness of vaccinations.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rural Poverty 47 mins – ““Rich Hill,” a new documentary on growing up poor, now, in rural America. The dreams and the desperation.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex 38 mins – “We spend the majority of this episode talking about sex and the female orgasm. Ohhhh, so NOW you’re interested?? You pervert (just kidding!). Join us this episode as we speak with author, sex coach and therapist Nicole Daedone about her brand new book “Slow Sex: The Art and Craft of the Female Orgasm“. Nicole is the founder of OneTaste, a coed live-in commune and for-profit business dedicated to female orgasm, that promotes greater personal awareness and interpersonal connectivity through the practice of Orgasmic Meditation and Slow Sex. Nicole’s slow sex practice has been covered by The New York Times, New York Post, EnlightenNext, the Huffington Post, ABC News Nightline and more.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smartphone Stalking 9 mins – “We’ve looked a lot at privacy from the Big Brother standpoint: how the National Security Agency or corporate giants like Google track us online, say for political reasons or to make money from ads. But there’s another kind of privacy concern that is a lot more intimate. You could call it Little Brother, though it’s really more like husbands and wives, lovers and exes who secretly watch their partners — from a distance. They are cyberstalking — using digital tools that are a lot cheaper than hiring a private detective. NPR investigated these tools, also known as spyware, and spoke with domestic violence counselors and survivors around the country. We found that cyberstalking is now a standard part of domestic abuse in the U.S.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sound and Hearing 60 mins – “This week, we’re exploring the science of sound and hearing. We’ll talk to Trevor Cox, Professor of Acoustic Engineering at the University of Salford, about his book “Sonic Wonderland: A Scientific Odyssey of Sound.” And we’ll speak to Andrew Wise, Senior Research Fellow at Bionics Institute, about a gene therapy technique to enhance the function of cochlear implants.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spray-on Cake 3 mins – A short description about the development of a way to produce dough that can be sprayed from a can. At the link find the title, “Episode 415 – September 18 2014,” right-click “ Media files ScienceElements_Sept18_2014.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teacher Maker 64mins – “Elizabeth Green, author of the new book Building a Better Teacher: How Teaching Works (and How to Teach it to Anyone), talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the art of teaching and the history of various reforms, mostly failed, trying to improve teaching in America. Specific topics include the theoretical focus of undergraduate education programs and various techniques being used in charter schools and elsewhere to improve teaching performance.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teachers with Guns 52 mins – “Last week, a Utah teacher injured herself when her concealed handgun accidently fired. The incident renewed discussion across the state about whether or not teachers should be packing heat while on the job. Gun-rights advocates argue that everybody’s safer when instructors and administrators are armed. Those pushing for stricter gun controls contend firearms are an evident danger, and they say parents have a right to know which teachers are carrying. Thursday, we’ll hear from both sides in this heated debate.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teaching Science 29 mins – “Keith talks with William Robertson, aka “Dr. Skateboard.” Bill is the Associate Provost at the University of Texas at El Paso, and is an Associate Professor in the Teacher Education Department at UTEP. Bill trains teachers to teach science, and tells us why the way today’s students learn is different from just a generation ago because of technology. In his alter ego as “Dr. Skateboard,” Bill, an lifelong skateboarder, explains how he communicates the principles of math & science through sports such as skateboarding.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trauma Manual 9 mins – “Promotions: ATACC Trauma Textbook – A free trauma textbook that is simply amazing and the best example of FOAM brought to traditional media that I have ever seen–want it? I bet you do. I could have written an entire post on this book, but luckily someone did it for me: Tim Leeuwenburg on the ATACC Textbook Just want to download it? The Ibooks Version can be found at this link or go to the ATACC site for the PDF versions.” The textbook is a new illustrated 465 page, British publication. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Traumatic Brain Injury 6 mins- “Steven Galetta discusses his Review on how tests of visual function can be useful in the assessment of minor head injury and TBI.” At the link find the title, “Listen to The Lancet Neurology: September, 2014,” right-click “laneur_september.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

TWIV Q and A 113 mins – “The TWiVers discuss the growing Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, and an epidemic of respiratory disease in the US caused by enterovirus D68.” At the link right-click “TWIV 302” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccines History 47 mins – “Welcome to Sawbones, where Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband Justin McElroy take you on a whimsical tour of the dumb ways in which we’ve tried to fix people. This week: We save your kids.” At the link right-click beside “Direct Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War of 1812 54 mins – “In our continuing series about the War of 1812, host Paul Kennedy visits the battlefields at Washington (where the White House was famously torched) and Baltimore (which ultimately inspired the American national anthem, “The Star Spangled Banner”).” At the link find the title, “Oh Say, Can You See?”right-click “Download Oh Say, Can You See?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wireless Technology 58 mins – “On a marathon episode John critiques the Artemis pCell presentation, critiques a lengthy article about how pCell might work and finally walks through the key pieces to understanding if this is real life or is this just fantasy; and whether Steve Perlman is the right man to make this dream a reality.” At the link right-click “Download” from the pop-up menu.

Zionist Liberals 48 mins – “After a summer of deadly clashes between Gaza and Israel, we talk to Jews on the left and right about the future of liberal Zionism. Some say it’s over. “At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 200 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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Media Mining Digest 149 – 19 Sept 2014: Benghazi, Berkman Center, Border Management in America, Broadband in Maine, Campus Assaults, Cancer and Immune System, Capitalism Crisis, Child Abuse in England, Chiropractic Critique, Clean Energy Project, Climate and Religion, Deaf School, Diabetes Treatment, Digital Clone, Disability Care, Domestic Violence, Dr Drew, Ebola Spread, Education Decline in US, Experiments Online, Finances for Doctors, Flight Instrument Training, Gabby Giffords, Gender Violence, Genius Trait, Hand Axe, Health Innovation, Homeopathy Critique, Howard University President, Imperial America, Internet Era, Internet Immune System, Internet Lessons, Job Training, Ketogenic Diet, Lunch Lady Heroes, Medical Errors Medical Suicides, Mental Illness Inmates, Nihilism, Organ Transplants, Oscar Pistorius Trial, Scottish Independence, Senator Elizabeth Warren, Smoking Bans,Soccer Women, Stuttering,T axReform, Trimethylamine, Underground Park, Wise Choices, Women in Tech, World War One Legacy, Zoo Animals

The following audio files come from a larger group of 205 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 56 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Benghazi 47 mins – “Investigative reporter Mitch Zuckoff goes deep on Benghazi. What really happened. What it could mean” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Berkman Center 62 mins – “Learn more about the Berkman Center for Internet & Society — and its incredible network of researchers, activists, faculty, students, technologists, entrepreneurs, artists, policy makers, lawyers, and more — in an interactive conversation led by Faculty Chair Jonathan Zittrain. If you’re curious about connecting with our research, our community, or our events, or are just generally interested in digital technologies and their impact on society, find out more here!” At the link right-click “MP3” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Border Management in America 113 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute (MPI) panel discussion offers perspectives on border policy management from leading officials in the U.S., Canadian, and Mexican governments, and showcases MPI’s edited volume, Managing Borders in an Increasingly Borderless World. Book co-editors Randall Hansen of the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto and MPI President Demetrios Papademetriou, as well as Mexican Ambassador to the United States Eduardo Medina Mora, Canada Border Services Agency Executive Vice President Malcolm Brown, former Acting Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection David V. Aguilar, and Mexico’s former Undersecretary of Population, Migration, and Religious Affairs Gustavo Mohar, discuss continuing and evolving challenges in border management and security. The book covers these challenges—terrorism, organized crime, illegal migration, smuggling, trafficking, human rights, infrastructure, corruption, and economic and political factors—and offers an analysis of effective and ineffective policies and programs. The panelists discuss the challenges and successes their governments have had in pursuing better, more effective, and smarter border controls, and the deepening regional cooperation in this important policy area.” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download” again and select “Save Target As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Maine 16 mins – “By building a fiber line to allow some local businesses to get next-generation Internet access, Rockport became the first municipal fiber network in the state of Maine. Town Manager Richard Bates joins us for episode 115 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast.” At the link right-click “…download this MP3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Campus Assaults 52 mins – “A troubling statistic has been making a lot of headlines recently: 20% of college women are sexually assaulted in the US. So Monday, we’re asking if there is something inherent in the structure of college life that puts students at risk. Sociologist Elizabeth Armstrong says many students think they deserve a social experience that’s more about partying than academics, and competition for tuition dollars has universities providing them with what they want over what they need. She’ll join us to talk about what this means for women and men.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer and Immunity System  6 mins – “Cancer is one of the world’s biggest killers, and current treatments often have terrible side effects. So scientists have begun looking into ways to help the body’s own defences fight back. When we have a bacterial or viral infection, our immune systems go into overdrive to tackle the invader and protect our bodies. It’s also possible to harness this attack to combat cancer. At the British Science Festival, Ginny Smith talked to Louise and Vanessa, both PhD students at Birmingham University, to find out how…” At the link right-click “MP3” beside “Download as” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Capitalism Crisis 20 mins – “Nick Hanauer is a rich guy, an unrepentant capitalist — and he has something to say to his fellow plutocrats: Wake up! Growing inequality is about to push our societies into conditions resembling pre-revolutionary France. Hear his argument about why a dramatic increase in minimum wage could grow the middle class, deliver economic prosperity … and prevent a revolution.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Abuse in England 51 mins – “At least 1,400 children were sexually exploited in the northern English town of Rotherham by gangs of men who were predominantly of Pakistani origin between 1997 and 2013 according to an independent inquiry, by Professor Alexis Jay. How did police, press, politicians and professional agencies fail to deal with it?” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Girls Britain Betrayed,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chiropractic Critique 32mins – Dr Mark Crislip, an infectious disease doctor in Portland, Oregon who hosts the award-winning QuackCast podcast and an editor on the Science-Based Medicine.org website presents this critique of the chiropractic practice. At the link find the title, “Quackcast 149,” right-click the “Play” button beside it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clean Energy Project 30 mins – “…This week on Sea Change Radio, we hear from two participants from the 7th annual Clean Energy Summit which took place on September 4th in Las Vegas. First, we focus on southern Nevada as host Alex Wise discusses Las Vegas’ energy needs with Rose McKinney-James the chairperson of the Clean Energy Project. Then, we turn to the northern part of the state and hear from David Bobzien, a state assemblyman from Reno who talks about the efforts of the Conservation Lands Foundation as well as the recent announcement that Tesla Motors will be building a major electric vehicle battery plant in his part of the state.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate and Religion 23 mins – “…In the face of those who use religion to deny the worldwide crisis of climate change, climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe, an evangelical Christian, believes that her faith is compatible with science. This week she speaks to Bill about ending the gridlock between politics, science and faith in order to find solutions to the widespread threats associated with global warming.” At the link find the title, “Full Show: Climate Change — Faith and Fact,” right-click “Media files Moyers and Company_336_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deaf School 48 mins – “Disability Matters with David Carter from Highmark: Competitive employment and empowerment for people with disabilities is the emphasis of this show. Broadcast live and captioned in real-time for individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing, we discuss how people with disabilities can secure career opportunities, and how employers, organizations and individuals can support employment and empowerment of people with disabilities.” The American School for the Deaf in Connecticut is the focal point of this episode. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diabetes Treatment 29 mins – “Keith talks with Fraser Cameron, a Research Associate with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Southampton, United Kingdom. Fraser is a systems design engineer who is working on developing a system that can effectively and steadily control the blood glucose levels of individuals with Type I Diabetes.” At the link right-click beside “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Cloning 47 mins – “Martine Rothblatt is the highest paid female executive in America. Founder of Sirius Radio. She was once a man. Now she’s pushing digital mind clones for us all.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disability Care 55 mins – “On the 50th anniversary of L’Arche, the now-international organization Jean Vanier started, a celebration of a Canadian humanitarian and visionary.” At the link find the title, “How To Do Ordinary Things, Part 2,” right-click “Download How To Do Ordinary Things, Part 2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Domestic Violence 47 mins – “#WhyIStayed. We’re looking at women in and out of relationships of domestic violence.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dr Drew 66 mins – Leo Laporte interviews “Dr. Drew Pinsky is an American board-certified internist, addiction medicine specialist, and radio and television personality. He is best known for his work on the radio show Loveline, the TV show Celebrity Rehab, and the podcasts he cohosts with Adam Carolla.” During the interview they discuss drug abuse, prostate cancer and insurance administrative costs. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Spread 47 mins – “An urgent plea for more help to slow the epidemic of Ebola in West Africa. We look at the exploding challenge.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Decline in US 44 mins – “In this episode of Uncommon Knowledge, Hoover fellow Peter Robinson interviews Hoover senior fellows and members of Hoover’s Task Force on K–12 Education Paul Peterson and Rick Hanushek on education in the United States compared to the rest of the world. The authors of Education Prosperity: A Global View of American Schools, Peterson and Hanushek explain that the United States, in the latest international test, is now in thirty-second place, with only 32 percent of students scoring as proficient in math. Currently, Shanghai is at the top of the list of countries, with 75 percent of its students proficient in math. Nevertheless, Peterson and Hanushek offer an optimistic perspective on what could be done to improve America’s education system.” At the link find the title, “Uncommon Knowledge with Hoover fellows Rick Hanushek and Paul Peterson,” right-click “Media files 20140909.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Experiments Online 47 mins – “We’ll talk to the co-founder of dating site OkCupid about human nature, love and the future of big data. Every second of every day, the Internet is scooping up oceans of data about you and everyone else within its reach. We know that, and yet when we focus on it, we often freak out. Christian Rudder, a big thinker and co-founder of the big dating site OKCupid, says don’t panic, this is good. Of course, he would, running a dating site. But his claim is this: the aggregate data on human nature flooding onto the web is now teaching us more than we have ever known about who we really are.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Finances for Doctors 47 mins – “Can you tell me how a physician that makes $400,000 a year can be struggling financially? I can – with a 4 car payments, a boat, too big of a house, too many expensive vacations and so much more. This can happen to you too if you are not wise so listen in and find out a ton of great information! For this info-packed episode, we have Ryan Michler as our financial guru for today to lead us to a great deal of interesting discussion about how you, the premed, or medical student, can start preparing to get ahead of the pack with your finances. Ryan is an Investment Advisor/Financial Coach for Healthcare Professionals and runs the website and podcast WealthAnatomy.com.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flight Instrument Training 75 mins – “Victoria kicks us off with a discussion of getting her Instrument Flight Rating and keeping your rating. This leads into a discussion of best practices for training, and how to handle communicating with the tower and keeping track of information. We also discusses Automation Management and the danger of over-relying on automated systems. Carl brings up a situation where a friend of his flew an aircraft where she was the Captain and her sister was the Co-Pilot, which may be a first in aviation history. Very few people seem to know that there are female pilots in the airlines, and automatically assume that a man always does the flying.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gabby Giffords 19 mins – “On January 8, 2011, Congresswoman Gabby Giffords was shot in the head while meeting constituents in her home town of Tucson, Arizona. Her husband, the astronaut Mark Kelly, immediately flew to be by her side. In this emotional conversation with Pat Mitchell, the pair describe their lives both before and after the accident — and describe their views on responsible gun ownership.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Violence 14 mins – “This talk begins with a personal story of sexual violence that may be difficult to listen to. But that’s the point, says citizen journalist Meera Vijayann: Speaking out on tough, taboo topics is the spark for change. Vijayann uses digital media to speak honestly about her experience of gender violence in her home country of India — and calls on others to speak out too.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Video” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the MP4 file.

Genius Trait 19 mins – “Elizabeth Gilbert muses on the impossible things we expect from artists and geniuses — and shares the radical idea that, instead of the rare person “being” a genius, all of us “have” a genius. It’s a funny, personal and surprisingly moving talk.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Video” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the MP4 file.

Hand Axe 14 mins – “In the beginning, there was design. Before any other human discipline, even before the dawn of mankind its self, design was a practice passed down from generation to generation of early humans. Today, everything that has been designed–space ships, buildings, pyramids, weapons, clothing , artwork, everything–can be traced back to a single designed object. The first designed object: the Acheulean hand axe. The Acheulean hand axe does not look like an “axe.” There’s no handle, and no metal. It could be called the “Acheulean pointy hand rock,” because it is just a rock that has been chipped and shaped, usually into the form of a tear-drop.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Innovation 18 mins – “Rishi Manchanda has worked as a doctor in South Central Los Angeles for a decade, where he’s come to realize: His job isn’t just about treating a patient’s symptoms, but about getting to the root cause of what is making them ill—the “upstream” factors like a poor diet, a stressful job, a lack of fresh air. It’s a powerful call for doctors to pay attention to a patient’s life outside the exam room.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Video” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the MP4 file.

Homeopathy Critique 29 mins – Dr Mark Crislip, an infectious disease doctor in Portland, Oregon who hosts the award-winning QuackCast podcast and an editor on the Science-Based Medicine.org website presents this critique of homeopathy. At the link find the title, “Quackcast 150,” right-click the “Play” button beside it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Howard University President 59 mins – “Wayne A.I. Frederick talked about the challenges facing Howard University and other historically black colleges, as well as the state of higher education in the United States. Mr. Frederick also spoke about his career as a surgical oncologist and his upbringing in Trinidad and Tobago, including his fight with sickle cell anemia.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Wayne Frederick,” right-click “Media files 319784-1-MP3-STD_01.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Imperial America 55 mins – “On the anniversary of 9-11, IDEAS revisits an interview with academic Chalmers Johnson who suggested that failure in Iraq might mark the beginning of the end of the American Empire.” At the link find the title, “The Sorrows of Empire,” right-click “Download The Sorrows of Empire” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Era 28 mins – “Advances in technology have changed the way we work, the way we socialize, and the way we learn. But not everybody knows that. In his book the End of Absence, author Michael Harris reminds us that people born after 1985 will not have experienced adulthood without the internet, and children today will never know what life was like before facebook, twitter, and iPhones. On this episode, Michael Harris discusses the impact of the ‘end of absence’ and what constant connectedness means for the well being of future generations. He’ll also tell us how we can mitigate the effects of technology and preserve the benefits of periodic absence while still maintaining our social connections.” At the link right-click “Listen to episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Immune System 17 mins – “The beauty of hackers, says cybersecurity expert Keren Elazari, is that they force us to evolve and improve. Yes, some hackers are bad guys, but many are working to fight government corruption and advocate for our rights. By exposing vulnerabilities, they push the Internet to become stronger and healthier, wielding their power to create a better world. At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Lessons 32 mins – “Click investigates triumphs and pitfalls of the digital age at the dConstruct Conference.” Several comments by Cory Doctorow. At the link find the title, “DigitalP: 09 Sep 14: dConstruct: Living with the Network,” right-click “Media files digital 20140909-2032b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Training 19 mins –“For years now, the economy has been kind of stuck. The unemployment rate is getting better, but slowly. Household incomes have actually been falling. It’s easy to feel stuck. Today on the show, stories of two people trying to get unstuck.” At the link find the title, “#567: Getting Unstuck,” right-click npr_347524695.mp3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ketogenic Diet 102 mins – “On this episode of Latest in Paleo, Jimmy Moore and I discuss the ketogenic diet described in his new book, Keto Clarity, co-authored with Dr. Eric Westman. Jimmy tells the story of his public testimony regarding the American Dietary Guidelines, and he addresses some of my reservations regarding long-term ketosis. The After the Bell segment features Dr. Stephen Phinney.” At the link right-click “MP3 Audio” beside”Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Lunch Lady Heroes 5 mins – “Children’s book author Jarrett Krosoczka shares the origins of the Lunch Lady graphic novel series, in which undercover school heroes serve lunch…and justice! His new project, School Lunch Hero Day, reveals how cafeteria lunch staff provide more than food, and illustrates how powerful a thank you can be.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Errors 55 mins (2 parts) – “What happens after a medical error and is saying sorry really enough? Two mothers in two countries who both lost newborn children help us pull back the curtain on what happens after a medical mistake is made. Beth Daley Ullum tells the story of trying to save her unborn son who had a serious heart defect. She had to break through the medical culture of secrecy to find the best surgeons to perform a very delicate operation.” At the link find the titles, “White Coat – After the Error Part One [and Two],” right-click “Download White Coat – After the Error Part One” and Part Two” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Suicides 11 mins – “In this mini-episode, I talk a bit about an incredibly interesting and important article published recently in the New York Times regarding resident suicide and depression. The bottom line: If you feel like you need help, you’re not alone. Check this sobering article out here.” At the link find the title, “Episode 21: You’re Not Alone,” right-click “Resident_suicide.m4a” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Illness Inmates 27 mins – “Hilary Andersson investigates the more than one million mentally ill prisoners held in US jails and prisons, most of whom are incarcerated for relatively minor offences.” At the link find the title, “Docs: America’s New Bedlam,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140911-0330a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nihilism 42 mins – “Horror, fashion, and the end of the world … things get weird as we explore the undercurrents of thought that link nihilists, beard-stroking philosophers, Jay-Z, and True Detective….” There’s a blank area at the end of the podcast. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Organ Transplants 18 mins – “Rebecca Cooney discusses organ donation and distribution in the US with David Mulligan, chair of the Liver and Transplant Committee for United Network for Organ Sharing.” At the link find the title, “Listen to The Lancet: 12 September,” right-click “Media files 12september.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oscar Pistorius Trial 50 mins – “After becoming a Paralympics champion, Oscar Pistorius rose to fame as the first double amputee to compete in the Olympics. He became a hero to millions – until the fateful night when he shot dead his girlfriend, the model Reeva Steenkamp.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Trial of Oscar Pistorius,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140912-2105a.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scottish Independence 48 mins – “Scotland is about to vote on breaking away from the UK. Britain. We’ll look at the breakaway movement, in Scotland and beyond.” At the link right-click “Download this story” from the pop-up menu.

Senator Elizabeth Warren 25 mins – “In Oklahoma, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and her brothers grew up in “an America that invested in kids like us and helped build a future where we could flourish.” But, as she writes in her memoir, A Fighting Chance, “Today the game is rigged – rigged to work for those who have money and power… The optimism that defines us as a people has been beaten and bruised. It doesn’t have to be this way.” At the link find the title, “Full Show: Elizabeth Warren on Fighting Back Against Wall St. Giants,” right-click “Media files Moyers and Company_335_Podcast.mp3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smoking Bans 27 mins – “Ten years ago, Ireland became the first country in the world to ban smoking in the workplace. In the decade since, countries across the world have passed smoke-free laws of their own. Denis Murray looks at the impact of this type of anti-smoking legislation across Europe – and considers the future of tobacco.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Clearing the Air,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140910-0332a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soccer Women 27 mins – “Could women’s football provide a new, more sustainable model to the men’s game? Yvonne Macken hears from young women in Trinidad and Tobago, Iceland, Brazil, Japan, the UK, the USA and Africa.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Future of Women’s Football 9 Sept 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140909-0905a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stuttering 13 mins – “Megan Washington is one of Australia’s premier singer/songwriters. And, since childhood, she has had a stutter. In this bold and personal talk, she reveals how she copes with this speech impediment—from avoiding the letter combination “st” to tricking her brain by changing her words at the last minute to, yes, singing the things she has to say rather than speaking them.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tax Reform 46 mins (2 parts) –“…A recent report by Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph E. Stiglitz for the Roosevelt Institute suggests that paying our fair share of taxes and cracking down on corporate tax dodgers could be a cure for inequality and a faltering economy. In America right now inequality is too great, unemployment too high, public investments too meager, corporations too greedy and the tax code too biased toward the very rich… But the Nobel Laureate economist Joseph E. Stiglitz says it doesn’t have to be this way. He has a new plan for overhauling America’s current tax system, which he says contributes to making America the most unequal society of the advanced countries….” At the link find the titles “Encore: Joseph E. Stiglitz Calls for Fair Taxes for All,” and “Encore: How Tax Reform Can Save the Middle Class,” right-click “Play Now” for each and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menus.

Trimethylamine 5 mins – “…You may be familiar with the popular American television show Breaking Bad. In the show, the lead characters make the drug methamphetamine from phenylacetone and methylamine, an analogue of trimethylamine where two of the methyl groups are replaced by hydrogens. As methylamine is a controlled chemical in the US, several episodes revolved entirely around obtaining the hard-to-get reagent. Methylamine smells just as bad as trimethylamine, so in real life the police often discover labs making meth using the Breaking Bad method because of the tell-tale fishy smell!….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Underground Park 6 mins – “Dan Barasch and James Ramsey have a crazy plan — to create a park, filled with greenery, underneath New York City. The two are developing the Lowline, an underground greenspace the size of a football field. They’re building it in a trolley terminal abandoned in 1948, using technology that harvests sunlight above-ground and directs it down below. It’s a park that can thrive, even in winter.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Video” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the MP4 file.

Wise Choices 23 mins – “In an intimate talk, Barry Schwartz dives into the question “How do we do the right thing?” With help from collaborator Kenneth Sharpe, he shares stories that illustrate the difference between following the rules and truly choosing wisely.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Tech 30 mins – “When you picture what success looks like in Silicon Valley, you might think of a hoodie-clad guy fresh out of Stanford — or maybe an older, tie-wearing investor type. In recent months, we’ve seen tremendous coverage of the fact that women are too often peripheral in the tech scene. Talking heads write articles and books about it, and headlines report striking statistics. But how do you really solve the problem? Women like CEO Sheri Atwood and venture capitalist Eurie Kim say they’ve found ways to use their experiences as women to their advantage in the male-dominated tech world.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One Legacy 50 mins – “Turkey emerged from the First World War as a new republic, with a secular and modern identity, attempting to break from its Ottoman past. How has this influenced Turkey today? With historians Aksin Somel and Ahmet Kuyas, and novelist Elif Shafak.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The War That Changed The World: Istanbul – Modernity and Secularism,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140908-1228a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zoo Animals 17 mins – “Zoo animals are different than most possessions, because zoos follow a fundamental principle: You can’t sell or buy the animals. It’s unethical and illegal to put a price tag on an elephant’s head. Today on the show: What do you do in a world where you can’t use money?” At the link find the title, “#566: The Zoo Economy,” right-click “npr_346191939.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

==============================================================                                                                     ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 200 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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Media Mining Digest 148 – 12 Sept 2014: 401(k) Plans, Acoustic History, Airbnb, America Defined, Ata Kak Musician, Bit Coin Impact, Book Prices in Europe, California Climate Change, Charlie Rangel, Chikungunya, Church of the Almighty God, Circuit Courts, Civil War Women, Climate Change and Human Rights, Coding Concepts, College Stories, Communications Breakdown, Computer Repair Concept, Deportation Dilemma, Desalinaiton, Design Trends, Diets, Dow Jones, Drug Policy, Electricity, Engineering MBA, Farm Animal Antibiotics, Immigrant Students, ISIS Social Media, Law Defined, Lawyers Wear Technology, London Immigrants, Maya Angelou on Facing Evil, Medical Military Program, Mentally Ill, Migrant Brain Drain, Migrant Labor Management, Migrant Minors, Migrant Schooling in Georgia State, Noise Pollution, Numbers, Ocean Sanctuaries, Phenol History, PSA Critique, Small Arms Statistics, Spanish Coal Miners, Steadfast, Syrian Refugees, Technology Trends, Trans Atlantic Flights, TWIV 300, War of 1812, Weather Forecasting, Wilderness Act

The following audio files come from a larger group of 272 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 56 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

401(k) Plans 18 mins – “The 401(k) is the backbone of most retirements, yet millions of people are investing in 401(k) plans with mediocre offerings. To help make the most of your retirement investment, Paul Merriman offers recommendations for more than 100 Top U.S. company plans and the U.S. Government TSP at his website In this podcast he explains why and how to use them.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Acoustic History 27 mins – “King George VI spoke to the world about the declaration of war on Germany in 1939. Listen to the story of how it was broadcast around the world 75 years ago.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Delivering the King’s Speech 2 Sept 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140902-0905a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Airbnb 56 mins – “At issue is the so-called sharing economy, a range of services that facilitate peer-to-peer transactions through the Internet. Companies like Airbnb, Uber, and Lyft have seen rapid growth and eye-popping valuations, but as they expand around the world, they are increasingly butting heads with government regulators….” At the link find the title, “Regulate This!,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Airbnb 59 mins – “Nathan Blecharczyk, co-founder and chief technology officer of Airbnb, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Airbnb, one of the earliest companies to use technology to allow individuals to share underused resources, and in the case of Airbnb, housing. Blecharczyk and Roberts discuss how a design conference and the Democratic National Convention got Airbnb started, how the company aligns incentives to overcome the trust problem of house-sharing, and the rise of technology and online social networks to make a new business model possible. Along the way, Blecharczyk gives his take on the role of luck vs. skill in entrepreneurial success and how Airbnb plans to expand its product offerings in the future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America Defined 120 mins – “Author and documentary director Dinesh D’Souza and activist and author Bill Ayers participated in a debate titled, “What’s so Great About America?” Following their opening remarks, they asked questions of each other for ten minutes arguing such topics as Israel, weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, the Second Amendment, and religious freedom. They then responded to questions from audience members and made closing statements.” At the link you can buy the file for $.99. An audio file is included in the blog archive.

Ata Kak Musician 27 mins – “Giving Africa’s obscure musical gems a new lease of life – meet the fans of rediscovered sounds. Among them is ethnomusicologist Brian Shimkovitz who’s trying to track down musician Ata Kak.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Ata Kak and the Crate Diggers 3 Sept 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140903-1253a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bit Coin Impact 31 mins – “Can a digitally encrypted currency uproot the world’s financial institutions. On this episode, Jimmy Homma talks about bit coins, its mysterious and tumultuous history, and what it means for us.” At the link right-click “Listen to episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Prices in Europe 16 mins – “As Hachette and Amazon continue to battle over e-book pricing, the case is sometimes made that “books are different” than cars or soap. In the US, of course, books are treated no differently than any other good when it comes to sales and marketing. Across Europe, though, many nations have laws that control pricing, restrict e-commerce, or otherwise protect publishers and authors from unchecked free market forces….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Climate Change 29 mins – “As Californians continue to look beseechingly to the skies for signs of any kind of rainfall, the effects of this drought are indeed far-reaching. The policies that emerge from this disastrously dry year may ultimately alter what foods we eat, where we build new homes and even what sports we play. Earlier this year, we heard from the President of the Pacific Institute, Peter Gleick, as he told us of the critical nature of this drought, even in its early stages. This week on Sea Change Radio, host Alex Wise speaks again to Dr. Gleick for an update and to get a glimpse into the future of what a permanently drier California might mean for us all.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charlie Rangel 60 mins – “Representatives Charles Rangel (D-NY) talked about his more than 40 years in the House, as well as his life before entering public office. … Rangel had recently won the Democratic party primary in his New York City district, but decided that if he were to win re-election in November 2014, it would be his last term in Congress. Representative Rangel was elected to the House in 1970, unseating Representative Adam Clayton Powell (D-NY).” At the link find the title,“Q&A: Rep. Charlie Rangel (D-NY),” right-click “Media files program.357454.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chikungunya 10 mins – “In 2008, we noted that the global reemergence of dengue fever threatened U.S. residents. An outbreak of locally acquired dengue subsequently occurred in Florida, and the risk of U.S. dengue outbreaks will probably continue indefinitely. We now face a new threat posed by the unrelated chikungunya virus, which causes a disease clinically similar to dengue in a similar epidemiologic pattern, which is transmitted by the same mosquito vectors, and for which we also lack vaccines and specific treatments….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Church of the Almighty God 27 mins – “The BBC’s China Editor investigates an elusive cult at the centre of a grisly murder that has shocked the nation.” At the link find the title, “ Docs: Chasing China’s Doomsday Cult – 14 Aug 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140814-0330a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Circuit Courts 59 mins – “Robert Katzmann, chief judge of the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals, discusses his book [Judging Statutes], on his views about how federal judges should interpret laws passed by Congress and his belief in deciphering the intent of the law.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Robert KatzmannSunday, August 31, 2014,” right-click “Media files program.362316.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil War Women 46 mins – “True stories of daring women during the Civil War. Best-selling author Karen Abbott shares their exploits in a new book: “Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change and Human Rights 129 mins – “This MPI event, in partnership with the International Organization for Migration (IOM), discusses the critical issue of climate-related displacement in the Asia-Pacific region, explored in depth in the joint MPI and IOM brief Human Rights, Climate Change, Environmental Degradation and Migration: A New Paradigm. Climate change and environmental degradation are predicted to displace millions of people in the coming years, either directly or indirectly. While today’s international legal framework provides a degree of protection to those displaced by environmental factors and climatic events, there is no global consensus on a definition for such a group. In the absence of this, gaps in the legal system, and in implementation, how can recognition of the vulnerability of environmental migrants be facilitated and their protection ensured? This discussion explores how to protect climate change-induced migrants, particularly in the highly vulnerable Asia-Pacific region.” At the link click “download,” then right-click “Download” in the next window, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coding Concepts 38 mins – “ Join Father Robert Ballecer and Shannon Morse on Coding 101, a weekly instructional, project-oriented programming show with appeal for beginning to intermediate programmers. Using a combination of classroom-style teaching, guest programmers, and special interest segments, Coding 101 will offer beginner, intermediate and “applied” programming topics within several interchangeable modules. Learn programming languages such as Java, C++, Visual Basic, and more!” This episode is a review that emphasizes concepts. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Stories 60 mins – “Students all over are starting college this month, and some of them still have a nagging question: what, exactly, got me in? An admissions officer tells us the most wrongheaded things applicants try. And Michael Lewis has the incredible story of how a stolen library book got one man — Emir Kamenica — into his dream school.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Breakdown 51 mins – “A revolution in technology has connected us online more than ever before: Nearly 60 percent of Americans now have a Facebook account. Digital connections have replaced informal interaction with neighbors and acquaintances. And a quarter of Americans say they have no best friend to confide in. Some caution the decline in face-to-face interactions has led to polarization and congressional gridlock, while others argue that digital connections provide invaluable connections with far-flung family and friends. Diane and [3] guests discuss how virtual relationships affect real life connections and building community.” At the link you can only listen, but a copy of the audio file is included in the archive blog.

Computer Repair Concept  68 mins – “Jeff Halash from TechNutPC.com Talks To Computer Technician Services.” about a repair system of use to small business operators. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deportation Dilemma 84 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute panel discussion examines the U.S. deportation system with analysis on migrant apprehensions, removals, returns, and criminal prosecutions, and launches the report, The Deportation Dilemma: Reconciling Tough and Humane Enforcement. Report authors Doris Meissner, MPI Director of the U.S. Immigration Policy Program, and Marc Rosenblum, MPI Deputy Director of the U.S. Immigration Policy Program, as well as commentators David V. Aguilar and Hiroshi Motomura and moderator Muzaffar Chishti, discuss the findings of the report, including the main drivers of deportation policy and how the system has changed over the past two decades….” At the link click “download,” then right-click “Download” in the next window, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Desalination 56 mins – “For California, 2013 was the driest calendar year ever recorded across virtually the entire state. On January 17, 2014, Governor Jerry Brown proclaimed the drought to be a State of Emergency, directed state officials to take all necessary actions to assist the hardest hit communities, and called for all Californians to pitch in to reduce water use by 20 percent. While CA agencies and experts have clearly identified those actions best suited to provide relief, some observers wonder whether the long-term answer to California’s drought lies in the ocean through the promotion of seawater desalination. On today’s episode, we’ll explore an overview of the science and policy related to seawater desalination and demonstrates why this option is generally the least promising option for drought relief.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Design Trends 51 mins – “Innovation Hub is all about design – and redesign. Sasha Frere-Jones, pop critic for The New Yorker, talks about how technology has made it easier than ever to produce music…and why the results can be surprising. Then we have a discussion about the maker movement with Chris Anderson, author of Makers: The New Industrial Revolution, and Limor Fried, an electrical engineer and owner of electronics hobbyist company AdaFruit. Plus, John Maeda, design partner at Kleiner Perkins and former president of RISD, explores the merging of design and technology and scientist Sean Davies explains how good bacteria may help us reshape our bodies.” At the link find the title, “9.6.14 – The Whole Design Show,” right-click “IHUB-090614-FullShow.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diet of Fat   52 mins – “Since the 1950s, a war has been waged in America against an accused dietary culprit: fat. Avoid fat, we were told, and you’ll live longer and healthier. However, as the investigative journalist Nina Teicholz discovered, there isn’t solid evidence of the benefits of a low-fat diet nor of the dangers of fat. In a new book, Teicholz reviews the science and history of the war on fat and she joins us Thursday to explain how America’s nutrition was derailed by personal ambition, bad science, and politics. Nina Teicholz has written for GourmetThe New YorkerThe Economist, and The New York Times. Her new book is called The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat & Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diet on What 47 mins – “The constant train of diet advice and counter-study proof in the medical and nutrition fields can seem overwhelming at times. Often, you might wonder if the food you’re eating today was a better idea last week than it is this week. Our hour today on a new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine suggesting low-carb diets lead to greater weight loss than low fat meals. “The low-carb group lost an average of 7.7 pounds more than the low-fat group,” our guest and study co-author Dr. Lydia Bazzano told us today.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dow Jones 4 mins – “…The Dow is up. The Dow is down. Chances are that part of you rises and falls a little right along with it. That’s okay — very few fluctuations in life are so comfortingly black and white — I mean — red. The Dow Jones Industrial Average has been around since 1896, and the first thing to know is that it’s two names, not one: Charles Henry Dow and Edward Davis Jones….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Policy 30 mins – “Keith talks with Carl Hart, Associate Professor of Psychology at Columbia University, and author of “High Price: A Neuroscientist’s Journey of Self-Discovery that Challenges Everything You Know About Drugs and Society.” And, indeed, Hart’s views on drug use challenge much of what were are brought up to believe – that drugs are bad. Are drugs really as destructive as we think? Hart believes that most people who use hard drugs like cocaine and heroin are not addicts or drug abusers, but instead know how to use those drugs responsibly…within limits. Hart, who believes in the decriminalization of drugs, does not discount, however, the destructive nature of these drugs for some users. http://www.drcarlhart.com/.” At the link right-click beside “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electricity 4 mins – “…America “discovered” electricity in the 1880s. An 1889 volume of Scribners Magazine makes that very clear. The telegraph had been around for decades by then. Otherwise, our electric world was just coming to life. Commercial telephones, less than a decade old, were still feeling their way. Electric lighting systems were brand new — arc lamps, and then light bulbs….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineering MBA 75 mins – “Michael Lachman, who started his career as an aerospace engineer, leads us through the pros and cons of following up an engineering degree with an MBA.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Animal Antibiotics 5 mins – “The emergence of diseases resistanct to antibiotics is a growing and alarming global problem, but a new court decision means that American agriculture may keep contributing to the spread of resistance….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right side of the sound bar and selecting “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Students 63 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute (MPI) webinar discusses the report Immigrant Parents and Early Childhood Programs: Addressing Barriers of Literacy, Culture, and Systems Knowledge from MPI’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy (NCIIP). Presenters include report authors NCIIP Director Margie McHugh and NCIIP Policy Analyst and Program Coordinator Maki Park, as well as Miriam Calderon, Senior Partner for School Readiness Consulting and former Senior Policy Advisor for Early Learning with the White House’s Domestic Policy Council, and Eliza Leighton, Director of Promise Neighborhood Langley Park Program with CASA de Maryland. The report seeks to better understand the experiences and challenges faced by early childhood programs and immigrant and refugee parents as they connect with one another by identifying the unique needs of newcomer parents and recommendations for addressing them. MPI partnered with leading organizations in California, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, and Washington state to conduct field work for the study, which spans the range of early childhood parent skill, engagement, and leadership programs. The webinar includes a preview of new state-level sociodemographic data on foreign-born parents of young children compiled by MPI. Presenters discuss the top-line data and findings from the report, barriers facing immigrant parents, and challenges and opportunities facing policymakers in this arena.” At the link click “download,” then right-click “Download” in the next window, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Social Media 47 mins – “…ISIS has rampaged across the desert, taking turf, claiming a “caliphate,” slaughtering. It has also rampaged across social media. Using the platforms that lifted pro-democracy forces in Egypt’s Tahrir Square, this time to raise a reign of terror. This hour On Point: the ISIS onslaught, and the use of social media in its bloody grab for power.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Law Defined 65 mins – “Barry Weingast, professor of political science at Stanford University and senior fellow at Stanford’s Hoover Institution, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the nature of law. Weingast takes issue with some of the standard views of law, and proposes a better way to understand law. The two discuss the fundamental principles of law, how it can emerge in a decentralized way to resolve disputes over property and other commercial and social interactions. Examples include Iceland, Ancient Greece, and California during the gold rush. Also considered are how laws coordinate expectations and the way that social pressure can be used to enforce law in a decentralized fashion.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lawyers Wear Technology 26 mins – “Wearable technology like the smartwatch is the next in a long line of new technological advancements that are embraced by some, but viewed skeptically by most lawyers. Judges already discourage smart phones in court and many clients worry about a decrease in information security. But if used properly, a smartwatch can actually increase the productivity, availability, and even safety of any lawyer’s practice with fewer disruptions. What are the best practices for using wearable technology to benefit your practice?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

London Immigrants 27 mins – “Presenter Nihal Arthanayake visits UK immigration lawyer Harjap Singh Bhangal who gives advice to migrants seeking visas to work and live in Britain.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: A Day in the Life of an Immigration Lawyer 12 Aug 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140812-0806a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maya Angelou on Facing Evil 23 mins – “In this second of two programs celebrating the life and work of the late Maya Angelou, Bill Moyers revisits a 1988 documentary in which he and Angelou attended a conference on “Facing Evil,” held in the Hill Country of central Texas. Evil was a topic about which Angelou, the victim of childhood rape and virulent racism, had a lot to say….” At the link find the title, “Full Show: Maya Angelou on Facing Evil,” right-click “Media files Moyers and Company_332 Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Military Program 42 mins – “For our episode today, we are joined by Dr. Chad Hendrickson, a practicing Dermatologist and a former Army Medical Officer. Dr. Hendrickson shares with us his journey through medical school [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences], the decisions and choices he made which brought him there, and the amazing experiences that he had gone through during his years of service. If you are thinking of taking the same route, he gives us insights on what you need to expect and prepare as well as the great training opportunities in store for you.

Mentally Ill 51 mins – “When Liza Long heard about the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School two years ago, her first thought was: What if my son does that someday? Her 13-year-old son had just been hospitalized in a mental facility for violent behavior. Two days after Adam Lanza killed his mother, 20 children, six teachers, and then himself, Long posted an emotional response on her blog titled: “I am Adam Lanza’s mother.” Her article went viral. Her essay became a rallying cry for better access to treatment for mentally-ill children. Guest host Tom Gjelten talks with Liza Long about her new book on raising a son with a mental illness.” At the link you can only listen, but a copy of the audio file is included in the archive blog.

Migrant Brain Drain 74 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute (MPI) webinar focuses on data compiled by MPI on brain waste among foreign-trained nurses, engineers, and teachers, and updates on three state-level initiatives—in Illinois, Washington, and Massachusetts—that are working to analyze and address challenges faced by immigrants and refugees with degrees and training in these fields. Dr. Jeanne Batalova presents MPI’s data on brain waste at the national and state levels and representatives from the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, OneAmerica, and the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition discuss their analysis and efforts on these issues. The discussion is moderated by Margie McHugh, Director of MPI’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy.” At the link click “download,” then right-click “Download” in the next window, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Labor Management 163 mins (2 parts) – “This Migration Policy Institute Europe event, organized with the Bertelsmann Stiftung, entitled “Effective Labour Migration Management: Creating Checks and Balances while Searching for Talent” brought together experts, policymakers, and social partners involved in the management of labor migration to discuss the various options available to policymakers when trying to design an ‘optimally balanced’ labor migration policy….” At the link click “download,” then right-click “Download” in the next window, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part 2.

Migrant Minors 66 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute (MPI) telebriefing discusses factors behind the recent surge in flows of unaccompanied children from Mexico and Central America to the United States as well as short- and longer-term policy options for improving how the U.S. immigration system interacts with this population with distinct needs. Speakers include Doris Meissner, Director of MPI’s U.S. Immigration Policy Program, and Marc Rosenblum, Deputy Director of the U.S. Immigration Policy Program. The call previews a policy brief on unaccompanied minors that MPI will release in July.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Schooling in Georgia State 79 mins – “…Georgia has experienced one of the fastest rates of growth from immigration in the United States over the past two decades, and today one in five Georgia youth is foreign born or is the child of parents who are immigrants or refugees. The educational outcomes of the state’s first- and second- generation young adults (ages 16-26) are cause for concern, however. Many are English Language Learners (ELLs), and they lag considerably behind their nonimmigrant peers in terms of high school graduation, college access, and postsecondary degree completion. They often face extra hurdles as they seek to develop academic English-language skills, complete high school course requirements, navigate the transition to college and careers, and finance postsecondary education—often while juggling work and family responsibilities. Educators in districts such as Gwinnett County—which enrolls one-fifth of the state’s ELL students—are on the front lines of efforts to address these challenges.” At the link click “download,” then right-click “Download” in the next window, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Noise Pollution 51 mins – “Noise is defined as unwanted sound. And we encounter it almost every day, no matter where we live. Cars and taxis honking on city streets. Jet planes taking off from the nation’s runways. Tractors and combines on farms. Air conditioners, generators, factories. Of course, people have varied reactions to the sounds they hear. What’s annoying to one person might be barely noticeable to another. But a growing body of research shows we have reason to be concerned. Excessive noise is putting millions of Americans at risk, not just for hearing loss but for heart attacks and strokes. For this month’s Environmental Outlook, a discussion on the dangers of noise pollution.” (3 guests) At the link you can only listen, but a copy of the audio file is included in the archive blog.

Numbers 4 mins – “…What do the following words have in common: natural, imaginary, real, irrational, and transcendental. If you guessed “states of mind,” you’re probably not alone. But the better answer is they’re types of numbers. We take numbers for granted. One, two, three. These are the natural, or whole numbers. What could be simpler? Fractions are no trouble. Half a cup of sugar, a quarter teaspoon of salt. These’re called rational numbers because they can be written as the ratio of two whole numbers. But many numbers aren’t rational. We call them irrational….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Sanctuaries 5 mins – “In 2006, filmmaker Jean-Michel Cousteau, son of the explorer Jacques Cousteau, screened his documentary, Voyage to Kure, about the waters northwest of Hawaii. The theater was the White House and his audience was President George W. Bush. Bush was apparently moved by the images of rare sea turtles, sharks and coral, so moved in fact that within months he used his executive authority to protect a patch of ocean, called Papahānaumokuākea. It’s an area almost the size of Montana and, at the time, was the world’s largest fully protected marine reserve. “It’s an area like a national park, it’s an area that’s closed off to commercial extraction and fishing,” said Matt Rand, who directs the Global Ocean Legacy Project with the Pew Charitable Trusts. “And it’s an opportunity for that area to recover and become a healthy ecosystem.” In the past decade, Rand’s group has helped the US and other governments protect almost a million square miles of ocean. The United Kingdom currently manages the world’s largest fully protected marine reserve in the Indian Ocean, around the Chagos Islands, an area roughly the size of France. Earlier this summer, the Obama administration announced that it would create the largest reserve yet — in US waters in the south Pacific….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phenol History 6 mins – “Nowadays the whole business of personal hygiene is a gentle affair, a pleasant pampering with soothing creams and dermatologically tested soap substitutes. But go back a hundred years or so and keeping yourself clean and germ free was a rough, harsh world, typified by one hardboiled term. Carbolic. Phenol, the proper name of carbolic acid, is one of the simplest aromatic compounds – a benzene ring with a single hydrogen replaced by a hydroxyl group – yet it has proved of continuing value as new uses have been found for it, resulting in modern production levels in the millions of tonnes per year….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PSA Critique 29 mins – “Hello. I am Dr. Gerald Chodak for Medscape. This week, I want to talk about an interview between Dr. Eric Topol and Dr. Richard Ablin that was published on Medscape. Dr. Ablin is credited with helping to discover the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) protein that ultimately led to the PSA test. He has recently written a book called The Great Prostate Hoax, [1] in which he raises several concerns about what has occurred as a result of routine PSA screening. Dr. Ablin believes that the PSA test never should have been approved for screening, because the data were inadequate to demonstrate whether it was truly helping people. He is also concerned that although men are now given a choice about whether they want to be screened for prostate cancer, it is based on 2 studies that both have flaws, so the information being used is less than ideal….” At the link you can read and listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in the blog archive.

Small Arms Statistics 9 mins – “Around 875 million firearms are in circulation worldwide, with three-quarters of these in civilian hands, according to Small Arms Survey estimates. These widely-cited calculations are the result of an ongoing programme on inventories and stockpiles—started over a decade ago—to gather comprehensive data on the distribution of small arms and light weapons around the world. The programme has developed an ever larger pool of information that was initially scarce and unsystematic, but now can provide increasingly accurate and up-to-date knowledge of small arms and light weapon holdings. In this podcast, Senior Consultant Aaron Karp and Researcher Hannah Dönges discuss the challenges, achievements, and future directions of this initiative.” At the link find the title, “Step by Step: Researching the global distribution of small arms,” right-click “Media files SAS-Podcast-24-Step-by-Step-Researching-the-global-distribution-of-small-arms.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spanish Coal Miners 27 mins – “Natalio Cosoy meets the miners of northern Spain who sing to their patron saint, Santa Bárbara Bendita, in the hope that she will watch over them in the uncertain times ahead.” At the link find the title, “Docs: A Song for Spanish Miners – 4 September 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140904-0330a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Steadfast 19 mins – “Around 2005, a Seattle neighborhood called Ballard started to see unprecedented growth. Condominiums and apartment buildings were sprouting up all over the community which had once been mostly single family homes and small businesses. Around this time, developers offered a woman named Edith Macefield $750,000 dollars for her small house, which was appraised at around $120,000. They wanted to build a shopping mall on the block where Macefield had lived for the last 50 years. Macefield turned down the money. Developers went forward with the shopping mall anyway. The mall enveloped her house on three sides. The architects designed the building in such a way that if Mrs. Macefield ever decided to move, they could easily incorporate the space where her had been into the building. The developers eventually increased their offer to one million dollars, plus they offered to find her a similar home somewhere else, and pay for a home health-care work for Macefield who was elderly and in poor health. Again, Edit Macefield turned them down….” At the link are related photos and you can right-click “Download,” then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Syrian Refugees 104 mins – “This MPI panel discussion, in partnership with the Middle East Institute and the Center for Middle Eastern Strategic Studies (ORSAM), examines the status of Syrian refugees abroad and the effect of the ongoing Syrian crisis on Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, and Iraq. Panelists Oytun Orhan, ORSAM Project Coordinator and Researcher, Peri-Khan Aqrawi-Whitcomb, Middle East Research Institute Junior Research Fellow, Faysal Itani, Resident Fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East, and Saban Kardas, ORSAM President discuss the experiences of each country as outlined in ORSAM’s report. The project team visited each country and after six months of boots-on-the-ground research, found that women and children account for more than 75 percent of the refugees, making education in particular a devastating issue for the next generation of Syrians. In addition, Syrian emigrants settle not only in camps but also in cities, raising prices and lowering wages all along the Syrian borders….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Trends 52 mins – “ENCORE Hi ho, hi ho … it’s out with work we go! As you relax this holiday weekend, step into our labor-atory and imagine a world with no work allowed. Soft robots help us with tasks at home and at the office, while driverless cars allow us to catch ZZZZs in the front seat. Plus, the Internet of Everything interconnects all your devices, from your toaster to your roaster to … you. So there’s no need to ever get off the couch. But is a machine-ruled world a true utopia? And, the invention that got us into our 24/7 rat race: Edison’s electric light.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “ Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans Atlantic Flights 50 mins – “Air traffic controllers have guided trans-Atlantic flights since 1919. As Creative archaeologist Christine Finn discovers, datalink – effectively text messaging – is increasingly being used, so that voice communication is on the wane.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Atlantic Crossing 30 Aug 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140830-0905a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

TWIV 300 93 mins – “Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler. Recording together for the first time, the TWiV team celebrates their 300th podcast at the American Society for Microbiology headquarters in Washington, DC, where Vincent speaks with Dickson, Alan, Rich, and Kathy about their careers in science.” At the link right-click “TWIV 300” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War of 1812 52 mins – “Two hundred years ago, the United States was engulfed in a war that had seen Washington, D.C. attacked and burned, and the nation’s independence seriously threatened. Today, few people remember who we were even fighting in that conflict — the War of 1812 — much less what we were fighting for. But despite its forgotten status, the War of 1812 was hugely influential in shaping the nation we live in today.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Weather Forecasting 47 mins – “We look at what’s at stake for the future of weather forecasting when our aging weather satellites die.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wilderness Act 31 mins – “Today is the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Wilderness Act of 1964. The act drew protective lines around millions of acres and their wildlife. To mark the anniversary, humans and nature from two angles today. One, that my guest Ruth DeFries calls the Big Rachet – the human pattern of pushing nature to its limits, paying a price, then recovering – even more dominant – with human ingenuity. Will we do that this time? Then nature writer Jordan Fisher Smith joins us to look at the health of our wilderness itself. This hour On Point: nature and the wild in a time of planetary climate change.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 200 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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